Peking sentence example

peking
  • Unlike the walls of most Chinese cities, those of Peking are kept in perfect order.
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  • Viewed from the walls Peking looks like a city of gardens.
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  • From the date when Mr Hart took up his duties at Peking, in 1863, he unceasingly devoted the whole of his energies to the work of the department, with the result that the revenue grew from upwards of eight million taels to nearly twenty-seven million, collected at the thirty-two treaty ports, and the customs staff, which in 1864 numbered 200, reached in 1901 a total of 57 0 4.
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  • Kang-hi next ordered a similar map to be made of Tibet, the survey being executed by two lamas who were carefully trained as surveyors by the Jesuits at Peking.
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  • The word itself represents the Mongol Khan-Balik, "the city of the khan," or emperor, the title by which Peking continues, more or less, to be known to the Mongols and other northern Asiatics.
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  • And this constitutes the modern (so-called) "Tatar city" of Peking, the south front of which is identical with the south front of the city of Kublai.
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  • In 1873 he became interested in a project for uniting Europe and Asia by a railway to Bombay, with a branch to Peking.
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  • For nine centuries Peking, under various names and under the dominion of successive dynasties, has, with some short intervals, remained an imperial city.
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  • Peking suffered severely during the Boxer movement and the siege of the legations in the summer of 1900.
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  • The population of Peking is reckoned to be about r,000,000, a number which is out of all proportion to the immense area enclosed within its walls.
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  • It is fortunate that the city is not close-built or crowded, for since the first advent of foreigners in Peking in 1860 nothing whatever had been done until 1900 to improve the streets or the drainage.
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  • The inhabitants of Peking being consumers only, and in no way producers, the trade of the city is very small, though the city is open to foreign commerce.
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  • In 1897 a railway was opened between Tientsin and Peking.
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  • It was over the Meiling Pass and down this river that, in old days, embassies landing at Canton proceeded to Peking.
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  • From the north of Manchuria the Khingan range stretches southward to the Chinese frontier near Peking, east of which the drainage falls into the Amur and the Yellow Sea, while to the west is an almost rainless region, the inclination of which is towards the central area of the continent, Mongolia.
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  • He subsequently passed through eastern Tibet to the town of Darchendo, or Tachienlu, on the high road between Lhasa and Peking, and on the borders of China.
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  • In 1891 Hamilton Bower made his famous journey from Leh to Peking.
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  • Littledale's first journey ended at Peking; his second, in 1894-1895, took him almost within sight of the sacred walls of Lhasa, but he failed to pass inside.
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  • Mark Bell crossed the continent in 1887 and illustrated its ancient trade routes, following the steps of Archibald Colquhoun, who wandered from Peking to Talifu in 1881.
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  • All this is comparatively new geography, and it goes far to explain why the great trade routes from Peking to the west were pushed so far to the north.
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  • In 1644 the Ming succumbed to the attacks of the Manchus, a northern tribe who captured Peking and founded the present imperial house.
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  • In the southwest of Manchuria a line of the imperial railways of Northern China gives connexion from Peking, and branches at Kou-pang-tsze to Sin Population.
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  • The first runs from Peking to Kirin via Mukden, where it sends off a branch to Korea.
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  • That empire had been founded by Jenghiz Khan in the first quarter of the century; it stretched from Peking on the east to the Euphrates and the Dnieper on the west.
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  • A great field for missionary enterprise opened itself in the Mongol empire, in which, as has already been mentioned, there were many Christians to be found; and by 1350 this field had been so well worked that Christian missions and Christian bishops were established from Persia to Peking, and from the Dnieper to Tibet itself.
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  • When one remembers that missionaries like Piano Carpini, and traders like the Venetian Polos, either penetrated by land from Acre to Peking, or circumnavigated southern Asia from Basra to Canton, one realizes that there was, about 1300, a discovery of Asia as new and tremendous as the discovery of America by Columbus two centuries later.
