Philip sentence example

philip
  • The court at which he grew up was the focus of great activities, for Philip, by war and diplomacy, was raising Youth.
    2
    0
  • Another brother, Philip Livingston (1716-1778), was also prominent as a leader of the New York Whigs or Patriots.
    1
    0
  • Charles's sons Robert and Philip landed in Sicily, but after capturing Catania were defeated by Frederick, Philip being taken prisoner (1299), while several Calabrian towns were captured by the Sicilians.
    1
    0
  • He claimed to be recognized as guardian of his young son Philip and as regent of the Netherlands, but some of the states refused to agree to his demands and disorder was general.
    1
    0
  • Having crushed a rebellion at Utrecht, he compelled the burghers of Ghent to restore Philip to him in 1485, and returning to Germany was chosen king of the Romans, or German king, at Frankfort on the 16th of February 1486, and crowned at Aix-la-Chapelle on the 9th of the following April.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1494 he was again in the Netherlands, where he led an expedition against the rebels of Gelderland, assisted Perkin Warbeck to make a descent upon England, and formally handed over the government of the Low Countries to Philip. His attention was next turned to Italy, and, alarmed at the progress of Charles VIII.
    0
    0
  • It is at this period that Ranke believes Maximilian to have entertained the idea of a universal monarchy; but whatever hopes he may have had were shattered by the death of his son Philip and the rupture of the treaty of Blois.
    0
    0
  • Their first and most notable victim was Philip, the saintly metropolitan of Moscow, who was strangled for condemning the oprichina as an unchristian institution, and refusing to bless the tsar (1569).
    0
    0
  • Ivan had stopped at Tver, to murder St Philip, while on his way to destroy the second wealthiest city in his tsardom - Great Novgorod.
    0
    0
  • The same society which produced his infamous favourites also produced St Philip of Moscow, and by refusing to listen to St Philip Ivan sank below even the not very lofty moral standard of his own age.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • His great-grandson, Charles, son of Philip of Artois, count of Eu, and Marie of Berry, played a conspicuous part in the Hundred Years' War.
    0
    0
  • Crossing the Murray at Albury, the explorers, bearing to the south-west, skirted the western shore of Port Philip and reached the sea-coast near where the town of Geelong now stands.
    0
    0
  • The foundation of the Burgundian r ule in the Netherlands was laid by the succession of Y Philip the Bold to the counties of Flanders and Artois in 1384 in right of his wife Margaret de Male.
    0
    0
  • In 1404 Antony, Philip's second son (killed at Agincourt 1415), became duke of Brabant by bequest of his great-aunt Joan.
    0
    0
  • The consolidation of the Burgundian power was effected by Philip the Good, grandson of Philip the Bold, in his long and successful reign of 48 years, 1419-1467.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • On the death in 1430 of his cousin Philip, duke of Brabant, he took possession of Brabant and Limburg; the duchy of Luxemburg he acquired by purchase, 1 443.
    0
    0
  • Philip did not live to see Gelderland and Liege pass definitively under his rule; it was reserved for his son, Charles the Bold, to crush the independence of Liege (1468) and to incorporate Gelderland in his dominions (1473).
    0
    0
  • Their strength had been seriously weakened by the overthrow of Roosebeke, but Philip on his accession found them once more advancing rapidly in power and prosperity.
    0
    0
  • On this matter Philip would brook no opposition.
    0
    0
  • The splendour and luxury of the court of Philip surpassed that of any contemporary sovereign.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Before the accession of Charles, the only son of Philip, two steps had been taken of great importance in the direction of unification.
    0
    0
  • Philip, surnamed the Fair, was fifteen years of age, and his accession was welcomed by the Netherlanders with whom Maximilian had never been popular.
    0
    0
  • In 1496 Philip married Joanna of Aragon, who in 1500 became heiress apparent to Castile and Aragon.
    0
    0
  • Philip's reign in the Netherlands was chiefly noteworthy for his efforts for the revival of trade with England.
    0
    0
  • On the death of Queen Isabel, Philip and Joanna succeeded to the crown of Castile and took up their residence in their new kingdom (January 1506).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A few months later Philip unexpectedly died at Burgos (September 25th).
    0
    0
  • In 1548 Charles laid before the states a scheme for making the Netherlands an integral part of the empire under the name of the Circle of Burgundy; but the refusal of the German Electors to make his only son Philip king of the Romans led him to abandon the project, which was never renewed.
    0
    0
  • Deputies Philip and was able to hand over the country to his son Philip Joanna.
    0
    0
  • The terms of the treaty of CateauCambresis (February 1559) were entirely favourable to Philip. Internal difficulties, however, confronted him.
    0
    0
  • As a thorough Spaniard who did not even understand the language of his Netherland subjects Philip was from the first distrusted and his acts regarded with suspicion.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The most serious difficulty with which Margaret had to deal arose from the attitude of the great nobles, and among these especially of William (the " Silent ") of Nassau, prince of Orange, Lamoral, count of Egmont, and Philip de Montmorency, count of Hoorn.
    0
    0
  • At last Philip unwillingly gave way, and he secretly suggested to the cardinal that he should ask permission from the regent to visit his mother at Besancon.
    0
    0
  • The Council of Trent had recently brought its long labours to a close (December 4, 1563), and Philip resolved to enforce its decrees throughout his dominions.
    0
    0
  • Philip was inexorable.
    0
    0
  • At their instance, and carrying with them instructions from the regent and the council, the marquis of Berghen and Hoorn's brother (the lord of Montigny) were persuaded to go to Spain and lay before Philip the serious character of the crisis.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Philip received them courteously, but took care that neither of them should return home.
    0
    0
  • The regent was alienated from the popular leaders, and was no longer disposed to help William of Orange, Egmont, and Hoorn to secure a mitigation of religious persecution; and the heart of Philip was hardened in its resolve to exterminate heresy in the Netherlands.
    0
    0
  • But Philip's preparations were now complete, and Alva set out from Italy at the head of a force of some io,000 veteran troops, Spaniards and Italians, afterwards increased by a body of Germans, with which, after marching through Burgundy, Lorraine and Luxemburg, he reached the Netherlands (August 8), and made his entry into Brussels a fortnight later.
    0
    0
  • A few weeks later his eldest son, Philip William, count of Buren, a student at the university of Louvain, was kidnapped and carried off to Madrid.
    0
    0
  • Already at his summons the states of Holland had Orange takes up met at Dort (July 15) under the presidency of Philip his resi- de Marnix, lord of Sainte Aldegonde, and they had deuce at unanimously recognized William as their lawful stadt- Delft.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Meanwhile Philip had appointed his natural brother, Don John of Austria, to be governor-general in the place of Requesens.
    0
    0
  • Deeply ..Per- ratified by Philip a few weeks later.
    0
    0
  • But Philip had now become thoroughly alarmed, and he despatched Alexander Farnese, son of the duchess of Parma, to join his uncle Don John with a veteran force of 20,000 troops.
    0
    0
  • Philip immediately appointed Alexander Farnese to the vacant post.
