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philadelphia

philadelphia

philadelphia Sentence Examples

  • I had more than an hour to wait at Philadelphia International Airport.

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  • Winston explained that Arthur had recently contacted the government about supplying information on his Philadelphia clients because, he claimed, he was beginning to get nervous.

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  • "Willard Humphries is in Philadelphia," I countered.

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  • Curiosity got the better of him and later, on a trip to Philadelphia, he checked the city's library.

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  • He was frighteningly nervous, but in Dean's mind his sincerity buried the flowery words of the Philadelphia insurance executive.

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  • They've got a directory the size of the Philadelphia phone book.

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  • On Monday, three Colombians were brutally murdered in Philadelphia and their dis­membered body parts scattered like Easter eggs around the city of Brotherly Love.

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  • Dean made surprisingly good time driving to Philadelphia in spite of having taken longer than he had planned interviewing the wife of the missing man.

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  • White days and Philadelphia had that effect.

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  • The Jeffrey Byrne Mayer eulogized was a far different man than Mayer had described in his Philadelphia office.

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  • Hear-tell he's one of the local lawyers defending some of the Philadelphia family's bad boys.

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  • I could never be sure the old boy wouldn't have a change of heart some night and blow me away just to prove his masculinity, or send some of his Philadelphia clients around to work me over.

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  • Dean detailed what he'd learned from speaking with Cynthia Byrne and meeting with Byrne's boss in Philadelphia and gave the detective a written copy of his inter­views.

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  • When some of the Philadelphia big-wigs flew down, everyone would sweat and jump.

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  • The twins had been involved in some escapade for the Philadelphia crime family that Vinnie refused to describe.

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  • He didn't bother to point out that Bala Cynwyd, Cece Baldwin's address, was near Philadelphia, the opposite direction from Parkside.

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  • Parkside was no safer than the worst of the worst—we might as well be living in Philadelphia, or, God forbid, The Big Apple!

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  • Big Daddy, kingpin of the Philadelphia family, had been untouchable for as long as anyone could remember.

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  • He had been rushed to a well-known Philadelphia hospi­tal.

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  • The last thing David Dean had wanted to do was to climb back in his tired automobile and drive to Philadelphia in the middle of the night.

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  • "Welcome to Philadelphia!" said Jonathan Winston, looking as resplendent as ever.

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  • The Old Side adopted the academy at New London, Chester (disambiguation)|Chester county, Pennsylvania, which had been organized by Francis Alison in 1741, as their own; but the New London school broke up when Alison became a professor in the Philadelphia Academy (afterwards the university of Pennsylvania).

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  • During the separation the synod of Philadelphia decreased from twentysix to twenty-two ministers, but the synod of New York grew from twenty to seventy-two ministers, and the New Side reaped all the fruits of the Great Awakening under Whitefield and his successors.

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  • The union was not perfect; the presbytery of Donegal was for three years in revolt against the synod; and in 1762 a second presbytery of Philadelphia was formed; but the strength of the synod increased rapidly and at the outbreak of the War of Independence it had 11 presbyteries and 132 ministers.

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  • The Burgher Synod in 1764 sent Thomas Clarke of Ballybay, Ireland, who settled at Salem, Washington county, New York, and in 1776 sent David Telfair, of Monteith, Scotland, who preached in Philadelphia; they united with the Associate Presbytery of Pennsylvania; in 1771 the Scotch Synod ordered the presbytery to annul its union with the Burghers, and although Dr Clarke of Salem remained in the Associate Presbytery, the Burgher ministers who immigrated later joined the Associate Reformed Church.

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  • Big Daddy, kingpin of the Philadelphia family, had been untouchable for as long as anyone could remember.

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  • He had been rushed to a well-known Philadelphia hospi­tal.

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  • The union was not perfect; the presbytery of Donegal was for three years in revolt against the synod; and in 1762 a second presbytery of Philadelphia was formed; but the strength of the synod increased rapidly and at the outbreak of the War of Independence it had 11 presbyteries and 132 ministers.

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  • We had to change cars at Philadelphia; but we did not mind it much.

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  • Airy, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1896:

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  • While Parkside was officially beyond the limits of sensible commuting, enough hardy souls made the long daily trek into Philadelphia to label the town an outlying bedroom community.

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  • World Wide Insurance Company was in the heart of Philadelphia, occupying a towering structure that glared down on city hall and a thousand tired buildings, many dating back to the horse-drawn carriage days.

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  • Vinnie claimed to be able to show the police where Billie and Willie had been hiding and continued to brag that he had enough information to make headlines and sink half the Philadelphia mobsters.

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  • It was shortly before 11:00 when the federal visitor from Philadelphia arrived, heralding Dean's return to legitimate police work.

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  • He needs help with fat-cat client—one of his Philadelphia gangsters.

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  • The smaller airport was a welcome relief from the Philadelphia crowds and the large jet was loaded quickly.

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  • While killings in Philadelphia were fun reading, a murder in Parkside was a far different matter.

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  • It was after 4 a.m. when the pair slid into the brightly lit parking lot of the Philadelphia hospital.

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  • Ms. Nightingale murmured a room number and motioned down a hall crowded with bodies like the day after Gettysburg while white-coated figures strolled among the moaning, clip boards in hand With wide-eyed Fred following behind, Dean ran the gauntlet until he found the room, a small office packed with five men and a lot of smoke, three of them in Philadelphia Police uniforms.

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  • A gentleman in Philadelphia has just written to my teacher about a deaf and blind child in Paris, whose parents are Poles.

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  • First I get to third-degree a woman who just lost her husband and then I get to fight Philadelphia traffic.

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  • Dean rushed to the Philadelphia hospital where three days later a third heart attack claimed the woman's life.

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  • Dean rushed to the Philadelphia hospital where three days later a third heart attack claimed the woman's life.

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  • DeLeo and Sackler were off to Philadelphia chasing down evi­dence on their check thieves.

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  • See The Life, Travels and Opinions of Benjamin Lundy (Philadelphia, 1847), compiled (by Thomas Earle) "under the direction and on behalf of his children."

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  • Parkside was a small city of 40,000 located 50 miles northwest of Philadelphia.

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  • Jeffrey Byrne was employed in a regional marketing position by The World Wide Insurance Company of Philadelphia.

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  • Dean had hoped to make it as soon as possible so he could beat the worst of the late afternoon traffic when he returned from his chores in Philadelphia.

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  • We use local doctors and dentists and Jeff tries to schedule evening appointments because it's diffi­cult with his working in Philadelphia.

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  • Mustache was Alfred Nota, from Boston, and tic-face was Homer Flanders, from Philadelphia.

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  • Dean recognized Jackie Rudman, the employee from World Wide Insurance in Philadelphia.

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  • But Burlington, New Jersey isn't far from Philadelphia.

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  • Did you read the Philadelphia newspaper this morning?

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  • It was a Philadelphia Phillies baseball cap.

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  • The Feds busted a gang of Colombians in Philadelphia and one of them is implicated in slitting the throat of that fellow Homer Flanders.

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  • Some of the Philadelphia family took exception to it.

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  • He represented New Jersey in the first and second Continental Congresses (1774,1775-1776), but left Philadelphia in June 1776, probably to avoid voting on the question of adopting the Declaration of Independence, which he regarded as inexpedient.

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  • It is served by the Atlantic Coast Line, the Seaboard Air line, the Southern, the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Norfolk & Western, the Norfolk & Southern and the Virginian railways, by many steamship lines, by ferry to Portsmouth (immediately opposite), Newport News, Old Point Comfort and Hampton, and by electric lines to several neighbouring towns.

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  • In 1836-1838 Lundy edited in Philadelphia a new anti-slavery weekly, The National Enquirer, which he had founded, and which under the editorship of John G.

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  • Since then it has met in Philadelphia, Belfast, London, Toronto, Glasgow, Washington and Liverpool.

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  • These New England ministers in the Delaware valley, with Francis Makemie as moderator, organized in 1706 the first American presbytery, the presbytery of Philadelphia.

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  • Philadelphia is the home of the boards of publication and of Sunday schools of the Northern Church; and in Allegheny (Pittsburg) are the principal theological seminary of the United Presbyterian body and its publishing house.

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  • On American Presbyterianism, see Charles Hodge, Constitutional History of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America,1706-1788(2 vols., Philadelphia, 1839-1840); Records of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America from 1706 to 1788 (ibid., 1841); Richard Webster, History of the Presbyterian Church in America (ibid., 1858); E.

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  • Beard, Ku Klux Sketches (Philadelphia, 1876); J.

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  • Philadelphia (vol.

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  • He was ordained in 1848 and was pastor of the Central Presbyterian church of Philadelphia in 1849-1851.

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  • pp. 377-396 (Philadelphia, 1900).

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  • " Philadelphia," received wireless messages printed on the ordinary Morse tape at a distance of 1557 m.

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  • The line of circuit passed through the secondary of the induction coil I to the line, from that to the telephone T at the receiving station, 'See Journal of the Telegraph, New York, April 1877; Philadelphia Times, 9th July 1877; and Scientific American, August 181 This term was used by Wheatstone in 1827 for an acoustic apparatus intended to convert very feeble into audible sounds; see his Scientific Papers, p. 32.

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  • Philadelphia (1902), pp. 750-790, pls.

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  • Early in 1787 King was moved by the Shays Rebellion and by the influence of Alexander Hamilton to take a broader view of the general situation, and it was he who introduced the resolution in Congress, on the 21st of February 1787, sanctioning the call for the Philadelphia constitutional convention.

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  • Alfred Langdon Elwyn has edited Letters by Washington, Adams, Jefferson and Others, Written During and After the Revolution, to John Langdon of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1880), a book of great interest and value.

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  • Sulgrove, History of Indianapolis and Marion County (Philadelphia, 1884); M.

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  • Baldwin, the founder of the famous Baldwin Locomotive Works in Philadelphia, built his first engine, Old Ironsides, for the Philadelphia, Germantown & Morristown railroad; first tried in November 1832, it was modelled on Stephenson's Planet, and had a single pair of driving wheels at the firebox end and a pair of carrying wheels under the smoke-box.

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  • The guarantee for this activity may be illustrated by a single fact: the combined building operations, in 1908, of San Francisco, Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, Spokane and Salt Lake City exceeded the combined building operations of Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Kansas City, Boston, Baltimore and Cincinnati during the same year.

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  • San Francisco spent more in new permanent structures than Philadelphia, and Seattle spent more than Pittsburg.

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  • (Oxon.)], Spirit Identity and Spirit Teaching; Zbllner, Wissenschaftliche Abhandlungen (the part relating to spiritualism has been translated into English under the title Transcendental Physics by C. C. Massey); Report of the Seybert Commission on Spiritualism (Philadelphia, 1887); Professor Th.

