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philippine

philippine

philippine Sentence Examples

  • The Philippine Islands which had been for several centuries a Spanish possession, passed in 1898 by conquest to the United States of America.

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  • Although he had advised the ratification of the Peace Treaty, he opposed the permanent acquisition of the Philippine Islands.

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  • Although he had advised the ratification of the Peace Treaty, he opposed the permanent acquisition of the Philippine Islands.

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  • Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • These animals live in the forests of the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo and the Philippine Islands, where they feed chiefly on leaves, and probably also on insects.

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  • From this species the tobaccos of Cuba, the United States, the Philippine Islands and the Latakia of Turkey are derived, and it is also largely cultivated in India; the variety macrophylla is the source of the Maryland tobaccos.

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  • A southern extension of the Mexican Central, via Cuernavaca, has reached the Balsas river and will be extended to Acapulco, once the chief Pacific port of Mexico and the depot for the rich Philippine trade.

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  • Leaving Hampton Roads on the 18th of August 1838, it Mopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Paumotu group of the Low Archipelago, the Samoan islands and New South Wales; from Sydney sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny islands; visited the Fiji and the Hawaiian islands in 1840, explored the west coast of the United States, including the Columbia river, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento river, in 1841, and returned by way of the Philippine islands, the Sulu archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope, reaching New York on the 10th of June 1842.

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  • coast of the island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the Maasin River.

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  • Cabatuan, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Suague river, 15 m.

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  • BURAUEN, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the Dagitan river, 21 m.

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  • CALBAYOG, a town of the province of Samar, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • The Philippine Islands are represented in a carefully compiled map by C. W.

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  • Diatom ooze has been found in detached areas between the Philippine and Mariana islands, and near the Aleutian and Galapagos groups, forming an exception to the general rule of its occurrence only in high latitudes.

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  • CARIGARA, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on Carigara Bay, 22 m.

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  • Philippine Islands >>

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  • BATAC, a town of the province of Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, io m.

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  • Cavite has long been the principal naval base of the Philippine Islands, and one of the four Spanish penitentiaries in the Islands was here.

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  • An important fact in the physical geography of the archipelago is that Java, Bali, Sumatra and Borneo, and the lesser islands between them 1 For more detailed information respecting the several islands and groups of the archipelago, see the separate articles Borneo; Java; Philippine Islands; Sumatra, &C.

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  • CARCAR, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the Carcar river near its mouth at the head of Carcar Bay, 23 m.

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  • None extend farther to the westward than the valley of the Indus,' which, considering the nature of the country in Baluchistan and Afghanistan, is perhaps intelligible enough; but it is not so easy to understand why none are found either in Cochin China or China proper; and they are also wanting in the Philippine Islands, which is the more remarkable and instructive when we find how abundant they are in the groups a little farther to the southward.

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  • Not a few noteworthy versions of the Bible, such as those in Arabic, 15 dialects of Chinese, Armenian, and Zulu, and many American Indian, Philippine, and African languages have appeared under the auspices of the American Bible Society.

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  • The Areca palm is a native of the Malay Peninsula and Islands and is extensively cultivated over a wide area in the East, including southern India, Ceylon, Siam, the Malay Archipelago and the Philippine Islands.

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  • At the census of 1910, while the continental United States population (excluding Alaska) was 91,972,266, the total, including Alaska, Hawaii and Porto Rico, but excluding the Philippine Islands, Guam, Samoa and the Canal Zone, was 93,402,151.

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  • The transmarine dominions are Alaska, the Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico, the Philippine Islands, and the Canal Zone on the Isthmus of Panama.

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  • BATANGAS, a town, port of entry, and the capital of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the Batangas river, about 1 m.

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  • Here also may be noticed the huge Philippine long-haired rats of the genus Phlaeomys, characterized by their broad incisors, transversely laminated molars and large claws.

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  • Still less specialized are Chrotomys and Xeromys, which include Philippine land-rats, while Crunomys, from the sane area, retains the third molars, and thus connects the group with the Murinae.

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  • Finally, the Philippine Rhynchornys is represented by a rat with two pairs of molars and a long shrew-like nose, the zygomatic arch of the skull being also placed unusually far backward.

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  • NARVACAN, a town of the province of Ilocos Sur, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the coast and on the main road 13 m.

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  • Missionary work in the Pacific began with Magellan (1521), when in a fortnight he converted all the inhabitants of Cebu and the adjacent Philippine Islands!

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  • ALBAY, a city and the capital of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near an inlet on the W.

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  • Albay is one of the most important cities of the Philippine Islands.

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  • MANILA, the capital city and principal port of the Philippine Islands, situated on the W.

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  • The public school system of Manila includes, besides the common schools and Manila high school, the American school, the Philippine normal school (1901), the Philippine school of arts and trades (1901), the Philippine medical school (1907) and the Philippine school of commerce (1908).

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  • The Philippine government also maintains here a bureau of science which publishes the monthly Philippine Journal of Science, and co-operates with the Jesuits in maintaining, in Ermita, the Manila observatory (meteorological, seismological and astronomical), which is one of the best equipped institutions of the kind in the East.

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  • Manila is governed under a charter enacted in 1901 by the Philippine commission, and amended in 1903.

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  • This vests the legislative and administrative authority mainly in a municipal board of five members, of whom three are appointed by the governor of the Philippines by the advice and with the consent of the Philippine commission, and the others are the president of the advisory board and the city engineer.

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  • Bolo, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on Bogo Bay at the mouth of the Bulac river, in the north-east part of the island.

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  • CALASIAO, a town of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Agno river, about 4 m.

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  • BINAN, a town of the province of La Laguna, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • CALUMPIT, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the junction of the Quingua river with the Rio Grande de la Pampanga, about 25 m.

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  • He opposed the acquisition by the United States of the Philippine Islands, became president of the Anti-Imperialistic League, and was a presidential elector on the Bryan (Democratic) ticket in 1900.

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  • APARRI, a town of the province of Cagayan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Grande de Cagayan river near its mouth, about 55 m.

