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peerage

peerage

peerage Sentence Examples

  • He was raised to the peerage in 1895, and died in London Jan.

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  • But in 1756, when the government was evidently approaching its fall, an unexpected vacancy occurred in the chief justiceship of the king's bench, and he claimed the office, being at the same time raised to the peerage as Baron Mansfield.

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  • In November 1660 by his father's death he had become Viscount Valentia and Baron Mountnorris in the Irish peerage, and on the 20th April 1661 he was created Baron Annesley of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire and earl of Anglesey in the peerage of Great Britain.

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  • the Fair, in September 1297, attached a peerage of France.

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  • But in 1756, when the government was evidently approaching its fall, an unexpected vacancy occurred in the chief justiceship of the king's bench, and he claimed the office, being at the same time raised to the peerage as Baron Mansfield.

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  • He would have taken his title from Beaconsfield had he survived to enter the peerage.

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  • A peerage was openly talked of as his due, while his own ambition pointed to some responsible office at home.

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  • Her children he adopted as his own; and it was chiefly for her sake that he desired the peerage which was twice held out to him.

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  • About the end of the year 1579 his wife died, leaving him one son, Archibald (who in 1627 was raised to the peerage by the title of Lord Napier), and one daughter, Jane.

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  • When the Liberals returned to power in 1880 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Sherbrooke, but from 1875 till his death at Warlingham, Surrey, on the 27th of July 1892, his health was constantly failing, and by degrees he figured less and less in public life.

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  • Saigo's patriotism and his great services in the cause of the restoration of the administrative power to the throne were so fully recognized that his son was raised to the peerage with the title of marquess, and his own memory was honoured by the erection of a bronze statue in Tokyo.

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  • The Terre d'Auvergne was first an appanage of Count Alphonse of Poitiers (1241-1271), and in 1360 was erected into a duchy in the peerage of France (duch y -pairie) by King John II.

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  • He was created Viscount Osborne in the Scottish peerage on the 2nd of February 1673, and a privy councillor on the 3rd of May.

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  • On the 19th of June, on the resignation of Lord Clifford, he was appointed lord treasurer and made Baron Osborne of Kiveton and Viscount Latimer in the peerage of England, while on the 27th of June 1674 he was created earl of Danby, when he surrendered his Scottish peerage of Osborne to his second son Peregrine Osborne.

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  • Its head, the duke of Norfolk, is the first of the dukes and the hereditary earl marshal of England, while the earls of Suffolk, Carlisle and Effingham and the Lord Howard of Glossop represent in the peerage its younger lines.

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  • At this time came his sudden lifting to the highest rank in the peerage.

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  • A patent of 1604 created Henry Howard (1540-1614), younger son of Surrey the poet, earl of Northampton, a peerage which ended with the death of this, the most unprincipled of his house.

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  • Roger Stafford, the impoverished heir male of the ancient Staffords, had been forced to surrender his barony to the king by a deed dated in the preceding year, a piece of injustice which is in the teeth of all modern conceptions of peerage law.

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  • C., Complete Peerage; J.

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  • Round, Peerage Studies; Howard of Corby, Memorials of the Family of Howard; Brenan and Statham, House of Howard; Howard, Historical Anecdotes of the Howard Family; Morant, Essex; Blomefield, Norfolk.

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  • In England nobility is apt to be confounded with the peculiar institution of the British peerage.

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  • Yet nobility, in some shape or another, has existed in most places and times of the world's history, while the British peerage is an institution purely local, and one which has actually hindered the existence of a nobility in the sense which the word bears in most other countries.

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  • The peerage, as it exists in the three British kingdoms, is something which is altogether peculiar to the three British kingdoms, and which has nothing in the least degree like it elsewhere.

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  • nobility and peerage.

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  • The word "gentleman" has lost its original meaning in a variety of other uses, while the word "nobleman" has come to be confined to members of the peerage and a few of their immediate descendants.

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  • That the English peerage does not answer to the true idea of a nobility will be seen with a very little thought.

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  • His remoter descendants have no advantage of any kind over other people, except their chance of succeeding to the peerage.

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  • But perhaps no cause was more important than the growth of the peerage.

