Pennines sentence example

pennines
  • From Yorkshire to the flat indented sea-coast north of the Thames estuary, east of the Pennines and the slight hills indicated as the Northampton uplands, and in part demarcated southward by the East Anglian ridge in Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire and Suffolk, the land, although divided between a succession of river-systems, varies so little in level as to be capable of consideration as a single plain.
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  • It lies in the uppermost part of the valley of the South Tyne, among the high bleak moors of the Pennines.
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  • N., was a Roman fort, the original name of which is not known, guarding the road which ran along the South Tyne valley and over the Pennines.
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  • In the North Pennines the SPA designation suggests there are nearly 4,000 pairs of breeding curlew.
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  • Alston & North Pennines A landscape of high moorland, cut through by green dales and impressive natural features.
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  • Buried in a peat bog on the Pennines, his sleep was disturbed by peat diggers.
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  • The blanket peat erosion in parts of the Semer Water catchment is typical of many parts of the Pennines.
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  • You will find superb views over the North Pennines, the eastern fells of the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales.
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  • The application of such an attitude secured the northern frontier, the area around the Pennines.
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  • On the evening of Sunday 2nd July, heavy thunderstorms brought torrential rain to this area of the Pennines.
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  • Yesterday was Bamburgh beach and Berwick on Tweed, tomorrow the otter sanctuary in the North Pennines.
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  • The center of distribution of marsh saxifrage in the UK is the North Pennines in England.
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  • Parts of the Pennines received a snowfall up to 15cm, while drifts up to 1.5m high were recorded.
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  • The route westwards beyond the Pennines provided links with areas centered round Halton, Heysham, Preston and Kendal.
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  • The England categories seem notably awkward, as well - why not just subdivide all geographical articles on the UK by county, with the articles on the counties themselves and on things like the Pennines just going straight into Category:England?
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  • East of the Pennines, isolated on three sides by lowlands and on the fourthsideby the North Sea, lie the high moors of the North Riding of Yorkshire, with the Cleveland Hills, and, to the south, the Yorkshire Wolds of the East Riding.
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  • Southward from the Pennines there may be mentioned, in the midlands, the small elevated tract of Charnwood Forest (Bardon Hill, 912 ft.) in Leicestershire, and Cannock Chase (775 ft.) and the Clent Hills (928 ft.), respectively north and south of the great manufacturing district of Birmingham and Wolverhampton.
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  • Such are Leeds, Bradford, Sheffield, Huddersfield and Halifax on the great and densely peopled West Riding coal-field, which lies on the eastern slope of the Pennines.
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  • High on the barren crest of the Pennines, where the rocks yield no mineral wealth, except it be medicinal waters, Harrogate, Buxton and Matlock are types of health resorts, prosperous from their pure air and fine scenery.
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  • But with lands thus classified heath, moor and hill pastures are not included; and the greatest area of these are naturally found in the counties of the Pennines and the Lake District, especially in Northumberland, Cumberland, Westmorland and the North and West Ridings of Yorkshire.
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  • The coal-fields on the eastern flank of the Pennines, therefore, namely, the Northern and the Yorkshire, are seen to be by far the most important in England.
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  • The immediate neighbourhood of a coal-supply influenced the geographical settlement of this industry, like others; and the importance to the manufacture of a moist climate, such as is found on the western slope of the Pennines (in contradistinction to the eastern), must also be considered.
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  • South of the Pennines, the Red rocks extend eastward in a great sweep through the south of Derbyshire, Warwick, the west of Leicestershire, and the east of Nottingham, their margin being approximately marked by the Avon, flowing south-west, and the Soar and Trent, flowing north-east.
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