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  • There are good survey maps of the British colony of Hong-Kong, of Wei-hai-Wei and of the country around Kiao-chou, and the establishment of topographical offices at Peking and Ngan-king holds out some promise of native surveys.
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  • Regular postal communication is maintained by the Russians between Kiakhta and Kalgan (close by Peking) across the desert of Gobi.
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  • Four Manchu tsian-tsuns, or governor-generals, acted as chiefs of the troops, and the prince of each aimak, nominated from Peking, was considered as the lieutenant or assistant of his respective Manchu chief.
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  • This organization was maintained by the Manchu rulers, the khan being elected from among the princes, and the latter having each an adviser, tusalakchi, nominated from Peking.
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  • Mongolia is now administered by a Lifan Yuen or superin tendency with headquarters at Peking.
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  • Among other interesting features it contains information about the Nestorian Church of China in the 13th century - Yabhalaha was a native of Peking - an account of a journey through Central Asia, and a description of a visit to Europe by Rabban Sauma, the friend of the catholicus."
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  • Passing northward by Nanking and crossing the Yangtsze-kiang, Odoric embarked on the Great Canal and travelled to Cambalec (otherwise Cambaleth, Cambaluc, &c.) or Peking, where he remained for three years, attached, no doubt, to one of the churches founded by Archbishop John of Monte Corvino, at this time in extreme old age.
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  • The name Kinsai, which appears in Wassaf as Khanzai, in Ibn Batuta as Khansa, in Odoric of Pordenone as Camsay, and elsewhere as Campsay and Cassay, is really a corruption of the Chinese King-sze, capital, the same word which is still applied to Peking.
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  • Wuchang is an important junction on the trunk railway from Peking to Canton; and is on the route of the Sze-ch`uen railway.
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  • When the Tsar Nicholas inaugurated the Peace Conference at the Hague, Count Muraviev extricated his country from a situation of some embarrassment; but when, subsequently, Russian agents in Manchuria and at Peking connived at the agitation which culminated in the Boxer rising of 5900, the relations of the responsible foreign minister with the tsar became strained.
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  • In Peking there are said to be as many as 20,000 Mahommedan families, and in Pao-ting Fu, the capital of the province, there are about 1000 followers of the prophet.
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  • Four high roads radiate from Peking, one leading to Urga by way of Shan-hwa Fu, which passes through the Great Wall at Chang-kiu K`ow; another, which enters Mongolia through the.
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  • The coal here is anthracite, as is also that, at Tai-gan-shan, where are found beds of greater value than any in the neighbourhood of Peking.
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  • The supremacy of China is indicated by occasional missions sent, as on the founding of a new dynasty, to Peking, to bring back a seal and a calendar.
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  • This monarch despatched an embassy to Peking to demand the restitution of the Mahommedan states of Central Asia, but the embassy was not well received, and Ahmed Shah was too much engaged with the Sikhs to attempt to enforce his demands by arms. The Chinese continued to hold Kashgar, with sundry interruptions from Mahommedan revolts - one of the most serious occurring in 1827, when the territory was invaded and the city taken by Jahanghir Khoja; Chang-lung, however, the Chinese general of Ili, recovered possession of Kashgar and the other revolted cities in 1828.
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  • It is the terminus of a railway between Peking and the Yangtsze, the northern half of the trunk line from Peking to Canton.
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  • Thereafter he rose rapidly, until, after a long period of service as vice-minister of foreign affairs, he was appointed to represent his country first in Peking, then in St Petersburg and finally in London, where he acted an important part in negotiating the first AngloJapanese Alliance, for which service he received the title of viscount.
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  • He at first superintended a Christian mission in the southern provinces, and then passing to Peking, where he perfected his knowledge of the language, eventually settled in the Valley of Black Waters or He Shuy, a little to the north of the capital, and just within the borders of Mongolia.
