Philology sentence example

philology
  • Of his numerous publications the following are of special importance: - Assyrian Grammar for Comparative Purposes (1872); Principles of Comparative Philology (1874); Babylonian Literature (1877); Introduction to the Science of Language (1879); Monuments of the Hittites (1881); Herodotus i.-iii.
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  • On the whole, greater weight is due to the evidence from botanical sources than to that derived from philology, particularly since the discovery both of the wild almond and of a form like a wild peach in Afghanistan.
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  • In 1843 he was appointed professor of philology at Kiel and director of the archaeological museum founded by himself in co-operation with Otto Jahn.
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  • Current periodicals are Hollandsche revue, monthly; De Gids (1837), monthly; De nieuwe Gids (1886), monthly; De Architect, bi-monthly; Caecilia (for music); Tijdschrift voor Strafrecht; Museum, for philology (1893), monthly; Tijdschrift voor nederlandsche taal en letterkunde; Nederlandsch Archievenblad; De Paleograaf; Elseviers geillustreerd Maandschrift, monthly; Groot Nederland, monthly.
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  • The strife, which reflects the controversy between the "analogists" and the "anomalists" in philology, continued long after their death.
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  • Passing to the university of Gottingen he took his degree in classical philology and ancient history, but the bent of his mind was definitely towards the philosophical side of theology.
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  • He studied philology and theology in Berlin and Breslau.
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  • Other institutional investigations have been prosecuted, the result of all which will be an intelligent comprehension of the philology of a primitive race.
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  • In 1742 by Schultens's advice Reiske took up medicine as a study by which he might hope to live if he could not do so by philology.
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  • The foundation of Arabic philology, however, was laid not by him but by De Sacy.
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  • From 1854 to 1859 he edited the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology.
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  • He wrote poems of all kinds in a language hitherto employed only for ballads and hymns; he instituted a theatre, and composed a rich collection of comedies for it; he filled the shelves of the citizens with works in their own tongue on history, law, politics, science, philology and philosophy, all written in a true and manly style, and representing the extreme attainment of European culture at the moment.
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  • He resigned his benefice in 1773 and betook himself to the study of the law and philology.
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  • A few names were, however, distinguished in 1711 theology, philology and poetry.
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  • Resigning in 1882 owing to conscientious scruples, he became professor extraordinarius of oriental languages in the faculty of philology at Halle, was elected professor ordinarius at Marburg in 1885, and was transferred to Gottingen in 1892.
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  • In 1849 he was placed in charge of the Philological Seminary at Prague, and two years later was appointed professor of classical philology in Prague University.
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  • In his last work, Zur Kritik der neuesten Sprachforschung (1885), he attacks the views of the "new" school of philology.
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  • His Hebrew Grammar inaugurated a new era in biblical philology.
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  • By his work on language Uber den Ursprung der Sprache (1772), Herder may be said to have laid the first rude foundations of the science of comparative philology and that deeper science of the ultimate nature and origin of language.
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  • Philology: Bollettino di filologia classica (1894); Giornale italiano di filologia e linguistica classica (1886); Studi di filologia romanza (1885); Studi italiani di filologia classica (1893); Bessarione, bi-monthly.
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  • Not intending originally to devote himself to physical science, he first took up the study of law and philology at Göttingen, and the general culture he thus gained stood him in good stead when he turned to chemistry, the study of which he began under Liebig.
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  • His voluminous writings in philology, natural history, physics and mathematics often accordingly have a good deal of the historical interest which attaches to pioneering work, however imperfectly performed; otherwise they now take rank as curiosities of literature merely.
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  • There he busied himself with philology, and published notably some works on the Basque language: Grammaire basque, Remarques sur plusieurs assertions concernant la langue basque (1876), Observations sur le basque Fontarabie (1878).
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  • After a brief stay in the grammar school of Colmar he went to Strassburg in 1651, where he devoted himself to the study of philology, history and philosophy, and won his degree of master (1653) by a disputation against the philosophy of Hobbes.
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  • He then became private tutor to the princes Christian and Charles of the Palatinate, and lectured in the university on philology and history.
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  • In 1843 he founded the Jahrbilcher der Gegenwart, and became Privatdozent of philosophy and classical philology in Tubingen university.
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  • A valuable worker in the field of Slavonic philology was Linde, the author of an excellent Polish dictionary in six volumes.
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  • For a long time the cultivation of Polish philology was in a low state, owing to the prevalence of Latin in the 17th century and French in the 18th.