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  • DUMANJUG, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, or THE Philippines, an archipelago belonging to the United States of America, situated about Soo m.

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  • A uniformly high temperature, excessive humidity, heavy rainfalls and violent tropical storms, known as typhoons or baguios, are characteristic of the Philippine climate.

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  • But in 1902 and 1903 the Philippine government, as established in 1902 by an act of the Congress of the United States, granted franchises for the extension of the Manila-Dagupan railway to Cabanatuan (55 m.) and to Antipolo (24 m.).

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  • In February 1905 Congress authorized the Philippine government to aid and encourage the construction of railways by guaranteeing 4% interest on bonds; the duty on imported materials used in the construction of railways and the internal revenue on Philippine forest products used for that purpose have also been removed.

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  • of railway in Luzon; and the Philippine Railroad Company, organized under the laws of the state of Connecticut, agreed to construct about 300 m.

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  • To continue the work of organizing and establishing civil government the president of the United States appointed in February 1900 a Philippine Commission of five members, with William H.

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  • On the 1st of September 1900 this body assumed the legislative functions of the central government at Manila; on the 4th of July 1901 the executive authority was, by order of the president, transferred from the military governor to Judge Taft, whom he had appointed civil governor; on the 6th of September 1901 the Philippine Commission, by authority of the president, established the four executive departments, of interior, commerce -and police, finance and justice, and public instruction; and on the 29th of October 1901 the president appointed a vice-governor.

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  • The first popular assembly, of 80 members, was opened at Manila on the 16th of October 1907, and since then the legislature has been composed of two branches, the Philippine Commission (five Americans and four, formerly three, Filipinos), and the Philippine Assembly.

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  • The judges of the courts of first instance are appointed by the governor with the consent of the Philippine Commission.

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  • The most common form of provincial government is that by a governor, who is elected biennially by the municipal councillors in convention, and a secretary, a treasurer, a supervisor, and a fiscal or prosecuting attorney, who are appointed by the Philippine Commission.

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  • The Philippine " municipality " is an administrative area, often sparsely settled, is often called a town, and may be compared to a New England township; the municipalities are the units into which the provinces are divided.

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  • The American system, established by the Philippine Commission in 1901, provides a course of instruction (in the English language) for 11 years: 4 primary, 3 intermediate and 4 secondary.

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  • In 1902 there were 928 American teachers employed in the Philippine schools; the employment of American teachers is only a temporary policy, however, and by 1908 the number has been reduced to 795.

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  • Besides the elementary schools there are at Manila the Philippine Normal School, the Philippine School of Arts and Trades, the Philippine School of Commerce and the school for the instruction of the deaf and blind, and in 1908 the Philippine legislature passed an act for the establishment of a university of the Philippines.

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  • - The Philippine Islands were discovered by Magellan in March 1521.

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  • The chief defect in the Spanish Philippine policy was that while it made converts it did not make citizens.

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  • The treaty of peace between the United States and Spain, by which the Philippine Islands passed into the hands of the former, was signed in Paris on the 10th of December 1898, but it was not confirmed by the Senate until the 6th of February 1899.

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  • The elections for the first Philippine Assembly were held on the 30th of July 1907, and 31 Nationalists, 16 Progressists, 33 Independents and others were elected.

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  • On the 2nd of November 1909 delegates were elected for the second Philippine Assembly.

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  • P. C. Griffin, A List of Books on the Philippine Islands in the Library of Congress (Washington, 1903), with references to periodicals; T.

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  • Robertson, Bibliography of the Philippine Islands (Cleveland, Ohio, 1908).1908).

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  • For statistics, general description and material on administration, see Census of the Philippine Islands in 1903 (4 vols., Washington, 1905);; Pronouncing Gazetteer and Geographical Dictionary of the Philippine Islands (Washington, 1902); Ethnological Survey Publications of the.

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  • Department of the Interior (Manila, 1904 sqq.); Reports of the Philippine Commission (Washington, 1901 sqq.); Sir John Bowring, A Visit to the Philippine Islands (London, 1859); D.

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  • C. Worcester, The Philippine Islands and their People (New York, 1898); F.

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  • Atkinson, The Philippine Islands (Boston, 1905); C. H.

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  • LeRoy, Philippine Life in Town and Country (ibid.

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  • Lala, Philippine Islands (New York, 1899); H.

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  • P. Willis, Our Philippine Problem, a Study of American Colonial Policy (New York, 1905); Edith Moses, Unofficial Letters of an Official's Wife (ibid.

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  • Freer, The Philippine Experiences of an American Teacher (ibid.

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  • Schurman, Philippine Affairs (ibid.

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  • C. McGregor, Manual of Philippine Birds (New York, 1909).

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  • Robertson, The Philippine Islands, 1 4931 898 (55 vols., Cleveland, 1903-1909); J.

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  • Bourne, Discovery, Conquest and Early History of the Philippine Islands (Cleveland, 1907); F.

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  • NORZAGARAY, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Quingua river, about 25 m.

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  • The lower Colorado river was discovered in 1540, but the explorers did not penetrate California; in 1542-1543 Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo explored at least the southern coast; in 1579 Sir Francis Drake repaired his ships in some Californian port (almost certainly not San Francisco Bay), and named the land New Albion; two Philippine ships visited the coast in 1584 and 1595, and in 1602 and 1603 Sebastian Vizcaino discovered the sites of San Diego and Monterey.

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  • IRIGA, a town of the province of Ambos Camarines, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Bicol river, about 20 m.

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  • After a long discussion the peace treaty was ratified by the United States Senate on the 6th of February 1899; and in accordance with its terms Porto Rico, the Philippine Archipelago, and Guam were transferred by Spain to the United States, and Cuba came under American jurisdiction pending the establishment there of an independent government.

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  • Wood was sent on a special Federal mission to the Philippine Is.

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  • Trade with the Philippine Islands and the Hawaiian Islands and Alaska is important, while the coastwise trade with Pacific ports exceeds all the rest in tonnage.