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  • Rather than encounter alone the horrors of a four months' journey to Lhasa they resolved to wait for eight months till the arrival of a Tibetan embassy on its return from Peking.
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  • They have been visited by native explorers of the Indian Survey, who reported that much gold was produced and remitted twice a year under a Chinese guard to Peking.
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  • Some of its rulers send also tribute missions to Peking.
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  • Once in every five years the chiefs send a tribute mission to the capital of Szechuen, and once every ten years to Peking, but the tribute sent is purely nominal.
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  • The Jesuit Antonio Andrada, a native of Portugal (1580-1634), travelling from India, appears to have entered Tibet on the west, in the Manasarowar Lake region, and made his way across to Tangut and north-western China; in 1661 the Jesuit fathers Johann Grueber (an Austrian) and Albert D 'Orville (a Belgian) travelled from Peking via Tangut to Lhasa, and thence through Nepal to India.
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  • After travelling from Lhasa to Peking with a lama mission he returned, again by Lhasa, to India, and was an eyewitness of the sack of Delhi by Nadir Shah in 1737.
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  • He subdued Tibet proper and Kham, for the continued possession of which he was, however, compelled to fight for several years; but he succeeded in the long run, and with the approval of the court of Peking established a dynasty which furnished twelve rulers in succession.
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  • The Chinese government in 1653 confirmed the Dalai Lama in his authority, and he paid a visit to the emperor at Peking.
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  • The Dalai Lama was now summoned to Peking, where he obtained the imperial authority to resume his administration in place of the provisional governors appointed as a result of the British mission.
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  • The British government, in view of the apparent intention of China to establish effective suzerainty in Tibet, drew the attention of the government at Peking to the necessity of strictly observing its treaty obligations, and especially pointing out that the integrity of the frontier states of Nepal, Bhutan and Sikkim must be respected.
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  • To the Dalai Lama, who had attempted to obtain British intervention at Peking, it was made clear that he personally had no claim to this, as the British government could only recognize the de facto government in Tibet.
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  • In 1685 there were three dioceses, Peking, Nanking and Macao, with a hundred churches.
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  • An important concession was obtained in 1899 by the French minister at Peking, with a view to the more effective protection of the Roman missions.
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  • The murder of the German ambassador, Baron von Ketteler, at Peking in 1900 compelled the government to take a leading part in the joint expedition of the powers to China.
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  • Sheng-king is well supplied with railways, Mukden being in direct railway connexion with Peking, Niu-chwang, Port Arthur and Tairen as well as with the Korean railways, and with Europe and Vladivostock by the trans-Siberian line.
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  • The abolition of this system was announced in 1906, and, as a partial substitute, it was decided to hold an annual examination in Peking of Chinese graduates educated abroad (Times, 22nd of October 1906).
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  • It was to Si-gan Fu that the emperor and dowager empress retreated on the capture of Peking by the allied armies in August 190o; and it was once again constituted the capital of the empire until the following spring when the court returned to Peking, after the conclusion of peace.
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  • Its walls are little inferior in height and massiveness to those of Peking, while its gates are handsomer and better defended than any at the capital.
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  • The town is built on a vast alluvial plain, which extends from the mountains beyond Peking to the sea, and through which the Peiho runs a circuitous course, making the distance by water from Tientsin to the coast about 70 m.
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  • The importance of Tientsin has been enhanced by the railways connecting it with Peking on the one hand and with Shanhai-kwan and Manchuria on the other.
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  • In 1853 Tientsin was besieged by an army of T'aip'ing rebels, which had been detached from the main force at Nanking for the capture of Peking.
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  • After the opening of certain Korean ports to foreign trade, the customs were placed under the management of European commissioners nominated by Sir Robert Hart from Peking.
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  • Putting aside the temporary Christian work of a Jesuit chaplain to the Japanese Christian General Konishe, in 1594 during the Japanese invasion, as well as that on a larger scale by students who received the evangel in the Roman form from Peking in 1792, and had made 4000 converts by the end of 1793, the first serious attempt at the conversion of Korea was made by the French Societe des Missions Etrangeres in 1835.