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  • One of the most active writers on Polish philology and literature is Wladyslaw Nehring, whose numerous contributions to the Archiv fiir slavische Philologie of Professor Jagic entitle him to the gratitude of all who have devoted themselves to Slavonic studies.
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  • Young Dbllinger was first educated in the gymnasium at Wiirzburg, and then began to study natural philosophy at the university in that city, where his father now held a professorship. In 1817 he began the study of mental philosophy and philology, and in 1818 turned to the study of theology, which he believed to lie beneath every other science.
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  • The history of classical philology in Germany was written by Conrad Bursian (1830-1883).
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  • P. Norris (Journal of Philology) wished to transpose chapters v.
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  • In 1808 he entered the university of Dorpat (Yuriev), where he first studied philology, but soon turned his attention to astronomy.
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  • He studied philosophy, philology and theology at Marburg in 1786, and eventually (1795) became professor ordinarius of theology at Heidelberg, where he died on the 22nd of November 1836.
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  • In 1880 The American Journal of Philology, a quarterly published by the Johns Hopkins University, was established under his editorial charge, and his strong personality was expressed in the department of the Journal headed "Brief Report" or "Lanx Satura," and in the earliest years of its publication every petty detail was in his hands.
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  • He was a traveller, a linguist, well versed in Scandinavian literature and philology, the author of mystical poems entitled Improvisations from the Spirit (1857), a social and medical reformer, and a convinced opponent of vivisection and also of vaccination.
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  • As regards native philology, the most ancient work extant is a grammar of the Tibetan tongue preserved in the Bstan-hgyur (mdo cxxiv.).
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  • The Tibetan language, presenting such marked differences between its written and spoken forms, has a great interest for philologists, Philology.
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  • Before the rise of comparative philology it was a popular opinion that Hebrew was the original speech of mankind, from which all others were descended.
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  • With the rise of criticism Hebrew philology soon became a necessary department of theology.
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  • These conjectures were made in the pre-scientific era of philology.
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  • Joseph I K IMIiI was a native of southern Spain, and settled in Provence, where he was one of the first to set forth in the Hebrew language the results of Hebraic philology as expounded by the Spanish Jews in their Arabic treatises.
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  • In his commentaries he also made contributions to the comparative philology of Hebrew and Arabic.
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  • His Shakespearian Grammar (1870) is a permanent contribution to English philology.
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  • Afterwards, as the knowledge of the old language declined, and the study of philology arose, more attention began to be paid to the explanation of vocables.
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  • In 1744 Jakob Langebek (1710-1775) founded the Society for the Improvement of the Danish Language, which opened the field of philology.
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  • There were, however, eminent men in other departments of letters, and especially in philology.
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  • In 1675 appeared his Notitia Galliarum ordine litterarum digesta, a work of the highest merit, which laid the foundations of the scientific study of historical geography in France; but, like all the scholars of his age, he had no solid knowledge of philology.
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  • C. Schlosser, when he went to Heidelberg in 1811, devoted himself to philology, giving special attention to the Persian language.
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  • He was a teacher at Swanzey, New Hampshire, and at the Leicester Academy, Massachusetts, in 1845-1847, and attempted the philological method of teaching English "like Latin and Greek," later described in his Method of Philological Study of the English Language (1865); at Amherst in 1847-1849; at Fredericksburg, Virginia, in 1852-1855; and in 1855 became a tutor at Lafayette College, where he became adjunct professor of belles-lettres and English literature in 1856, and professor of English language and comparative philology - the first chair of the kind established - in 1857.
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  • In philology he wrote Encyclopaedia philologica sive primae lineae Isagoges in antiquorum stadia (1798; 2nd ed., 1805); Kurze Theorie des lateinischen Stils (1793); Leitfaden der Rhetorik (1802); and an annotated edition of the Satires of Persius.
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  • The University publishes Bulletins of the Agricultural and Engineering Experiment Stations; Reports of the State Water Survey, of the State Natural History Survey, of the State Geological Survey, and of the State Entomologist's Office; University Studies; and The Journal of English and Germanic Philology.
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  • His duties were light, and he employed his leisure in the study of philology, mathematics, philosophy, history, political economy, natural science and natural history, for which he made large collections.
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  • Unlike Gottfried Hermann, Heyne regarded the study of grammar and language only as the means to an end, not as the chief object of philology.
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  • In 1829 he entered the university of Leipzig, and one year later that of Gottingen, where, under the influence of Otfried Miller, he finally decided to devote himself to the archaeological side of philology.