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  • A "campaign" biography was published by Lew Wallace (Philadelphia, 1888), and a sketch of his life may be found in Presidents of the United States (New York, 1894), edited by James Grant Wilson.

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  • Davis's History of the Town of Plymouth (Philadelphia, 1885); also his Ancient Landmarks of Plymouth (Boston, 2nd ed., 1899); and his Plymouth Memories of an Octogenarian (Plymouth, 1906); and John A.

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  • See Moses Coit Tyler, Patrick Henry (Boston, 1887; new ed., 1899), and William Wirt Henry (Patrick Henry's grandson), Patrick Henry: Life, Correspondence and Speeches (New York, 1890-1891); these supersede the very unsatisfactory biography by William Wirt, Sketches of the Life and Character of Patrick Henry (Philadelphia, 1817).

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  • See also George Morgan, The True Patrick Henry (Philadelphia, 1907).

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  • Those who had fled to Philadelphia in Pennsylvania (1734) formed a small community under the name of Schwenkfelders; and Zinzendorf and Spangenberg, when they visited the United States, endeavoured, but with little success, to convert them to their views.

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  • Hamilton's Colonial Mobile (Boston and New York, 1898), and the Colonization of the South (Philadelphia, 1904) are standard authorities for the French and English periods (1699-1781).

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  • The production in Rutherford and Burke counties and their vicinity was so great, and transportation to the United States Mint at Philadelphia so difficult, that from 1831 to 1857 gold was privately coined in I, 22 and 5 dollar pieces bearing the mark of the coiner " C. Bechtler, Rutherford county, N.C."

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  • North Carolina sent delegates to the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention of 1787, but the state convention, at Hillsboro, called to pass upon the constitution for North Carolina, did not meet until the 21st of July 1788, when ten states had already ratified.

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  • Philadelphia, 1812), which deals with the period before 1771 and is meagre and full of errors; F.

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  • When he landed in Philadelphia in October 1771, the converts to Methodism, which had been introduced into the colonies only three years before, numbered scarcely 300.

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  • C. McCook, Agricultural Ant of Texas (Philadelphia, 1880); and A.

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  • Philadelphia, 1901); E.

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  • He served in various capacities in the Civil War, and in1865-1867was a member of the state House of Representatives, becoming secretary of the commonwealth in1873-1878and again in 1879-1882, recorder of Philadelphia in 1878-1879, and state treasurer in 1886-1887.

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  • of Philadelphia.

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  • It is served by the Lehigh Valley and the Philadelphia & Reading railways, and by the electric lines of the Schuylkill Railway Company and the Shamokin & Mount Carmel Transit Company.

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  • from Philadelphia.

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  • of the Pennsylvania German Society, Proceedings and Addresses (Lancaster, Penn., 1900); Julius Friedrich Sachse, The German Sectarians of Pennsylvania, 1742-1800: A Critical and Legendary History of the Ephrata Cloister and the Dunkers (Philadelphia, 1900); and John Lewis Gillin, The Dunkers: A Sociological Interpretation (New York, 1906), a doctor's dissertation,, with full bibliography.

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  • It is served directly by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, and indirectly by the New York, Philadelphia & Norfolk (Pennsylvania System), passengers and freight being carried by steamer from the terminus at Cape Charles; by steamboat lines connecting with the principal cities along the Atlantic coast, and with cities along the James river; by ferry, connecting with Norfolk and Portsmouth; and by electric railway (3 m.) to Hampton and (1 2 m.) to Newport News.

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  • Stephens (Philadelphia, 1908); R.

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  • Stephens (Philadelphia, 1878; new ed., 1883); and Henry Cleveland, Alexander H.

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  • Stephens in Public and Private, with Letters and Speeches (Philadelphia, 1866).

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  • Barton's Fragments of the Natural History of Pennsylvania,' both printed at Philadelphia, one in 1791, the other in 1799; but J.

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  • i i (2878); Robert Ridgway, Manual of North American Birds (Philadelphia, 1887); Frank M.

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  • There is a statue of Witherspoon in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, and another on the University Library at Princeton.

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  • WILLIAM WARREN (1812-1888), American actor, was born in Philadelphia on the 17th of November 1812, the son of an English actor (1767-1832) of the same name.

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  • ELISHA KENT KANE (1820-1857), American scientist and explorer, was born in Philadelphia on the 10th of February 1820, the son of the jurist John Kintzing Kane (1795-1858), a friend and supporter of Andrew Jackson, attorney-general of Pennsylvania in 1845-1846, U.S. judge of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania after 1846, and president of the American Philosophical Society in 1856-1858.

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  • The Federal Street theatre-the first regular theatrewas established in 1794, the old Puritan feeling having had its natural influence in keeping Boston behind New York and Philadelphia in this respect.

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  • deep. Railway rates have also been a matter of vital importance in recent years; Boston, like New York, complaining of discriminations in favour of Philadelphia, Baltimore, New Orleans and Galveston.

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  • In 1770 most of the merchants agreed not to import goods from England and transferred their trade with New York City, where Loyalist influence was strong, to Boston and Philadelphia.

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  • in 1148, Frederick marched by Philadelphia and Iconium, not without dust and heat, until he reached the river Salof, in Armenian territory.

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  • Fairbanks, History of Florida (Philadelphia, 1871).

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  • by a line which may be said to follow the meridian of Amman (Philadelphia or Rabbath-Ammon).

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  • The Federalists swept all before them, and the members of the opposition either retired from Philadelphia or went over to the government.

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  • The Writings of Albert Gallatin, edited by Henry Adams, were published at Philadelphia, in three volumes, in 1879.

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  • on remarkable revival services in Western New York, in Philadelphia (1828), in New York City (1829-1830 and 1832, the New York Evangelist being founded to carry on his work), in Boston (1831, 1842-1843, 1856-1857), in London (1849-1850) and throughout England and Scotland (1858).

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  • Its last act in national politics was to nominate William Henry Harrison for president and John Tyler for vice-president at a convention in Philadelphia in November 1838.

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  • Gowen (1836-1889), president of the Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron Company, sent James McParlan, an Irish Catholic and a Pinkerton detective (who some thirty years later attracted attention in the investigation of the assassination of Governor Steunenberg of Idaho), to the mining region in 1873; he joined the order, lived among the "Molly Maguires" for more than two years, and even became secretary of the Shenandoah division, one of the most notoriously criminal lodges of the order.

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  • P. Dewees, The Molly Maguires;(Philadelphia, 18 77); Allan Pinkerton, The Molly Maguires and the Detectives (New York, 1877); E.

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  • In 1764 a new post route between New York and Philadelphia passed through what is now the city, and direct ferry communication began with New York.

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  • Coxe (Philadelphia) Expedition, 44 that of Oxford at Farras, directed by Mr. F.

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  • In 1688 the German Friends of Germantown, Philadelphia, raised the first official protest uttered by any religious body against slavery.

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  • Two yearly meetings remain outside the organization, that of Ohio on ultra-evangelical grounds, while that of Philadelphia has not taken the matter into consideration.

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  • BENJAMIN RUSH (1745-1813), American physician, was born in Byberry township, near Philadelphia, on a homestead founded by his grandfather, a Quaker gunsmith, who had followed Penn from England in 1683.

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  • After serving an apprenticeship of six years with a doctor in Philadelphia, he went for two years to Edinburgh, where he attached himself chiefly to William Cullen.

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  • degree there in 1768, spent a year more in the hospitals of London and Paris, and began practice in Philadelphia at the age of twenty-four, undertaking at the same time the chemistry class at the Philadelphia medical college.

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  • He gained great credit when the yellow fever devastated Philadelphia, in 1793, by his assiduity in visiting the sick, and by his bold and apparently successful treatment of the disease by bloodletting.

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  • He died in Philadelphia on the 19th of April 1813, after a five days' illness from typhus fever.

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  • His part in the yellow fever controversies is indicated by La Roche (Yellow Fever in Philadelphia from 1699 to 1854, 2 vols., Philadelphia, 1855) and by Bancroft (Essay on the Yellow Fever, London, 1811).

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  • In 1742, in reply to a call from the Lutheran churches of Pennsylvania, he went to Philadelphia, and was joined from time to time, especially in 1745, by students from Halle.

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  • Mann (Philadelphia, 1887).

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  • Hubbell's Life of Horace Mann, Educator, Patriot and Reformer (Philadelphia, 1910), may be mentioned.

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  • Meyer, Qabbalah (Philadelphia, 1888); Rubin, Kabbala and Agada (Vienna, 1895), Heideritum and Kabbalah (1893); Karppe, Et.

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  • The Histoire de la Louisiane, et de la cession de colonie par la France aux EtatsUnis (Paris, 1829; in English, Philadelphia, 1830) by Barbe-Marbois has great importance in diplomatic history.

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  • Cabrera, Cuba y sus Jueces (Havana, 1887; 9th ed., Philadelphia, 1895; 8th ed., in English, Cuba and the Cubans, Philadelphia, 1896); P. de Alzola y Minondo, El Problema Cubano (Bilbao, 1898); various works by R.

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  • 1878-1893 (Philadelphia, 1894); Labra et al., El Problema colonial contempordnea (2 vols., Madrid, 1894) articles by Em.

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  • Second Grinnell Expedition (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1856).

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  • 7.4),whose name was changed into Philadelphia by Ptolemy Philadelphus, a large and strong city with an acropolis, was situated on both sides of a branch of the Jabbok, bearing at the present day the name of Nahr 'Amman, the river of Ammon, whence the designation "city of waters" (2 Sam.

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  • In 1803 he was in command of the "Enterprise," which formed part of Commodore Preble's squadron in the Mediterranean, and in February 1804 led a daring expedition into the harbour of Tripoli for the purpose of burning the U.S. frigate "Philadelphia" which had fallen into Tripolitan hands.

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  • GEORGE MIFFLIN DALLAS (1792-1864), American statesman and diplomat, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of July 1792.

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  • He practised law in New York and Philadelphia, was chosen mayor of Philadelphia in 1828, and in 1829 was appointed by President Jackson, whom he had twice warmly supported for the presidency, United States attorney for the eastern district of Pennsylvania, a position long held by his father.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 1st of December 1864.

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  • His Diary of his residence in St Petersburg and London was published in Philadelphia in 1892.

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  • See Jeremy Belknap, History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784-1792); and Rev. Dr A.

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  • HENRY CHARLES LEA (1825-1909), American historian, was born at Philadelphia on the 19th of September 1825.

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  • These are: Superstition and Force (Philadelphia, 1866, new ed.

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  • 1892); Historical Sketch of Sacerdotal Celibacy (Philadelphia, 1867); History of the Inquisition of the Middle Ages (New York, 1888); Chapters from the religious history of Spain connected with the Inquisition (Philadelphia, 1890); History of auricular Confession and Indulgences in the Latin Church (3 vols., London, 1896); The Moriscos of Spain (Philadelphia, 1901), and History of the Inquisition of Spain (4 vols., New York and London, 1906-1907).