    0
    0
  • It was introduced into England by Philip Miller about 1 735, and is now common in parks and plantations, where it seems to flourish in nearly all soils.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He is said to have baptized the emperor Philip and his son, to have done some building in the catacombs, to have improved the organization of the church in Rome, to have appointed officials to register the deeds of the martyrs, and to have founded several churches in France.
    0
    0
  • The Escurial was built in honour of St Lawrence by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • This family quarrel occasioned the intervention of Philip Augustus, king of France, who succeeded in possessing himself of a large part of the country, which was annexed to the royal domains under the name of Terre d'Auvergne.
    0
    0
  • A little later Lingen was sold to the emperor Charles V., from whom it passed to his son, Philip II.
    0
    0
  • In 1596 Porto Longone was taken by Philip III.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was rebuilt by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • After quarrelling with the French king, Philip le Bel, he fell into the hands of the Colonna family at Anagni, and died, either of the violence he there received or of mortification, in October 1303.
    0
    0
  • In 1556 Philip II., by the abdication of his father Charles V., became king of Spain.
    0
    0
  • But the princes of the house of Savoy were a race of warriors; and what Emmanuel Philibert lost as sovereign he regained as captain of adventure in the service of his cousin Philip II.
    0
    0
  • Emmanuel Philibert was succeeded by his son Charles Emmanuel I., who married Catherine, a daughter of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • In order to secure this territory, he went to war with Philip III.
    0
    0
  • Philip founded the Bourbon line of Spanish kings, renouncing in Italy all that his Habsburg predecessors had gained.
    0
    0
  • After this marriage Philip broke the peace of Europe by invading Sardinia.
    0
    0
  • Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla were formed into a duchy for Don Philip, brother of Charles III.
    0
    0
  • With his mercenaries behind him he met with some small successes in his fight for Normandy, but on the 27th of July he and his ally, the emperor Otto IV., met with a crushing defeat at Bouvines at the hands of Philip Augustus, and even the king himself was compelled to recognise that his hopes of recovering Normandy were at an end.
    0
    0
  • Capturing Rochester castle, John met with some other successes, and the disheartened barons invited Louis, son of Philip Augustus of France and afterwards king as Louis VIII., to take the English crown.
    0
    0
  • During the Thirty Years' War the elector Philip Christopher von Sotern favoured France, and accepted French protection in 1631.
    0
    0
  • In the year named the secular courts complained to the king, Philip of Valois, of the encroachments of the courts Christian.
    0
    0
  • It is ornamented with the arms of Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy, and must have been cast between 1419 and 1467.
    0
    0
  • The earliest charter to the citizens of Ghent was that granted by Count Philip of Flanders between 1169 and 1191.
    0
    0
  • Far more comprehensive was the second charter, granted by Philip's widow Mathilda, after his death on crusade in 1191, as the price paid for the faithfulness of the city to her cause.
    0
    0
  • The constitution and liberties of the city, which survived its incorporation in Burgundy, were lost for a time as a result of the unsuccessful rising against Duke Philip the Good (1450).
    0
    0
  • He was equally loyal to his son, Philip II.
    0
    0
  • About 245 the emperor Philip the Arabian entrusted him with an important command on the Danube, and in 249 (or end of 248), having been sent to put down a revolt of the troops in Moesia and Pannonia, he was forced to assume the imperial dignity.
    0
    0
  • He still protested his loyalty to Philip, but the latter advanced against him and was slain near Verona.
    0
    0
  • Philip Cluver's Introductio in geographiam universam tam veterem quam novam was published in 1624.
    0
    0
  • The expedition, consisting of the " Dolphin " commanded by Wallis, and the " Swallow " under Captain Philip Carteret, sailed in September 1766, but the ships were separated on entering the Pacific from the Strait of Magellan.
    0
    0
  • Athens, the headquarters of the Mithradatic cause, was taken and sacked in 86; and in the same year, at Chaeroneia, the scene of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • But Philip Howard, the son and heir, succeeded to the ancient earldom of Arundel in 1580, on the death of his maternal grandfather, while the Lord Lumley, his uncle by marriage, surrendered to him his life interest in the castle and honour of Arundel.
    0
    0
  • The ill fate of the Howards seemed to be appeased by the death of Philip, earl of Arundel.
    0
    0
  • In the first year of James I., Thomas, the young son of Earl Philip, was restored in blood and given the titles of Arundel and Surrey.
    0
    0
  • William Howard, Viscount Stafford, was the fifth son of Thomas, earl of Arundel, and grandson of Philip the prisoner.
    0
    0
  • The real conquest of Uruguay was begun under Philip III.
    0
    0
  • Such are the Philippovsti, founded by one Philip (who burned himself alive for Christ's sake in 1 743), who have exalted self-immolation into a principle; the Stranniki (pilgrims) and Byeguni (runners), who interpret Matt.
    0
    0
  • He lost his place owing to a reduction of the duke's establishment, and for several years he lived obscurely; but by good fortune he succeeded in persuading Maria de Uceda, one of the ladiesin-waiting of Mariana, second wife of Philip IV., to marry him.
    0
    0
  • In the following year he conducted the negotiations for the marriage of Mary of England and Philip II.
    0
    0
  • In April 1 559 Granvella was one of the Spanish commissioners who arranged the peace of Cateau Cambresis, and on Philip's withdrawal from the Netherlands in August of the same year he was appointed prime minister to the regent, Margaret of Parma.
    0
    0
  • The following six years were spent in comparative quiet, broken, however, by a visit to Rome in 1565; but in 1570 Granvella, at the call of Philip, resumed public life by accepting another mission to Rome.
    0
    0
  • He was summoned to Madrid in 1575 by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • The idea of writing memoirs was dismissed in favour of the more elaborate form, and in November 1855 the first two volumes of his uncompleted History of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • A slight attack of apoplexy on the 4th of February 1858 foretold the end, though he persevered with the preparation of the third volume of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • It was cultivated in England in the 17th century, and the name C. lusitanica was given by Philip Miller, the curator of the Chelsea Physick garden, in 1768, in reference to its supposed Portuguese origin.
    0
    0
  • He tried to mediate between his brother Philip the Bold of Burgundy and his nephew Louis, duke of Orleans, and later between John "sans Peur" of Burgundy and Orleans.
    0
    0
  • After taking his doctorate at Evora, he was named by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • James caused it to be burned by the common hangman, and forbade its perusal under the 'severest penalties, complaining bitterly at the same time to Philip III.
    0
    0
  • Gregory founded the Congregation of the Propaganda, encouraged missions, fixed the order to be observed in conclaves, and canonized Ignatius Loyola, Francis Xavier, Philip Neri and Theresa de Jesus.
    0
    0
  • After the departure of Philip, Conrad fomented the opposition of the French to Richard, and even intrigued with Saladin against him.
    0
    0
  • Philip, who had been left in charge of Palestine pending the decision and had won the respect of Varus, became tetrarch of Batanaea, Trachonitis and Auranitis, with ioo talents.
