Persian empire sentence example

persian empire
  • Susa once more became a capital, and on the establishment of the Persian empire remained one of the three seats of government, its language, the Neo-Susian, ranking with the Persian of Persepolis and the Semitic of Babylon as an official tongue.
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  • With the growing weakness of the Persian empire Egypt reasserted its independence for a time.
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  • His death prevented the achievement of his designs; but he had broken down the barrier, he had planted the seed of the Greek's influence in the four quarters of the Persian Empire.
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  • As a part of the Persian Empire the community was obscure and unimportant.
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  • Its main centres were at Edessa and Nisibis, but it was the literary language of practically all the Christian writers in the region east of Antioch, as well as of the Christian subjects of the Persian empire.
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  • By this achievement they had demonstrated the internal weakness of the Persian empire and the absolute superiority of the Greek arms.
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  • The Arabian tribes began to take possession of the partly cultivated lands east of Canaan, became masters of the Eastern trade, gradually acquired settled habits, and learned to speak and write in Aramaic, the language which was most widely current throughout the region west of the Euphrates in the time of the Persian Empire (6th-4th century B.C.).
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  • But the smallness of the single city-states and their unwillingness to combine prevented this superiority in quality from telling destructively upon the bulk of the Persian empire.
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  • Then came the invasion of the Persian empire by Alexander in 334 at the head of an army composed both of Macedonians and contingents from the allied Greek states.
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  • Under him or his predecessor Armenia was divided between the Roman and the Persian empire.
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  • Under the name of Mouru this place is mentioned with Bakhdi (Balkh) in the geography of the Zend-Avesta (Vendidad, ed Spiegel, 1852-1863), which dates probably from at least 1200 B.C. Under the name of Margu it occurs in the cuneiform (Behistun) inscriptions of the Persian monarch Darius Hystaspis, where it is referred to as forming part of one of the satrapies of the ancient Persian Empire.
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  • The nation has only a municipal organization with a priestly aristocracy, precisely the state of things that prevailed under the Persian empire.
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  • Probably (as Duval suggests) the use of Syriac in these regions went hand in hand with the spread of the monophysite doctrine, for the liturgies and formulas of the Jacobite Church were composed in Syriac. Similarly the spread of Nestorian doctrines throughout the western and southwestern regions of the Persian Empire was accompanied by the ecclesiastical use of a form of Syriac which differed very slightly indeed from that employed farther west by the Jacobites.
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  • Another early Monophysite was Simeon of Beth Arsham, who by a series of journeys and disputations within the Persian empire did all he could to prevent the triumph of Nestorianism among the Persian Christians.
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  • Under the Persian empire Cilicia was apparently governed by tributary native kings, who bore a name or title graecized as Syennesis; but it was officially included in the fourth satrapy by Darius.
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  • This part of the prophecy, therefore, is later than Alexander, who overthrew the Persian empire in 333.
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  • The Persian empire was struck down (637).
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  • In the Persian empire there was apparently some method in force by which the resources of each province were ascertained for the purpose of fixing the tribute.
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  • Nor does it appear with certainty to which of the twenty satrapies into which, according to Herodotus, the Persian empire was divided, Mesopotamia belonged; probably it was included in 'Abar nahara.
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  • At the same time it is difficult to understand why Jews in Palestine and Egypt should have accepted a purely Persian or Babylonian festival long after they had ceased to be connected with the Persian Empire.
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  • Codomannus the dynasty became extinct and the Persian empire came to an end (330).
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  • Phene Spiers, Architecture East and West, p. 245 f.), but it is certain that the engraved gems for which there was a demand in the Persian empire were largely the work of Greek artists (Furtwangler, Antike iii.
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  • It is especially those long ages, during which Egypt was an independent centre of culture and government, before its absorption in the Persian empire in the 6th century B.C., that make the most powerful appeal to the imagination and can often justify this appeal by the splendour of the monuments representing them.
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  • Whether Bactria formed part of the Median empire, we do not know; but it was subjugated by Cyrus and from then formed one of the satrapies of the Persian empire.
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  • Zerubbabel's age is of the past, and any attempt to revive political aspirations is considered detrimental to the interests of the surrounding peoples and of the Persian Empire.
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  • About his reign we know little, as the narrative of Herodotus, which makes Cyrus the grandson of Astyages by his daughter Mandane, is merely a legend; the figure of Harpagus, who as general of the Median army betrays the king to Cyrus, alone seems to contain an historical element, as Harpagus and his family afterwards obtained a high position in the Persian empire.
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  • The hero, a young Scythian descended from the famous philosopher Anacharsis, is supposed to repair to Greece for instruction in his early youth, and after making the tour of her republics, colonies and islands, to return to his native country and write this book in his old age, after the Macedonian hero had overturned the Persian empire.
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  • Nabonidos (Nabunaid, Nabu-nahid) was immediately succeeded by Cyrus, who ruled the whole Persian empire.
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  • In former times the second language has often been called Scythian, Turanian or Median; but we now know from numerous inscriptions of Susa that it is the language of Elam which was spoken in Susa, the capital of the Persian empire.
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  • The provinces of the Persian Empire differed as materially in economy as in organization.
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  • The extent of the Persian Empire was, in essentials, defined by the great conquests of Cyrus and Cambyses.
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  • For the development of the Asiatic religions, the Persian Empire was of prime importance.
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  • History of the Achaemenian Empire.The history of the Persian Empire was often written by the Greeks.
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  • The Gyro paedia is a didactic romance, written with a view to Greek institutions and rarely preserving genuine information on the Persian Empire.
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  • The wreck of Xerxes expedition is the turning-point in the history of the Persian Empire.
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  • The Persian Empire under Hulagu and his descendants extended from the dominions of Jagatai on the north to that of the Egyptian dynasts on the south, and from the Byzantine Empire on the west to the confines of China.
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  • Under the new Persian empire the expression has gradually become restricted to the northeastern portion of Persia which forms one of the five great provinces of that country.
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  • He threw in his lot with the Rhodian condottiere Mentor, and with his help succeeded in subjecting Egypt again to the Persian empire (probably 342 B.C.).
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  • After the fall of the Lydian monarchy they remained under the Persian Empire until its overthrow by Alexander.
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  • To unite the Greek race in a war against the Persian empire was set up as the ultimate mark for ambition, the theme of idealists.
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  • Fars is the same word as the Greek Persis, and, originally the name of only a part of the Persian empire (Iran), has become the name which Europeans have applied to the whole (see PERS1s).
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  • Her medism in 4 91 is to be explained by her commercial relations with the Persian Empire.
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  • There the foundations of the second great Persian Empire were laid, and Istakhr acquired special importance as the centre of priestly wisdom and orthodoxy.
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  • In fact Susiana was only a late name for the country, dating from the time when Susa had been made a capital of the Persian empire.
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