Physical-sciences sentence example

physical-sciences
  • In 1825 he migrated to Lemberg, where he taught the physical sciences.
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  • The reputation which he had gained in the physical sciences soon caused him to be raised to the position of rector of the university (for the first term of the year 1313).
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  • Since its reorganization in 1869 the academy has, however, paid equal attention to the various departments of history, archaeology, national economy and the physical sciences.
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  • Thus mysticism was finally banished from the domain of biology, and zoology became one of the physical sciences - the science which seeks to arrange and discuss the phenqmena of animal life and form, as the outcome of the operation of the laws of physics and chemistry.
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  • As a foundation his education must be thorough in the natural and physical sciences and mathematics.
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  • Duff gave much thought and time to the university of Calcutta, which owes its examination system and the prominence given to physical sciences to his influence.
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  • This classification, though it is of high value in the clearing up of our conceptions of the essential contrasted with the accidental, the relation of genus, differentia and definition and so forth, is of more significance in connexion with abstract sciences, especially mathematics, than for the physical sciences.
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  • At that period, and in the 19th century, Geneva was a centre of light, especially in the case of various of the physical sciences.
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  • She received a rather desultory education, and mastered algebra and Euclid in secret after she had left school, and without any extraneous help. In 1804 she married her cousin, Captain Samuel Greig, who died in 1806; and in 1812 she married another cousin, Dr William Somerville (1771-1860), inspector of the army medical board, who encouraged and greatly aided her in the study of the physical sciences.
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  • Her other works are the Connexion of the Physical Sciences (1834), Physical Geography (1848), and Molecular and Microscopic Science (1869).
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  • On the other hand it is asserted that quite apart from any particular view as to the relation between mind and body the existence of the freedom of the will is necessarily incompatible with the principle of the conservation of energy and is therefore in direct contradiction to many if not most of the assured conclusions of the physical sciences.
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  • Similar ideas are relatively commonplace in CBL and in the virtual laboratories of the natural and physical sciences.
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  • Today, statistical mechanics lies at the heart of the physical sciences.
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  • In addition, the Liberal Arts offerings are plentiful, ranging from physical sciences to behavioral sciences, with English and performing arts in between.
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