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  • He also edited a Formulary of the Papal Penitentiary in the 13th century (Philadelphia, 1892), and in 1908 was published his Inquisition in the Spanish Dependencies.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 24th of October 1909.

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  • Doolittle at the Flower Observatory near Philadelphia, and Professor J.

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  • M' Cook, American Spiders and their Spinning Work (3 vols.; Philadelphia, 1889-1893); 31.

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  • Pollard's Life of Jefferson Davis, with a Secret History of the Southern Confederacy (Philadelphia, 1869), a somewhat partisan arraignment by a prominent Southern journalist; and W.

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  • Dodd's Jefferson Davis (Philadelphia, 1907), which embodies the results of recent historical research.

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  • Monroe returned to America in the spring of 1797, and in the following December published a defence of his course in a pamphlet of 500 pages entitled A View of the Conduct of the Executive in the Foreign Affairs of the United States, and printed in Philadelphia by Benjamin Franklin Bache (1769-1798).

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  • He was president of Hampden-Sidney College from 1796 to 1807, with a short intermission (in 1801-1802), and in 1807 became pastor of Pine Street Church, Philadelphia.

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  • Richmond was for many years the centre, west of Philadelphia, of the activities of the Society of Friends.

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  • He graduated at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y., in 1820, and at the Princeton Theological Seminary in 1823, was ordained as a Presbyterian minister by the presbytery of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1825, and was the pastor successively of the Presbyterian Church in Morristown, New Jersey (1825-1830) and of the First Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia(1830-1867).

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  • Barnes was the author of several other works of a practical and devotional kind, and a collection of his Theological Works was published in Philadelphia in 1875., He died in Philadelphia on the 24th of December 1870.

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  • Fries died in Philadelphia in 1825.

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  • Taken Shorthand (Philadelphia, 1800); the second volume of McMaster's History of the United States (New York, 1883); and W.

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  • In America the system was enthusiastically adopted by a noted physician, Benjamin Rush (1745-1813), of Philadelphia, who was followed by a considerable school.

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  • It is served by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic (which has shops here), and the New York, Philadelphia && Norfolk railways, and by steamers on the Wicomico river, which has a channel 9 ft.

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  • For further details regarding the formation of Sumerian and Babylonian-Assyrian proper names, as well as for an indication of the problems involved and the difficulties still existing, especially in the case of Sumerian names,' see the three excellent works now at our disposal for the Sumerian, the old Babylonian, and the neoBabylonian period respectively, by Huber, Die Personennamen den Keilschrifturkunden aus der Zeit der Konige von Ur and Nisin (Leipzig, 1907); Ranke, Early Babylonian Proper Names (Philadelphia, 1905); and Tallqvist, Neu-Babylonisches Namenbuch (Helsingfors, 1905).

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  • Tamaqua is served by the Central railroad of New Jersey, by the Philadelphia and Reading railway and by an electric line connecting with Mauch Chunk, Pottsville, and other places.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 6th of November, 1872.

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  • was conferred upon him by Harvard University, and his scientific attainments were recognized by the American Philosophical Society and the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences.

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  • There are statues of General Meade in Philadelphia and at Gettysburg.

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  • Las Mocedades del Cid (Toulouse, 1890) and Ingratitud de amor (Philadelphia, 1899) have been well edited by E.

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  • Coxe of Philadelphia published a description and coloured figure taken from living plants sent him two years previously from Mexico.

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  • Hamilton Hurd's History of Middlesex County (Philadelphia, 1890).

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  • Maurtua, The Question of the Pacific (Philadelphia, 1901); M.

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  • Prescott, History of the Conquest of Peru (3 vols., Philadelphia, 1868); A.

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  • Von Tschudi, Reisen durch Seidamerika (5 vols., Leipzig, 1866-1868); idem, Travels in Peru (London, 1847); Charles Wiener, Perou et Bolivie (Paris, 1880); Frank Vincent, Around and about South America (New York, 1890); Marie Robinson Wright, The Old and New Peru (Philadelphia, 1909); the Consular and Diplomatic Reports of Great Britain and the United States; Handbook of Peru and Bulletins of the Bureau of American Republics; and the departmental publications of the Peruvian Government.

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  • It is served by the Central of New Jersey, the Lehigh Valley, the Perkiomen (of the Reading system) and the Philadelphia & Reading railways.

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  • In 1787, with Roger Sherman and William Samuel Johnson (1727-1819), he was one of Connecticut's delegates to the constitutional convention at Philadelphia, in which his services were numerous and important.

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  • Hinchman, Early Settlers of Nantucket (Philadelphia, 1896; 2nd ed., 1901); W.

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  • Christopher went to school near Bristol, in England, returned to America in 1741, was afterwards employed in a counting house in Philadelphia, and became a merchant and planter at Charleston.

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  • When the constitutional convention met in Philadelphia in 1787 to frame a constitution for a stronger Federal government, the agriculturists of Rhode Island were afraid that the movement would result in an interference with their local privileges, and especially with their favourite device of issuing paper money, and the state refused to send delegates, and not until the Senate had passed a bill for severing commercial relations between the United States and Rhode Island, did the latter, in May 1790, ratify the Federal constitution, and then only by a majority of two votes.

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  • See also Adelos Gorton, The Life and Times of Samuel Gorton (Philadelphia, 1908); W.

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  • Finally in 1390 Philadelphia, which had for some time been an independent Christian city, surrendered to Sultan Bayezid's mixed army of Ottoman Turks and Byzantine Christians, and the Seljuk power in the Hermus valley was merged in the Ottoman empire.

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  • HENRY MARTYN BAIRD (1832-1906), American historian and educationalist, a son of Robert Baird (1798-1863), a Presbyterian preacher and author who worked earnestly both in the United States and in Europe for the cause of temperance, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 17th of January 1832.

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  • By an agreement made in 1907 the school of theology of Ursinus College (Collegeville, Pennsylvania; the theological school since 1898 had been in Philadelphia) and the Heidelberg Theological seminary (Tiffin, Ohio) united to form the Central Theological seminary of the German Reformed Church, which was established in Dayton in 1908.

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  • London, 1878); Morais, "The Falashas" in Penn Monthly (Philadelphia, 1880); Cyrus Adler, "Bibliography of the Falashas" in American Hebrew (16th of March 1894); Lewin, "Ein verlassener Bruderstamm," in Bloch's Wochenschrift (7th February 1902), p. 85; J.

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  • Spurred by the success of the Gentleman's Magazine in England Benjamin Franklin founded the General Magazine (1741) at Philadelphia, but it expired after six monthly numbers had appeared.

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  • Further attempts at Philadelphia in 1757 and 1769 to revive periodicals with the same name were both fruitless.

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  • Among the other magazines which ran out a brief existence before the end of the century was the Philadelphia Political Censor or Monthly Review (1796-1797) edited by William Cobbett.

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  • One of the most successful was the Farmer's Weekly Museum (1790-1799), supported by perhaps the most brilliant staff of writers American periodical literature had yet been able to show, and edited by Joseph Dennie, who in 1801 began the publication of the Portfolio, carried on to 1827 at Philadelphia.

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  • Brown founded at Philadelphia the Literary Magazine (1803-1808); he and Dennie may be considered as having been the first American professional men of letters.

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  • The first serious rival of the Portfolio was the Analectic Magazine (1813-1820), founded at Philadelphia by Moses Thomas, with the literary assistance of W.

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  • Next came Lippincott's Magazine (1868) from Philadelphia, and the Cosmopolitan (1886) and Scribner's Monthly (1870, known as the Century Illustrated Magazine since 1881) from New York.

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  • The first attempt to carry on an American review was made by Robert Walsh in 1811 at Philadelphia with the quarterly American Review of History and Politics, which lasted only a couple of years.

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  • The American Quarterly Review (1827-1837), established at Philadelphia by Robert Walsh, came to an end on his departure for Europe.

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  • Among the most representative are: the Popular Science Monthly, New York; the monthly Boston Journal of Education; the quarterly American Journal of Mathematics, Baltimore; the monthly Cassier's Magazine (1891), New York; the monthly American Engineer (1893), New York; the monthly House and Garden, Philadelphia; the monthly Astrophysical Journal, commenced as Sidereal Messenger (1882), Chicago; the monthly American Chemical Journal, Baltimore; the monthly American Naturalist, Boston; the monthly American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Philadelphia; the monthly Outing, New York; the weekly American Agriculturist, New York; the quarterly Metaphysical Magazine (1895) New York; the bi-monthly American Journal of Sociology, Chicago; the bi-monthly American Law Review, St Louis; the monthly Banker's Magazine, New York; the quarterly American Journal of Philology (1880), Baltimore; the monthly Library Journal (1876), New York; the monthly Public Libraries, Chicago; Harper's.

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  • The earliest in the latter class was the Lady's Magazine (1792) of Philadelphia.

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  • 15 1879 in Philadelphia, and was educated at the Convent of Notre Dame in that city.

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  • ANDREW ATKINSON HUMPHREYS (1810-1883), American soldier and engineer, was born at Philadelphia on the 2nd of November 1810.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 26th of June 1796.

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  • Fletcher Johnson, Life of William Tecumseh Sherman (Philadelphia, 1891); Manning F.

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  • Blaine graduated at Washington College in Washington, Pennsylvania, in 1847, and subsequently taught successively in the Military Institute, Georgetown, Kentucky, and in the Institution for the Blind at Philadelphia.

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  • ALA-SHEHR (anc. Philadelphia), a town of Asia Minor, in the Aidin vitayet, situated in the valley of the Kuzu Chai (Cogamus), at the foot of the Boz Dagh (Mt.

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  • Philadelphia was founded by Attalus II.

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  • Philadelphia was an independent neutral city, under the influence of the Latin Knights of Rhodes, when taken in 1390 by Sultan Bayezid I.

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  • See Wilkinson's Memoirs of My Own Time (Philadelphia, 1816); untrustworthy and to be used with caution; W.

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  • Its site was originally included in the so-called "Bingham Patent," a tract on both sides of the Susquehanna river owned by William Bingham (1751-1804), a Philadelphia merchant, who was a member of the Continental Congress in 1787-1788 and of the United States Senate in 1795 - 1801, being president pro tempore of the Senate from the 16th of February to the 3rd of March 1797.

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  • Its railway mileage in January 1907 was J33.6 m.; the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (Pennsylvania system), the Baltimore & Philadelphia (Baltimore & Ohio system), and the Wilmington & Northern (Philadelphia & Reading system) cross the northern part of the state, while the Delaware railway (leased by the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington) runs the length of the state below Wilmington, and another line, the Maryland, Delaware & Virginia (controlled by the Baltimore, Chesapeake & Atlantic railway, which is related to the Pennsylvania system), connects Lewes, Del., with Love Point, Md., on the Chesapeake Bay.

