Pertussis sentence example

pertussis
  • The vaccine is designed to prevent diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B and polio.
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  • Only 4.4% did not receive any whole-cell pertussis vaccine.
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  • They used genetic information from the Human Genome Sequencing Project to find around 14 genes in Bordetella pertussis which causes whooping cough.
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  • In the 1920s, we got a vaccine for diphtheria, pertussis, tuberculosis, and tetanus.
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  • Vaccinations are an effective method of preventing certain disease such as polio, tetanus, pertussis, diphtheria, influenza, hepatitis b, and pneumococcal infections.
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  • The vaccine used in the United States is actually multiple diphtheria and tetanus toxoids combined with acellular pertussis (DTaP).
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  • The original vaccine, which as of 2004 was still used in other parts of the world, contains whole cells of Bordatella pertussis, the organism that causes pertussis, better known as whooping cough.
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  • Pertussis, also called whooping cough, is a respiratory disease caused by Bordatella pertussis.
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  • Pertussis is very contagious and usually affects young children.
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  • Diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis, taken together, provides immunity against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough.
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  • Whooping cough-An infectious disease of the respiratory tract caused by a bacterium, Bordetella pertussis.
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  • Franco, E., et al. "Pertussis vaccination for adolescents and adults."
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  • Besides other varieties of strep organisms, these organisms may include Candida albicans, which can cause thrush; Corynebacterium diphtheriae, which can cause diphtheria; and Bordetella pertussis, which can cause whooping cough.
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  • For children, vaccination against tetanus is normally included in a vaccine called DTaP that protects against diphtheria, tetanus, and whooping cough (acellular pertussis).
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  • Whooping cough is caused by a bacteria called Bordetella pertussis.
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  • B. pertussis causes its most severe symptoms by attaching itself to those cells in the respiratory tract that have cilia.
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  • When B. pertussis interferes with this normal, cleansing function, mucus and cellular debris accumulate and cause constant irritation to the respiratory tract, triggering coughing and increasing further mucus production.
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  • Apparently, exposure to B. pertussis bacteria earlier in life gives individuals some immunity against infection with it later on.
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  • According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, since 1990, the reported incidence of pertussis has increased in the United States.
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  • Nearly 75 percent of pertussis cases reported worldwide are in children; half of those children affected require hospitalization.
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  • Prior to effective immunization programs in the United States, pertussis was the major cause of death from infectious disease among individuals under the age of 14.
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  • Because developing countries as of 2004 did not have widespread immunization available, there continue to be about 50 million cases of pertussis every year across the globe, with 300,000 leading to death.
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  • About 38 percent of all hospitalizations from pertussis are in babies under the age of six months.
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  • An individual usually acquires B. pertussis by inhaling droplets infected with the bacteria coughed into the air by someone already suffering with the infection.
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  • The presence of a pertussis-like cough along with an increase of certain specific white blood cells (lymphocytes) is suggestive of pertussis (whooping cough).
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  • B. pertussis can then be identified by examining the culture under a microscope.
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  • However, treatment with erythromycin is still recommended, to decrease the likelihood of B. pertussis spreading.
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  • In fact, all members of the household in which an individual with whooping cough lives should be treated with erythromycin to prevent the spread of B. pertussis throughout the community.
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  • The pertussis vaccine, most often given as one immunization together with diphtheria and tetanus, has greatly reduced the incidence of whooping cough.
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  • However, several carefully constructed research studies disproved the idea that the pertussis vaccine is the cause of neurologic damage.
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  • Furthermore, a subsequent formulation of the pertussis vaccine became available.
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  • The acellular pertussis vaccine appears to greatly reduce the risk of unpleasant reactions to the vaccine, including high fever and discomfort following vaccination.
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  • W. "Pertussis: is eradication achievable?"
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  • A so-called "acellular pertussis" vaccine (aP) is usually used since its release in the mid-1990s.
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  • Gram-negative organisms are responsible for many diseases, including gonorrhea, pertussis (whooping cough), salmonella poisoning, and cholera.
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  • The Diphtheria, Tetanus, and Pertussis (DTaP) vaccine is also administered to infants, and it once contained trace amounts of thimerosal.
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  • This has caused outbreaks of measles, pertussis (whooping cough), and other illnesses throughout the United States, and it has resulted in the deaths of some children.
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