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  • Thus a Tagala (Philippine) translation was brought out at Manila in 1712.

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  • MANDAUE, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • VIGAN, a town and the capital of the province of Ilocos Sur, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the Abra river, about zoo m.

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  • BALAYAN, a town and port of entry of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the head of the Gulf of Balayan, about 55 m.

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  • TABACO, a town and port of entry of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on Tabaco bay, about 20 m.

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  • MANAOAG, a town in the north central part of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Angalacan river, 21 m.

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  • JARO, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, on the Jaro river, 2 m.

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  • swinhoei, and the Philippine C. u.

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  • A black coat with white spots distinguishes the Philippine spotted deer, C. alf redi, which is about the size of a roe-buck; while other members of this group are the Calamianes deer of the Philippines (C. culionensis), the Bavian deer (C. kuhli) from a small island near Java, and the well-known Indian hog-deer or para (C. porcinus), all these three last being small, more or less uniformly coloured, and closely allied species.

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  • TUGUEGARAO, a town and the capital of the province of Cagayan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Grande de Cagayan River, about 60 m.

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  • BARUGO, a town on the north coast of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on Carigara Bay.

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  • DANAO, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • Scalpellum rostratum, Darwin, Philippine Islands.

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  • above the sea), near the straits of Magellan, as well as in Teneriffe, the Cape of Good Hope, Abyssinia, Rodriguez, the Philippine Islands and the Malay Archipelago.

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  • ORMOC, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • BARILI, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the Barili river, 2 m.

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  • ARGAO, a town on the east coast of Cebu, Philippine Islands, 36 M.

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  • of the province of Ambos Camarines, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Bicol river, about 22 m.

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  • CANDON, a town of South Ilocos province, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • BAUAN (or Baun), a town of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the head of Batangas Bay, about 54 m.

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  • MALOLOS, a town and the capital of the province of Bulacán, island of Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Pampanga Grande river.

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  • BAROTAC NUEVO, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, near the Jalaud river, above its mouth on the S.E.

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  • By the relinquishment of Cuba and the cession of Porto Rico, the Philippine and Sulu Islands, and Guam, the largest of the Colonial Ladrones, to the United States, as a consequence Posses- of the war of 1898, and of the remaining Ladrone sions, or Marianne Islands, together with the Caroline and Pelew Islands, to Germany by a treaty of the 8th of February 1899, the colonial possessions of Spain were greatly reduced.

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  • Reckless as was the course adopted, it was in touch with the feelings of the majority of a nation which had been to the very end deceived by the government and by the press not only in regard to its own resources, but also in regard to those of the United States and of the colonists in arms in Cuba and in the Philippine Islands.

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  • Unfortunately, Spain indulged in the illusion that America would perhaps respect her rights of sovereignty in the Philippine Islands, or pay a considerable sum for their cession and recognize the debts of Cuba and of the Philippines.

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  • Spain could not help assenting to a treaty by which she renounced unconditionally all her rights of sovereignty over Cuba and Porto Rico and ceded the Philippine and Sulu Islands and the largest of the Marianne Islands in consideration of the payment of four millions sterling by America.

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  • The national debt, which consisted before the war of 234,866,500 of external Financial and internal consols ar,d redeemable debts, and and Political 24,2 50,000 of home floating debt, was increased Reoiganizaby 46,21o,ooo of Cuban and Philippine debts, which tion.

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  • MALABON, a town of the province of Rizal, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 1 m.

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  • One significant impact of convergence on Philippine media is that it will provide a backdoor that will allow foreign firms to own media networks.

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  • We decided to stay till sunset for the evening flight and were rewarded with eighty Philippine cockatoos flying into the roost tree.

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  • She said ' We are honored to receive a visit from so many distinguished Philippine parliamentarians.

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  • The comparative advantage of the Mexican telenovela over Philippine television drama is the markedly mestizo features of its actors and actresses.

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  • CARIGARA, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on Carigara Bay, 22 m.

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  • The Church now has, besides these missions, others in India (1834), Siam (1840), China (1846),(1846), Colombia (1856), Brazil (1859),(1859), Japan (1859), Laos (1867),(1867), Mexico (transferred in 1872 by the American and Foreign Christian Union), Chile (transferred in 1873 by the same Union; first established in 1845), Guatemala (1882),(1882), Korea (1884)(1884) and the Philippine Islands (1899).

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  • CALBAYOG, a town of the province of Samar, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • In the western hemisphere they range along the Mexican highlands and the Andes far into the tropics, while in the Old World the genus, well represented in the Himalayas and the hills of China, exists likewise in the peninsula of Malacca, in the Indian Archipelago and Malaya to the Philippine Islands and Borneo.

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  • Drake's discoveries extended from Cape Mendocino to 48° N., in which latitude he gave up his quest, sailed across the Pacific and reached the Philippine Islands, returning home round the Cape of Good Hope in 1580.

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  • LAOAG, a town, port for coasting vessels, and capital of the province of Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Laoag river, about 5 m.

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  • Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • MACABEBE, a town of the province of Pampanga, island of Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Pampanga Grande river, about 10 m.

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  • The cordage works are among the largest in the world, and consume immense quantities of sisal fibre imported from Mexico and manila from the Philippine Islands; binder-twine for binding wheat is one of the principal products.

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  • In 1900 he was asked by President McKinley to accept the presidency of the Philippine Commission charged with the administration of the islands.

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  • (See Philippine Islands.) The religious orders had been driven out during the insurrection, but held title to large tracts of land which many Filipinos and some Americans wished to confiscate.

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  • In his inaugural address (4th March 1909) President Taft announced himself as favouring the maintenance and enforcement of the reforms initiated by President Roosevelt (including a strict enforcement of the Sherman Anti-Trust Act, an effective measure for railway rate regulation, and the policy of conservation of natural resources); the revision of the tariff on the basis of affording protection to American manufactures equal to the difference between home and foreign cost of production; a graduated inheritance tax; a strong navy as the best guarantee of peace; postal savings banks; free trade with the Philippine Islands; and mail subsidies for American ships.