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  • part of the state, connecting Delaware river and Chesapeake Bay, and thus affords transportation by water from Baltimore to Philadelphia.

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  • The harbour is about equidistant from New York, Philadelphia, and the capes of Chesapeake Bay, and is used chiefly by vessels awaiting orders to ports for discharge or landing.

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  • The most elaborate history is that of John Thomas Scharf, History of the State of Delaware (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1888); the second volume is entirely biographical.

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  • and viii.) are based, in part, on documents in the Swedish Royal Archives and at the universities of Upsala and Lund, which were unknown to Benjamin Ferris (History of the Original Settlements of the Delaware, Wilmington, 1846) and Francis Vincent (History of the State of Delaware, Philadelphia, 1870), which ends with the English occupation in 1664).

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  • 3, Philadelphia, iii.

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  • Eleven Christians had been brought, mostly from Philadelphia, to be put to death.

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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania railway, the Camden & Trenton railway (an electric line, forming part of the line between Philadelphia and New York) and by freight and passenger steamboat lines on the Delaware.

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  • Kroeger, portions of the Wissenschaftslehre (Science of Knowledge, Philadelphia, 1868; ed.

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  • Gonge, The Fiscal History of Texas (Philadelphia, 1852), for the early financial history; O.

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  • He made his way first to New York City, and then (October 1723) to Philadelphia, where he got employment with a printer named Samuel Keimer.'

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  • He reached Philadelphia in October 1726, but a few months later Denham died, and Franklin was induced by large wages to return to his old employer Keimer; with Keimer he quarrelled repeatedly, thinking himself ill used and kept only to train apprentices until they could in some degree take his place.

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  • In 1731 he established in Philadelphia one of the earliest circulating libraries in America (often said to have been the earliest), and in 1732 he published the first of his Almanacks, under the pseudonym of Richard Saunders.

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  • In 1737 he had been appointed postmaster at Philadelphia, and about the same time he organized the first police force and fire company in the colonies; in 1749, after he had written Proposals Relating to the Education of Youth in Pensilvania, he and twenty-three other citizens of Philadelphia formed themselves into an association for the purpose of establishing an academy, which was opened in 1751, was chartered in 1753, and eventually became the University of Pennsylvania; in 1727 he organized a debating club, the " Junto," in Philadelphia, and later he was one of the founders of the American Philosophical Society (1743; incorporated 1780); he took the lead in the organization of a militia force, and in the paving of the city streets, improved the method of street lighting, and assisted in the founding of a city hospital (1751); in brief, he gave the impulse to nearly every measure or project for the welfare and prosperity of Philadelphia undertaken in his day.

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  • He visited nearly every post office in the colonies and increased the mail service between New York and Philadelphia from once to three times a week in summer, and from twice a month to once a week in winter.

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  • This quiet was interrupted, however, by the " Paxton Massacre " (Dec. 14, 1763) - the slaughter of a score of Indians (children, women and old men) at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, by some young rowdies from the town of Paxton, who then marched upon Philadelphia to kill a few Christian Indians there.

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  • Because he, too, thought so, and because he recommended John Hughes, a merchant of Philadelphia, for the office of distributor of stamps, Franklin himself was denounced - he was even accused of having planned the Stamp Act - and his family in Philadelphia was in danger of being mobbed.

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  • Satisfied that his usefulness in England was at an end, Franklin entrusted his agencies to the care of Arthur Lee, and on the 21st of March 1775 again set sail for Philadelphia.

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  • On the 6th of May, the day after his arrival in Philadelphia, he was elected by the assembly of Pennsylvania a delegate to the Continental Congress in Philadelphia.

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  • Franklin arrived in Philadelphia on the 13th of September, disembarking at the same wharf as when he had first entered the city.

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  • He was immediately elected a member of the municipal council of Philadelphia, becoming its chairman; and was chosen president of the Supreme Executive Council (the chief executive officer) of Pennsylvania, and was re-elected in 1786 and 1787, serving from October 1785 to October 1788.

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  • His last days were marked by a fine serenity and calm; he died in his own house in Philadelphia on the 17th of April 1790, the immediate cause being an abscess in the lungs.

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  • He was buried with his wife in the graveyard (Fifth and Arch Streets) of Christ Church, Philadelphia.

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  • In 1730 he married Deborah Read, in whose father's house he had lived when he had first come to Philadelphia, to whom he had been engaged before his first departure from Philadelphia for London, and who in his absence had married a ne'er-do-well, one Rogers, who had deserted her.

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  • Another illegitimate child became the wife of John Foxcroft of Philadelphia.

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  • her dread of an ocean voyage kept her in Philadelphia during Franklin's missions to England, and she died in 1774, while Franklin was in London.

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  • ., Philadelphia: Printed by B.

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  • Personally he had little connexion with the Philadelphia printing office after 1748, when David Hall became his partner and took charge of it.

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  • In 1743, from the circumstance that an eclipse not visible in Philadelphia because of a storm had been observed in Boston, where the storm although north-easterly did not occur until an hour after the eclipse, he surmised that storms move against the wind along the Atlantic coast.

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  • Experiments and Observations on Electricity (London, 1769) was translated into French by Barbeu Dubourg (Paris, 1773); Vaughan attempted a more complete edition, Political, Miscellaneous and Philosophical Pieces (London, 1 779); an edition in three volumes appeared after Franklin's death (London, 1806); what seemed the authentic Works, as it was under the care of Temple Franklin, was published at London (6 vols., 1817-1819; 3 vols., 1818) and with some additional matter at Philadelphia (6 vols., 1818).

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  • Sparks's edition (10 vols., Boston, 1836-1842; revised, Philadelphia, 1858) also contained fresh matter; and there are further additions in the edition of John Bigelow (Philadelphia, 1887-1888; 5th ed., 1905) and in that by Albert Henry Smyth (to vols., New York, 1905-1907).

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  • Bigelow published the complete Autobiography with additions from Franklin's correspondence and other writings in 1868; a second edition (3 vols., Philadelphia, 1888) was published under the title, The Life of Benjamin Franklin, Written by Himself.

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  • Fisher, The True Benjamin Franklin (Philadelphia, 1899); E.

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  • The materials for studying the American man biologically are abundant in the United States National Museum in Washington; the Peabody Museum, at Cambridge, Massachusetts; the American Museum of Natural History, New York; the Academy of Sciences and the Free Museum of Arts and Sciences, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the Field Museum in Chicago; the National Museum, city of Mexico, and the Museum of La Plata.

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  • the Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia; the Field Museum, Chicago; the California Academy and the California University, San Francisco; and the Canadian Institute, Toronto, publish monographs and lists.

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  • (Philadelphia, 1822-1890); The American Race (New York, 1891); Gustav Bruhl, Die Culturvolker Amerikas (Cincinnati, 1889); Desire Charnay, The Ancient Cities of the New World (New York, 1887); Frank Cushing, Zuni Folk Tales (New York, 1901); William H.

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  • C. Mercer, The Hill Caves of Yucatan (Philadelphia, 1896); Clarence B.

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  • Heilprin, Bermuda Islands (Philadelphia, 1889); Stark, Bermuda Guide (London, 1898); Cole, Bermuda.

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  • He began teaching in Bristol, Conn., in 1823, and subsequently conducted schools in Cheshire, Conn., in 1825-1827, again in Bristol in 1827-1828, in Boston in 1828-1830, in Germantown, now part of Philadelphia, in 1831-1833, and in Philadelphia in 1833.

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  • He settled in Philadelphia as a lawyer, and in February 1780 he published in Philadelphia a series of essays on finance, in which he criticized the issue of legal-tenders, denounced laws passed for the benefit of the debtor class, and urged the people to tax themselves for the common good.

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  • He had a high reputation in the United States navy for practical seamanship. He died at Philadelphia on the 13th of February 1843.

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  • In the United States the Philadelphia mint was opened in 1792, but only manual or horse power was used until 1836, when steam was introduced.

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  • Gas is used as fuel for the melting furnaces at Philadelphia.

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  • In certain Anabaptist circles the primitive idea of a " covenant " between believers and God as conditioning all their life, especially one with another, was revived (Champlin Burrage, The Church-Covenant Idea, Philadelphia, 1904).

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  • The Works of John Woolman appeared in two parts at Philadelphia, in 1774-1775, and have often been republished; a German version was printed in 1852.

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  • JOHN HENRY HOBART (1775-1830), American Protestant Episcopal bishop, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of September 1775, being fifth in direct descent from Edmund Hobart, a founder of Hingham, Massachusetts.

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  • He was educated at the Philadelphia Latin School, the College of Philadelphia (now the University of Pennsylvania), and Princeton, where he graduated in 1793.

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  • After studying theology under Bishop William White at Philadelphia, he was ordained deacon in 1798, and priest two years later.

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  • It is served by the Philadelphia & Reading, the Cornwall and the Cornwall & Lebanon railways.

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  • In 1900, although he wished to serve another term as governor in order to complete and establish certain policies within the state, he was nominated for the vice-presidency of the United States on the ticket with President McKinley by the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia in spite of his protest.

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  • Although at first unfriendly to the Federal Constitution as drafted by the convention at Philadelphia, he was finally won over to its support, and in 1788 he presided over the Massachusetts convention which ratified the instrument.

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  • In 1838 the Society of Friends founded a nursing organization in Philadelphia, and in 1840 Mrs Fry, a member of the same community, started the Institution of Nursing Sisters in London.

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  • In the United States a similar system prevails in New York, Boston, Brooklyn, Chicago, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New Haven and many other large towns.

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  • (4 vols., Philadelphia, 1825-1833), which established his scientific reputation.

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  • Soc. Philadelphia, iii.

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  • The Zoological Gardens in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, resemble the gardens of the Zoological Society of London, on which they were modelled.

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  • They are controlled by the Zoological Society of Philadelphia, founded in 1859, and are supported partly by subscriptions of members, partly by gate-money and partly by an allowance from the city of Philadelphia.

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  • of Auricular Confession and Indulgences in the Latin Church (Philadelphia, 1896); his standpoint in frankly non-Catholic, but he gives ample materials for judgment.

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  • It is served by the Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia & Reading, the Northern Central and the Cumberland Valley railways; and the Pennsylvania canal gives it water communication with the ocean.

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  • He early removed to Philadelphia, where he acquired a high standing as a lawyer.

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  • Galloway declined a second election to Congress in 1775, joined the British army at New Brunswick, New Jersey (December 1776), advised the British to attack Philadelphia by the Delaware, and during the British occupation of Philadelphia (1777-1778) was superintendent of the port, of prohibited articles, and of police of the city.