    0
    0
  • After receiving from Queen Elizabeth a patent for colonization in the New World, Sir Walter Raleigh, in April 1584, sent Philip Amadas, or Amidas (1S501618), and Arthur Barlowe (c. 1550 - c. 1620) to discover in the region bordering on Florida a suitable location for a colony.
    0
    0
  • His first literary work, except the bombastic but eloquent Essai sur le despotisme (Neufchatel, 1 775), was a translation of Robert Watson's Philip II., done in Holland with the help of Durival; his Considerations sur l'ordre de Cincinnatus (London, 1788) was based on a pamphlet by Aedanus Burke (1743-1802), of South Carolina, who opposed the aristocratic tendencies of the Society of the Cincinnati, and the notes to it were by Target;, his financial writings were suggested by the Genevese exile, Claviere.
    0
    0
  • Philip certainly possessed more energy, both mental and physical, than his father.
    0
    0
  • When, in 1643, the disasters falling on the monarchy on all sides led to the dismissal of Olivares, Philip had lost the power to devote himself to hard work.
    0
    0
  • The king of Spain, Philip IV., received the author coldly, and it is said even tried to suppress his book, fearing that the Portuguese, who had just revolted from Spain (1640), would profit by its information.
    0
    0
  • He was the author of two text-books on them - one an Elementary Treatise on Quaternions (1867), written with the advice of Hamilton, though not published till after his death, and the other an Introduction to Quaternions (1873), in which he was aided by Professor Philip Kelland (1808-1879), who had been one of his teachers at Edinburgh.
    0
    0
  • He had also read a great deal of history in English - Robertson's histories, Hume, Gibbon, Robert Watson's Philip II.
    0
    0
  • The founder Seleucus (surnamed for later generations Nicator) was a Macedonian, the son of Antiochus, one of Philip's generals.
    0
    0
  • Epiphanes succeeded to the Egyptian throne, and Antiochus concluded a secret pact with Philip of Macedonia for the partition of the Ptolemaic possessions.
    0
    0
  • Epiphanes Philadelpiius (reigned during 95), Philip I.
    0
    0
  • Dionysus Epiphanes (reigned 86?-85?), and lastly Philip II., the son of Philip I., who appears momentarily on the stage in the last days of confusion.
    0
    0
  • About the same time Edward Bruce took Rutherglen and laid siege to Stirling, whose governor, Sir Philip de Mowbray, agreed to capitulate if not relieved before the 24th of June 1314.
    0
    0
  • As he had formerly had dealings with the house of Alexander Severus, so now he entered into a correspondence with the emperor Philip the Arabian and his wife Severa.
    0
    0
  • The principal apologetic work of Origen is his book Kara KeXuov (eight books), written at Caesarea in the time of Philip the Arabian.
    0
    0
  • Gonzago, sensible of his secretary's abilities, commended him to Philip II.
    0
    0
  • This charge he resigned in the next year, and, after making arrangements for the protection of his northern diocese from an expected inroad of the Scots, he proceeded in July 1336 to France to attempt a settlement of the claims in dispute between Edward and Philip. In the next year he served on three commissions for the defence of the northern counties.
    0
    0
  • Attempts were made to seize Tyndale at Worms, but he found refuge at Marburg with Philip, landgrave of Hesse.
    0
    0
  • It was the period of the agitation for the abolition of slavery in England, where Philip's charges against the colonists and the colonial government found powerful support.
    0
    0
  • One of Philip's ideals was the curbing of colonial "aggression" by the creation of a belt of native states around Cape Colony.
    0
    0
  • In Sir Benjamin D'Urban Philip found a governor anxious to promote the interests of the natives.
    0
    0
  • When however at the close of the Kaffir War of 1834-35 D'Urban annexed the country up to the Kei River, Philip's hostility was aroused.
    0
    0
  • Philip was by nature dull and phlegmatic. He had learnt morality from Fenelon's teaching, and showed himself throughout his life strongly adverse to the moral laxity of his grandfather and of most of the princes of his time.
    0
    0
  • If he had a strong passion, it was to provide for his succession to the throne of France, if his nephew, Louis XV., should die, and he indulged in many intrigues against the house of Orleans, whose right to the succession was supposed to be secured by Philip's solemn renunciation of all claim to the French throne, when he became king of Spain.
    0
    0
  • But Louis died in a few months, and Philip returned to the throne.
    0
    0
  • The best account of Philip's character and reign is still that given by Coxe in his Memoirs of the Kings of Spain of the House of Bourbon (London, 1815).
    0
    0
  • With the help of these troops the Phocian League at first carried the war into Boeotia and Thessaly, and though driven out of the latter country by Philip of Macedon, maintained itself for ten years, until the exhaustion of the temple treasures and the treachery of its leaders placed it at Philip's mercy.
    0
    0
  • In 339 the Phocians began to rebuild their cities; in the following year they fought against Philip at Chaeronea.
    0
    0
  • In 1689 it was given to Philip William, a younger son of the elector of Brandenburg, Frederick William, and he and his successors called themselves margrave of BrandenburgSchwedt.
    0
    0
  • Philip VI., the first of the Valois kings, was a son of Charles I., count of Valois and grandson of King Philip III.
    0
    0
  • For two years the duchy was in the hands of the crown, but in 1363, the second ducal house, also Capetian, was founded by Philip the Bold, son of John II., king of France.
    0
    0
  • This house merged in that of Valois in 1383, by the marriage of Margaret, daughter of Louis, count of Artois, with Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy.
    0
    0
  • In 1284 Jeanne, daughter and heiress of Henry I., king of Navarre, married Philip IV., king of France, and the two kingdoms were united until Philip of Valois became king of France as Philip VI.
    0
    0
  • Several of his works have been translated into English by Philip Wicksteed.
    0
    0
  • Maurice, who had on the death of his elder brother Philip William, in February 1618, become prince of Orange, was now supreme in the state, but during the remainder of his life he sorely missed the wise counsels of the experienced Oldenbarneveldt.
    0
    0
  • Repeated appeals had been sent to the West from the beginning of the Egyptian affair (1163) onwards; while in 1184-1185 a great mission, on which the patriarch of Jerusalem and the masters of the Templars and the Hospitallers were all present, came to France and England, and offered the crown of Jerusalem to Philip Augustus and Henry II.
    0
    0
  • The very means which Philip Augustus and Henry II.
    0
    0
  • War had indeed disturbed the original agreement of Gisors between Philip Augustus and Henry II., but a new agreement was made between Henry's successor, Richard I., and the French king at Nonancourt (December 1189), by which the two monarchs were to meet at Vezelay next year, and then follow the sea route to the Holy Land together.
    0
    0
  • The enforced inactivity of a whole winter was the mother of disputes and bad blood; and when Philip sailed for the Holy Land, at the end of March 1191, the failure of the Crusade was already decided.
