This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

pharaoh

pharaoh

pharaoh Sentence Examples

  • He was the greatest Pharaoh in the New Empire, if not in all Egyptian history.

    373
    152
  • Egypt was the vast estate of Pharaoh, and the vizier was the steward of it.

    111
    58
  • The Pharaoh is hostile, and Yahweh, the Israelite deity, is moved to send a deliverer; on the events that followed see Exodus, Book Of; Moses.

    72
    59
  • Further speculation is caused when it is found that Solomon fortifies such cities as Megiddo, Beth-horon and Tamar, and that the Egyptian Pharaoh had slain the Canaanites of Gezer (ix.

    70
    53
  • The formula employed by P is "and Pharaoh's heart was strong (pin)," or, "and Pharaoh made strong (p'in) his heart," as in E, but it is distinguished from E's phrase by the addition of "and he hearkened not unto them as Yahweh had spoken."

    67
    62
  • Lofty enclosure walls, Temples adorned with scenes from the victorious campaigns of the Pharaoh, shut off the sacred buildings from the surrounding streets.

    61
    58
  • Lofty enclosure walls, Temples adorned with scenes from the victorious campaigns of the Pharaoh, shut off the sacred buildings from the surrounding streets.

    61
    58
  • According to E, Moses with Aaron is to demand from Pharaoh the release of Israel, which will be effected in spite of his opposition; in assurance thereof the promise is given that they shall serve God upon this mountain; moreover, the people on their departure are to borrow raiment and jewels from their Egyptian neighbours.

    60
    48
  • Of his earlier life it was said that he was born in Egypt of Levite parents, and when the Pharaoh commanded that every new-born male child of the Hebrews should be killed, he was put into a chest and cast upon the Nile.

    46
    44
  • The Judaeans made Jehoahaz (or Shallum) their king, but the Pharaoh banished him to Egypt three months later and appointed his brother Jehoiakim.

    40
    41
  • The young Akh Pharaoh Amenophis IV.

    37
    35
  • These books contain the great national epic of Judaism relating the deliverance of the people from bondage in Egypt, the overthrow of the pursuing Pharaoh and his army, the divinely guided wanderings through the wilderness and the final entry into the promised land.

    36
    36
  • This did not save her from the Pharaoh, who took her into the royal harem and enriched Abram with herds and servants.

    34
    34
  • It is to this latter source that we owe the account of the birth of Moses and of his education at the court of Pharaoh (ii.

    33
    35
  • It became the theory that the temples were the gifts of the Pharaoh to his fathers the gods, and therefore in the scenes of the cult that adorn the inner walls it is always he who is depicted as performing the ceremonies.

    29
    26
  • II that the Israelites built in Egypt for the Pharaoh two store-cities, Pithom and Rameses.

    28
    30
  • Of a more primitive character, however, is another parallel story of Abraham at the court of Pharaoh, king of Egypt (xii.

    26
    22
  • Not until 608 did a Pharaoh (Necho) lead an Egyptian army so far north, and he was defeated by Nebuchadrezzar.

    26
    24
  • Pharaoh Hophra (Apries), 589570 B.C., fomented rebellion against the Babylonian suzerainty in Judah, but accomplished little there.

    25
    21
  • Of the old deities Ammon represented by far the wealthiest and most powerful interests, and against this long favored deity the Pharaoh hurled himself with fury.

    24
    21
  • Those who relied on Pharaoh and remained loyal as their fathers had done sent letter after letter appealing for aid against their foes.

    24
    22
  • In the Tell el-Amarna letters the friendly kings ask Pharaoh for much gold.

    19
    15
  • 17), (d) the return of Moses to Egypt, and his appeal to Pharaoh which results in the further oppression of Israel (iv.

    19
    19
  • If Pharaoh still remains obdurate his first-born is threatened (iv.

    17
    14
  • He was kindly received by Pharaoh, who gave him the sister of his queen Tahpenes to wife.

    17
    17
  • The sign, however, has no effect on Pharaoh (vii.

    12
    18
  • It was allotted to the Levites, but its original inhabitants were not driven out until the time of Solomon, when "Pharaoh, king of Egypt" took the city and gave it as a dowry to his daughter, Solomon's wife (1 Kings ix.

    11
    9
  • PHARAOH (Par`oh), the Hebraized title of the king of Egypt, in Egyptian Per-`o; Pheron in Herodotus represents the same.

    11
    12
  • In early Egypt men of rank would be followed by a servant carrying a pair of sandals in case of need; but in the New Kingdom they were in common use, although a typical difference is observed when princes appear unshod in the presence of the Pharaoh, who wears sandals him self.

    11
    16
  • Psammetichus died in the fifty-fourth year of his reign and was succeeded by his son Necho, 610594 B.C. Taking advantage of the helpless state of the Assyrians, whose capital was assailed by the Medes and the Babylonians, the new Pharaoh prepared an expedition to recover the ancient possessions of the Empire in Syria.