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  • See Thomas Balch (Ed.), The Examination of Joseph Galloway by a Committee of the House of Commons (Philadelphia, 18 55); Ernest H.

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  • Steelton is served by the Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia && Reading railways, and is connected with Harrisburg by electric line.

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  • The more important railway lines are the Baltimore & Ohio, the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington (controlled by the Pennsylvania and a consolidation of the Philadelphia, Wilmington & Baltimore, and the Baltimore & Potomac), the Western Maryland, the West Virginia Central & Pittsburg (leased by the Western Maryland), the Northern Central, the Maryland electric railways (including what was formerly the Baltimore & Annapolis Short Line), and the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis electric railway.

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  • Among his other works may be named Paroles d'un revolte (1884); La Conquete du pain (1888); L' Anarchic: sa philosophie, son ideal (1896); The State, its Part in History (1898); Fields, Factories and Workshops (1899); Memoirs of a Revolutionist (1900); Mutual Aid, a Factor of Evolution (1902); Modern Science and Anarchism (Philadelphia, 1903); The Desiccation of Asia (1904); The Orography of Asia (1904); and Russian Literature (1905).

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  • Niederlein, The Republic of Costa Rica (Philadelphia, 1898); R.

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  • White, Stonewall Jackson (Philadelphia, 1909).

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  • _ In America the earliest Bible society was founded at Philadelphia in 1808.

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  • All kindred organizations in the states gradually became amalgamated with this national body, and the federation was completed in 1839 by the adhesion of the Philadelphia Society (which now changed its name to the Pennsylvania Bible Society).

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  • Bole, The Harmony Society (Philadelphia, 1904); Charles Nordhoff, The Communistic Societies of the United States (New York, 1875); and among several excellent monographs in German, Karl Knortz, Die christlichkommunistische Kolonie der Rappisten (Leipzig, 1892), and J.

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  • of Philadelphia and about 146 m.

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  • Wright, Picturesque Mexico (Philadelphia, 1898); and Rafael de Zayas Enriquez, Les Etats-unis mexicains (Mexico, 18 99) .

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  • Norristown is served by the Pennsylvania, the Philadelphia & Reading and the Stony Creek railways, by interurban electric railway to Philadelphia and Reading, and by the Schuylkill canal, and is connected by bridge with the borough of Bridgeport (pop. in 1900, 3095), where woollen and cotton goods are manufactured.

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  • Norristown is a residential suburb of Philadelphia, and commands fine views of the Schuylkill Valley.

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  • Belknap, The History of New Hampshire (Philadelphia, 1784); Life of William Plumer (Boston, 1857), by his son William Plumer, Jr.; G.

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  • The American Congress at Philadelphia, acting for all the thirteen colonies, voted general defensive measures, called out troops and appointed George Washington of Virginia commander-in-chief.

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  • The British then pushed down through New Jersey with designs on Philadelphia.

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  • Following up the occupation of New York, Howe proceeded in 1 777 to capture Philadelphia.

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  • In June 1778 he evacuated Philadelphia, with the intention of concentrating his force at New York.

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  • It assisted in the expedition to Philadelphia in July 1777.

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  • On the coast of America the news of the approach of d'Estaing compelled the British commanders to evacuate Philadelphia on the 18th of June.

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  • It is served by the Cambridge branch of the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington railway (Pennsylvania railway), which connects with the main line at Seaford, 30 m.

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  • Tower, A History of the American Whale Fishery (Philadelphia, 1907).

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  • Crampton, received his passports, and the exequaturs of the British consuls at New York, Philadelphia and Cincinnati were revoked.

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  • and a Tour through the Interior Parts of New Spain was published at Philadelphia in 1810; was reprinted and rearranged in London in 1811; and was published in a French version in Paris in 1812, and a Dutch version at Amsterdam in 1812-1813.

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  • THOMAS MIFFLIN (1744-1800), American soldier and politician, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of January 1744, of Quaker parentage.

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  • He graduated at the college of Philadelphia (now the university of Pennsylvania): in 1760.

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  • 2, part 2, Philadelphia, 1830); and J.

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  • Merrill, Memoranda relating to the Mifflin Family (Philadelphia, 1890).

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  • See Washington Irving's Astoria; or Anecdotes of an Enterprise beyond the Rocky Mountains (Philadelphia, 1836).

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  • Reading is served by the Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia & Reading railways, by the Schuylkill Canal, which carries freight to Philadelphia, and by electric railways to several villages in Berks county.

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  • There are large shops of the Philadelphia & Reading railway here.

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  • The development of the town dates from the opening in 1824 of the Schuylkill Canal, from Reading to Philadelphia.

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  • This was followed in 1828 by the Union Canal, running westward to Lebanon and Middletown, and in 1838 by the entrance into Reading of the Philadelphia & Reading railway.

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  • Wit continued decrease of altitude south-eastward, the crystalline belt dips under the coastal plain, near a line marked by the Delaware river from Trenton to Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, and thence south-south-westward through Maryland and Virginia past the cities of Baltimore, Washington and Richmond.

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  • This is well shown in the falls of the Potomac a few miles above Washington; in the rapids 01 the lower Susquehanna; and in the falls of the Schuylkill, a branch which joins the Delaware at Philadelphia, where the water-power has long been used in extensive factories.

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  • The three leading colonial cities, Philadelphia, w York and Boston, grew six-fold in the I 8th century, and fiftyfo in the next.

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  • In 1820 the first cargo of anthracite coal was shipped to Philadelphia.

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  • It will be seen that the commercial1789-1818consult Adam Seyberts Statistical Annals (Philadelphia, 1818), which are based upon official documents, a large part of which are no longer in existence.

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  • New York, New Orleans, Boston, Galveston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, San Francisco and Puget Sound are, in order, the leading customs districts of the country in the value of their imports and exports.

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  • See also Proceedings of the National Conference for Good City Government (Philadelphia, 1894).

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  • The Federal Government: For a study of the constitution see the Documentary History of the Constitution of the United States of America,1786-1870(5 vols., Washington, 1894-1905); Jonathan Elliot, Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution, &c. (2nd ed., 5 vols., Philadelphia, 1888); The Federalist, edited by H.

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  • Hurd, History of Essex County (Philadelphia, 1888); J.

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  • He graduated from the medical department of the university of Pennsylvania in 1838, and a few years later set up in practice at Philadelphia and became a lecturer at the Philadelphia School of Anatomy.

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  • He was appointed surgeon at the Philadelphia Hospital in 1854 and was the founder of its pathological museum.

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  • During the American Civil War he was consulting surgeon in the Mower Army Hospital, near Philadelphia, and acquired considerable reputation for his operations in cases of gun-shot wounds.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 22nd of March 1892.

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  • He afterwards resided principally in Germany until his death on the 9th of September 1894, but frequently visited Egypt, took part in another official mission to Persia, and organized an Egyptian exhibit at the Philadelphia Exposition in 1876.

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  • His ship, the "Philadelphia," ran aground on the Tunisian coast, and he was for a time imprisoned.

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  • As the crusaders marched by way of Dorylaeum and Iconium towards Antioch, the Greeks subdued the Turkish amirs residing at Smyrna, Ephesus, Sardis, Philadelphia, Laodicea, Lampes and Polybotus; 1 and Kilij Arslan, with his Turks, retired to the north-eastern parts of Asia Minor, to act with the Turkish amirs of Sivas (Sebaste), known under the name of the Danishmand.

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  • (Philadelphia, 1900).

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  • Hurd, History of Middlesex County (3 vols., Philadelphia, 1890); S.

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  • Stevens's History of Georgia to 1798 (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1847-1859) and C. C. Jones, jun., History of Georgia (2 vols., Boston, 1883) for the Colonial and Revolutionary periods; C. H.

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  • Stephens (Philadelphia, 1878), and Louis Pendleton, Life of Alexander H.

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  • Stephens (Philadelphia, 1907); P. A.

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  • Newport News is served by the Chesapeake & Ohio railway, of which it is a terminus; by river boats to Richmond and Petersburg, Va.; by coastwise steamship lines to Washington, D.C., Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Providence; by foreign steamship lines to London, Glasgow, Liverpool, Dublin, Belfast, Rotterdam, Hamburg and other ports; and by electric lines to Old Point Comfort, Norfolk and Portsmouth.

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  • Onward till the period of the War of Independence bounties and other rewards for the rearing of worms and silk filature continued to be offered; and just when the war broke out Benjamin Franklin and others were engaged in nursing a filature into healthy life at Philadelphia.

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  • He died at Philadelphia on the 22nd of December 1887.

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  • Here he spent two more years on a farm, and then, securing employment as a drover, worked his way to Philadelphia and finally to Albany, New York, where for two years he taught school, studied medicine, and was a labourer on the Erie Canal.

    0
    0
  • Forbes-Lindsay, American Insular Possessions (Philadelphia, 1906); Jose de Olivares, Our Islands and their People (New York, 1899); J.

    0
    0
  • Jacobs, The Book of Concord (Philadelphia, 1882-83).

    0
    0
  • In 1844 the British Museum possessed three, and the sale catalogue of the Rivoli Collection, which passed in 1846 to the Academy of Natural Sciences at Philadelphia, includes a single specimen - probably the first taken to America.

    0
    0
  • The second and much more serious host of warriors, led by Godfrey of Bouillon, he conducted also into Asia, promising to supply them with provisions in return for an oath of homage, and by their victories recovered for the Empire a number of important cities and islands - Nicaea, Chios, Rhodes, Smyrna, Ephesus, Philadelphia, Sardis, and in fact most of Asia Minor (1097-1099).

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    0
  • From 1880 until his death he was editor and part proprietor of the Philadelphia Press.

    0
    0
  • He died in Philadelphia on the, 9th of January 1908.

    0
    0
  • Foulke (Philadelphia, 1807), and the German by O.

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    0
  • In 1785 he became a commission merchant in Philadelphia; but in October 1786, soon after the legislature of Pennsylvania had passed a bill for erecting Wyoming district into the county of Luzerne, he was appointed prothonotary and a judge of the court of common pleas and clerk of the court of sessions and orphans, court for the new county, and was commissioned to organize the county.

    0
    0
  • Timothy Pickering's grandson, Charles Pickering (1805-1878), graduated at Harvard College in 1823 and at the Harvard Medical School in 1826, practised medicine in Philadelphia, was naturalist to the Wilkes exploring expedition of 1838-1842, and in1843-1845travelled in East Africa and India.

    0
    0
  • - Pennsylvania skirts the coastal plain in the south-east below Philadelphia, is traversed from north-east to south-west by the three divisions of the Appalachian province - Piedmont or older Appalachian belt, younger Appalachian ridges and valleys and Alleghany plateau - and in the north-west corner is a small part of the Erie plain.