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  • SAN' 'MIGUEL DE MAYUMO, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 40 m.

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  • The Philippine Islands lie between 5° and 20° N., between Borneo and southern China.

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  • ELIZABETH [Elisabeth Philippine Marie Helene of] (1764-1794), commonly called Madame Elizabeth, daughter of Louis the Dauphin and Marie Josephine of Saxony, and sister of Louis XVI., was born at Versailles on the 3rd of May 1764.

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  • BINMALEY, a town of the province of Pangasinfin, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the delta of the Agno river, about 5 m.

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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • It is the general medium of communication throughout the archipelago from Sumatra to the Philippine Islands, and it was so upwards of three hundred and fifty years ago when the Portuguese first appeared in those parts.

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  • LIGAO, a town near the centre of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, close to the left bank of a tributary of the Bicol river, and on the main road through the valley.

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  • The Philippine Islands are represented in a carefully compiled map by C. W.

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  • DAGUPAN, a town and the most important commercial centre of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Agno river near its entrance into the Gulf of Lingayen, 1 20 m.

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  • BURAUEN, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the Dagitan river, 21 m.

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  • ILOILO, a town, port of entry and the capital of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of Iloilo river, on the S.E.

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  • In commercial importance Iloilo ranks next to Manila among Philippine cities; it has manufactures of pina, jusi, coconut oil, lime, vinegar and various articles made from palm wood.

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  • Cabatuan, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Suague river, 15 m.

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  • olibanum of Java), corrupted in the parlance of Europe into benjamin and benzoin; camphor, produced by Cinnamomum Camphora, the "camphor laurel" of China and Japan, and by Dryobalanops aromatica, a native of the Indian Archipelago, and widely used as incense throughout the East, particularly in China; elemi, the resin of an unknown tree of the Philippine Islands, the elemi of old writers being the resin of Boswellia Frereana; gumdragon or dragon's blood, obtained from Calamus Draco, one of the ratan palms of the Indian Archipelago, Dracaena Draco, a liliaceous plant of the Canary Island, and Pterocarpus Draco, a leguminous tree of the island of Socotra; rose-malloes, a corruption of the Javanese rasamala, or liquid storax, the resinous exudation of Liquidambar Altingia, a native of the Indian Archipelago (an American Liquidambar also produces a rose-malloes-like exudation); star anise, the starlike fruit of the Illicum anisatum of Yunan and south-western China, burnt as incense in the temples of Japan; sweet flag, the root of Acorus Calamus, the bath of the Hindus, much used for incense in India.

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  • Philippine Islands >>

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  • DALAGUETE, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the TapOn river on the E.

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  • From this species the tobaccos of Cuba, the United States, the Philippine Islands and the Latakia of Turkey are derived, and it is also largely cultivated in India; the variety macrophylla is the source of the Maryland tobaccos.

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  • TAYUG, a town of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the Agno river, 33 m.

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  • Leaving Hampton Roads on the 18th of August 1838, it Mopped at Madeira and Rio de Janeiro; visited Tierra del Fuego, Chile, Peru, the Paumotu group of the Low Archipelago, the Samoan islands and New South Wales; from Sydney sailed into the Antarctic Ocean in December 1839 and reported the discovery of an Antarctic continent west of the Balleny islands; visited the Fiji and the Hawaiian islands in 1840, explored the west coast of the United States, including the Columbia river, San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento river, in 1841, and returned by way of the Philippine islands, the Sulu archipelago, Borneo, Singapore, Polynesia and the Cape of Good Hope, reaching New York on the 10th of June 1842.

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  • BATAC, a town of the province of Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, io m.

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  • BAYBAY, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • MAGALDAN, a town in the northern part of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 2 m.

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  • coast of the island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the Maasin River.

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  • Coal is worked to some extent in Sumatra, British North Borneo, and the Philippine Islands.

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  • A southern extension of the Mexican Central, via Cuernavaca, has reached the Balsas river and will be extended to Acapulco, once the chief Pacific port of Mexico and the depot for the rich Philippine trade.

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  • - Strictly speaking, the United States has no colonial policy, for the Philippine Islands and Porto Rico can scarcely be called colonies.

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  • In April 1898, while with his fleet at Hong Kong, he was notified by cable that war had begun between the United States and Spain, and was ordered to "capture or destroy the Spanish fleet" then in Philippine waters.

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  • He was a member (1899) of the Schurman Philippine Commission, and in 1899 and 1900 was spoken of as a possible Democratic candidate for the presidency.

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  • It includes the Sunda Islands, the Moluccas, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands, but excludes the Andaman-Nicobar group. The equator passes through the middle of the archipelago; it successively cuts Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes and Halmahera, four of the most important islands.

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  • An important fact in the physical geography of the archipelago is that Java, Bali, Sumatra and Borneo, and the lesser islands between them 1 For more detailed information respecting the several islands and groups of the archipelago, see the separate articles Borneo; Java; Philippine Islands; Sumatra, &C.

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  • Political Division.-Politically the whole of the archipelago, except British North Borneo, &c. (see Borneo), part of Timor (Portuguese), New Guinea east of the 141st meridian (British and German), and the Philippine Islands, belongs to the Netherlands.

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  • The Philippine Islands which had been for several centuries a Spanish possession, passed in 1898 by conquest to the United States of America.

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  • CARCAR, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the Carcar river near its mouth at the head of Carcar Bay, 23 m.

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  • None extend farther to the westward than the valley of the Indus,' which, considering the nature of the country in Baluchistan and Afghanistan, is perhaps intelligible enough; but it is not so easy to understand why none are found either in Cochin China or China proper; and they are also wanting in the Philippine Islands, which is the more remarkable and instructive when we find how abundant they are in the groups a little farther to the southward.

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  • Bering Sea is bounded by the Alaskan Peninsula and the chain of the Aleutian Islands; the sea of Okhotsk is enclosed by the peninsula of Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands; the Sea of Japan is shut off by Sakhalin Island, the Japanese Islands and the peninsula of Korea; the Yellow Sea is an opening between the coast of China and Korea; the China Sea lies between the Asiatic continent and the island of Formosa, the Philippine group, Palawan and Borneo.