    9
    12
  • Psammetichus died in the fifty-fourth year of his reign and was succeeded by his son Necho, 610594 B.C. Taking advantage of the helpless state of the Assyrians, whose capital was assailed by the Medes and the Babylonians, the new Pharaoh prepared an expedition to recover the ancient possessions of the Empire in Syria.

    9
    12
  • that he was blind of one eye; that he was the Elihu of Job; that, as one of Pharaoh's counsellors, he was governor of a city of Ethiopia, and rebelled against Pharaoh; Moses was sent against him by Pharaoh at the head of an army, and stormed the city and put Balaam to flight, &c. &c.

    8
    6
  • In 588 Apries (Pharaoh Hophra) made an attempt 1 The above interpretation of Menander and the Assyrian evidence is based upon Ed.

    8
    6
  • The enormous constructive energy of the proud Pharaoh, instead of being concentrated on the capital, was expended with almost equal lavishness on other parts of the country.

    8
    6
  • A supreme priestly rank, that of Rish 'amma: or "head of the people," is recognized, but only in theory; since the time of Pharaoh this sovereign pontificate has only once been filled.

    8
    8
  • One would suppose that the most ignorant Jew could never have mistaken Haman, the minister of Ahasuerus, for the minister of Pharaoh, as happens in the Koran, or identified Miriam, the sister of Moses, with Mary (= Mariam), the mother of Christ.

    8
    11
  • I) is mainly taken from J, though E's account of the first interview with Pharaoh has been partially retained in v.

    8
    14
  • It was cut on the rocks by an Egyptian nobleman named Hannu, who states that he was sent by Pharaoh Sankhkere, Menthotp IV., with a force gathered out of the Thebaid, from Coptos to the Red Sea, there to take command of a naval expedition to the Holy Land of Punt (Puoni), "to bring back odoriferous gums."

    7
    6
  • From Meroe to Memphis the commonest subject carved or painted in the interiors of the temples is that of some contemporary Phrah or Pharaoh worshipping the presiding deity with oblations of gold and silver vessels, rich vestments, gems, the firstlings of the flock and herd, cakes, fruits, flowers, wine, anointing oil and incense.

    7
    7
  • The original order of events in J seems to have been as follows: after the death of Pharaoh (ii.

    7
    7
  • From Meroe to Memphis the commonest subject carved or painted in the interiors of the temples is that of some contemporary Phrah or Pharaoh worshipping the presiding deity with oblations of gold and silver vessels, rich vestments, gems, the firstlings of the flock and herd, cakes, fruits, flowers, wine, anointing oil and incense.

    7
    7
  • The first Pharaoh of the succeeding dynasty, Rameses I., came to terms with a Kheta king called Saplel or Saparura; but Seti I.

    7
    8
  • Apart from the literary characteristics which clearly differentiate this narrative from the preceding accounts of J and E, the following points of variation are worthy of consideration: (I) The people refuse to listen to Moses; (2) Aaron is appointed to be Moses' spokesman, not with the people, but with Pharaoh; (3) one sign is given (not three) and performed before Pharaoh; (4) the rod is turned into a reptile (tannin), not a serpent (n(thash).

    7
    11
  • Other distinctive features of J's narrative are: (I) Moses alone is bidden to interview Pharaoh (vii.

    7
    12
  • The king (for titles see PHARAOH) was the head of the hierarchy: he was himself divine and is often styled the good god, and was the proper mediator between gods and men.

    6
    6
  • Hence the Pharaoh of the Exodus is commonly supposed to have been Ramses (Rameses) II.'s successor, Merenptah (Mineptah).

    6
    9
  • After an interview with the Pharaoh (recorded only by P, xlvii.

    6
    9
  • The earth is conceived of as a round disk, slightly sloping towards the south, surrounded on three sides by the sea, but on the north by a high mountain of turquoises; behind this is the abode of the blest, a sort of inferior paradise, inhabited by the Egyptians who were saved from drowning with Pharaoh in the Red Sea, and whom the Mandaeans look upon as their ancestors, Pharaoh himself having been their first high priest and king.

    6
    10
  • At midnight all the first-born of the Egyptians are slain and Pharaoh sends the Israelites out of Egypt in haste, and the people took the dough before it was leavened upon kneading troughs upon their shoulders.

    6
    10
  • i f.); (2) on each occasion he makes a formal demand; (3) on Pharaoh's refusal the plague is announced, and takes place at a fixed time without any human intervention; (4) when the plague is sent, Pharaoh sends for Moses and entreats his intercession, promising in most cases to accede in part to his request; when the plague is removed, however, the promise is left unfulfilled, the standing phrase being "and Pharaoh's heart was heavy (7f)," or "and Pharaoh made heavy (-r»n) his heart"; (5) the plagues do not affect the children of Israel in Goshen.

    6
    14
  • Its combination with the name of the king, as in PharaohNecho, Pharaoh-Hophra, is in accordance with contemporary native usage: the name of the earlier Pharaoh Shishak (Sheshonk) is rightly given without the title.