    0
    0
  • or less on the bank of the Delaware between Philadelphia and Chester to2000-3000ft.

    0
    0
  • Another range of hills, known as the Trenton Prong, extends from the northern suburbs of Philadelphia both westward and southward through Chester, Delaware, Lancaster and York counties, but these rise only 400-600 ft.

    0
    0
  • The lower portion of the Delaware river has been entered by the sea as the result of the depression of the land, giving a harbour, at the head of which developed the city of Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • At Philadelphia the mean temperature in winter (December, January and February) is 34°, the mean temperature in summer (June, July and August) is 74°, and the range of extremes here for a long period of years ending with 1907 was within 103° and 6°.

    0
    0
  • The dairy business is largest in the regions around Philadelphia and Pittsburg, and in Erie and Bradford counties.

    0
    0
  • A large portion of the vegetables are grown in the vicinity of Philadelphia or in the vicinity of Pittsburg.

    0
    0
  • Floriculture is an important industry in Philadelphia and its vicinity.

    0
    0
  • However until increased facilities of transport brought more desirable stones into competition they were used extensively in Philadelphia and.

    0
    0
  • In Dauphin county is a quarry of bluish-brown Triassic sandstone that has been used extensively especially in Philadelphia, for the erection of the so-called brown stone fronts.

    0
    0
  • The most marked advances from 1900 to 1905 were in worsted goods (61.4%) structural iron-work (60%), and tin and terne-plate (54.4%) Philadelphia is the great manufacturing centre.

    0
    0
  • The silk and cement industries are confined largely to the eastern cities and boroughs; the coke, tin and terne-plate, and pickling industries to the western; and the construction and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, and repair of railway cars to Altoona, Meadville, Dunmore, Chambersburg, Butler and Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • The new road cut through the Juniata region in the march of the army of Brigadier-General John Forbes, against Fort Duquesne in 1758, was a result of the influence of Pennsylvania, for it was considered even then a matter of great importance to the future prosperity of the province that its seaport, Philadelphia, be connected with navigation on the Ohio by the easiest line of communication that could be had wholly within its limits.

    0
    0
  • As early as 1762 David Rittenhouse and others made a survey for a canal to connect the Schuylkill and the Susquehanna rivers, and in 1791 a committee of the state legislature reported in favour of a project for establishing communication by canals and river improvement from Philadelphia to Lake Erie by way of the Susquehanna river.

    0
    0
  • Before anything was done, the need of improved means of transportation between Philadelphia and the anthracite coal-fields became the more pressing.

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    0
  • The Schuylkill Canal Company, chartered in 1815, began the construction of a canal along the Schuylkill river from Philadelphia to Mount Carbon, Schuylkill county, in 1816, and completed it in 1826.

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    0
  • In 1818 the Lehigh Navigation Company was formed to improve the navigation of the Lehigh river from its confluence with the Delaware to Coalport, and two years later coal was successfully carried down the Lehigh and Delaware rivers to Philadelphia in " arks " or rectangular boxes, two or more of which were joined together and steered by a long oar.

    0
    0
  • Work was begun on the system in 1826 and was continued without interruption until 1840, when the completed or nearly completed portions embraced a railway from Philadelphia to Columbia on the Susquehanna, a canal up the Susquehanna and the Juniata from Columbia to Hollidaysburg, a portage railway from Hollidaysburg through Blair's Gap in the Alleghany Front to Johnstown on the Conemaugh river, a canal down the Conemaugh, Kiskiminetas, and Allegheny rivers to Pittsburg, a canal up the Susquehanna and its west branch from the mouth of the Juniata to Farrandsville, in Clinton county, a canal up the Susquehanna and its north branch from Northumberland nearly to the New York border, and a canal up the Delaware river from Bristol to the mouth of the Lehigh; considerable work had also been done on two canals to connect the Ohio river with Lake Erie.

    0
    0
  • In its natural condition there were bars in the Delaware river below Philadelphia which obstructed the navigation of vessels drawing more than 17-20 ft.

    0
    0
  • In 1823 a company was incorporated to build a railway from Philadelphia to Columbia, but nothing further was done until 1828, when the state canal commissioners were directed to build this road and the Allegheny Portage railway from Hollidaysburg to Johnstown.

    0
    0
  • Both the Philadelphia & Columbia and the Allegheny Portage railways were completed in 1834.

    0
    0
  • The principal railways are the lines operated by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company from New York to Washington through Philadelphia; from Philadelphia to Cincinnati, Cleveland, Chicago and St Louis through Harrisburg and Pittsburg; from Baltimore, Maryland, to Sodus Point on Lake Ontario (Northern Central) through Harrisburg and Williamsport; from Williamsport to Buffalo and to Erie, and from Pittsburg to Buffalo; the Philadelphia & Reading; the Lehigh Valley; the Erie; the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western; the Baltimore & Ohio; and the Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburg.

    0
    0
  • Philadelphia, the Atlantic port, exports chiefly petroleum, coal, grain and flour, and imports chiefly iron ore, sugar, drugs and chemicals, manufactured iron, hemp, jute and flax.

    0
    0
  • The populations of the principal cities in 1900 were as follows: Philadelphia, 1,293,697 Pittsburg, 321,616; Allegheny, 129,896 (subsequently annexed to Pittsburg); Scranton, 102,026; Reading, 78,961; Erie, 52,733 Wilkes-Barre, 51,721; Harrisburg, 50,167; Lancaster, 4 1, 459; Altoona, 38,973; Johnstown, 35,936; Allentown, 35,416; McKeesport, 34, 22 7; Chester, 33,988; York, 33,708; Williamsport, 28,757; New Castle, 28,339; Easton, 25,238; Norristown, 22,265; Shenandoah, 20,321; Shamokin (borough), 18,202; Lebanon, 17,628.

    0
    0
  • Under an act of the general assembly passed in 1870 the people of Philadelphia were forced to contribute more than $20,000,000 for the construction of a city-hall.

    0
    0
  • The object of the provision, however, has been in a large measure nullified by the system of city classification, under which Philadelphia is the only city of the first class.

    0
    0
  • An agitation begun by the Philadelphia society for assisting distressed prisoners in 1776, checked for a time by the War of Independence,.

    0
    0
  • led ultimately to the passage of a statute in 1818 for the establishment of the Western Penitentiary at Allegheny (opened 1826) and another of 1821 for the establishment of the Eastern Penitentiary in Philadelphia (opened 1829).

    0
    0
  • The famous Friends' public school, founded in Philadelphia in 1689 and chartered in 1697, still exists as the William Penn charter school.

    0
    0
  • Other institutions for higher education are the University of Pennsylvania, at Philadelphia (1749), an endowed institution which receives very little support from the state; the University of Pittsburgh (1819), at Pittsburg (q.v.); Dickinson College (Methodist Episcopal, 1783), at Carlisle; Haveriord College (Society of Friends, 1833), at Haverford; Franklin and Marshall {German Reformed, 1853), at Lancaster; Washington and Jefferson {Presbyterian, 1802), at Washington; Lafayette (Presbyterian, 1832), at Easton; Bucknell University (Baptist, 1846), at Lewisburg; Waynesburg (Cumberland Presbyterian, 1851), at Waynesburg; Ursinus (German Reformed, 1870), at Collegeville; Allegheny College (Methodist Episcopal, 1815), at Meadville; Swarthmore (Society of Friends (Hicksites), 1866), at Swarthmore; Muhlenberg (Lutheran, 1867), at Allentown; Lehigh University (non-sectarian) 1867), at Bethlehem; and for women Bryn Mawr College (Society of Friends, 1885), at Bryn Mawr; the Allentown College (German Reformed, 1867), at Allentown; Wilson College (Presbyterian, 1870), and the Pennsylvania College for women (1869), at Pittsburg.

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    0
  • There are theological seminaries at Pittsburg, the Allegheny Seminary (United Presbyterian, 1825), Reformed Presbyterian (1856), and Western Theological Seminary (Presbyterian, 1827); at Lancaster (German Reformed, 1827); at Meadville (Unitarian, 18 44); at Bethlehem (Moravian, 1807); at Chester, the Crozer Theological Seminary (Baptist, 1868); at Gettysburg (Lutheran, 1826); and in Philadelphia several schools, notably the Protestant Episcopal Church divinity school (1862) and a Lutheran seminary (1864), at Mount Airy.

    0
    0
  • There are many technical and special schools, such as Girard College, Drexel institute and Franklin institute at Philadelphia, the Carnegie institute at Pittsburg and the United States Indian school at Carlisle (1891).

    0
    0
  • In December 1763 six Christian Indians, Conestogas, were massacred by the " Paxton boys " from Paxton near the present Harrisburg; the Indians who had escaped were taken to Lancaster for safe keeping but were seized and killed by the " Paxton boys," who with other backwoodsmen marched upon Philadelphia early in 1764, but Quakers and Germans gathered quickly to protect it and civil war was averted, largely by the diplomacy of Franklin.

    0
    0
  • The two Continental Congresses (1774, and 1 7751 781) met in Philadelphia, except for the months when Philadelphia was occupied by the British army and Congress met in Lancaster and York, Pennsylvania, and then in Princeton, New Jersey.

    0
    0
  • In Philadelphia the second Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, which the Pennsylvania delegation, excepting Franklin, thought premature at the time, but which was well supported by Pennsylvania afterwards.

    0
    0
  • During the War of Independence battles were fought at Brandywine (1777), Paoli (1777), Fort Mifflin (1777) and Germantown (1777), and Washington's army spent the winter of1777-1778at Valley Forge; and Philadelphia was occupied by the British from the 26th of September 1777 to the 18th of June 1778.

    0
    0
  • They still own considerable property in and around Wilkes-Barre, in Luzerne county, and in Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • The party which had carried this constitution through attacked its opponents by withdrawing the charter of the college of Philadelphia (now the university of Pennsylvania) because its trustees were anti-Constitutionalists and creating in its place a university of the State of Pennsyl vania.

    0
    0
  • These actions of the state assembly against the college and the bank probably were immediate causes for the insertion in the Federal Constitution (adopted by the convention in Philadelphia in 1787) of the clause (proposed by James Wilson of Pennsylvania, a friend of the college and of the bank) forbidding any state to pass a law impairing the obligation of contracts.

    0
    0
  • Philadelphia was the seat of the Federal government, except for a brief period in 1789-1790, until the removal to Washington in 1800.

    0
    0
  • The state capital was removed from Philadelphia to Lancaster in 1799 and from Lancaster to Harrisburg in 1812.

    0
    0
  • Pennsylvania was usually Democratic before the Civil War owing to the democratic character of its country population and to the close commercial relations between Philadelphia and the South.