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  • Diatom ooze has been found in detached areas between the Philippine and Mariana islands, and near the Aleutian and Galapagos groups, forming an exception to the general rule of its occurrence only in high latitudes.

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  • Not a few noteworthy versions of the Bible, such as those in Arabic, 15 dialects of Chinese, Armenian, and Zulu, and many American Indian, Philippine, and African languages have appeared under the auspices of the American Bible Society.

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  • The Areca palm is a native of the Malay Peninsula and Islands and is extensively cultivated over a wide area in the East, including southern India, Ceylon, Siam, the Malay Archipelago and the Philippine Islands.

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  • CAVITE, a fortified seaport, the capital of the province of Cavite, Luzon, Philippine Islands, and the seat of the principal Asiatic naval station of the United States, on a forked tongue of land in Manila Bay, 8 m.

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  • Cavite has long been the principal naval base of the Philippine Islands, and one of the four Spanish penitentiaries in the Islands was here.

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  • These animals live in the forests of the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Borneo and the Philippine Islands, where they feed chiefly on leaves, and probably also on insects.

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  • At the census of 1910, while the continental United States population (excluding Alaska) was 91,972,266, the total, including Alaska, Hawaii and Porto Rico, but excluding the Philippine Islands, Guam, Samoa and the Canal Zone, was 93,402,151.

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  • The transmarine dominions are Alaska, the Hawaiian Islands, Porto Rico, the Philippine Islands, and the Canal Zone on the Isthmus of Panama.

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  • BATANGAS, a town, port of entry, and the capital of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the Batangas river, about 1 m.

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  • Here also may be noticed the huge Philippine long-haired rats of the genus Phlaeomys, characterized by their broad incisors, transversely laminated molars and large claws.

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  • Still less specialized are Chrotomys and Xeromys, which include Philippine land-rats, while Crunomys, from the sane area, retains the third molars, and thus connects the group with the Murinae.

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  • Finally, the Philippine Rhynchornys is represented by a rat with two pairs of molars and a long shrew-like nose, the zygomatic arch of the skull being also placed unusually far backward.

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  • NARVACAN, a town of the province of Ilocos Sur, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the coast and on the main road 13 m.

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  • In the Philippine Islands several species of Longicorns of the genus Doliops mimic hard inedible weevils (Curculionidae) of the genus Pachyrhynchus.

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  • Missionary work in the Pacific began with Magellan (1521), when in a fortnight he converted all the inhabitants of Cebu and the adjacent Philippine Islands!

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  • ALBAY, a city and the capital of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near an inlet on the W.

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  • Albay is one of the most important cities of the Philippine Islands.

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  • MANILA, the capital city and principal port of the Philippine Islands, situated on the W.

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  • The public school system of Manila includes, besides the common schools and Manila high school, the American school, the Philippine normal school (1901), the Philippine school of arts and trades (1901), the Philippine medical school (1907) and the Philippine school of commerce (1908).

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  • The Philippine government also maintains here a bureau of science which publishes the monthly Philippine Journal of Science, and co-operates with the Jesuits in maintaining, in Ermita, the Manila observatory (meteorological, seismological and astronomical), which is one of the best equipped institutions of the kind in the East.

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  • Manila is governed under a charter enacted in 1901 by the Philippine commission, and amended in 1903.

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  • This vests the legislative and administrative authority mainly in a municipal board of five members, of whom three are appointed by the governor of the Philippines by the advice and with the consent of the Philippine commission, and the others are the president of the advisory board and the city engineer.

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  • Bolo, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on Bogo Bay at the mouth of the Bulac river, in the north-east part of the island.

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  • CALASIAO, a town of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Agno river, about 4 m.

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  • BINAN, a town of the province of La Laguna, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • CALUMPIT, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the junction of the Quingua river with the Rio Grande de la Pampanga, about 25 m.

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  • He opposed the acquisition by the United States of the Philippine Islands, became president of the Anti-Imperialistic League, and was a presidential elector on the Bryan (Democratic) ticket in 1900.

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  • APARRI, a town of the province of Cagayan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Grande de Cagayan river near its mouth, about 55 m.

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  • DUMANJUG, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, or THE Philippines, an archipelago belonging to the United States of America, situated about Soo m.

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  • A uniformly high temperature, excessive humidity, heavy rainfalls and violent tropical storms, known as typhoons or baguios, are characteristic of the Philippine climate.

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  • But in 1902 and 1903 the Philippine government, as established in 1902 by an act of the Congress of the United States, granted franchises for the extension of the Manila-Dagupan railway to Cabanatuan (55 m.) and to Antipolo (24 m.).

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  • In February 1905 Congress authorized the Philippine government to aid and encourage the construction of railways by guaranteeing 4% interest on bonds; the duty on imported materials used in the construction of railways and the internal revenue on Philippine forest products used for that purpose have also been removed.

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  • of railway in Luzon; and the Philippine Railroad Company, organized under the laws of the state of Connecticut, agreed to construct about 300 m.

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  • To continue the work of organizing and establishing civil government the president of the United States appointed in February 1900 a Philippine Commission of five members, with William H.

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  • On the 1st of September 1900 this body assumed the legislative functions of the central government at Manila; on the 4th of July 1901 the executive authority was, by order of the president, transferred from the military governor to Judge Taft, whom he had appointed civil governor; on the 6th of September 1901 the Philippine Commission, by authority of the president, established the four executive departments, of interior, commerce -and police, finance and justice, and public instruction; and on the 29th of October 1901 the president appointed a vice-governor.

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  • The first popular assembly, of 80 members, was opened at Manila on the 16th of October 1907, and since then the legislature has been composed of two branches, the Philippine Commission (five Americans and four, formerly three, Filipinos), and the Philippine Assembly.

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  • The judges of the courts of first instance are appointed by the governor with the consent of the Philippine Commission.

