Pheasants sentence example

pheasants
  • Australia, he pointed out, has no woodpeckers and no pheasants, which are widely-spread Indian birds.
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  • Swamp deer, pheasants, and occasionally tigers are found in it.
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  • The woods are well stocked with red and roe deer, wild boar, hares, rabbits, pheasants, woodcock and snipe.
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  • Game birds include ducks, geese, plovers, snipe, loons, grebes, terns, rails, the woodcock and the ruffed grouse; quails are scarce except on Long Island, where a number or young birds are liberated each year, and by the same mea 's a supply of pheasants is maintained in some parts of the state.
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  • The native wild ducks are carefully preserved for sportsmen, in whose interests pheasants, red and fallow deer, and brown and rainbow trout have been very successfully acclimatized.
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  • The known fauna comprise boars, bears, deer, swans, geese, pheasants and quail.
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  • The forests are well stocked with game, deer, chamois (in the Alps), wild boars, capercailzie, grouse, pheasants, &c. being plentiful.
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  • Ptarmigan and blackcock are found in many districts, partridges and pheasants are carefully preserved, and the capercailzie, once extirpated, has been restored to some of the Highland forests.
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  • Silver pheasants and partridges are found in large numbers, especially in the mountains.
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  • The most important are eagles, kites, vultures, falcons, owls, horn-bills, cranes, pheasants (notably the argus, fire-back and peacock-pheasants), partridges, ravens, crows, parrots, pigeons, woodpeckers, doves, snipe, quail and swallows.
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  • Gamble's quail, bob-white, grouse, English pheasants and wild turkeys are the most important game birds, and the mocking-bird is common throughout south-western New Mexico.
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  • The golden pheasant (Chrysolophus pictus) is locally established in the United States, as appear to be other pheasants of less common species.
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  • Wild game is plentiful; pheasants, partridges, snipe and water-fowl of many descriptions make the country a tempting field for the sportsman.
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  • The gallinaceous birds include the peacock, which everywhere adorns the forest bordering on the plains, jungle fowl and several pheasants; partridges, of which the chikor may be named as most abundant, and snowpheasants and partridges, found only at the greatest elevations.
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  • Prairie-dogs, jack-rabbits, crows and occasional ravens, quail, grouse, pheasants and wild turkeys are also noteworthy in a rather scant animal life.
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  • Prairie chickens (pinnated grouse), pheasants and wild turkeys, all very common as late as 1880, are no longer to be found save in remote and thinly-settled districts.
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  • Among land birds may be enumerated several varieties of eagle, vulture, falcon, owl, crow, jay, magpie, stork, quail, thrush, dove, &c. Pheasants are easily acclimatized; grouse and woodcock are indigenous on the uplands of the north; partridges, in all districts.
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  • All male pheasants usually develop a spur on the back of each leg.
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  • By such measures Spain was induced to sue for peace, which was finally signed in the Isle of Pheasants on the Bidassoa, and is known as the Treaty of the Pyrenees.
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  • Wild geese and ducks, grouse, partridges, snipe, woodcock, quails, widgeons and teal are plentiful all over the country, and in recent years preserves have been largely stocked with pheasants.
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  • Turn the pheasants over and add the apricots, wine mixture and the dates to the pan.
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  • Shooting The steep banks of the Spey and Avon glens and mature hardwoods allow driven pheasants to be shown well to lines of guns.
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  • Reported losses of birds were often under 1% but rose to over 10% of released pheasants on different shoots.
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  • A wide range of fresh poultry, pheasants, wild ducks and local wild venison is also available.
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  • They have many predators including weasels, stoats, foxes, cats, owls, hawks, crows and even pheasants.
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  • On spring days you should hear skylarks, and may see a number of farmland birds including the yellowhammer, kestrel and pheasants.
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  • Pheasants Eye (Adonis) - Beautiful perennial or biennial plants, belonging to the Buttercup order, chiefly natives of cornfields in Europe and Western Asia, dwarf, with finely-divided leaves, and red or yellow flowers.
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  • Rasorial birds, such as peafowl, junglefowl, pheasants and partridges, though well represented in the Arakan hills, are rare in the islands; while a third of the different species found are peculiar to the Andamans.
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  • Of the many characteristic birds may be mentioned Pycnonotidae or bulbuls, of which the Phyllornithinae are peculiar, Campephagidae or cuckoo-shrikes, Dicruridae or drongos, Nectariniidae or sunbirds; pheasants, together with Pavo and Gallus.
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  • Indo-China is especially rich in Eurylaemidae, China proper and the Himalayas in pheasants.
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  • These cocoons, which may often be seen carried between the mandibles of the workers, are the "ants' eggs" prized as food for fish and pheasants.
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  • The still more magnificently clad gold pheasants (Thaumalea), and the eared pheasants (Crossoptilon), are also confined to certain districts in the mountains of north-eastern Asia.
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  • Next stands the order Gallinae with 4 " cohorts "; (I) Tetraonomorphae, comprising 2 families, the sand-grouse (Pterocles) and the grouse proper, among which the Central American Oreophasis finds itself; (2) Phasianomorphae, with 4 families, pheasants peacocks, turkeys, guinea fowls, partridges, quails, and hemipodes (Turnix); (3) Macronyches, the megapodes, with 2 families; (4) the Duodecimpennatae, the curassows and guans, also with 2 families; (5) the Struthioniformes, composed of the tinamous; and (6) the Subgrallatores with 2 families, one consisting of the curious South American genera Thinocorus and Attagis and the other of the sheathbill (Chionis).
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  • Pheasants, ducks, geese and snipe are abundant, and Dr C. Collingwood in his Naturalist's Rambles in the China Seas mentions .Ardea prasinosceles and other species of herons, several species of fly-catchers, kingfishers, shrikes and larks, the black drongo, the Cotyle sinensis and the Prinia sonitans.
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  • By the patient study of the behaviour of precocious young birds, such as chicks, pheasants, ducklings and moorhens, it can be readily ascertained that such modes of activity as running, swimming, diving, preening the down, scratching the ground, pecking at small objects, with the characteristic attitudes expressive of fear and anger, are so far instinctive as to be definite on their first occurrence - they do not require to be learnt.
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  • The more important wild animals are a large wild sheep (Ovis poli), foxes, wolves, jackals, bears, boars, deer and leopards; amongst birds, there are partridges, pheasants, ravens, jays, sparrows, larks, a famous breed of hawks, &c.
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  • Of small game, hares, jungle fowl, peacocks, partridges, snipe, woodcock, wild ducks and geese, and green pigeons are numerous in the tarai, and jungle fowl and pheasants in the hills.
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  • Oak-galls, for example, are broken open by the titmouse in order to obtain the grub within, and the " button-galls " of Neuroterus numismatis, Oliv., are eaten by pheasants.
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  • There are deer (at least five species), boars, bears, antelopes, beavers, otters, badgers, tiger-cats, marten, an inferior sable, striped squirrels, &c. Among birds there are black eagles, peregrines (largely used in hawking), and, specially protected by law, turkey bustards, three varieties of pheasants, swans, geese, common and spectacled teal, mallards, mandarin ducks white and pink ibis, cranes, storks, egrets, herons, curlews, pigeons, doves, nightjars, common and blue magpies, rooks, crows, orioles, halcyon and blue kingfishers, jays, nut-hatches, redstarts, snipe, grey shrikes, hawks, kites, &c. But, pending further observations, it is not possible to say which of the smaller birds actually breed in Korea and which only make it a halting-place in their annual migrations.
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