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  • In spite of his scientific training in philology Lepsius left behind few translations of inscriptions or discussions of the meanings of words: by preference he attacked historical and archaeological problems connected with the ancient texts, the alphabet, the metrology, the names of metals and minerals, the chronology, the royal names.
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  • His eloquence soon gave him a reputation, and in 1766 he was appointed professor extraordinarius of biblical philology.
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  • He was trained at the Roman Catholic seminary at Scalan and at the Scottish College in Paris, where he studied biblical philology, school divinity and modern languages.
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  • Mayor and Lightfoot, he established the Journal of Classical and Sacred Philology, and plunged eagerly into theological and patristic study.
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  • - Clarke, though in no way an original thinker, was eminent in theology, mathematics, metaphysics and philology, but his chief strength lay in his logical power.
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  • The Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences embraces twenty-six departments, of which those of music, philology and the fine arts have each more than l000 members; the total membership of all departments in 1906 was 5894.
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  • Poetry, philology, philosophy all flourished under his encouragement, and his name was handed down to posterity as the first of the many Spanish Jews who combined diplomatic skill with artistic culture.
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  • In a paper published in the volume of Philologische Studien, presented as a " Festgabe " to Professor Sievers in 1896, and in a second paper in the Journal of Germanic Philology, ii.
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  • After the completion of his university studies at Kiel, Leipzig and Berlin, he travelled for three years in France and Italy; in 1839 he became privatdocent at Kiel, and in 1842 professor-extraordinary of archaeology and philology at Greifswald (ordinary professor 1845).
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  • In 1856 he became a Privat-docent, and in 1858 extraordinary professor at Leipzig; in 1861 professor of philology and archaeology at Tubingen; in 1864 professor of classical antiquities at Zurich; in 1869 at Jena, where he was also director of the archaeological museum; in 1874 at Munich, where he remained until his death on the 21st of September 1883.
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  • In Aristarchus ancient philology culminated, as philosophy had done in Socrates.
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  • Enough, however, remains to show that Aristarchus had a clear notion of the chief problems of philology (except perhaps those concerning etymology).
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  • One mass of Greek and Roman erudition, including history and metaphysics, law and science, civic institutions and the art of war, mythology and magistracies, metrical systems and oratory, agriculture and astronomy, domestic manners and religious rites, grammar and philology, biography and numismatics, formed the miscellaneous subject-matter of this so-styled rhetoric. Notes taken at these lectures supplied young scholars with hints for further exploration; and a certain tradition of treating antique authors for the display of general learning, as well as for the elucidation of their texts, came into vogue, which has determined the method of scholarship for the last three centuries in Europe.
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  • After studying philology, philosophy and theology at Helmstadt, Jena, Giessen, Tubingen and Heidelberg, he travelled through Holland, France and England, where he became acquainted with the leading Reformers.
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  • The faculties are four - philosophy and history, philology, mathematics and natural sciences, and jurisprudence.
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  • His father, Ferdinand, was a teacher of philology and philosophy in the gymnasium, while his mother was a Hanoverian lady, a lineal descendant of the great Quaker William Penn.
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  • Its value en modern philology has been the subject of much needless contro- th rsy amongst European scholars.
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  • Amongst its numerous auxiliaries may be mentioned the library, with 200,000 volumes, the observatory, the meteorological institute, the botanical garden, seminaries of theology, philology and education, and well equipped clinical, anatomical and physical institutes.
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  • Along with grammar, which had been a prominent branch of study under Chrysippus, philosophy, history, geography, chronology and kindred subjects came to be recognized as fields of activity no less than philology proper.
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  • Gieseler for church history, but his energies were principally devoted to philosophy and philology, and his earliest publication was an edition of the Arabic Moallakat of Amru'lQais, which gained for him the prize at his graduation in the philosophical faculty.
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  • The complete catalogue may be roughly arranged under three heads - (1) belles lettres, (2) history and antiquities, (3) technical treatises on philosophy, law, grammar, mathematics, philology and other subjects.
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  • He was educated at Edinburgh High School, in Germany and at the university of St Andrews, taking an especial interest in the study of Celtic philology and literature.
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  • It is conceded on all hands that Livy in this decade makes con For Livy's debt to Valerius Antias, see A A Howard in Harvard Studies Classical Philology, xvii (1906), pp 161 sqq.
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  • He studied philology at the universities of Bonn, Göttingen and Berlin, and in 1843 he began to work upon the Monumenta Germaniae historica.