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  • The most common form of provincial government is that by a governor, who is elected biennially by the municipal councillors in convention, and a secretary, a treasurer, a supervisor, and a fiscal or prosecuting attorney, who are appointed by the Philippine Commission.

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  • The Philippine " municipality " is an administrative area, often sparsely settled, is often called a town, and may be compared to a New England township; the municipalities are the units into which the provinces are divided.

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  • The American system, established by the Philippine Commission in 1901, provides a course of instruction (in the English language) for 11 years: 4 primary, 3 intermediate and 4 secondary.

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  • In 1902 there were 928 American teachers employed in the Philippine schools; the employment of American teachers is only a temporary policy, however, and by 1908 the number has been reduced to 795.

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  • Besides the elementary schools there are at Manila the Philippine Normal School, the Philippine School of Arts and Trades, the Philippine School of Commerce and the school for the instruction of the deaf and blind, and in 1908 the Philippine legislature passed an act for the establishment of a university of the Philippines.

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  • - The Philippine Islands were discovered by Magellan in March 1521.

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  • The chief defect in the Spanish Philippine policy was that while it made converts it did not make citizens.

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  • The treaty of peace between the United States and Spain, by which the Philippine Islands passed into the hands of the former, was signed in Paris on the 10th of December 1898, but it was not confirmed by the Senate until the 6th of February 1899.

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  • The elections for the first Philippine Assembly were held on the 30th of July 1907, and 31 Nationalists, 16 Progressists, 33 Independents and others were elected.

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  • On the 2nd of November 1909 delegates were elected for the second Philippine Assembly.

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  • P. C. Griffin, A List of Books on the Philippine Islands in the Library of Congress (Washington, 1903), with references to periodicals; T.

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  • Robertson, Bibliography of the Philippine Islands (Cleveland, Ohio, 1908).1908).

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  • For statistics, general description and material on administration, see Census of the Philippine Islands in 1903 (4 vols., Washington, 1905);; Pronouncing Gazetteer and Geographical Dictionary of the Philippine Islands (Washington, 1902); Ethnological Survey Publications of the.

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  • Department of the Interior (Manila, 1904 sqq.); Reports of the Philippine Commission (Washington, 1901 sqq.); Sir John Bowring, A Visit to the Philippine Islands (London, 1859); D.

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  • C. Worcester, The Philippine Islands and their People (New York, 1898); F.

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  • Atkinson, The Philippine Islands (Boston, 1905); C. H.

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  • LeRoy, Philippine Life in Town and Country (ibid.

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  • Lala, Philippine Islands (New York, 1899); H.

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  • P. Willis, Our Philippine Problem, a Study of American Colonial Policy (New York, 1905); Edith Moses, Unofficial Letters of an Official's Wife (ibid.

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  • Freer, The Philippine Experiences of an American Teacher (ibid.

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  • Schurman, Philippine Affairs (ibid.

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  • C. McGregor, Manual of Philippine Birds (New York, 1909).

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  • Robertson, The Philippine Islands, 1 4931 898 (55 vols., Cleveland, 1903-1909); J.

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  • Bourne, Discovery, Conquest and Early History of the Philippine Islands (Cleveland, 1907); F.

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  • NORZAGARAY, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Quingua river, about 25 m.

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  • The lower Colorado river was discovered in 1540, but the explorers did not penetrate California; in 1542-1543 Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo explored at least the southern coast; in 1579 Sir Francis Drake repaired his ships in some Californian port (almost certainly not San Francisco Bay), and named the land New Albion; two Philippine ships visited the coast in 1584 and 1595, and in 1602 and 1603 Sebastian Vizcaino discovered the sites of San Diego and Monterey.

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  • IRIGA, a town of the province of Ambos Camarines, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Bicol river, about 20 m.

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  • After a long discussion the peace treaty was ratified by the United States Senate on the 6th of February 1899; and in accordance with its terms Porto Rico, the Philippine Archipelago, and Guam were transferred by Spain to the United States, and Cuba came under American jurisdiction pending the establishment there of an independent government.

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  • Taking up the story at the point where the earlier historical summary leaves off, we get the following list of countries in which plague is known to have been present in each year (see Local Government Board's Reports): 1880, Mesopotamia; 1881, Mesopotamia, Persia and China; 1882, Persia and China; 1883, China; 1884, China and India (as mahamari); 1885, Persia; 1886, 1887, 1888, India (as mahamari); 1889, Arabia, Persia and China; 1890, Arabia, Persia and China; 1891, Arabia, China and India (as mahamari); 1892, Mesopotamia, Persia, China, Russia (in central Asia); 1893, Arabia, China, Russia and India (as mahamari); 1894, Arabia, China and India (as mahamari); 1895, Arabia and China; 1896, Arabia, Asia Minor, China, Japan, Russia and India (Bombay); 18 9 7, Arabia, China, Japan, India, Russia and East Africa; 1898, Arabia, Persia, China, Japan, Russia, East Africa, Madagascar and Vienna; 1899, Arabia, Persia, China, Japan, Mesopotamia, East Africa, West Africa, Philippine Islands, Straits Settlements, Madagascar, Mauritius, Reunion, Egypt, European Russia, Portugal, Sandwich Islands, New Caledonia, Paraguay, Argentine, Brazil: 1900,1900, to the foregoing should be added Turkey, Australia, California, Mexico and Glasgow; in 1901, South Africa and in 1902 Russia chiefly at Odessa.

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  • Wood was sent on a special Federal mission to the Philippine Is.

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  • Trade with the Philippine Islands and the Hawaiian Islands and Alaska is important, while the coastwise trade with Pacific ports exceeds all the rest in tonnage.

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  • Thus a Tagala (Philippine) translation was brought out at Manila in 1712.

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  • MANDAUE, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • VIGAN, a town and the capital of the province of Ilocos Sur, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the Abra river, about zoo m.

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  • BALAYAN, a town and port of entry of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the head of the Gulf of Balayan, about 55 m.