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  • The east road is the great Tung-kwan road, which forms the principal means of communication between Peking and the northeastern provinces of the empire, and Sze-ch'uen, Yun-nan and Tibet.
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  • In addition to the provinces of Yunnan, Kwang-si and Kwang-tung in southern China, plague is reported to have been present for several years in a district in Mongolia to the north of Peking, and distant about " twelve days' ride."
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  • Tien Ti, Fu Mu, " Heaven and Earth, Father and Mother," are conjoined in common speech, and are the supreme objects of imperial worship. The great altar to Heaven, round in shape like the circuit of the sky, and white as the symbol of the light principle (Yang), stands in the southern suburb of Peking in the direction of light and heat.
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  • The process of enrolling the spirits of the dead in the ranks of what may be more or less definitely called " gods " may be seen in the popular usages of India at the present day, or traced in the pages of the Peking Gazette under the direction of the Board of Rites, one of the most ancient branches of Chinese administration.
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  • Only one waggon road leads northwards from Hu-peh, and that is to Nan-yang Fu in Ho-nan, where it forks, one branch going to Peking by way of K`ai-feng Fu, and the other into Shan-si by Ho-nan Fu.
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  • Talienwan is in railway connexion with Niuchwang and Peking and via the Siberian railway with Europe.
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  • While, however, the court of Peking was honestly endeavouring to suppress the foreign trade in opium from 1839 to 1858 several of the provincial viceroys encouraged the trade, nor could the central government put a stop to the home cultivation of the drug.
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  • He next appears in " Cambaliech " or Peking, and wrote letters (of January 8, 1305, and February 13, 1306), describing the progress of the Roman mission in the Far East, in spite of Nestorian opposition; alluding to the Roman Catholic community he had founded in India, and to an appeal he had received to preach in " Ethiopia " and dealing with overland and oversea routes to " Cathay," from the Black Sea and the Persian Gulf respectively.
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  • Besides three mission stations in Peking, he established one near the present Amoy harbour, opposite Formosa.
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  • He was apparently the only effective European bishop in the Peking of the middle ages.
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  • Between November 1870 and September 1873, accompanied by only three men and with ridiculously small pecuniary resources, he crossed the Gobi desert, reached Peking, and, pushing westwards and south-westwards, explored the Ordos and the Ala-shan, as well as the upper part of the Yangtsze-kiang.
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  • He took a brilliant and successful part in the advance on Peking and the relief of the Legations.
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  • Excellent timber of various kinds - eagle-wood, rose-wood, liquidambar, &c. - is one of the principal products of the island, and has even been specially transported to Peking for imperial purposes.
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  • In the far East, the operations which it had been decided to undertake in China were necessarily postponed on account of the diversion of the forces, intended to exact redress at Peking, to the suppression of mutiny in India.
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  • It was arranged that the treaty, which was then provisionally concluded at Tientsin, should be ratified at Peking in the follow- China ing year; and in June 1859 Mr (afterwards Sir war, Frederick) Bruce, Lord Elgins brother, who, had been appointed plenipotentiary, attempted to proceed up the Peiho with the object of securing its ratification.
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  • But by the middle of October the Chinese army was decisively defeated; Peking was occupied; those British and French prisoners who had not succumbed to the hardships of their confinement were liberated.
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  • The embassy, which included two Chinese ministers, an English and a French secretary, six students from the Tung-wan Kwang at Peking, and a considerable retinue, arrived in the United States in March 1868, and concluded at Washington (28th of July 1868) a series of articles, supplementary to the Reed Treaty of 1858, and later known as "The Burlingame Treaty."
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  • Ratifications of the treaty were not exchanged at Peking until November 23, 1869.