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  • But the real auxiliary sciences to history are those which deal with those traces of the past that still exist, the science of language (philology), of writing (palaeography), of documents (diplomatic), of seals (sphragistics), of coins (numismatics), of weights and measures, and archaeology in the widest sense of the word.
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  • He studied theology and philology at Heidelberg and later at Halle under Hermann Hupfeld, who persuaded him to include Arabic, Syriac and Egyptian.
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  • The interpretation of the Avesta is one of the most difficult problems of oriental philology.
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  • The evidence of comparative philology supports the necessity for an enormous time allowance.
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  • Nevertheless, it is now acknowledged that at some far remoter time, before these nations were divided from the parent stock, and distributed over Asia and Europe, a single barbaric people stood as physical and political representative of the nascent Aryan race, speaking a now extinct Aryan language, from which, by a series of modifications not to be estimated as possible within many thousands of years, there arose languages which have been mutually unintelligible since the dawn of history, and between which it was only possible for an age of advanced philology to trace the fundamental relationship.
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  • Philology is especially appealed to by anthropologists as contributing to the following lines of argument.
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  • In 1869 Oppert was appointed professor of Assyrian philology and archaeology at the College de France.
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  • In 1832 he was called to Marburg as professor ordinarius of classical literature; and in 1842 he was transferred to Gottingen to the chair of philology and archaeology, vacant by the death of Otfried Muller.
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  • About this time he turned to philology, and fell under the spell of the Transylvanian school.
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  • The university publishes Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, the Journal of Physical Chemistry, the Physical Review, Publications of Cornell University Medical College, various publications of the college of agriculture, and Studies in History and Political Science (of " The President White School of History and Political Science ").
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  • From the popularity of Max Miller's works on comparative philology this is the use of the word which is most familiar to the general public. The arguments in support of this use are set forth by him in the latter part of lecture vi.
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  • But in 1751 he was invited to Altdorf as professor of philology and history, and in 1752 he became a professor of theology in Halle.
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  • Panofka, Asklepios and die Asklepiaden (1846); Alice Walton, "The Cult of Asklepios," in Cornell Studies in Classical Philology, iii.
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  • As Proudhon knew nothing whatever of the true principles of philology, his treatise was of no value.
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  • In philology a very high place is occupied by Gyuro Danichich, once professor of philology at the high school in Belgrade and secretary to the South Slavonic Academy at Agram, where he was for years the principal editor of the great lexicon of the Servian or Croatian language.
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  • This is partly to be explained by the fact that the serious study of Irish philology only dates from 1853 and much of the most important material has not yet appeared in print.
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  • Its numerous publications, though sometimes biased by political passion, throw much light on Serbo-Croatian history, law, philology and kindred topics.
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  • The system is simply this: the original meaning of the names of gods must be ascertained by comparative philology.
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  • But Max Muller's system is based on scientific philology, not on conjecture, and is supported by a theory of the various processes in the evolution of myths out of language.
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  • Dr Hahn tries to prove (by philology's " artful aid ") that the name really means " red dawn," and is a Hottentot way of speaking of the infinite.
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  • From that work we learn that the higher education of the youth of Bagdad consisted principally in a minute and careful study of the rules and principles of grammar, and in their committing to memory the whole of the Koran, a treatise or two on philology and jurisprudence, and the choicest Arabian poetry.
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  • His scattered papers on romance and Jewish philology were collected by James Darmesteter as Arsene Darmesteter, reliques scientifiques (2 vols., 1890).
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  • It demands a careful study of the myths and religious thought of primitive peoples; and the tracing of the names from one language to another belongs to comparative philology.
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  • It was not mathematics but philology which was to settle the gathering doubts of Ernest Renan.
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  • His course completed at Issy, he entered the college of St Sulpice in order to take his degree in philology prior to entering the church; and here he began the study of Hebrew.
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  • In the daytime he continued his researches in Semitic philology.
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  • Geoffrey Driver, who was Professor of Semitic Philology at Oxford, argued for an essentially Egyptian origin for the North Semitic alphabet.
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  • But this is not comparative philology, it is looking for Finnish and Pictish words that are roughly similar in spelling.
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  • Consequently, you may study Comparative Slavonic philology with special reference to Polish, Czech or Russian.
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  • I joined the Department in 1990 after lecturing at Glasgow University where I taught Older and Modern Scots, Old English and Germanic philology.
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  • You may be offered introductory lectures to Comparative Slavonic philology during your time at Oxford.
