Perugia sentence example

perugia
  • When Charles of Bourbon stormed Rome in 1527 Paleario went first to Perugia and then to Siena, where he settled as a teacher.

    0
    0
  • But Perugia had no mind simply to subserve the papal interests.

    0
    0
  • He spent a year in prison at Perugia, and when peace was made at the end of 1202 he returned to Assisi and recommenced his old life.

    0
    0
  • Sepolcro and Città di Castello, then between Perugia and Todi to Orte, just below which it receives the Nera.

    0
    0
  • Other cities where the ceramic industries keep their ground are Pesaro, Gubbio, Faenza (whose name long ago became the distinctive term for the finer kind of potters work in France, falence), Savona and Albissola, Turin, Mondovi, Cuneo, Castellamonte, Milan, Brescia, Sassuolo, Imola, Rimini, Perugia, Castelli, &c. In all these the older styles, by which these places became famous in the IthI8th centuries, have been revived.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Pisa and Perugia were threatened with extinction, and Florence dreaded the advance of the Visconti arms, when the plague suddenly cut short his career of treachery and conquest in the year 1402.

    0
    0
  • Other communes which stit preserved the shadow of independence, like Perugia and Bologna began once more to dream of republican freedom under theii own leading families.

    0
    0
  • The Medici became yearly more indispensable to Florence, the Bentivogli more autocratic in Bologna, the Baglioni in Perugia; and even Siena was ruled by the Petrucci.

    0
    0
  • With this object, he secured Emilia, carried his victorious arms against Ferrara, and curbed the tyranny of the Baglioni in Perugia.

    0
    0
  • But the Marches were soon reoccupied by pontifical troops, and Perugia fell, its capture being followed by an indiscriminate massacre of men, women and children.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Among them were John of Monte Corvino, a Franciscan monk, Andrew of Perugia, John Marignioli and Friar Jordanus, who visited the west coast of India, and above all Friar Odoric of Pordenone.

    0
    0
  • His success here led to his appointment in 1841 as delegate of Perugia, which was at that time a centre of anti-papal secret societies.

    0
    0
  • In January 1846, at the request of the magistrates and people of Perugia, he was appointed bishop of that city with the rank of archbishop; but before returning to Italy he spent February in London, and March and April in Paris.

    0
    0
  • The former papal territories are now comprised within the Italian provinces of Bologna, Ferrara, Forli, Ravenna, Pesaro and Urbino, Ancona, Macerata, Ascoli-Piceno, Perugia, Rome and Benevento.

    0
    0
  • The plan, spreading from the centre over three hills, closely resembles that of Perugia.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1397-1398 Florence had two more wars with Gian Galeazzo Visconti, who, aspiring to the conquest of Tuscany, acquired the lordship of Pisa, Siena and Perugia.

    0
    0
  • His territories were then divided between his sons and his condottieri, and Florence, ever keeping her eye on Pisa, now ruled by Gabriele Maria Visconti, made an alliance with Pope Boniface IX., who wished to regain Perugia and Bologna.

    0
    0
  • In September Malatesta surrendered Perugia, and other cities fell before the Imperialists.

    0
    0
  • The collapse of the Borgias threw Central Italy into confusion; and Machiavelli had, in 1505, to visit the Baglioni at Perugia and the Petrucci at Siena.

    0
    0
  • In the following year he accompanied Julius upon his march through Perugia into the province of Emilia, where the fiery pope subdued in person the rebellious cities of the Church.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He began his parliamentary career as deputy for Civitavecchia in 1886, sitting on the Right, but he resigned his seat in 1897, having been appointed prefect of Perugia; three years later he went to Naples in a similar capacity, and in 1902 he was raised to the Senate.

    0
    0
  • Benedict died at Perugia on the 7th of July 1304; if he was really poisoned, as report had it, suspicion would fall primarily on Nogaret.

    0
    0
  • The conclave that met at Perugia on his death was divided between the partisans of the irreconcilable policy of Boniface VIII.

    0
    0
  • The alliance at first resulted only in compelling the surrender of a few unimportant fortresses in the Romagna; but Julius freed Perugia and Bologna in the brilliant campaign of 1506.

    0
    0
  • It changed hands often during the wars of the 13th century, and was destroyed by Perugia in 1281.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Foligno is a station on the main line from Rome (via Orte) to Ancona, and is the junction for Perugia.

    0
    0
  • In the middle ages it had frequent struggles with Perugia, and its obedience to the church until the 16th century was somewhat fitful.

    0
    0
  • He was driven from Rome by a popular uprising and died at Perugia.

    0
    0
  • The number of dukes continually increased, and in the 6th and 7th centuries there were duces at Rome, Naples, Rimini, Venice and Perugia.

    0
    0
  • It was at first independent, but passed under Perugia in 1292, and later became dependent on the duchy of Spoleto.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It became involved, however, in the disputes of Guelphs and Ghibellines, and was frequently at war with Perugia.

    0
    0
  • It was sacked by Perugia and the papal troops in 1442, and even after that continued to be the prey of factions.