    5
    6
  • Its combination with the name of the king, as in PharaohNecho, Pharaoh-Hophra, is in accordance with contemporary native usage: the name of the earlier Pharaoh Shishak (Sheshonk) is rightly given without the title.

    5
    6
  • 6 But the fullest information about the state of Phoenicia in the i 5th and 14th centuries B.C. comes from the Amarna tablets, among which are many letters from the subject princes and the Egyptian governors of Phoenicia to the Pharaoh.'

    5
    7
  • The other bears the record of a second expedition to the same land of Punt, undertaken by command of Queen Hatshepsut, 1600 B.C. It is preserved in the vividly chiselled and richly coloured decorations portraying the history of the reign of this famous Pharaoh on the walls of the "Stage Temple" at Thebes.

    5
    10
  • Throughout the P sections Aaron is associated with Moses, and the regular command given to the latter is "Say unto Aaron": no demand is ever made to Pharaoh, and the description of the plague is quite short.

    4
    4
  • Pharaoh Marres (Marres being, his praenomen graecized).

    4
    6
  • To this civilization as a whole it is convenient to give the name "Minoan," and the name of Minos itself may be reasonably thought to cover a dynastic even more than a personal significance in much the same way as such historic terms as "Pharaoh" or "Caesar."

    3
    11
  • 16 f., while the demand which is to be addressed to Pharaoh is identical 1 The fact that the father-in-law of Moses is called Reuel in v.

    2
    5
  • Egypt was the vast estate of Pharaoh, and the vizier was the steward of it.

    1
    0
  • In the Tell el-Amarna letters the friendly kings ask Pharaoh for much gold.

    1
    0
  • He was found by Pharaoh's daughter, and his (step-)sister Miriam contrived that he should be nursed by his mother; on growing up he killed an Egyptian who was oppressing an Israelite, and this becoming, known, he sought refuge in flight.

    0
    0
  • Two hundred and forty years after the appearing of the false Messiah there came to the world sixty thousand saints out of Pharaoh's world to take the place of the Mandaeans, who had been completely extirpated; their high priest had his residence in Damascus.

    0
    0
  • by "ark," is used in the Old Testament (I) of the box made of bulrushes in which Pharaoh's daughter found the infant Moses (Exodus ii.

    0
    0
  • The Pharaoh's characteristic crown (or crowns) symbolized his royal domains, the sacred uraeus marked his divine ancestry, and he sometimes appeared in the costume of the gods with their fillets adorned with double feathers and horns.

    0
    0
  • It must suffice, therefore, to record the Pharaoh's simple girdle (with or without a tunic) from which hangs the lion's tail, or the tail-like band suspended from the extremity of his head-dress (above), or the panther or leopard skin worn over the shoulders by the high priest at Memphis, subsequently a ceremonial dress of men of rank.

    0
    0
  • That the Pharaoh's skirt, sometimes decorated with a pleated golden material, should become an honorific garment, the right of wearing which was proudly recorded among the bearer's titles, is quite intelligible, but many difficulties arise when one attempts to identify the individuals represented, or to trace the evolution of ideas.2 The well-known conservatism of religious practice manifests itself in ceremonial festivals (where there is a tendency for the original religious meaning to be obscured) and among cere= the priests, and it is interesting to observe that despite the great changes in Egyptian costume in the New Kingdom the priests still kept to the simple linen skirt of earlier days (Erman, 206).

    0
    0
  • Though he says he levied tribute upon them, his successors in the dynasty nearly all record fresh wars with the Kheta who appear as the northernmost of Pharaoh's enemies, and Amenophis or Amenhotep III.

    0
    0
  • He maintained a very large harem (xi.), and among his wives was the daughter of an Egyptian Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • 610 B.e.) Greek mercenaries had been used to prop Pharaoh's throne.

    0
    0
  • Opposite Old Cairo lies the island of Roda, where, according to Arab tradition, Pharaoh's daughter found Moses in the bulrushes.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire all power was again centralized in the hands of the Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Perso (Pharaoh).

    0
    0
  • In the thirty-fourth year, c. 1250 B.C., Khattusil with his friend or subject the king of Kode came from his distant capital to see the wonders of Egypt in person, bringing one of his daughters to be wife of the splendid Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Horeb, after the latter had taken leave of Jethro, and, later on, accompanies him into the presence of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • E regularly uses the phrase "and Pharaoh's heart was strong (pin)," or "and Yahweh made strong (p'Tn) Pharaoh's heart" and "he would not let the children of Israel (or, them) go."

    0
    0
  • On hearing of their flight Pharaoh at once starts in pursuit.

    0
    0
  • The Babylonian army began to lay siege to Jerusalem in the ninth year of his reign, and a vain attempt was made by Pharaoh Hophra to cause a diversion.

    0
    0
  • In accordance with what is now known to be a very widespread belief, the kingship was a semi-divine function, and the Pharaoh was the incarnation of Amon-Re.

    0
    0
  • The petty kings naturally recognize the identity of the Pharaoh, and they hail him as their god and identify him with the heads of their own pantheon.