    0
    0
  • Richard soon followed; but while Philip sailed straight for Acre, Richard occupied himself by the way in conquering Cyprus - partly out of knight-errantry, and in order to avenge an insult offered to his betrothed wife Berengaria by the despot of the island, partly perhaps out of policy, and in order to provide a basis of supplies and of operations for the armies attempting to recover Palestine.
    0
    0
  • In these dissensions it was inevitable that Philip Augustus and Richard I., already discordant, should take contrary sides; and while Richard naturally sided with Guy de Lusignan, who came from his own county of Poitou, Philip as naturally sided with Conrad.
    0
    0
  • In the same year, however, Isaac was dethroned by his brother, Alexius III.; but Henry married Isaac's daughter Irene to his brother, Philip of Swabia, and thus attempted to give the Hohenstaufen a new title and a valid claim against the usurper Alexius.
    0
    0
  • Philip of Swabia, engaged in a struggle with the papacy, found Innocent III.
    0
    0
  • On the one hand, the death of the count of Champagne (May 1201) had induced the crusaders to elect as their leader Boniface of Montferrat, the brother of Conrad; and Boniface was the cousin of Philip, and interested in Constantinople, where not only Conrad, but another brother as well, had served, and suffered for their service at the hands of their masters.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand Alexius, the son of the dethroned Isaac Angelus, was related to Philip through his marriage with Irene; and Alexius had escaped to the German court to urge the restoration of his father.
    0
    0
  • On Christmas day 1201, Philip, Alexius and Boniface all met at Hagenau 1 and formulated (one may suppose) a plan for the diversion of the Crusade.
    0
    0
  • The latter applied to Sir Philip Wodehouse at the Cape for protection, but he declined to interfere.
    0
    0
  • The last and the worst of the Cid ballads are those which betray by their frigid conceits and feeble mimicry of the antique the false taste and essentially unheroic spirit of the age of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • He was married first of all to a daughter of Aretas, the Arabian king; but, making the acquaintance of Herodias, the wife of his brother Philip (not the tetrarch), during a visit to Rome, he was fascinated by her and arranged to marry her.
    0
    0
  • Becket had not shrunk from excommunicating a tenant in chief who had encroached upon the lands of Canterbury, and had protected against the royal courts a clerk named Philip de Brois who was charged with an assault upon a royal officer.
    0
    0
  • When Philip of Macedon began to grow.
    0
    0
  • This ideal, when put forward by the consummate eloquence of Demosthenes and other orators, created great enthusiasm among the Athenians, who at times displayed all their old vigour in opposing Philip, notably in the decisive campaign of 338.
    0
    0
  • Philip and Alexander, who sincerely admired Athenian culture and courted a zealous co-operation against Persia, treated the conquered city with marked favour.
    0
    0
  • By his wife, Eurydice, he had three sons, the youngest of whom was the famous Philip of Macedon.
    0
    0
  • His descent from the Hohenstaufen through his mother, a daughter of the emperor Philip, gave him claims to represent the Swabian line.
    0
    0
  • Bibelwerk has been translated, enlarged and revised under the general editorship of Dr Philip Schaff.
    0
    0
  • His tractate (1542) against the permission of bigamy in the case of Philip of Hesse was not allowed to be printed (the manuscript is in the Heidelberg university library).
    0
    0
  • Having been fortified the town stood several sieges, specially during the wars of freedom waged by the Dutch, the most celebrated fight under its walls being the one in September 1586 when Sir Philip Sidney was mortally wounded.
    0
    0
  • In 1608 she appeared at court, where her beauty soon attracted admiration and became the theme of the poets, her suitors including the dauphin, Maurice, prince of Orange, Gustavus Adolphus, Philip III.
    0
    0
  • She had thirteen children - Frederick Henry, drgwned at sea in 1629; Charles Louis, elector palatine, whose daughter married Philip, duke of Orleans, and became the ancestress of the elder and Roman Catholic branch of the royal family of England; Elizabeth, abbess and friend of Descartes; Prince Rupert and Prince Maurice, who died unmarried; Louisa, abbess; Edward, who married Anne de Gonzaga, "princesse palatine," and had children; Henrietta Maria, who married Count Sigismund Ragotzki but died childless; Philip and Charlotte, who died childless; Sophia, who married Ernest Augustus, elector of Hanover, and was mother of George I.
    0
    0
  • He also arrested Philip, duke of Orleans, who had visited France in disguise.
    0
    0
  • His reputation for learning was very high, and in 1302 he was summoned to Rome by Boniface VIII., to assist in the controversy then being carried on with Philip of France.
    0
    0
  • In 1509 William's young son, Philip, became landgrave, and by his vigorous personality brought his country into prominence during the religious troubles of the 16th century.
    0
    0
  • Following the example of his ancestors Philip cared for education and the general welfare of his land, and the Protestant university of Marburg, founded in 1527, owes to him its origin.
    0
    0
  • The work, begun by his predecessors, of consolidating the kingdom internally and making its army a fighting-machine of high power was com pleted by the genius of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • At the synod of Corinth (338) Philip was solemnly declared the captain-general (o-TpaTsyis auroKpitTCep) of the Hellenes against the Great King.
    0
    0
  • The attack on Persia was delayed by the assassination of Philip in 336, and it needed some fighting before the young Alexander had made his position secure in Macedonia and Greece.
    0
    0
  • Philip's bimetallic system, which had attempted artificially to fix the value of silver in spite of the great depreciation of gold consequent upon the working of the Pangaean mines, was abandoned.
    0
    0
  • Alexander's gold coinage, indeed (possibly not struck till after the invasion of Asia), follows in weight that of Philip's staters; but he seems at once to have adopted for his silver coins (of a smaller denomination than the tetradrachm) the Euboic-Attic standard, instead of the Phoenician, which had been Philip's.
    0
    0
  • King Philip had been murdered by Olympias in 317; the young Alexander by Cassander in 310; Heracles, the illegitimate son of Alexander the Great, by Polyperchon in 309.
    0
    0
  • The prince of Conde sustained a severe repulse under its walls in 1638, and it was on this occasion that the town received from Philip IV.
    0
    0
  • In 1 434 he received a gift from Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy, for his military services, but on the conclusion of the peace of Arras in the next year he abandoned soldiering for diplomacy.
    0
    0
  • During these years Chastellain had ample opportunity of obtaining an intimate knowledge of French affairs, but on the further breach between the two princes, Chastellain left the French service to enter Philip's household.
    0
    0
  • In 1767 he was appointed to succeed Shakelton as principal painter to the king; and so fully employed was he on the royal portraits which the king was in the habit of presenting to ambassadors and colonial governors, that he was forced to take advantage of the services of a host of assistants - of whom David Martin and Philip Reinagle are the best known.
    0
    0
  • In 1800, when a frost-bitten thumb gave him great pain and much fear for his life, his friend, Rev. Philip Oliver of Chester, died, leaving him director and one of three trustees over his chapel at Boughton; and this added much to his anxiety.
    0
    0
  • In Plaquemines there is practically no cultivable land below Forts Jackson and St Philip, and above there is only a narrow strip.