    0
    0
  • Having spent his youth in the papal diplomatic service - he was nuncio at Brussels from 1843-46 - he had a certain knowledge of the workings of parliamentary institutions, while the years immediately before his accession had been spent as archbishop of Perugia, so that he was not closely identified with any of the Vatican parties.

    0
    0
  • He was appointed legate in England on the 22nd of November 1263, and before his return was elected pope at Perugia on the 5th of February 1265.

    0
    0
  • His mother escaped with the boy to Perugia, and it was here that Pontano received his first instruction in languages and literature.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • He studied the civil law first of all under Cinus at Perugia, and afterwards under Oldradus and Jacobus de Belvisio at Bologna, where he was promoted to the degree of doctor of civil law in 1334.

    0
    0
  • His great reputation dates from his appointment to a chair of civil law in the university of Perugia, 1343, where he lectured for many years, raising the character of the law school of Perugia to a level with that of Bologna.

    0
    0
  • He died in 1357 at Perugia, where a magnificent monument recorded the interment of his remains in the church of San Francisco, by the simple inscription of "Ossa Bartoli."

    0
    0
  • The discovery (by Professor Helbig in 1886) of two sets of actual apparatus near Perugia and various representations on vases help to elucidate the somewhat obscure accounts of the method of playing the game contained in the scholia and certain ancient authors who, it must not be forgotten, wrote at a time when the game itself had become obsolete, and cannot therefore be looked to for a trustworthy description of it.

    0
    0
  • The first specimen of the apparatus found at Perugia resembles a candelabrum on a base, tapering towards the top, with a blunt end, on which the small disk (found near the rod), which has a hole near the edge and is slightly hollow in the middle, could be balanced.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A shameless rake and a man of uncontrollable temper, his massacre of the people of Perugia after a rebellion in 1540 and the unspeakable outrage he committed on the bishop of Fano are typical of his character.

    0
    0
  • Upon his promotion to the doctorate he at once proceeded to Bologna, where he taught law for three years; after which he was advanced to a professorship at Perugia, where he remained for thirty-three years.

    0
    0
  • In the sacristy is a crucifix in silver by Paolo Vanni of Perugia (1398).

    0
    0
  • Belonging thus to an old and distinguished Swabian family, he was born on the 10th of November 1547, and after studying at the universities of Ingolstadt, Perugia, Louvain and elsewhere began his ecclesiastical career at Augsburg.

    0
    0
  • It consisted of twelve members, three from Rome, two from Spain, one each from Bologna, Ferrara, Venice, Milan, Germany, France, and (alternately) Tuscany or Perugia.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At Perugia on the 5th of June 1305 he was chosen to succeed Benedict XI.; the cardinals by a vote of ten to five electing one neither an Italian nor a cardinal, in order to end a conclave which had lasted eleven months.

    0
    0
  • The widespread discontent which the confiscations caused provoked the insurrection generally known as the bellum perusinurn from its only important incident, the fierce and fatal resistance of Perugia, which deprived the poet, of another of his relations, who was killed by brigands while making his escape from the lines of Octavian.

    0
    0
  • In 17 9 7 Perugia was occupied by the French; in 1832, 1838 and 18s4 it was visited by earthquakes; in May 1849 it was seized by the Austrians; and, after a futile insurrection in 1859, it was finally united, along with the rest of Umbria, to Piedmont, in 1860.

    0
    0
  • When he was twenty (1201) the neighbouring and rival city of Perugia attempted to restore by force of arms the nobles who had been expelled from Assisi by the burghers and the populace, and Francis took part in the battle fought in the plain that lies between the two cities; the men of Assisi were defeated and Francis was among the prisoners.

    0
    0
  • He studied in Perugia and Padua, became a canon lawyer, and was vice-legate in Bologna.

    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • Sepolcro and Città di Castello, then between Perugia and Todi to Orte, just below which it receives the Nera.

    0
    0
  • His avidity was insatiable and he could brook no opposition; but, unlike his father, he was morose, silent and unsympathetic. His next conquests were Camerino and Urbino, but his power was now greatly shaken by the conspiracy of La Magione (a castle near Perugia where the plotters met).

    0
    0
  • It is incorrect, however, to suppose that St Anthony took any part in the creation of the flagellant fraternities, which were the result of spontaneous popular movements, and later than the great Franciscan preacher; while Ranieri, a monk of Perugia, to whom the foundation of these strange communities has been attributed, was merely the leader of the flagellant brotherhood in that region.

    0
    0
  • Starting with a visit to Piombino, on the coast opposite Elba, he went by way of Siena to Urbino, where he made drawings and began works; was thence hastily summoned by way of Pesaro and Rimini to Cesena; spent two months between there and Cesenatico, projecting and directing canal and harbour works, and planning the restoration of the palace of Frederic II.; thence hurriedly joined his master, momentarily besieged by enemies at Imola; followed him probably to Sinigaglia and Perugia, through the whirl of storms and surprises, vengeances and treasons, which marked his course that winter, and finally, by way of Chiusi and Acquapendente, as far as Orvieto and probably to Rome, where Caesar arrived on the 14th of February 1503.

    0
    0