    0
    0
  • An organized association, known as the Molly Maguires, terrorized the mining regions for many years, but was finally suppressed through the courageous efforts of President Franklin, Benjamin Gowen (1863-1889) of the Philadelphia & Reading railroad with the assistance of Allan Pinkerton and his detectives.

    0
    0
  • There have been mining strikes at Scranton (1871), in the Lehigh and Schuylkill regions (1875), at Hazleton (1897), and one in the anthracite fields (1902) which was settled by a board of arbitrators appointed by President Roosevelt; and there were street railway strikes at Chester in 1908 and in Philadelphia in 1910.

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    0
  • Seaboard Air Line, the Chesapeake & Ohio and the New York, Philadelphia && Norfolk (Pennsylvania system), the Southern, and the Norfolk & Western railways, by steamboat lines to Washington, Baltimore, New York, Providence and Boston, by ferries to Norfolk, and by electric lines to numerous suburbs.

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    0
  • It is served by branches of the Lehigh Valley and the Philadelphia & Reading railways.

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    0
  • south of Toledo; but both militias disbanded when Richard Rush, of Philadelphia, and Benjamin C. Howard, of Baltimore, appeared at Toledo as peace emissaries, appointed by President Jackson.

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  • After studying at the College d'Orleans he began, in 1826, to study law in Philadelphia, and three years later was admitted to the bar.

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    0
  • In 1859 he graduated, was ordained deacon by Bishop William Meade of Virginia, and became rector of the church of the Advent, Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • In 1860 he was ordained priest, and in 1862 became rector of the church of the Holy Trinity, Philadelphia, where he remained seven years, gaining an increasing name as preacher and patriot.

    0
    0
  • Early in 1862 Port Royal Island and the neighbouring region became the scene of the so-called "Port Royal Experiment" - the successful effort of a group of northern people, chiefly from Boston, New York and Philadelphia, among whom Edward S.

    0
    0
  • Cassin's "Study of the Ramphastidae," in the Proceedings of the Philadelphia Academy for 1867 (pp. 100-124).

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  • Wilmington is served by the Atlantic Coast Line and the Seaboard Air Line railways, and by steamboat lines to New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore and to ports on the Cape Fear and Black rivers, and is connected by an electric line with Wrightsville Beach, a pleasure resort 12 m.

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    0
  • After cruising round the world (1837-1840) in the " John Adams," he was assigned to the Philadelphia Naval Asylum, and later (1846-1848) to the Boston Navy Yard.

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    0
  • The price of wrought iron in Philadelphia reached $ 1 55 (£3 2, os.

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    0
  • Stephens, Constitutional View of the War between the States (Philadelphia, 1868-1870); J.

    0
    0
  • ELIAS BOUDINOT (1740-1821), American revolutionary leader, was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, of Huguenot descent, on the 2nd of May 1740.

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    0
  • From 1789 to 1795 he sat as a member of the national House of Representatives, and from 1795 until 1805 he was the director of the United States mint at Philadelphia.

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  • (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1886).

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  • of Philadelphia and 137 m.

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  • In 1852 a movement was made to develop it as a seaside resort for Philadelphia, and after the completion of the Camden & Atlantic City railway in 1854 the growth of the place was rapid.

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    0
  • Pop. (1890) 40,634; (1900) 5 2, 733, of whom 11,957 were foreign-born, including 5226 from Germany and 1468 from Ireland, and 26,797 were of foreign parentage (both parents foreign-born), including 13,316 of German parentage and 4203 of Irish parentage; (1906, estimate) 59993 Erie is served by the New York, Chicago & St Louis, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Erie & Pittsburg (Pennsylvania Company), the Philadelphia & Erie (Pennsylvania railway), and the Bessemer & Lake Erie railways, and by steamboat lines to many important lake ports.

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    0
  • Georg Michael Weiss (c. 1700-c. 1762), a graduate of Heidelberg, ordained and sent to America by the Upper Consistory of the Palatinate in 1727, organized a church in Philadelphia; preached at Skippack; worked in Dutchess and Schoharie counties, New York, in 1731-46; and then returned to his old field in Pennsylvania.

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  • Johann Heinrich Goetschius was pastor (c. 1731-38) of ten churches in Pennsylvania, and was ordained by the Presbyterian Synod of Philadelphia in 1737.

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    0
  • Michael Schlatter (1716-1790), a Swiss of St Gall, sent to America in 1746 by the Synods (Dutch Reformed) of Holland, immediately convened Boehm, Weiss and Rieger in Philadelphia, and with them planned a Coetus, which first met in September 1747; in 1751 he presented the cause of the Coetus in Germany and Holland, where he gathered funds; in 1752 came back to America with six ministers, one of whom, William Stoy (1726-1801), was an active opponent of the Coetus and of clericalism after 1772.

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    0
  • The strongest churches were those of Philadelphia, Lancaster and Germantown in Pennsylvania, and Frederick in Maryland.

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  • New German Synods were: that of the North-West (1867), organized at Fort Wayne, Ind.; that of the East (1875), organized at Philadelphia; and the Central Synod (1881), organized at Galion, Ohio.

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  • The Church has publishing houses in Philadelphia (replacing that of Chambersburg, Pa., founded in 1840 and destroyed in July 1864 by the Confederate army) and in Cleveland, Ohio.

    0
    0
  • But in 1796, the Directory having offered to release his mother and his two brothers, who had been kept in prison since the Terror, on condition that he went to America, he set sail for the United States, and in October settled in Philadelphia, where in February 1 797 he was joined by his brothers the duc de Montpensier and the comte de Beaujolais.

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  • SAMUEL JACKSON RANDALL (1828-1890), American politician, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of October 1828.

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  • He was educated in the public schools and in the University Academy, Philadelphia.

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  • In 1859 he removed to Syracuse, N.Y.; in 1862 to Philadelphia, where he was pastor of the Second Reformed Dutch Church; and in 1869 to the Central Presbyterian Church in Brooklyn, where a large building known as the Tabernacle was erected for him in 1870.

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  • Stephens, Constitutional View of the War Between the States (Philadelphia, 1868-1870); and A.

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    0
  • It is served by the West Jersey && Seashore railroad, and has steamer connexion with Philadelphia.

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    0
  • A w-suit awarded the property to the branch making its headsarters at Indianapolis, whereon the other party, numbering, ooo, that met at Philadelphia, constituted themselves the nited Evangelical Church.

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    0
  • De Land, a manufacturer of Fairport, New York, and in 1887 incorporated under the name of De Land University, which was changed in 1889 to the present name, in honour of John Batterson Stetson (1830-1906), a Philadelphia manufacturer of hats, who during his life gave nearly $500,000 to the institution.

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    0
  • Learned, Abraham Lincoln: An American Migration (Philadelphia, 1909), a careful study of the Lincoln family in America; W.

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    0
  • A series of political essays, written by him for the Salem Gazette, was copied by a prominent Philadelphia journal, the editor of which attributed them to the Hon.

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  • of Philadelphia, and about 59 m.

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  • Trenton is served by the Pennsylvania (main line and Belvidere division) and the Philadelphia & Reading railway systems, by inter-urban electric railways, and by small freight and passenger steamers on the Delaware river; the Delaware && Raritan Canal connects with r 0 U Argent Diagram of Half of Trente et Quarante Table.

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    0
  • Its proximity to the coal fields of Pennsylvania and to the great markets of New York and Philadelphia, and its excellent transportation facilities by rail and by water, have promoted the development of its manufactures.

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    0
  • The fine exhibits from the Trenton potteries at the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia in 1876 greatly stimulated the demand for these wares and increased the competition among the manufacturers; and since that date there has been a marked development in both the quantity and the quality of the product.

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    0
  • Of these, one may note for their later celebrity Philadelphia in Lydia and Attalia on the Pamphylian coast.

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  • Perhaps his most noted achievements were the raising of a corps at Philadelphia, called the Irish Volunteers, who under him became famous for their fighting qualities, and the victory of Hobkirk's Hill, which, in command of only a small force, he gained by superior military skill and determination against a much larger body of Americans.

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    0
  • In America the museums and universities of Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco and New York have collections of greater or less interest.

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    0
  • He is best known for his plastic representations of the North American Indian - especially for "The Signal of Peace" in Lincoln Park, Chicago, and "The Medicine Man," in Fairmount Park, Philadelphia.

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    0
  • In 1770 he opened a studio in Philadelphia, and met with immediate success.

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    0
  • This portrait had been ordered by the Continental Congress, which, however, made no appropriation for it, and eventually it was bought for a private collection in Philadelphia.

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    0
  • Peale painted two miniatures of Mrs Washington (1772 and 1777), and portraits of many of the famous men of the time, a number of which are in Independence Hall, Philadelphia.

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    0
  • Philadelphia in 1777, and served as a member of the committee of public safety; he aided in raising a militia company, became a lieutenant and afterwards a captain, and took part in the battles of Trenton,.

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    0
  • In 1801 he undertook, largely at his own expense, the excavation of the skeletons of two mastodons in Ulster and Orange counties, New York, and in 1802 he established at Philadelphia Peale's Museum.

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    0
  • He was one of the founders, in 1805, of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts at Philadelphia.

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    0
  • His brother, James Peale (1749-1831), also an artist, painted two portraits of Washington (one now the property of the New York Historical Society, and the other in Independence Hall, Philadelphia), besides landscapes and historical compositions.

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    0
  • Philadelphia (1892),(1892), ix.

    0
    0
  • Lord Howe, commander-in-chief of the British in America, who had received no instructions binding him in detail to co-operate with Burgoyne, moved southward and captured Philadelphia.

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  • As a manufacturing centre Allegheny was outranked in 1905 by only two cities in the state - Philadelphia and Pittsburg; among the more important of its large variety of manufactures are the products of slaughtering and meat-packing establishments, iron and steel rolling mills, the products of foundries and machineshops, pickles, preserves and sauces, the products of railwayconstruction and repair shops, locomotives, structural iron and plumbers' supplies.

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    0
  • John Bassett Moore has edited The Works of James Buchanan, comprising his Speeches, State Papers, and Private Correspondence (Philadelphia, 1908 et seq.).

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    0
  • He married in July 1852 and removed to America, living for a time in Philadelphia.

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    0
  • Hamilton Hurd, History of Norfolk County, Massachusetts (Philadelphia, 1864).

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    0
  • NEW PHILADELPHIA, a city and the county-seat of Tuscarawas county, Ohio, U.S.A., on the Tuscarawas River and near the Ohio canal, about 75 m.

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  • The first settlement in the vicinity was made in May 1772, when Moravian Indian converts migrated from Pennsylvania (Friedenshiitten, Bradford county, and Friedenstadt, Lawrence county) to Schoenbrunn, called by the Indians Welhik-Tuppeek, a spring (now dry) a little south of the present New Philadelphia.