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  • TABACO, a town and port of entry of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on Tabaco bay, about 20 m.

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  • MANAOAG, a town in the north central part of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Angalacan river, 21 m.

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  • JARO, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, on the Jaro river, 2 m.

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  • swinhoei, and the Philippine C. u.

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  • A black coat with white spots distinguishes the Philippine spotted deer, C. alf redi, which is about the size of a roe-buck; while other members of this group are the Calamianes deer of the Philippines (C. culionensis), the Bavian deer (C. kuhli) from a small island near Java, and the well-known Indian hog-deer or para (C. porcinus), all these three last being small, more or less uniformly coloured, and closely allied species.

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  • OPON, a town of the province of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the small island of Mactan (area about 45 sq.

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  • TUGUEGARAO, a town and the capital of the province of Cagayan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Grande de Cagayan River, about 60 m.

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  • BARUGO, a town on the north coast of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on Carigara Bay.

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  • DANAO, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the E.

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  • Scalpellum rostratum, Darwin, Philippine Islands.

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  • above the sea), near the straits of Magellan, as well as in Teneriffe, the Cape of Good Hope, Abyssinia, Rodriguez, the Philippine Islands and the Malay Archipelago.

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  • (For the pathology see Digestive Organs.) Recently considerable advance has been made in our knowledge of dysentery, and it appears that there are two distinct types of the disease: (1) amoebic dysentery, which is due to the presence of the amoeba histolytica (of Schaudinn) in the intestine; (2) bacillary dysentery, which has as causative agent two separate bacteria, (a) that discovered by Shiga in Japan, (b) that discovered by Flexner in the Philippine Islands.

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  • ORMOC, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • BARILI, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, on the Barili river, 2 m.

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  • ARGAO, a town on the east coast of Cebu, Philippine Islands, 36 M.

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  • of the province of Ambos Camarines, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Bicol river, about 22 m.

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  • CANDON, a town of South Ilocos province, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • BAUAN (or Baun), a town of the province of Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands, at the head of Batangas Bay, about 54 m.

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  • MALOLOS, a town and the capital of the province of Bulacán, island of Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Pampanga Grande river.

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  • BAROTAC NUEVO, a town of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, near the Jalaud river, above its mouth on the S.E.

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  • By the relinquishment of Cuba and the cession of Porto Rico, the Philippine and Sulu Islands, and Guam, the largest of the Colonial Ladrones, to the United States, as a consequence Posses- of the war of 1898, and of the remaining Ladrone sions, or Marianne Islands, together with the Caroline and Pelew Islands, to Germany by a treaty of the 8th of February 1899, the colonial possessions of Spain were greatly reduced.

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  • Reckless as was the course adopted, it was in touch with the feelings of the majority of a nation which had been to the very end deceived by the government and by the press not only in regard to its own resources, but also in regard to those of the United States and of the colonists in arms in Cuba and in the Philippine Islands.

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  • Unfortunately, Spain indulged in the illusion that America would perhaps respect her rights of sovereignty in the Philippine Islands, or pay a considerable sum for their cession and recognize the debts of Cuba and of the Philippines.

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  • Spain could not help assenting to a treaty by which she renounced unconditionally all her rights of sovereignty over Cuba and Porto Rico and ceded the Philippine and Sulu Islands and the largest of the Marianne Islands in consideration of the payment of four millions sterling by America.

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  • The national debt, which consisted before the war of 234,866,500 of external Financial and internal consols ar,d redeemable debts, and and Political 24,2 50,000 of home floating debt, was increased Reoiganizaby 46,21o,ooo of Cuban and Philippine debts, which tion.

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  • MALABON, a town of the province of Rizal, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 1 m.

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  • The comparative advantage of the Mexican telenovela over Philippine television drama is the markedly mestizo features of its actors and actresses.

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  • However, Asia is the largest continent in the world with 69 countries that include the Middle Eastern countries, all of India and the South Pacific Malaysian, Indonesian and Philippine islands.

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  • A Philippine legend that credits the birth of humanity to the bamboo stem -- a creation myth in which a man and woman came from the stem and began the world's progeny.

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  • Philippine Retirement includes real estate properties and vacation rentals in paradise.

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  • Philippine ethnic dance has a wide and varied range of movements and costumes coming from many cultures and time periods.

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  • Still, these sources all come together in the unique form that is Philippine ethnic dance.

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  • This is one of the most popular and well-known of the Philippine ethnic dances, performed by cultural groups all over to world to celebrate their heritage.

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  • While many of the dances reflect Philippine heritage, they also are brought into the future by contemporary dancers who have taken these cultural influences into the wider global arena.

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  • It would be impossible to catalog all of the steps in Philippine Folk dance - it is far too broad a spectrum.

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  • However, many of these steps are given their own particularly Philippine style - for example, instead of Spanish castanets, bamboo castanets were invented.

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  • The costumes may bear some resemblance to a fine European gown, but adjustments in the fabric and cut (especially the sleeves) make these gowns unique to the culture of the Philippine islands.

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  • Breaking down the steps in Philippine folk dances should be done separately for colonial and indigenous dances.

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  • Other dance moves are based on more "martial" forms, such as the kumintang move, a rotating hand gesture which resembles the stick-fighting technique developed by Philippine warriors.

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  • Many examples of Philippine dance steps can be found online, but the best way to find out more is to find a cultural center and learn the steps for yourself!

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  • The most extensive part of this new aquarium construction is the Philippine Coral Reef, which measures 25 feet deep.

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  • While these films certainly remain favorites among the native Philippine people, they are gaining in popularity among a wider ethnic audience.

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  • The Church now has, besides these missions, others in India (1834), Siam (1840), China (1846),(1846), Colombia (1856), Brazil (1859),(1859), Japan (1859), Laos (1867),(1867), Mexico (transferred in 1872 by the American and Foreign Christian Union), Chile (transferred in 1873 by the same Union; first established in 1845), Guatemala (1882),(1882), Korea (1884)(1884) and the Philippine Islands (1899).