    0
    0
  • In such a case there is resort to a controlling authority, whether self-imposed (like the divine Pharaoh of the Amarna age), or mutually agreed (as Mahomet and the Arabian clans).

    0
    0
  • The historian Ferishta says he had read that the Afghans were descended from Copts of the race of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • as officer, and also Piru (Pharaoh!) as king of Musri, and it is, doubtful whether Hoshea's ally was a petty prince of Egypt or of a N.

    0
    0
  • Near the end of the defile stands the most elaborate of the ruins, el-Hazne or " the Treasury of Pharaoh," not built but hewn out of the cliff; a little farther on, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, comes the theatre, so placed as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view; and at the point where the valley opens out into the plain the site of the city is revealed with striking effect.

    0
    0
  • iv.27), he plays only a secondary part in the incidents at Pharaoh's court.

    0
    0
  • raided south Palestine and Ethiopia, and at Semna beyond the second cataract set up a stela of conquest that in its expressions recalls the stelae of Sesostris in Herodotus: Sesostris may, therefore, be the highly magnified portrait of this Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • PITHOM, one of the "treasure cities" stated to have been built for Pharaoh by the Hebrews in Goshen during the Oppression (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Old Testament we are told that Pharaoh arrayed Joseph " in vestures of fine linen " (Gen.

    0
    0
  • The most beautiful of all the buildings is an unfinished kiosque inscribed by Trajan, well known under the name of "Pharaoh's Bed."

    0
    0
  • The heads of the sphinxes are royal portraits, and apparently they are intended to represent the power of the reigning Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • The story of his descent into Egypt and the plaguing of Pharaoh is a secondary insertion (xii.

    0
    0
  • Akizzi, governor of Katna (near Homs or Hamath), reported this to the Pharaoh who seems to have frustrated the attempt.

    0
    0
  • In vain did Rib-Addi send touching appeals for aid to the distant Pharaoh, who was far too much engaged in his religious innovations to attend to such messages.

    0
    0
  • Itakkama writes thus to the Pharaoh, 5 " Behold, Namyawaza has surrendered all the cities of the king, my lord, to the SA-GAS in the land of Kadesh and in Ubi.

    0
    0
  • The king of Jerusalem, Abd-Hiba, the second part of whose name has been thought to represent the Hebrew Yahweh, 7 reports thus to the Pharaoh, " If (Egyptian) troops come this year, lands and princes will remain to the king, my lord; but if troops come not, these lands and princes will not remain to the king, my lord.8 Abd-Hiba's chief trouble arose from persons called Milkili and the sons of Lapaya, who are said to have entered into a treasonable league with the Habiri.

    0
    0
  • 9 All these princes, however, malign each other in their letters to the Pharaoh, and protest their own innocence of traitorous intentions.

    0
    0
  • Its effect on Pharaoh's ants is to make the queen lay sterile eggs.

    0
    0
  • curse of the Pharaoh 's Tomb ' .

    0
    0
  • The Pharaoh, in sheer exasperation, becomes doubly stubborn.

    0
    0
  • According to the Bible an unnamed Egyptian Pharaoh became the father-in-law of Solomon.

    0
    0
  • Also, as Kaiser suggests, the firstborn of Moses and Zipporah may be linked with the firstborn of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • At an earlier stage in the story we were told that Pharaoh hardened his heart.

    0
    0
  • hardened Pharaoh 's heart for His purposes to be fulfilled.

    0
    0
  • In Egypt, for example, Sarah is in danger of being taken into Pharaoh's harem.

    0
    0
  • No, God hardened Pharaoh's heart for His purposes to be fulfilled.

    0
    0
  • heretic Pharaoh and his name is erased from statues and monuments.

    0
    0
  • Introduction to the Pharaoh hound The Kennel Club describes the dog as ' medium sized, of noble bearing with clean cut lines.

    0
    0
  • Such is Pharaoh king of Egypt to all who rely on him.

    0
    0
  • For the Levitical lawgiver the figure of Yahweh corresponds to the figure of the pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Then next, at least in the first cycle, there's the response of the Egyptian magicians who stand with Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • From the point of view of faith no one is interested in the names of Pharaoh's magicians.

    0
    0
  • mummifyead pharaoh was therefore mummified, which preserved his body.

    0
    0
  • He saves us that we might worship Him, but Pharaoh refuses the request.

    0
    0
  • sarcophagus of an Egyptian Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • But this book itself was a farrago of heterogeneous elements - pieces of genuine history, ancient stories once told in Babylon of Gilgamesh or Etanna, literary forgeries of the days soon after Alexander, like the oldest part of the "Testament of Alexander," variations due to Egyptian patriotic sentiment, like that which made Alexander the son of the last Pharaoh, Nectanebus.

    0
    0
  • Camels also formed part of the present which Pharaoh gave to Abraham, and it was to a company of Ishmaelites travelling from Gilead to Egypt on camels, laden with spices, much as their Arabian descendants do at the present day, that Joseph was sold by his brothers.

    0
    0
  • Of his earlier life it was said that he was born in Egypt of Levite parents, and when the Pharaoh commanded that every new-born male child of the Hebrews should be killed, he was put into a chest and cast upon the Nile.