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  • Geoffrey Driver, who was Professor of Semitic philology at Oxford, argued for an essentially Egyptian origin for the North Semitic alphabet.
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  • Thereafter, he continues at Warsaw University, graduating with an MA in romance philology.
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  • A course in comparative Celtic philology is available in Part II (Paper 12 ).
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  • From 1816 to 1819 Leo studied at the universities of Breslau, Jena and Göttingen, devoting himself more especially to history, philology and theology.
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  • We must content ourselves by referring to the progress of physical (including chemical) theory, which has led to the great generalization of the conservation of energy; to the discovery of the fundamental chemical identity of the matter of our planet and of other celestial bodies, and of the chemical relations of organic and inorganic bodies; to the advance of astronomical speculation respecting the origin of the solar system, &c.; to the growth of the science of geology which has necessitated the conception of vast and unimaginable periods of time in the past history of our globe, and to the rapid march of the biological sciences which has made us familiar with the simplest types and elements of organism; finally, to the development of the science of anthropology (including comparative psychology, philology, &c.), and to the vast extension and improvement of all branches of historical study.
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  • Especially famous have been the Jewish linguists, pre-eminent among them Theodor Benfey (1809-1881), the pioneer of modern comparative philology; and the Greek scholar and critic Jakob Bernays (1824-1881).
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  • Welcker was a pioneer in the field of archaeology, and was one of the first to insist, in opposition to the narrow methods of the older Hellenists, on the necessity of co-ordinating the study of Greek art and religion with philology.
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  • In 1846 Riemann entered himself as a student of philology and theology in the university of Göttingen.
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  • The chief of these are: Bibliography and Librarianship: Bibliographie des Buch- and Bibliothekswesens (1905); Chemistry: Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte der Chemie (1847); Classical Archaeology and Philology: Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte der klassischen Altertumswissenschaft (1873); Education: Jahrbuch der peidagogischen Literatur (1901); Geography: Geographisches Jahrbuch (1874); Bibliotheca geographica (1891); History: Jahresberichte der Geschichtswissenschaft (1878); Fine Arts: Internationale Bibliographie der Kunstwissenschaft (1902); Law and Political Economy: Uebersicht der gesamten staatsand rechtswissenschaftlichen Literatur (1868); Jurisprudentia Germaniae (1905); Bibliographic des birgerlichen Rechts (1888); Bibliographie der Sozialwissenschaften (1905); Bibliographic fur Sozialand Wirtschaftsgeschichte (1903); Bibliographic fur Volkswirtschaftslehre and Rechtswissenschaft (1906); Literature and Languages: Bibliographic der vergleichenden Literaturgeschichte (1903); Jahresberichte fiir neuere deutsche Literaturgeschichte (1890); Jahresbericht fiber die Erscheinungen auf dem Gebiete der germanischen Philologie (1879); Uebersicht fiber die auf dem Gebiete der englischen Philologie erschienenen Bucher, Schriften, and Aufseitze (1878); Kritischer Jahresbericht fiber die Fortschritte der romanischen Philologie (1875); Bibliographie fur romanische Philologie-Supl.
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  • Munch; Den norske Tilskuer (1817-1821), a miscellany brought out at Bergen; Hermoder (1821-1827), a weekly aesthetic journal; Iduna, (1822-1823), of the same kind but of less value; Vidar (1832-1834), a weekly scientific and literary review; Nor (1840-1846), of the same type; Norsk Tidsskrift for Videnskab og Litteratur (1847-1855); Illustreret Nyhedsblad (1851-1866), " Illustrated News "; Norsk Maanedsskrift (1856-1860), " Monthly Review for Norway," devoted to history and philology; and Norden (1866), a literary and scientific review.
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  • We have only vague knowledge of these early movements, laboriously gleaned from archaeology, anthropology and philology.
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  • Philology proves that, though called " Canaanites " from having sojourned in that land, the Phoenicians have no racial connexion with the African descendants of Ham.
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  • Not intending originally to devote himself to physical science, he first took up the study of law and philology at Göttingen, and the general culture he thus gained stood him in good stead when he turned to chemistry, the study of which he began under Liebig.
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  • Celtic ethnology and philology (see Celt) are still in the " age of discussion."
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  • The preface treats of Greek sciences, geometry, the discovery of specific gravity by Archimedes, and other discoveries of the Greeks, and of Romans of his time who have vied with the Greeks -- Lucretius in his poem De Rerum Natura, Cicero in rhetoric, and Varro in philology, as shown by his De Lingua Latina.
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  • Moreover, the origin of Arabic philology is intimately connected with the recitation and exegesis of the Koran.