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  • New Philadelphia was laid out in 1804 and was named by its founder, John Knisely, after Philadelphia in Pennsylvania; it was incorporated as a village in 1815, and was first chartered as a city in 1896.

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  • It is the principal petroleum-distributing centre on the Atlantic seaboard, the enormous refineries and storehouses of the Standard Oil Company, among the largest in the world, being located here; there are connecting pipe lines with the Ohio and Pennsylvania oil fields, and with New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia and Washington.

    0
    0
  • Egle's Life and Times of Andrew Gregg Curtin (Philadelphia, 1896), which contains chapters written by A.

    0
    0
  • JOHN ADOLF DAHLGREN (1809-1870), admiral in the U.S. navy, was the son of the Swedish consul at Philadelphia, Pennsyl vania, and was born in that city on the 13th of November 1809.

    0
    0
  • Meigs's The Growth of the Constitution (Philadelphia, 1900).

    0
    0
  • ALEXANDER DALLAS BACHE (1806-1867), American physicist, great-grandson of Benjamin Franklin, was born at Philadelphia on the 19th of July 1806.

    0
    0
  • Adams (ed.), Memoirs of John Q uincy Adams, comprising portions of his diary from 1795 to 1848 (12 vols., Philadelphia, 1874-1877).

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    0
  • He was one of Maryland's representatives in the Continental Congress in1784-1785and in the Constitutional Convention of 1787 at Philadelphia, but.

    0
    0
  • The total tonnage of the Duluth - Superior Harbour was estimated in 1908 to be exceeded in the United States only by that of New York and that of Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • Clay, Amurru (Philadelphia, 1909).

    0
    0
  • Montgomery, The Samaritans, Philadelphia, 1907; p. 62 seq.).

    0
    0
  • Nevertheless he made his way into Palestine, planted garrisons at Philoteria on the Sea of Galilee and Scythopolis, and finally stormed Rabbath-ammon (Philadelphia) which was held by partisans of Egypt.

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    0
  • Havana has frequent steam-boat communication with New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Tampa, Mobile, New Orleans and other ports of the United States; and about as frequent with several ports in England, Spain and France.

    0
    0
  • Guiteras, Historia de la conquista de la Habana 1762 (Philadelphia, 1856); J.

    0
    0
  • Prevented by illness from attending, Jefferson sent to the convention elaborate resolutions, which he proposed as instructions to the Virginia delegates to the Continental Congress that was to meet at Philadelphia in September.

    0
    0
  • Just as this book appeared Lowell and Miss White were married, and spent the winter and early spring of 1845 in Philadelphia.

    0
    0
  • (1904); Latest Literary Essays and Addresses (1891); The Old English Dramatists (1892); Conversations on some of the Old Poets (Philadelphia, David M`Kay; reprint of the volume published in 1843 and subsequently abandoned by its author, 18 93); The Power of Sound: a Rhymed Lecture (New York, privately printed, 1896); Lectures on English Poets (Cleveland, The Rowfant Club, 1899).

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    0
  • He was sent as a delegate from New York City to the Continental Congress at Philadelphia in September 1774, and though almost the youngest member, was entrusted with drawing up the address to the people of Great Britain.

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    0
  • Of the second congress, also, which met at Philadelphia on the 10th of May 1775, Jay was a member; and on its behalf he prepared an address to the people of Canada and an address to the people of Jamaica and Ireland.

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  • In April 1776, while still retaining his seat in the Continental Congress, Jay was chosen as a member of the third provincial congress of New York; and his consequent absence from Philadelphia deprived him of the honour of affixing his signature to the Declaration of Independence.

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    0
  • It is connected by lines of steamers with Miami and Port Tampa, with Galveston, Texas, with Mobile, Alabama, with Philadelphia and New York City, and with West Indian ports, and by regular schooner lines with New York City, the Bahamas, British Honduras, &c. There is now an extension of the Florida East Coast railway from Miami to Key West (1 55 m.).

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    0
  • Sir George Lockhart purchased the extensive estates of the earls of Carnwath in Lanarkshire, which were inherited by his eldest son, George, whose mother was Philadelphia, daughter of Lord Wharton.

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    0
  • Lindsay, The Philippines under Spanish and American Rules (Philadelphia, 1906) A.

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    0
  • philadelphia does not much exceed it in size.

    0
    0
  • In the first years of the century a little clique at Philadelphia became alarmed at the increase of the "money power," and at the growing perils to democracy.

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  • Eaton (Philadelphia, 1824) is a history of Jackson's early military exploits, written for political purposes.

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  • This led to the Annapolis convention of 1786, and that in turn led to the Philadelphia convention of 1787.

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  • Madison married, in 1794, Dorothy Payne Todd (1772-1849), widow of John Todd, a Philadelphia lawyer.

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  • Goold Adams, Korea, and the Sacred White Mountain (London, 1894); Stewart Culin, Korean Games (Philadelphia, 1895); Curzon, Problems of the Far East (London, 1896); Dallet, Histoire de l'eglise de Koree (2 vols., Paris, 1874); J.

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  • of Philadelphia, and opposite Bethlehem, with which it is connected by bridges.

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  • It is served by the Lehigh Valley, the Philadelphia & Reading, the Central of New Jersey and the Lehigh & New England railways.

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  • A final and complete edition of his works, including both prose and verse, was published in Philadelphia in 1889.

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  • Bucke (1897), who also wrote an authorized biography - Walt Whitman (Philadelphia, 1883) - which contains contemporary criticisms of Whitman and W D.

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  • And going south along the coast, we find the mean temperature of San Diego 6° or 7° less than that of Vicksburg, Miss., or Charleston, S.C. The quantity of total annual heat supply at Puget Sound exceeds that at Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Cleveland or Omaha, all more than In December 1904 Salton Sea was dry; in February 1906 it was.

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  • "RICHARD HARDING DAVIS (1864-1916), American writer, was born in Philadelphia April 18 1864.

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  • He studied at Lehigh University and Johns Hopkins, and in 1886 became a reporter on the Philadelphia Record.

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  • Crittenden, by his daughter Mrs Chapman Coleman (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1871).

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  • An "Industrial Congress" at Philadelphia also nominated him for the presidency in 1848, and the "Land Reformers" in 1856.

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  • In 1900 McKinley was unanimously renominated by the National Republican Convention which met in Philadelphia on the 19th of June, and which nominated Theodore Roosevelt, governor of New York, for the vice-presidency.

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  • Niederlein, The State of Nicaragua (Philadelphia, 1898); A.

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  • of Philadelphia, and 225 m.

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  • Seven railways enter the city: the Philadelphia, Baltimore & Washington division of the Pennsylvania System, the Baltimore & Ohio, the Southern, the Chesapeake & Ohio, the Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis, the Washington Southern and the Washington, Alexandria & Mt Vernon.

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  • There is also an hourly ferry service to Alexandria, and at irregular intervals there are boats direct to Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York and Boston.

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  • Wilson, Washington, the Capital City (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1901); C. H.

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  • Forbes-Lindsay, Washington, the City and the Seat of Government (Philadelphia, 1908); F.

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  • He died on the 18th of June 1884 in Philadelphia.

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  • There is a large foreign trade and a regular steamship service to Boston, Providence, New York, Philadelphia and Savannah from Norfolk, and there is a considerable traffic on Chesapeake Bay, the Rappahannock, York, James and Elizabeth rivers.

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  • In 1787, under the presidency of Washington, the National Convention sat in Philadelphia, with the result that the present Federal Constitution was submitted to the states for ratification during 1787-1789.

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  • 5 (1907), Bulletin, Philadelphia Geog.

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  • Mcllwaine, Journals of the House of Burgesses, 1742-76 (Richmond, 1905-7); Charles Campbell, History of the Colony and Ancient Dominion of Virginia (Philadelphia, 1859); E.

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  • Elliott, Debates in the Several State Conventions on the Adoption of the Federal Constitution (Philadelphia, 1861); T.

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  • In the following year Baltimore found itself the first metropolitan see of the United States, with New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Bardstown as suffragans.

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  • See Judah P. Benjamin, by Pierce Butler (Philadelphia, 1907, with a good bibliography).

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  • That he thought a great deal on public questions, and took full advantage of his legislative experience as a means of political education, is shown by his letter of the 5th of April 1769 to his neighbour, George Mason, communicating the Philadelphia non-importation resolutions, which had just reached him.

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  • On the 5th of August 1774 the Virginia convention appointed Washington as one of seven delegates to the first Continental Congress, which met at Philadelphia on the 5th of September, and with this appointment his national career, which was to continue with but two brief intervals until his death, begins.

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  • Washington's retreat through New Jersey; the manner in which he turned and struck his pursuers at Trenton and Princeton, and then established himself at Morristown, so as to make the way to Philadelphia impassable; the vigour with which he handled his army at the Brandywine and Germantown; the persistence with which he held the strategic position of Valley Forge through the dreadful winter of 1777-1778, in spite of the misery of his men, the clamours of the people and the impotence and meddling of the fugitive Congress - all went to show that the fibre of his public character had been hardened to its permanent quality.

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  • When the Federal Convention met at Philadelphia in May 1787 to frame the present constitution, Washington was present as a delegate from Virginia, though much against his will; and a unanimous vote at once made him the presiding officer.

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  • Baker's Bibliotheca Washingtoniana (Philadelphia, 1889).

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  • The most important lives are those of John Marshall (Philadelphia, 1804-1807), David Ramsay (New York, 2807), Washington Irving (New York, 1855-1859), E.

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  • Baker's Itinerary of Washington (Philadelphia, 1892), H.

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  • Ford's True George Washington (Philadelphia, 1896) and R.

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  • Rush's Washington in Domestic Life (Philadelphia 1857).

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  • Gaillard Hunt's John C. Calhoun (Philadelphia, 1908) is a valuable work.

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  • by Edwin James (3 vols., London; 2 vols., Philadelphia, 1823); Captain H.

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  • Stansbury, Exploration of the Valley of the Great Salt Lake (2 vols., Philadelphia, 1852; also as Senate Executive Document No.

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  • Kane of Philadelphia.

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  • James, The Colonization of New England (Philadelphia, 1904); H.

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  • After waiting some time for the erection of a spire at Philadelphia, by means of which he hoped to bring down the electricity of a thunderstorm, he conceived the idea of sending up a kite among thunder-clouds.

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  • The most important of Franklin's electrical writings are his Experiments and Observations on Electricity made at Philadelphia, 1 75 1 - 1 754; his Letters on Electricity; and various memoirs and letters in the Phil.

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  • Ebenezer Kinnersley (1711-1778) of Philadelphia made useful observations on the elongation and fusion of iron wires by electrical discharges (Phil.

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  • Davy, and improvements initiated by Wollaston and Robert Hare (1781-1858) of Philadelphia.

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