    0
    0
  • Among the most famous were the expedition undertaken by Diego de Ordaz, whose lieutenant Martinez claimed to have been rescued from shipwreck, conveyed inland, and entertained at Omoa by "El Dorado" himself (1531); and the journeys of Orellana (1540-1541), who passed down the Rio Napo to the valley of the Amazon; that of Philip von Hutten (1541-1545), who led an exploring party from Coro on the coast of Caracas; and of Gonzalo Ximenes de Quesada (1569), who started from Santa Fe de Bogota.
    0
    0
  • Philip was defeated and slain in a battle near Verona.
    0
    0
  • According to the usual tradition, which there seems no sufficient reason to reject, the Escorial owes its existence to a vow made by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • Each successive occupant of the Spanish throne has done something, however slight, to the restoration or adornment of Philip's convent-palace, and Ferdinand VII.
    0
    0
  • The most interesting room in the palace is Philip II.'s cell, from which through an opening in the wall he could see the celebration of mass while too ill to leave his bed.
    0
    0
  • The library, situated above the principal portico, was at one time one of the richest in Europe, comprising the king's own collection, the extensive bequest of Diego de Mendoza, Philip's ambassador to Rome, the spoils of the emperor of Morocco, Muley Zidan (1603-1628) and various contributions from convents, churches and cities.
    0
    0
  • Besides several interesting churches and palaces, it contains a fine arch, erected in 1595 in honour of Philip II., and partly constructed of inscribed Roman masonry.
    0
    0
  • Again, in the time of Philip of Macedon we find Cersobleptes, who ruled the south-eastern portion of the country, exercising an important influence on the policy of Athens.
    0
    0
  • This he was compelled to renounce upon the marriage of Joan to Philip the Fair, the heir to the crown of France.
    0
    0
  • He was employed by his brother as a mediator with Philip the Fair in 1293-1294.
    0
    0
  • When Philip's court pronounced that the king of England had forfeited Gascony, Edmund renounced his homage to Philip and withdrew with his wife to England.
    0
    0
  • At Rome he joined the Oratory in 1557 under St Philip Neri and succeeded him as superior in 1593.
    0
    0
  • Baronius is best known by his Annales Ecclesiastici, undertaken by the order of St Philip as an answer to the Magdeburg Centuries.
    0
    0
  • After nearly thirty years of lecturing on the history of the Church at the Vallicella and being trained by St Philip as a great man for a great work, he began to write, and produced twelve folios (1588-1607).
    0
    0
  • Enguerrand III., the Great, fought at Bouvines under Philip Augustus (1214), but later he was accused of aiming at the crown of France, and he took part in the disturbances which arose during the regency of Blanche of Castile.
    0
    0
  • Judge Chase was defended by the ablest lawyers in the country, including Luther Martin, Robert Goodloe Harper (1765-1825), Philip Barton Key (1757-1815), Charles Lee (1758-1815), and Joseph Hopkinson (1770-1842).
    0
    0
  • The place was taken by Philip Augustus in 1205 after a year's siege.
    0
    0
  • At the close of King Philip's War in 1676, Mount Hope Neck (which had been the seat of the vanquished sachem), with most of what is now the township of Bristol, was awarded to Plymouth Colony.
    0
    0
  • No less close affinities exist between our Acts and the Acts of Thomas, Andrew and Philip. In the case of the Acts of Thomas the problem is complicated, sometimes the Acts of Peter seem dependent on the Acts of Thomas, and sometimes the converse.
    0
    0
  • In the oldest register of Philip Augustus counts are reckoned with dukes in the first of the five orders into which the nobles are divided, but the list includes, besides such almost sovereign rulers as the counts of Flanders and Champagne, immediate vassals of much less importance - such as the counts of Soissons and Dammartin - and even one mediate vassal, the count of Bar-sur-Seine.
    0
    0
  • The citadel, south-west of the city, was constructed by order of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • At this time the colonies, although not yet independent of supplies from the mother country, were in a flourishing condition; but the usurpation of the crown of Portugal by Philip II.
    0
    0
  • As early as 1618 a code of laws for the regulation of the mining industry had been drawn up by Philip III., the executive and judicial functions in the mining districts being vested in a provedor, and the fiscal in a treasurer, who received the royal fifths and superintended the weighing of all the gold, rendering a yearly account of all discoveries and produce.
    0
    0
  • In 1076 he invaded Brittany to get possession of the fugitive earl of Norfolk; but Philip of France came to the aid of the Bretons, and William gave way before his suzerain.
    0
    0
  • Robert fled from Normandy and after aimless wanderings obtained from King Philip the castle of Gerberoi, in the Beauvaisis, from which he harassed the Norman marches.
    0
    0
  • There Heracleon, the court favourite and murderer of Antiochus Grypus, was born and made himself a principality (96 B.C.); and there the son of the latter king besieged his brother Philip in the last struggle for the heritage of Seleucus.
    0
    0
  • Adjoining are two smaller parks, Cook Park and Philip Park, while north of these stretches the Domain and the botanical gardens.
    0
    0
  • The war opened disastrously for the French, but by 1642, when Richelieu died, his armies - risen from 12,000 men in 1621 to 150,000 in 1638 - had conquered Roussillon from Spain; they held Catalonia, which had revolted from Philip IV.
    0
    0
  • Theobald I., count of Bar, was an ally of Philip Augustus, as was also his son Henry II., who distinguished himself at the battle of Bouvines in 1214.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Germany, he became privy councillor to the elector palatine Philip, whom he assisted in bringing the university of Heidelberg to the height of its fame.
    0
    0
  • And now the proclamation of Pretorius was followed by protests on the part of the British high commissioner, Sir Philip Wodehouse, as well as on the part of the consul-general for Portugal in South Africa.
    0
    0
  • In 1732 there was born to him, by a certain Mlle du Bouchet, the son, Philip Stanhope, for whose advice and instruction were afterwards written the famous Letters.
    0
    0
  • In 1768 died Philip Stanhope, the child of so many hopes.
    0
    0
  • Chesterfield, who had no children by his wife, Melusina von Schulemberg, illegitimate daughter of George I., whom he married in 1733, adopted his godson, a distant cousin, named Philip Stanhope (1755-1815), as heir to the title and estates.
    0
    0
  • Otto refused to reward Henry for this support, so in 1204 he assisted his rival, the German king Philip., but returned to Otto's side after Philip's murder in 1208.
    0
    0
  • It was Philip William of Neuburg, the son of Wolfgang William, who became elector palatine in succession to Charles in 1685.
    0
    0
  • The French king's brother, Philip, duke of Orleans, had married Charlotte Elizabeth, a sister of the late elector Charles, and consequently the French king claimed a part of Charles's lands in 1680.
    0
    0
  • His troops took Heidelberg and devastated the Palatinate, while Philip William took refuge in Vienna, where he died in 1690.
    0
    0
  • Philip William, however, gave equal rights to all his subjects, but under his son and successor, the elector John William, the Protestants were deprived of various civil rights until the intervention of Prussia and of Brunswick in 1705 gave them some redress.