    0
    0
  • He was found by Pharaoh's daughter, and his (step-)sister Miriam contrived that he should be nursed by his mother; on growing up he killed an Egyptian who was oppressing an Israelite, and this becoming, known, he sought refuge in flight.

    0
    0
  • 1 The plagues with which the reluctant Pharaoh was coerced culminated in the destruction of all the first-born, and Israel escaped to the Red Sea.

    0
    0
  • 8-13, the sign for Pharaoh); and the water is turned into blood (cf.

    0
    0
  • If Pharaoh still remains obdurate his first-born is threatened (iv.

    0
    0
  • PHARAOH (Par`oh), the Hebraized title of the king of Egypt, in Egyptian Per-`o; Pheron in Herodotus represents the same.

    0
    0
  • An old term for the royal palace establishment and estate was Per-`o, "the Great House," and this gradually became the personal designation of Pharaoh (cf.

    0
    0
  • The Judaeans made Jehoahaz (or Shallum) their king, but the Pharaoh banished him to Egypt three months later and appointed his brother Jehoiakim.

    0
    0
  • To this civilization as a whole it is convenient to give the name "Minoan," and the name of Minos itself may be reasonably thought to cover a dynastic even more than a personal significance in much the same way as such historic terms as "Pharaoh" or "Caesar."

    0
    0
  • The earth is conceived of as a round disk, slightly sloping towards the south, surrounded on three sides by the sea, but on the north by a high mountain of turquoises; behind this is the abode of the blest, a sort of inferior paradise, inhabited by the Egyptians who were saved from drowning with Pharaoh in the Red Sea, and whom the Mandaeans look upon as their ancestors, Pharaoh himself having been their first high priest and king.

    0
    0
  • Two hundred and forty years after the appearing of the false Messiah there came to the world sixty thousand saints out of Pharaoh's world to take the place of the Mandaeans, who had been completely extirpated; their high priest had his residence in Damascus.

    0
    0
  • A supreme priestly rank, that of Rish 'amma: or "head of the people," is recognized, but only in theory; since the time of Pharaoh this sovereign pontificate has only once been filled.

    0
    0
  • Indeed, as has been seen, they appropriate the entire personale of the Bible from Adam, Seth, Abel, Enos and Pharaoh to Jesus and John, a phenomenon which bears witness to the close relations of the Mandaean doctrine both with Judaism and Christianity - not the less close because they were relations of hostility.

    0
    0
  • At midnight all the first-born of the Egyptians are slain and Pharaoh sends the Israelites out of Egypt in haste, and the people took the dough before it was leavened upon kneading troughs upon their shoulders.

    0
    0
  • by "ark," is used in the Old Testament (I) of the box made of bulrushes in which Pharaoh's daughter found the infant Moses (Exodus ii.

    0
    0
  • In early Egypt men of rank would be followed by a servant carrying a pair of sandals in case of need; but in the New Kingdom they were in common use, although a typical difference is observed when princes appear unshod in the presence of the Pharaoh, who wears sandals him self.

    0
    0
  • The Pharaoh's characteristic crown (or crowns) symbolized his royal domains, the sacred uraeus marked his divine ancestry, and he sometimes appeared in the costume of the gods with their fillets adorned with double feathers and horns.

    0
    0
  • The consort of the Pharaoh, in turn, wore the sacred vulture head-dress.

    0
    0
  • It must suffice, therefore, to record the Pharaoh's simple girdle (with or without a tunic) from which hangs the lion's tail, or the tail-like band suspended from the extremity of his head-dress (above), or the panther or leopard skin worn over the shoulders by the high priest at Memphis, subsequently a ceremonial dress of men of rank.

    0
    0
  • That the Pharaoh's skirt, sometimes decorated with a pleated golden material, should become an honorific garment, the right of wearing which was proudly recorded among the bearer's titles, is quite intelligible, but many difficulties arise when one attempts to identify the individuals represented, or to trace the evolution of ideas.2 The well-known conservatism of religious practice manifests itself in ceremonial festivals (where there is a tendency for the original religious meaning to be obscured) and among cere= the priests, and it is interesting to observe that despite the great changes in Egyptian costume in the New Kingdom the priests still kept to the simple linen skirt of earlier days (Erman, 206).

    0
    0
  • It was cut on the rocks by an Egyptian nobleman named Hannu, who states that he was sent by Pharaoh Sankhkere, Menthotp IV., with a force gathered out of the Thebaid, from Coptos to the Red Sea, there to take command of a naval expedition to the Holy Land of Punt (Puoni), "to bring back odoriferous gums."

    0
    0
  • The other bears the record of a second expedition to the same land of Punt, undertaken by command of Queen Hatshepsut, 1600 B.C. It is preserved in the vividly chiselled and richly coloured decorations portraying the history of the reign of this famous Pharaoh on the walls of the "Stage Temple" at Thebes.