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  • LAOAG, a town, port for coasting vessels, and capital of the province of Ilocos Norte, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Laoag river, about 5 m.

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  • BULACAN, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on an arm of the Pampanga delta, 22 m.

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  • MACABEBE, a town of the province of Pampanga, island of Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Pampanga Grande river, about 10 m.

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  • ELIZABETH [Elisabeth Philippine Marie Helene of] (1764-1794), commonly called Madame Elizabeth, daughter of Louis the Dauphin and Marie Josephine of Saxony, and sister of Louis XVI., was born at Versailles on the 3rd of May 1764.

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  • France, Switzerland, Spain, Italy, Sicily, Greece, Rumania, Turkey-in-Europe, Styria, Slavonia, Hungary, Transylvania, Galicia, Lower Austria, Wurttemberg, Brandenberg, West Prussia, Crimea, Kuban, Terek, Kutais, Tiflis, Elizabetpol, Siberia, Transcaspia, Mesopotamia, Persia, Assam, Burma, Anam, Japan, Philippine Islands, Borneo, Sumatra, Java, Algeria, Egypt, British Columbia, Alaska, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas, Louisiana, Barbados, Trinidad, Venezuela, Peru, South Australia, Victoria, New Zealand.

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  • It is the general medium of communication throughout the archipelago from Sumatra to the Philippine Islands, and it was so upwards of three hundred and fifty years ago when the Portuguese first appeared in those parts.

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  • ILOILO, a town, port of entry and the capital of the province of Iloilo, Panay, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of Iloilo river, on the S.E.

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  • In commercial importance Iloilo ranks next to Manila among Philippine cities; it has manufactures of pina, jusi, coconut oil, lime, vinegar and various articles made from palm wood.

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  • olibanum of Java), corrupted in the parlance of Europe into benjamin and benzoin; camphor, produced by Cinnamomum Camphora, the "camphor laurel" of China and Japan, and by Dryobalanops aromatica, a native of the Indian Archipelago, and widely used as incense throughout the East, particularly in China; elemi, the resin of an unknown tree of the Philippine Islands, the elemi of old writers being the resin of Boswellia Frereana; gumdragon or dragon's blood, obtained from Calamus Draco, one of the ratan palms of the Indian Archipelago, Dracaena Draco, a liliaceous plant of the Canary Island, and Pterocarpus Draco, a leguminous tree of the island of Socotra; rose-malloes, a corruption of the Javanese rasamala, or liquid storax, the resinous exudation of Liquidambar Altingia, a native of the Indian Archipelago (an American Liquidambar also produces a rose-malloes-like exudation); star anise, the starlike fruit of the Illicum anisatum of Yunan and south-western China, burnt as incense in the temples of Japan; sweet flag, the root of Acorus Calamus, the bath of the Hindus, much used for incense in India.

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  • DALAGUETE, a town of the province of Cebu, island of Cebu, Philippine Islands, at the mouth of the TapOn river on the E.

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  • TAYUG, a town of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, near the Agno river, 33 m.

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  • BAYBAY, a town of the province of Leyte, island of Leyte, Philippine Islands, on the W.

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  • MAGALDAN, a town in the northern part of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 2 m.

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  • Coal is worked to some extent in Sumatra, British North Borneo, and the Philippine Islands.

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  • - Strictly speaking, the United States has no colonial policy, for the Philippine Islands and Porto Rico can scarcely be called colonies.

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  • In April 1898, while with his fleet at Hong Kong, he was notified by cable that war had begun between the United States and Spain, and was ordered to "capture or destroy the Spanish fleet" then in Philippine waters.

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  • He was a member (1899) of the Schurman Philippine Commission, and in 1899 and 1900 was spoken of as a possible Democratic candidate for the presidency.

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  • It includes the Sunda Islands, the Moluccas, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands, but excludes the Andaman-Nicobar group. The equator passes through the middle of the archipelago; it successively cuts Sumatra, Borneo, Celebes and Halmahera, four of the most important islands.

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  • ALIAGA, a town of the province of Nueva Ecija, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 70 m.

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  • CAVITE, a fortified seaport, the capital of the province of Cavite, Luzon, Philippine Islands, and the seat of the principal Asiatic naval station of the United States, on a forked tongue of land in Manila Bay, 8 m.

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  • In the Philippine Islands several species of Longicorns of the genus Doliops mimic hard inedible weevils (Curculionidae) of the genus Pachyrhynchus.

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  • BULACAN, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on an arm of the Pampanga delta, 22 m.

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  • ALIAGA, a town of the province of Nueva Ecija, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 70 m.

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  • The cordage works are among the largest in the world, and consume immense quantities of sisal fibre imported from Mexico and manila from the Philippine Islands; binder-twine for binding wheat is one of the principal products.

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  • In 1900 he was asked by President McKinley to accept the presidency of the Philippine Commission charged with the administration of the islands.

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  • SAN' 'MIGUEL DE MAYUMO, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, about 40 m.

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  • The Philippine Islands lie between 5° and 20° N., between Borneo and southern China.

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  • BINMALEY, a town of the province of Pangasinfin, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the delta of the Agno river, about 5 m.

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  • LIGAO, a town near the centre of the province of Albay, Luzon, Philippine Islands, close to the left bank of a tributary of the Bicol river, and on the main road through the valley.

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  • DAGUPAN, a town and the most important commercial centre of the province of Pangasinan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on a branch of the Agno river near its entrance into the Gulf of Lingayen, 1 20 m.

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  • BALIUAG, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Quingua river, 29 m.

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  • Bering Sea is bounded by the Alaskan Peninsula and the chain of the Aleutian Islands; the sea of Okhotsk is enclosed by the peninsula of Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands; the Sea of Japan is shut off by Sakhalin Island, the Japanese Islands and the peninsula of Korea; the Yellow Sea is an opening between the coast of China and Korea; the China Sea lies between the Asiatic continent and the island of Formosa, the Philippine group, Palawan and Borneo.

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  • BALIUAG, a town of the province of Bulacan, Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the Quingua river, 29 m.

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