    0
    0
  • The next elector, a brother of the last one, was Charles Philip, who removed his capital from Heidelberg to Mannheim in 1720.
    0
    0
  • In May 1314, by order of King Philip IV., she was arrested and imprisoned in the Chateau-Gaillard with her sisterin-law Marguerite, daughter of Robert II., duke of Burgundy, and wife of Louis Hutin, on the charge of adultery with two gentlemen of the royal household, Philippe and Gautier d'Aunai.
    0
    0
  • Jeanne, sister of Marguerite and wife of Philip the Tall, was also arrested for not having denounced the culprits, and imprisoned at Dourdan.
    0
    0
  • Returning to Normandy he was presented to the king by Jacques of Matignon; after he had abjured Protestantism, being again presented by Philip Desportes, abbot of Tiron, as a young man without equal for knowledge and talent, he was appointed reader to the king.
    0
    0
  • The duke married Louise Henriette de Bourbon-Conti, who bore him a son Philip (Egalite), duke of Orleans, and a daughter, who married the last duke of Bourbon.
    0
    0
  • London was then gay with pageants, but when the queen made known her intention of marrying Philip of Spain the discontent of the country found vent in the rising of Sir Thomas Wyat, and the city had to prepare itself against attack.
    0
    0
  • Locks (East London Advertiser, 1902); Philip Norman, London vanished and vanishing (1905); Records of the London Topographical Society; Monographs of the Committee for the Survey of the Memorials of Greater London.
    0
    0
  • Upon the death of Henry Stuart, Cardinal York, the last of James II.'s descendants, in 1807, the rightful occupant of the British throne according to legitimist principles was to be found among the descendants of Henrietta, daughter of Charles I., who married Philip I., duke of Orleans.
    0
    0
  • It was bestowed in 1180 on Philip Augustus of France by Philip of Alsace, as the dowry of his niece Isabella of Hainaut.
    0
    0
  • After his death, his son Philip having predeceased him (1298), Artois was adjudged to his daughter Mahaut, or Matilda, as against her nephew Robert, son of Philip, who attempted to support his claim to the countship by forged titles.
    0
    0
  • The earliest record of glass-making in the Low Countries consists in an account of payments made in 1453-1454 on behalf of Philip the Good of Burgundy to " Gossiun de Vieuglise, Maitre Vorrier de Lille " for a glass fountain and four glass plateaus.
    0
    0
  • In 1599 the privilege of making " Voires de cristal a la faschon Venise," was granted to Philippe de Gridolphi of Antwerp. In 1623 Anthony Miotti, a Muranese, addressed a petition to Philip IV.
    0
    0
  • On his death in 1189, the nobles of Anjou, Maine and Touraine refused to recognize John of England, and did homage to Arthur, who declared himself the vassal of Philip Augustus.
    0
    0
  • While Philip Augustus was invading Normandy, Arthur tried to seize Poitou.
    0
    0
  • By excommunicating Philip I.
    0
    0
  • In Burgoyne's expedition (1777) Skene and his son, Andrew Philip Skene (1753-1826), served as guides, and Skenesborough was recovered by the British after most of it had been burned by the Americans.
    0
    0
  • The prevalence of the dark English elms, first introduced into the country and planted here by order of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • It overlooks the Jardin de la Isla, a beautiful garden laid out for Philip II.
    0
    0
  • His expectations of the cardinalate were disappointed by Pius V.'s death in 1572, and Sanders spent the next few years at Madrid trying to embroil Philip II., who gave him a pension of 300 ducats, in open war with Elizabeth.
    0
    0
  • His ardent zeal was sorely tried by Philip's cautious temperament; and Sir Thomas Stukeley's projected Irish expedition, which Sanders was to have accompanied with the blessings and assistance of the pope, was diverted to Morocco where Stukeley was killed at the battle of Al Kasr al Kebir in 1578.
    0
    0
  • John endeavoured to strengthen his position by marrying his daughter Margaret to the dauphin Louis, and by betrothing his son Philip to a daughter of Charles VI.
    0
    0
  • Although he talked of helping his sovereign, his troops took no part in the battle of Agincourt (1415), where, however, two of his brothers, Anthony, duke of Brabant, and Philip, count of Nevers, fell fighting for France.
    0
    0
  • By his wife, Margaret of Bavaria, he had one son, Philip the Good, who succeeded him; and seven daughters - Margaret, who married in 1404 Louis, son of Charles VI., and in 1423 Arthur, earl of Richmond and afterwards duke of Brittany; Mary, wife of Adolph of Cleves; Catherine, promised in 1410 to a son of Louis of Anjou; Isabella, wife of Olivier de Chatillon, count of Penthievre; Joanna, who died young; Anne, who married John, duke of Bedford, in 1423; and Agnes, who married Charles I., duke of Bourbon, in 1425.
    0
    0
  • The tobacco plant itself was first brought to Europe in 1558 by Francisco Fernandes, a physician who had been sent by Philip II of Spain to investigate the products of Mexico.
    0
    0
  • Then in July 1646 Lady Dalkeith carried the princess in disguise to France, and she rejoined her mother in Paris, where her girlhood was spent and where she was educated as a Roman Catholic. Henrietta was present at the coronation of Louis XIV., and was mentioned as a possible bride for the king, but she was betrothed, not to Louis, but to his only brother Philip. After the restoration of her brother Charles II., she returned to England with her mother, but a few months later she was again in Paris, where she was married to Philip, now duke of Orleans, on the 30th of March 1661.
    0
    0
  • In 1670, at the instigation of Louis, she visited England and obtained the signature of Charles II.'s ministers to the treaty of Dover; her success in this matter greatly delighted Louis, but it did not improve her relations with Philip, who had long refused his consent to his wife's visit to England.
    0
    0
  • It is said that Philip fell in love with her in Samothrace, where they were both being initiated into the mysteries (Plutarch, Alexander, 2).
    0
    0
  • The marriage took place in 359 B.C., shortly after Philip's accession, and Alexander was born in 356.
    0
    0
  • The fickleness of Philip and the jealous temper of Olympias led to a growing estrangement, which became complete when Philip married a new wife, Cleopatra, in 337.
    0
    0
  • Alexander, who sided with his mother, withdrew, along with her, into Epirus, whence they both returned in the following year, after the assassination of Philip, which Olympias is' said to have countenanced.
    0
    0
  • In the war of the Spanish Succession he would willingly have remained neutral, but found himself between two fires, forced first to recognize Philip V., then driven by the emperor to recognize the Archduke Charles.
    0
    0
  • On the outward journey he wintered in Sicily, where he employed himself in quarrelling with Philip and in exacting satisfaction from the usurper Tancred for the dower of his widowed sister, Queen Joanna, and for his own share in the inheritance of William the Good.
    0
    0
  • Though Richard proved himself consistently the superior of Philip in the field, the difficulty of raising and paying forces to resist the French increased year by year.