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  • Beside his works on Plato, he wrote, on aesthetics,, System der Kunstlehre (1805) and Grundriss der Aesthetik (1807);, on the history of philosophy, Grundlinien der Philosophic (1807, republished 1809, but soon forgotten), Grundriss einer Geschichte der Philosophic (1807 and 1825), and Hauptmomente der Geschichte der Philosophie (1829); in philology, Grundlinien der Philologie (1808), and Grundlinien der Grammatik, Hermeneutik and Kritik (1808).
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  • He studied philology at the universities of Bonn, Göttingen and Berlin, and in 1843 he began to work upon the Monumenta Germaniae historica.
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  • From 1816 to 1819 Leo studied at the universities of Breslau, Jena and Göttingen, devoting himself more especially to history, philology and theology.
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  • During these years he began to study literary matters and philology, instigated, it is asserted, by criticisms on his style.
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  • Scarcely any member of the Arabian circle of the sciences, including theology, philology, mathematics, astronomy, physics and music, was left untouched by the treatises of Avicenna, many of which probably varied little, except in being commissioned by a different patron and having a different form or extent.
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  • His spare time was devoted to the prosecution of studies in philology and history, more particularly to the study of Thucydides, and of the new light which had been cast upon Roman history and upon historical method in general by the researches of Niebuhr.
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  • Having studied at Marburg and Jena, he for some time lived at Leipzig as a private tutor; but in 1802 he was appointed professor at Marburg, and two years later professor of philology and ancient history at Heidelberg.
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  • The schismatic Qaraites initiated or rather necessitated a new Hebrew philology, which later on produced Qimhi, the gaon Saadiah founded a Jewish philosophy, the statesman Hasdai introduced a new Jewish culture - and all this under Mahommedan rule.
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  • He was a member of the Old Testament Revision Company in 1874-1884; deputy professor of comparative philology in Oxford 1876-1890; Hibbert Lecturer 1887; Gifford Lecturer 1900-1902.
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  • Having studied classical philology at the university of Giessen, he was appointed (1803) master in the high school, an office which he combined with that of lecturer at the university.
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  • His favourite studies were philology and philosophy; he became an ardent Hegelian.
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  • Ritschl's recommendation, appointed to an extraordinary professorship of classical philology in the university of Basel, and rapidly promoted to an ordinary professorship. Here he almost immediately began a brilliant literary activity, which gradually assumed a more and more philosophical character.
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  • In 1846 Riemann entered himself as a student of philology and theology in the university of Göttingen.
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  • Dempster owed his great position in the history of scholarship to his extraordinary memory, and to the versatility which made him equally at home in philology, criticism, law, biography and history.
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  • Hitherto he had written only on law, history and philology, although in a Latin controversy with the jurist Andreas Hojer of Flensborg his satirical genius had flashed out.
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  • Among the most representative are: the Popular Science Monthly, New York; the monthly Boston Journal of Education; the quarterly American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore; the monthly Cassier's Magazine (1891), New York; the monthly American Engineer (1893), New York; the monthly House and Garden, Philadelphia; the monthly Astrophysical Journal, commenced as Sidereal Messenger (1882), Chicago; the monthly American Chemical Journal, Baltimore; the monthly American Naturalist, Boston; the monthly American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Philadelphia; the monthly Outing, New York; the weekly American Agriculturist, New York; the quarterly Metaphysical Magazine (1895) New York; the bi-monthly American Journal of Sociology, Chicago; the bi-monthly American Law Review, St Louis; the monthly Banker's Magazine, New York; the quarterly American Journal of Philology (1880), Baltimore; the monthly Library Journal (1876), New York; the monthly Public Libraries, Chicago; Harper's.
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  • Historical journalism was first represented by Electa juris publici (1709), philology by Neue acerra philologica (1715-1723), philosophy by the Ada philosophorum (1715-1727), medicine by Der patriotische Medikus (1725), music by Der musikalische Patriot (1725), and education by Die Matrone (1728).
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  • Another great service to English philology was rendered by his paper, read before the Philological Society, "On some Deficiencies in our English Dictionaries" (1857), which gave the first impulse to the great Oxford New EnglishDictionary.
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  • In 1783 he entered the university of Freiburg, where he became a pupil in the seminary for the training of priests, and soon distinguished himself in classical and Oriental philology as well as in biblical exegesis and criticism.
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  • In 1600 he was made rector of the high school at Dort, and devoted himself to philology and historical theology.
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