    0
    0
  • They were a power strong enough to give the Pharaoh cause to vaunt his success (see also Egypt: Ancient History, § " The New Empire ").

    0
    0
  • Though he says he levied tribute upon them, his successors in the dynasty nearly all record fresh wars with the Kheta who appear as the northernmost of Pharaoh's enemies, and Amenophis or Amenhotep III.

    0
    0
  • The first Pharaoh of the succeeding dynasty, Rameses I., came to terms with a Kheta king called Saplel or Saparura; but Seti I.

    0
    0
  • After long struggles, a treaty was concluded in Rameses's twenty-first year, between Pharaoh and " Khetasar " (i.e.

    0
    0
  • The Kheta king subsequently visited Pharaoh and gave him his daughter to wife.

    0
    0
  • Of a more primitive character, however, is another parallel story of Abraham at the court of Pharaoh, king of Egypt (xii.

    0
    0
  • It was allotted to the Levites, but its original inhabitants were not driven out until the time of Solomon, when "Pharaoh, king of Egypt" took the city and gave it as a dowry to his daughter, Solomon's wife (1 Kings ix.

    0
    0
  • This did not save her from the Pharaoh, who took her into the royal harem and enriched Abram with herds and servants.

    0
    0
  • But when Yahweh "plagued Pharaoh and his house with great plagues" suspicion was aroused, and the Pharaoh rebuked the patriarch for his deceit and sent him away under an escort (xii.

    0
    0
  • that he was blind of one eye; that he was the Elihu of Job; that, as one of Pharaoh's counsellors, he was governor of a city of Ethiopia, and rebelled against Pharaoh; Moses was sent against him by Pharaoh at the head of an army, and stormed the city and put Balaam to flight, &c. &c.

    0
    0
  • He maintained a very large harem (xi.), and among his wives was the daughter of an Egyptian Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Further speculation is caused when it is found that Solomon fortifies such cities as Megiddo, Beth-horon and Tamar, and that the Egyptian Pharaoh had slain the Canaanites of Gezer (ix.

    0
    0
  • He was kindly received by Pharaoh, who gave him the sister of his queen Tahpenes to wife.

    0
    0
  • II that the Israelites built in Egypt for the Pharaoh two store-cities, Pithom and Rameses.

    0
    0
  • Hence the Pharaoh of the Exodus is commonly supposed to have been Ramses (Rameses) II.'s successor, Merenptah (Mineptah).

    0
    0
  • After an interview with the Pharaoh (recorded only by P, xlvii.

    0
    0
  • These books contain the great national epic of Judaism relating the deliverance of the people from bondage in Egypt, the overthrow of the pursuing Pharaoh and his army, the divinely guided wanderings through the wilderness and the final entry into the promised land.

    0
    0
  • The Pharaoh is hostile, and Yahweh, the Israelite deity, is moved to send a deliverer; on the events that followed see Exodus, Book Of; Moses.

    0
    0
  • 6 But the fullest information about the state of Phoenicia in the i 5th and 14th centuries B.C. comes from the Amarna tablets, among which are many letters from the subject princes and the Egyptian governors of Phoenicia to the Pharaoh.'

    0
    0
  • Not until 608 did a Pharaoh (Necho) lead an Egyptian army so far north, and he was defeated by Nebuchadrezzar.

    0
    0
  • In 588 Apries (Pharaoh Hophra) made an attempt 1 The above interpretation of Menander and the Assyrian evidence is based upon Ed.

    0
    0
  • The enormous constructive energy of the proud Pharaoh, instead of being concentrated on the capital, was expended with almost equal lavishness on other parts of the country.

    0
    0
  • 610 B.e.) Greek mercenaries had been used to prop Pharaoh's throne.

    0
    0
  • One would suppose that the most ignorant Jew could never have mistaken Haman, the minister of Ahasuerus, for the minister of Pharaoh, as happens in the Koran, or identified Miriam, the sister of Moses, with Mary (= Mariam), the mother of Christ.

    0
    0
  • Opposite Old Cairo lies the island of Roda, where, according to Arab tradition, Pharaoh's daughter found Moses in the bulrushes.

    0
    0
  • The king (for titles see PHARAOH) was the head of the hierarchy: he was himself divine and is often styled the good god, and was the proper mediator between gods and men.

    0
    0
  • Under the Empire all power was again centralized in the hands of the Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • The ustribes were the victors, and it was from them that the astic line sprang; hence the Pharaoh always bore the name onus, and represented in his own hallowed person the ancient 11 deity.

    0
    0
  • The young Akh Pharaoh Amenophis IV.

    0
    0
  • It became the theory that the temples were the gifts of the Pharaoh to his fathers the gods, and therefore in the scenes of the cult that adorn the inner walls it is always he who is depicted as performing the ceremonies.

    0
    0
  • Perso (Pharaoh).

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh Marres (Marres being, his praenomen graecized).

    0
    0
  • He was the greatest Pharaoh in the New Empire, if not in all Egyptian history.