    0
    0
  • During the Seven Years' War a palisaded fort was erected on the south bank of the Mohawk at the ford where Utica later sprung up. It was named Fort Schuyler, in honour of Colonel Peter Schuyler, an uncle of General Philip Schuyler.
    0
    0
  • In default of payment of arrears of rent Cosby's Manor was sold at sheriff's sale in 1792 and was bid in by General Philip Schuyler, General John Bradstreet, John Morin Scott and others for X1387, or about 15 cents an acre.
    0
    0
  • After having withstood an attempt under Epaminondas to restore it to the Lacedaemonians, Byzantium joined with Rhodes, Chios, Cos, and Mausolus, king of Caria, in throwing off the yoke of Athens, but soon after sought Athenian assistance when Philip of Macedon, having overrun Thrace, advanced against it.
    0
    0
  • The Athenians under Chares suffered a severe defeat from Amyntas, the Macedonian admiral, but in the following year gained a decisive victory under Phocion and compelled Philip to raise the siege.
    0
    0
  • After the retreat of the Gauls Byzantium rendered considerable services to Rome in the contests with Philip II., Antiochus and Mithradates.
    0
    0
  • In war they trembled at the sound of a trumpet, in peace they quaked before the shouting of their own demagogues; and during the assault of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • In the 4th century it continued its traditional policy, but in 338 surrendered to Philip II.
    0
    0
  • It was first improved by Baldwin IV., count of Flanders, in 997, and afterwards, in 1224, was regularly fortified by Philip Hurepel, count of Boulogne.
    0
    0
  • Philip Schuyler served in the Provincial Army during the Seven Years' War, first as captain and later as deputy-commissary with the rank of major, taking part in the battles of Lake George (1755), Oswego River (1756), Ticonderoga (1758) and Fort Frontenac (1758).
    0
    0
  • See Bayard Tuckerman, Life of General Philip Schuyler (New York, 1903).
    0
    0
  • In the interior there is a fine organ and a quantity of statuary, and the vaults contain the remains of Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, and Anne of Burgundy, daughter of John the Fearless.
    0
    0
  • This building contains an archaeological museum with a collection of Roman stone monuments; the archives of the town; and the principal museum, which, besides valuable paintings and other works of art, contains the magnificent tombs of Philip the Bold and John the Fearless, dukes of Burgundy.
    0
    0
  • These were transferred from the Chartreuse of Dijon (or of Champmol), built by Philip the Bold as a mausoleum, now replaced by a lunatic asylum.
    0
    0
  • The communal privileges, conferred on the town in 1182 by Hugh III., duke of Burgundy, were confirmed by Philip Augustus in 1188, and in the 13th century the dukes took up their residence there.
    0
    0
  • The earliest critical serial, the Diario de los literatos (1737-1742), kept up at the expense of Philip V., did not long survive court favour.
    0
    0
  • Mlle de Montpensier, the heiress of Mlle de Guise, bequeathed the principality of Joinville to Philip, duke of Orleans (1693).
    0
    0
  • The fall of Olynthus (348) brought Aeschines into the political arena, and he was sent on an embassy to rouse the Peloponnesus against Philip. In 347 he was a member of the peace embassy to Philip of Macedon, who seems to have won him over entirely to his side.
    0
    0
  • This confederacy, which after many modifications and vicissitudes was finally broken up by the capture of Athens by Sparta in 404, was revived in 378-7 (the "Second Athenian Confederacy") as a protection against Spartan aggression, and lasted, at least formally, until the victory of Philip II.
    0
    0
  • Resuming operations in 354, Philip, in spite of temporary checks at the hands of Chares, and the spasmodic opposition of a VII.
    0
    0
  • In 346 the peace of Philocrates was made between the league and Philip on terms which were accepted by the Athenian Boule.
    0
    0
  • The victory of Philip at Chaeronea in 338 finally destroyed the league.
    0
    0
  • After 1776, when it was partly repaired by Colonel Elias Dayton, it was called by the continentals Fort Schuyler, in honour of General Philip Schuyler, and so is sometimes confused with (old) Fort Schuyler at Utica.
    0
    0
  • There remains, however, a letter from the king, in which Philip tells his old favourite, with frivolous ferocity, that it might be necessary to sacrifice his life in order to avert unpopularity from the royal house.
    0
    0
  • In 370 Amyntas died, and the troubled reign of Philip's eldest brother, Alexander II., was cut short in 368 by his assassination.
    0
    0
  • In 367 Philip was delivered as hostage to the Thebans, then the leading power of Greece (by whom does not seem clear).
    0
    0
  • Philip seized the throne and drove back his rivals.
    0
    0
  • The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ochrida.
    0
    0
  • Their possession was all-important for Philip, and he set there the new city, called after him, Philippi.
    0
    0
  • The work of fashioning the Macedonian army occupied Philip for the next few years, whilst hid diplomacy was busy securing partisans within the states of Greece.
    0
    0
  • In 353 Philip was ready for strong action.
    0
    0
  • Pherae called in the help of the Phocian mercenaries, who had profaned Delphi, and Philip met with a check.
    0
    0
  • This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
    0
    0
  • Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea.
    0
    0
  • From 352 to 346 Philip did not again come south.
    0
    0
  • Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his "Olympian" games at Dium.
    0
    0
  • In 347 Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes.
    0
    0
  • The time was come for Philip to assert himself in Greece, and the Phocians, who still dominated Delphi and held Thermopylae, could furnish a pretext to the champion of Pan-Hellenism and Apollo.
    0
    0
  • The Phocian mercenaries at Thermopylae were bought off and Philip crossed into central Greece.
    0
    0
  • The Pythian games of 346 were celebrated at the delivered Delphi under Philip's presidency.
    0
    0
  • Pan-Hellenic enthusiasts already saw Philip as the destined captain-general of a national crusade against Persia (Isocrates, Philippus, about 345).
    0
    0
  • In 344, or one of the following years, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic. In 342 Philip led a great expedition north "comparable to nothing in antiquity since Darius' famous march to Scythia."
    0
    0
  • In 341 his army was still campaigning in eastern Thrace, when Philip felt compelled to show his presence in Thessaly.
    0
    0
  • She now egged on the cities of the Propontis (Byzantium,Perinthus, Selymbria),who felt themselves threatened by Philip's Thracian conquests, to declare against him.
    0
    0
  • The sieges of Perinthus and Byzantium (34 o, 339) ended in Philip's meeting with a signal check, due in some measure to the help afforded the besieged cities by Athens and her allies.
    0
    0
  • Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised.
    0
    0
  • Philip's fortification of Elatea filled Athens with alarm.
    0
    0
  • Thebes was induced to join Athens; so were some of the minor Peloponnesian states, and the allies took the field against Philip. This opposition was crushed by the epoch-making battle of Chaeroneia, which left Greece at Philip's feet.
    0
    0
  • Philip returned to Macedonia to complete his preparations; an advanced force was sent into Asia in the spring of 336.
    0
    0
  • But Philip's plans were suddenly blasted by his assassination in the same year during the marriage festival of his daughter at Aegae, the old capital of Macedonia.
