Perquisites sentence example

perquisites
  • Even judges were expected to live on their perquisites, in the shape of bribes.
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  • Gregory replied that, if they would join the new religion, not only should the sacrifices continue, but they should have larger perquisites then ever.
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  • The special interior ministry troops, who are not part of the army, are better paid and enjoy perquisites such as looting.
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  • It keeps up a good spirit, and is one of my own little perquisites.
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  • Without any Re-estab- efficient means of self-protection and coercion at its lishment disposal, it had to interfere with the power, privileges and perquisites of a class which had long misgoverned the country.
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  • Chief amongst these are the Brahmans who minister for" unclean "Sudras and lower castes, including the makers and dealers in spirituous liquors; as well as those who officiate at the great public shrines or places of pilgrimage where they might be liable to accept forbidden gifts, and, as a matter of fact, often amass considerable wealth; and those who officiate as paid priests at cremations and funeral rites, when the wearing apparel and bedding of the deceased are not unfrequently claimed by them as their perquisites.
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  • The royal bailiffs were to answer at the exchequer for rents of assize and all the perquisites which they made in their offices, and apparently the duty of enforcing this provision was entrusted to the justices.
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  • The kidney fat of all sheep and the skins of all goats slaughtered in the public yard are perquisites of government, the former being used for the manufacture of soap, which, with snuff, is a government monopoly.
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  • Perquisites, offices, frced loans were multiplied to such a point that a critic of the times, Guy Patin, facetiously declared that duties were to be exacted from the beggars basking in the sun.
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  • Although few large salaries were paid, the perquisites attached to official positions were enormous; at the beginning of the 17th century, for example, the captain of Malacca received not quite boo yearly as his pay, but his annual profits from other sources were estimated at 20,000.
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  • Since 1579 he had lived mainly at Barn Elms, Barnes, maintaining an adequate establishment; but his salary did not cover his expenses, he was burdened with his son-in-law Sir Philip Sidney's debts, and he obtained few of those perquisites which Elizabeth lavished on her favourites.
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