    0
    0
  • Through the fortunate discovery of cuneiform tablets deposited by his successor in the archives at Tell el-Amarna, we can see how the rulers of the great kingdoms beyond the river, Mitanni, Assyria and even Babylonia, corresponded with Amenophis, gave their daughters to him in marriage, and congratulated themselves on having his friendship. The king of Cyprus too courted him; while within the empire the descendants of the Syrian dynasts conquered by his father, having been educated in Egypt, ruled their paternal possessions as the abject slaves of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Of the old deities Ammon represented by far the wealthiest and most powerful interests, and against this long favored deity the Pharaoh hurled himself with fury.

    0
    0
  • Those who relied on Pharaoh and remained loyal as their fathers had done sent letter after letter appealing for aid against their foes.

    0
    0
  • In the thirty-fourth year, c. 1250 B.C., Khattusil with his friend or subject the king of Kode came from his distant capital to see the wonders of Egypt in person, bringing one of his daughters to be wife of the splendid Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh Hophra (Apries), 589570 B.C., fomented rebellion against the Babylonian suzerainty in Judah, but accomplished little there.

    0
    0
  • 17), (d) the return of Moses to Egypt, and his appeal to Pharaoh which results in the further oppression of Israel (iv.

    0
    0
  • It is to this latter source that we owe the account of the birth of Moses and of his education at the court of Pharaoh (ii.

    0
    0
  • According to E, Moses with Aaron is to demand from Pharaoh the release of Israel, which will be effected in spite of his opposition; in assurance thereof the promise is given that they shall serve God upon this mountain; moreover, the people on their departure are to borrow raiment and jewels from their Egyptian neighbours.

    0
    0
  • Horeb, after the latter had taken leave of Jethro, and, later on, accompanies him into the presence of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • I) is mainly taken from J, though E's account of the first interview with Pharaoh has been partially retained in v.

    0
    0
  • 16 f., while the demand which is to be addressed to Pharaoh is identical 1 The fact that the father-in-law of Moses is called Reuel in v.

    0
    0
  • The original order of events in J seems to have been as follows: after the death of Pharaoh (ii.

    0
    0
  • The sign, however, has no effect on Pharaoh (vii.

    0
    0
  • Apart from the literary characteristics which clearly differentiate this narrative from the preceding accounts of J and E, the following points of variation are worthy of consideration: (I) The people refuse to listen to Moses; (2) Aaron is appointed to be Moses' spokesman, not with the people, but with Pharaoh; (3) one sign is given (not three) and performed before Pharaoh; (4) the rod is turned into a reptile (tannin), not a serpent (n(thash).

    0
    0
  • Other distinctive features of J's narrative are: (I) Moses alone is bidden to interview Pharaoh (vii.

    0
    0
  • i f.); (2) on each occasion he makes a formal demand; (3) on Pharaoh's refusal the plague is announced, and takes place at a fixed time without any human intervention; (4) when the plague is sent, Pharaoh sends for Moses and entreats his intercession, promising in most cases to accede in part to his request; when the plague is removed, however, the promise is left unfulfilled, the standing phrase being "and Pharaoh's heart was heavy (7f)," or "and Pharaoh made heavy (-r»n) his heart"; (5) the plagues do not affect the children of Israel in Goshen.

    0
    0
  • E regularly uses the phrase "and Pharaoh's heart was strong (pin)," or "and Yahweh made strong (p'Tn) Pharaoh's heart" and "he would not let the children of Israel (or, them) go."

    0
    0
  • Throughout the P sections Aaron is associated with Moses, and the regular command given to the latter is "Say unto Aaron": no demand is ever made to Pharaoh, and the description of the plague is quite short.

    0
    0
  • The formula employed by P is "and Pharaoh's heart was strong (pin)," or, "and Pharaoh made strong (p'in) his heart," as in E, but it is distinguished from E's phrase by the addition of "and he hearkened not unto them as Yahweh had spoken."

    0
    0
  • On hearing of their flight Pharaoh at once starts in pursuit.

    0
    0
  • The Babylonian army began to lay siege to Jerusalem in the ninth year of his reign, and a vain attempt was made by Pharaoh Hophra to cause a diversion.

    0
    0
  • In accordance with what is now known to be a very widespread belief, the kingship was a semi-divine function, and the Pharaoh was the incarnation of Amon-Re.

    0
    0
  • The petty kings naturally recognize the identity of the Pharaoh, and they hail him as their god and identify him with the heads of their own pantheon.

    0
    0
  • In such a case there is resort to a controlling authority, whether self-imposed (like the divine Pharaoh of the Amarna age), or mutually agreed (as Mahomet and the Arabian clans).

    0
    0
  • The historian Ferishta says he had read that the Afghans were descended from Copts of the race of Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • as officer, and also Piru (Pharaoh!) as king of Musri, and it is, doubtful whether Hoshea's ally was a petty prince of Egypt or of a N.

    0
    0
  • Near the end of the defile stands the most elaborate of the ruins, el-Hazne or " the Treasury of Pharaoh," not built but hewn out of the cliff; a little farther on, at the foot of the mountain called en-Nejr, comes the theatre, so placed as to bring the greatest number of tombs within view; and at the point where the valley opens out into the plain the site of the city is revealed with striking effect.