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  • Two instruments constructed at the time of Kublai Khan's accession in 1280 were still extant at Peking in 1881.
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  • Relations between Sun Yat-sen and Yuan Shih-k'ai were never cordial, but until the ejection from Peking of the Kuo Min-tang Radicals by the President Dictator in 1913, they preserved the appearance of goodwill, and towards the end of 1912 Sun accepted a highly paid appointment as Director of National Railways at Shanghai.
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  • Eventually, after the death of the Dictator (1916) he became one of the Cantonese group of politicians which waged continual warfare against the party in power at Peking.
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  • For some time Ricci's residence was at Nan-changfu, the capital of Kiang-si; but in 1598 he was able to proceed under favourable conditions to Nan-king, and thence for the first time to Peking, which had all along been the goal of his missionary ambition.
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  • They obtained a settlement, with an allowance for subsistence, in Peking, and from this time to the end of his life Ricci's estimation among the Chinese was constantly increasing, as was at the same time the amount of his labours.
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  • In the early part of his residence at Peking, when enjoying constant intercourse with scholars of high position, Ricci brought out the T'ien-chu shih-i, or "Veritable Doctrine of the Lord of Heaven," which deals with the divine character and attributes under eight heads.
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  • He was too late for the attack on the Taku forts, but was present at the occupation of Peking and destruction of the Summer Palace.
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  • Hardly had he resigned when he received a telegram from Sir Robert Hart, inspector-general of customs in China, inviting him to go to Peking.
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  • Gordon proceeded to Peking and used all his influence in favour of peace.
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  • The film shows the organization of a large agricultural commune to the north of Peking.
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  • The star of great american history including Peking duck.
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  • In the middle stages, the highly rhythmical music of bei guan and Peking opera became dominant.
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  • It hadn't been reloaded when the airline staff retrieved the luggage of the delayed passengers from Peking.
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  • Specialists in Peking and Cantonese cuisine - their aromatic crispy duck is fabulous, as is their sesame prawn toast.
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  • Finally the ever resourceful Glyn Giusti reported that he had entered a TD for the Peking to Paris event scheduled for 1982.
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  • London has twelve yummy new Chinese vegan restaurants, including Tai in Greek Street and Peking Palace in Holloway.
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  • Wade he appointed him minister plenipotentiary at Peking (1885).
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  • Thrice only did he visit Europe between 1863 and 1902, the result of this long comparative isolation, and of his constant intercourse with the Peking officials, being that he learnt to look at events through Chinese spectacles; and his work, These from the Land of Sinim, shows how far this affected his outlook.
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  • It was in the "yamen" of one of these boards - the Li Pu or board of rites - that Lord Elgin signed the treaty at the conclusion of the war in 1860 - an event which derives especial interest from the fact of its having been the first occasion on which a European plenipotentiary ever entered Peking accompanied by all the pomp and circumstance of his rank.
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  • The khan of Khiva laid a plan for detaining him as a hostage, but he eluded the danger and returned safely, after concluding with the khan of Bokhara a treaty of friendship. His next diplomatic exploit was in the Far East, as plenipotentiary to the court of Peking.
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  • British naval and marine forces seized control of Hong Kong, ravaged the Chinese coastline and briefly occupied Peking (Beijing).
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  • Peking is the site of the Imperial Palace and was considered the gourmet capital up until the 17th century.
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  • There is a dizzying array of regional cuisines in Chinese cooking, from Mandarin to Peking and far beyond.
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  • Beijing - Beijing (or Peking) is where the Imperial Cuisine of China originated, and the city is most famous today for Beijing (Peking) Duck.
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  • The calendar was found in a royal tomb in the vicinity of Peking, China.
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  • The original calendar is now kept in the Institute of Science in Peking.
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  • They first prepared a map of the country round Peking, which was submitted to the emperor Kang-hi; and, being satisfied with the accuracy of the European method of surveying, he resolved to have a survey made of the whole empire on the same principles.
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