    0
    0
  • A special interest belongs to the Macedonian kingdom as it was shaped by Philip, since it forestalls a system which was not to find the time ripe for it in European history till many centuries later - the national kingdom quickened with the culture developed by the ancient city-states.
    0
    0
  • The national kingdoms founded by the Northern races, after the fall of the Roman Empire, under the influence of the classical tradition, are the beginnings of the modern European system; Philip of Macedon foreshadows Theodoric, Charlemagne and William the Conqueror.
    0
    0
  • It contains the Gothic tomb of Isabella of Aragon, wife of Philip III.
    0
    0
  • Montanus claimed to have a prophetic calling in the very same sense as Agabus, Judas, Silas, the daughters of Philip, Quadratus and Ammia, or as Hermas at Rome.
    0
    0
  • At a later time, when the validity of the Montanistic prophecy was called in question, the adherents of the new movement appealed explicitly to a sort of prophetic succession, in which their prophets had received the same gift which the daughters of Philip, for example, had exercised in that very country of Phrygia.
    0
    0
  • When Amadeus succeeded to the throne these were divided into the county of Savoy (his own territory), the princi pality of Piedmont ruled by his nephew Philip, prince of Achaea (a title acquired through his wife, Isabella of Villehardouin, heiress of Achaea and the Morea), and Vaud ruled by his brother Louis.
    0
    0
  • His latter years were troubled by conspiracies and dissensions on the part of the nobles and even of his own son, Philip, count of Bresse.
    0
    0
  • This led to feuds and intrigues on the part of the French king and of Philip of Bresse, and Savoy would probably have been dismembered but for the patriotic action of the States General.
    0
    0
  • Yolande died in 1472, and the regency was disputed by various claimants; Philip of Bresse having obtained it by force, he carried off Philibert, who died in 1482 at Lyons.
    0
    0
  • Charles died at an early age, and, having no male heirs, the aged Philip of Bresse succeeded, but reigned only for one year.
    0
    0
  • When the northern Netherlands revolted from Philip II.
    0
    0
  • At the same time he worked actively against the Spanish authorities, especially through Philip Nolan.
    0
    0
  • At the same time his protege, the filibusterer, Philip Nolan, was engaged in a reconnaissance for him west of the Mississippi.
    0
    0
  • This Grand Master had gained the confidence of Philip of Spain, the friendship of the viceroy of Sicily, of the pope and of the Genoese admiral, Doria.
    0
    0
  • Contributing causes were Philip's support of the Scots and Edward's alliance with the Flemish cities, which were then on bad terms with their French overlord, and the revival of Edward's claim, first made in 1328, to the French crown.
    0
    0
  • But Edward's decisive victory over the French at Crecy, in Ponthieu, on the 26th of August, where he scattered the army with which Philip VI.
    0
    0
  • He assumed the reins of government at the age of sixteen, and married Princess Anne, daughter of Philip of Orleans and Henrietta of England, and niece of Louis XIV., king of France.
    0
    0
  • On her death he married Margaret of France, sister of King Philip Augustus.
    0
    0
  • Most of them obeyed; Artabazus of Phrygia, who tried to resist and was supported by his brothersin-law, Mentor and Memnon of Rhodes, was defeated and fled to Philip of Macedon.
    0
    0
  • He deposed or killed many Greek dynasts, among them the famous Hermias of Atarneus, the protector of Aristotle, who had friendly relations with Philip (342 B.C.).
    0
    0
  • When Philip attacked Perinthus and Byzantium (340), Artaxerxes sent them support, by which they were enabled to withstand the Macedonians; Philip's antagonists in Greece, Demosthenes and his party, hoped to get subsidies from the king, but were disappointed.
    0
    0
  • His brother Philip, count of Selles and of Charost, was ambassador to Scotland, Rome, Savoy and Germany, and died in 1649.
    0
    0
  • The empress Maria and Philip of Toucy governed during his absence.
    0
    0
  • The extremity of his financial straits reduced him soon afterwards to handing over his only son Philip to merchants as a pledge for loans of money.
    0
    0
  • During the next year Baldwin and his son Philip lived on pensions from Charles.
    0
    0
  • In October 1273 Philip married Beatrice, daughter of Charles, at Foggia.
    0
    0
  • Philip received his education in Spain.
    0
    0
  • From his earliest years Philip showed himself more addicted to the desk than the saddle and to the pen than to the sword.
    0
    0
  • Philip grew up grave, self-possessed and distrustful.
    0
    0
  • Though accused of extreme licentiousness in his relations with women, and though he lived for years in adultery with Dona Maria de Osorio, Philip was probably less immoral than most kings of his time, including his father, and was rigidly abstemious in eating and drinking.
    0
    0
  • If he had not become sovereign of the Low Countries, as heir of Mary of Burgundy through his father, Philip would in all probability have devoted himself to warfare with the Turks in the Mediterranean, and to the conquest of northern Africa.
    0
    0
  • Philip was summoned in 1548 to Flanders, where he went unwillingly, and was ill regarded.
    0
    0
  • In 1554, when Charles was meditating his abdication, and wished to secure the position of his son, he summoned Philip to Flanders again, and arranged the marriage with Mary, queen of England, who was the daughter of his sister Catherine, in order to form a union of Spain, the Netherlands and England, before which France would be powerless.
    0
    0
  • The abdication of his father on the 16th of January 1556 constituted Philip sovereign of Spain with its American possessions, of the Aragonese inheritance in Italy, Naples and Sicily, of the Burgundian inheritance - the Netherlands and Franche Comte, and of the duchy of Milan, which his father separated from the empire for his benefit.
    0
    0
  • But the death of Mary of England on the 17th of November 1558 had deprived Philip of English support.
    0
    0
  • But the religious agitation was affecting his own Flemish possessions, and when Philip went back to Spain, in August 1559, he was committed to a lifelong struggle in which he could not prove victorious except by the conquest of France and England.
    0
    0
  • The conflict assumed the character of a struggle between Protestantism and Roman Catholicism, in which Philip appeared as the champion of the Church.
    0
    0
  • Philip must therefore be held primarily responsible for the insane policy which brought Spain to ruin.
    0
    0
  • In the painful episode of the imprisonment and death of his firstborn son, Don Carlos, Philip behaved honourably.
    0
    0
  • As an administrator Philip had all the vices of his type, that of the laborious, self-righteous man, who thinks he can supervise everything, is capable of endless toil, and jealous of his authority, and who therefore will let none of his servants act without his instructions.
    0
    0
  • Philip II., by Martin Hume (London, 1897), is more just in its treatment of Philip's personal character, and gives a useful bibliography.
    0
    0
  • His father, Louis XIII., had married Anne of Austria, daughter of Philip III., king of Spain, in 1615, but for twenty years the marriage had remained without issue.
    0
    0
  • He subsidized Philip II.
    0
    0
  • He is generally said to have formed the acquaintance of Sir Philip Sidney, Fulke Greville and other eminent Englishmen, but there has been much controversy as to the facts of his life in London.
    0