    0
    0
  • iv.27), he plays only a secondary part in the incidents at Pharaoh's court.

    0
    0
  • raided south Palestine and Ethiopia, and at Semna beyond the second cataract set up a stela of conquest that in its expressions recalls the stelae of Sesostris in Herodotus: Sesostris may, therefore, be the highly magnified portrait of this Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • PITHOM, one of the "treasure cities" stated to have been built for Pharaoh by the Hebrews in Goshen during the Oppression (Exod.

    0
    0
  • In the Old Testament we are told that Pharaoh arrayed Joseph " in vestures of fine linen " (Gen.

    0
    0
  • The most beautiful of all the buildings is an unfinished kiosque inscribed by Trajan, well known under the name of "Pharaoh's Bed."

    0
    0
  • The heads of the sphinxes are royal portraits, and apparently they are intended to represent the power of the reigning Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • The story of his descent into Egypt and the plaguing of Pharaoh is a secondary insertion (xii.

    0
    0
  • Akizzi, governor of Katna (near Homs or Hamath), reported this to the Pharaoh who seems to have frustrated the attempt.

    0
    0
  • In vain did Rib-Addi send touching appeals for aid to the distant Pharaoh, who was far too much engaged in his religious innovations to attend to such messages.

    0
    0
  • Itakkama writes thus to the Pharaoh, 5 " Behold, Namyawaza has surrendered all the cities of the king, my lord, to the SA-GAS in the land of Kadesh and in Ubi.

    0
    0
  • The king of Jerusalem, Abd-Hiba, the second part of whose name has been thought to represent the Hebrew Yahweh, 7 reports thus to the Pharaoh, " If (Egyptian) troops come this year, lands and princes will remain to the king, my lord; but if troops come not, these lands and princes will not remain to the king, my lord.8 Abd-Hiba's chief trouble arose from persons called Milkili and the sons of Lapaya, who are said to have entered into a treasonable league with the Habiri.

    0
    0
  • 9 All these princes, however, malign each other in their letters to the Pharaoh, and protest their own innocence of traitorous intentions.

    0
    0
  • Namyawaza, for instance, whom Itakkama (see above) accuses of disloyalty, writes thus to the Pharaoh, " Behold, I and my warriors and my chariots, together with my brethren and my SA-GAS, and my Suti 10 are at the disposal of the (royal) troops, to go whithersoever the king, my lord, commands."

    0
    0
  • He saves us that we might worship Him, but Pharaoh refuses the request.

    0
    0
  • Of its history, there is mention of it as a herbal preparation in a papyrus taken from the sarcophagus of an Egyptian Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Join Jason, Sir Lancelot, the Pharaoh, Hiawatha or Rama on a spellbinding adventure across five locations.

    0
    0
  • Even celebrities are getting in on the trend, with Gwyneth Paltrow naming her son Moses, a character who freed the Jewish people that were under a pharaoh's control.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh's Fury: A classic swinging ship amusement ride with an Egyptian theme.

    0
    0
  • One person's boredom may be another person's thrills, and visitors should not dismiss Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom's seemingly simple attractions.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom theme park also formerly hosted several carnival rides along a small midway, featuring a ten story Skycoaster attraction that blended skydiving and hang gliding into one split second double thrill.

    0
    0
  • To properly enjoy Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom theme park, guests should allow enough time to experience different attractions even if lines are long.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom is much less expensive than a traditional theme park, depending on which attractions visitors are interested in.

    0
    0
  • For a fun day of activities without the high prices of well known theme parks, Pharaoh's Lost Kingdom in Redlands, California is a great option with fun attractions for everyone to enjoy..

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh's Secret: Located in the same building as the Disaster Transport roller coaster, this haunted tomb conceals a frightening pharaoh curse.

    0
    0
  • I still enjoy hours of play from Pharaoh, an Egyptian simulation strategy game by experimenting with different types of scenarios.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh is an impressive strategic city-building game set in ancient Egypt.

    0
    0
  • Oh great pharaoh, what challenges will you face?

    0
    0
  • If all this sounds interesting to you and want to learn more, go to the Pharaoh Heaven website.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh is a fun but involving strategy, city-building game.

    0
    0
  • Pharaoh is an Egyptian city-building simulation game.

    0
    0
  • You move pieces around and attempt to use your laser at certain points to "checkmate" the Pharaoh.

    0
    0
  • Your result is a single card, which can range from an Egyptian pharaoh to a Renaissance scientist, or even a court jester.

    0
    0
  • His strong features are still considered the ultimate pharaoh tattoo design.

    0
    0
  • Pharaohs: Getting a tattoo of a pharaoh could mean that you have high standards.

    0
    0
  • Ra was an Egyptian pharaoh in poor health who resented the lack of respect shown by his subjects.

    0
    0
  • As punishment, the pharaoh sent an aspect of his daughter, the eye of Ra, to wreak vengeance.

    0
    0
Browse other sentences examples →