Pepys sentence example

pepys
  • Samuel Pepys repeatedly mentions finding great people "at bowles."
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  • He was described to Pepys on his acquiring office as "one of a broken sort of people that have not much to lose and therefore will venture all," and as "a beggar having £1Too or £1200 a year, but owes above £10,000."
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  • Pepys, a far more trustworthy judge, speaks of him invariably in terms of respect and approval as a " grave, serious man," and commends his appointment as treasurer of the navy as that of " a very notable man and understanding and will do things regular and understand them himself."
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  • Pepys (Lord Cottenham) and Bickersteth (Lord Langdale) were both promoted to the bench in preference to Campbell.
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  • Pepys, who was secretary to the navy, has recorded the patient industry and unflinching probity of his naval administration.
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  • The church of St Mary-le-Bow, in Cheapside, is built upon a Norman crypt, and that of St Olave's, Hart Street, which was Pepys's church and contains a modern memorial to him, is of the 15th century.
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  • There, under the shadow of the elm trees which Bacon had planted, Pepys and his wife constantly walked.
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  • Mrs Pepys went on one occasion specially to observe the fashions of the ladies because she was then "making some clothes."
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  • On the 7th of June 1665 Samuel Pepys for the first time saw two or three houses marked with the red cross and the words " Lord, have mercy upon us," on the doors.
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  • On the 4th of September 1665 Pepys writes an interesting letter to Lady Carteret from Woolwich: " I have stayed in the city till above 7400 died in one week, and of them about 6000 of the plague, and little noise heard day or night but tolling of bells."
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  • Many interesting details of the fire are given in Pepys's Diary.
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  • There, also, is the refined and spirited figure of "Cimabue" in mosaic. In Lyndhurst church are mural decorations to the memory of Mr Pepys Cockerell, illustrating "The Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins."
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  • It consists mainly of one broad street, in which a majority of the houses are Jacobean; those on the north side, which have projecting upper storeys, forming the colonnade commended in the Diary of Samuel Pepys for 1668.
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  • He had none of Pepys's love of gossip, and was devoid of his all-embracing curiosity, as of his diverting frankness of self-revelation.
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  • Evelyn's Diary covers more than half a century (1640-1706) crowded with remarkable events, while Pepys only deals with a few years of Charles II.'s reign.
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  • In Stuart times all ranks of society believed in her, and referring to her supposed foretelling of the Great Fire, Pepys relates that when Prince Rupert heard, while sailing up the Thames on the 10th of October 1666, of the outbreak of the fire "all he said was, ` now Shipton's prophecy was out.'" One of her prophecies was supposed to have menaced Yeovil, Somerset, with an earthquake and flood in 1879, and so convinced were the peasantry of the truth of her prognostications that hundreds moved from their cottages on the eve of the expected disaster, while spectators swarmed in from all quarters of the county to see the town's destruction.
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  • Pepys's often-quoted mention of the fact that on the 25th September 1660, "I did send for a cup of tee, a China drink, of which I never had drunk before," proves the novelty of tea in England at that date.
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  • It is certain, from an entry by Pepys, that as early as 1666 he had established a character for vice and profligacy.
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  • A more recently discovered version in Magdalene College, Cambridge, in MS. Pepys 2498, is entitled The Recluse, and is abridged and differently arranged.
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  • It was a frequent resort of Pepys, who mentions its houses of entertainment and the wrestling and other pastimes carried on, also that it furnished a refuge for many of those whose houses were destroyed in the fire of London in 1666.
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  • " A lazy Prince," writes Pepys, " no Council, no money, no reputation at home or abroad.
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  • In this office he was in constant intercourse with Pepys, whose diary frequently mentions him; but the insinuations of Pepys against him must not be taken too seriously, as there is no evidence to show that Batten in making a profit from his office fell below the standards of the time.
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  • In a letter dated the 13th of September 1693, addressed to Samuel Pepys, he writes: " Some time after Mr Millington had delivered your message, he pressed me to see you the next time I went to London.
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  • Pepys must have heard such rumours, as in a letter to his friend Millington, the tutor of Magdalene College at Cambridge, dated the 26th of September 1693, he wrote: " I must acknowledge myself not at the ease I would be glad to be at in reference to excellent Mr Newton; concerning whom (methinks) your answer labours under the same kind of restraint which (to tell you the truth) my asking did.
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  • On the 30th of September 1693 Millington wrote to Pepys that he had been to look for Newton some time before, but that " he was out of town, and since," he says, " I have not seen him, till upon the 28th I met him at Huntingdon, where, upon his own accord, and before I had time to ask him any question, he told me that he had writt to you a very odd letter, at which he was much concerned; added, that it was in a distemper that much seized his head, and that kept him awake for above five nights together, which upon occasion he desired I would represent to you, and beg your pardon, he being very much ashamed he should be so rude to a person for whom he hath so great an honour.
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  • Claire Tomalin is our foremost literary biographer whose last book Pepys won the Whitbread Book of the Year prize.
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  • In the long list of the honorary burgesses of his suite is found the name of Samuel Pepys.
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  • Steve Coogan is to star as Samuel Pepys in a BBC drama about the 17th century diarist.
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  • Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist, took on the challenge.
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  • He will also appear in the title role of Pepys, a lavish costume drama for the BBC.
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  • Diarist Samuel Pepys took advantage of its many inns, including the falcon in 1662.
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  • Another reason in Pepys ' case, however, may well be that the Waits were not recovered following the interregnum.
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  • Dr. Johnson and Samuel Pepys would probably have a punch-up trying to decide who should lay claim to Fleet Street.
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  • Introducing the expenditure strategy, Shadow Chancellor Oliver Letwin even remarked that Samuel Pepys once ran the navy almost single-handed.
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  • A seemingly tireless worker, Pepys had a variety of interests and seems to have known all the great men of the period.
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  • "It is strange," wrote Pepys in 1667 under a different regime, "how everybody nowadays reflect upon Oliver and Cromwell to the authority of the Commonwealth and the Navi a S' g empire.
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  • In August of this same year he accompanied Lord Dartmouth to Tangier as chaplain to the fleet, and Pepys, who was one of the company, has left on record some quaint and kindly reminiscences of him and of his services on board.
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  • Pepys was delighted with the playing of "pretty, witty Nell," but when he saw her as Florimel in Dryden's Secret Love, or the Maiden Queen, he wrote "so great a performance of a comical part was never, I believe, in the world before" and, "so done by Nell her merry part as cannot be better done in nature" (Diary, March 25, 1667).
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  • Pepys was effectively a minister in his own right, similar in style to Colbert, Louis XIV 's Minister of the Marine.
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