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  • See also the articles Titles Of Honour, Peerage, Feudalism, Gentleman, Duke, Count, &C.

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  • After a marriage between the prince and Lady Diana Spencer, afterwards the wife of John, 4th duke of Bedford, had been frustrated by Walpole, Frederick was married in April 1736 to 1 Frederick was never actually created duke of Gloucester, and when he was raised to the peerage in 1736 it was as duke of Edinburgh only.

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  • C(okayne), Complete Peerage, sub "Gloucester."

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  • 1761), left a son Arthur, whose legitimacy was doubted, and the peerage became extinct.

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  • He was created in 1793 earl of Mountnorris in the peerage of Ireland.

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  • The 1st viscount was also the ancestor of the Earls Annesley in the Irish peerage.

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  • In 1793 he was raised to the peerage of Ireland as Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle, and in 1795 was created a viscount.

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  • By the death of his elder brother, killed near Ticonderoga on the 6th of July 1758, he became Viscount Howe - an Irish peerage.

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  • Doyle's Official Baronage of England (1886), the Complete Peerage of G.

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  • In reward for his devotion to the court party during the Fronde he obtained many signal favours, and Saint Aignan was raised to a duchy in the peerage of France (duchepairie) in 1663.

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  • He did not, however, sit long in the House of Commons; for, on the death of his mother in 1837, he succeeded to the peerage which had been conferred on her with remainder to her only surviving son, and as Viscount Canning took his seat in the House of Lords.

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  • It passed into the hands of the houses of Rieux and Lorraine, and was raised to the rank of a duchy in the peerage of France by Henry III.

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  • In 1781 John Bourke, a Mayo man, believed to be descended from the line of "MacWilliam Oughter," was created Viscount Mayo, and four years later earl of Mayo, a peerage still extant.

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  • and privy councillor, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Milner of St James's and Cape Town.

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  • During his absence he was elected member for King's Lynn, which he represented till October 1869, when he succeeded to the peerage.

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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

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  • C[okayne], Complete Peerage (1887-1898); W.

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  • 1 Hostilities were still proceeding, but in the areas under control Lord Milner (who was raised to the peerage in May) speedily set the machinery of government in motion.

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  • A peerage of Great Britain was conferred on his wife as Baroness Hood of Catherington in 1 795, and he was himself created Viscount Hood of Whitley in 1796.

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  • The marquis de Ruvigny has compiled The Jacobite Peerage (Edinburgh, 1904), a work which purports to give a list of all the titles and honours conferred by the kings of the exiled House of Stuart.

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  • During the voyage Gladstone had determined to offer Tennyson a peerage.

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  • On the 10th of November 1834 Lord Althorp succeeded to his father's peerage, and thereby vacated the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • The peerage became extinct at his death.

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  • He was created a baronet in 1886, and was raised to the peerage in 1896, a few days before his death.

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  • He entered Parliament in 1874 as Conservative member for the city of Dublin, holding the seat till 1880, when he was raised to the peerage.

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  • The protector, hearing of his "grievous complaint," sent him a writ, and Lenthall was elated at believing he had secured a peerage.

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  • In 1581 it was erected into a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) for Albert de Gondi, marshal of France and general of the galleys.

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  • JOHN STUART BUTE, 3RD Earl Of (1713-1792), English prime minister, son of James, 2nd earl, and of Lady Jane Campbell, daughter of the 1st duke of Argyll, was born on the 25th of May 1713; he was educated at Eton and succeeded to the earldom (in the peerage of Scotland; created for his grandfather Sir James Stuart in 1703) on his father's death in 1723.

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  • Lord Armstrong, who was raised to the peerage in 1887, was the author of A Visit to Egypt (1873), and Electric Movement in Air and Water (1897), besides many professional papers.

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  • in September 1889; and in February 1892 was raised to the peerage as Lord Hood of Avalon, but on his death the title became extinct.

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  • MOUNTSTUART ELPHINSTONE (1779-1859), Indian statesman and historian, fourth son of the 11th Baron Elphinstone in the peerage of Scotland, was born in 1779.

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  • 9 peerage shortly after his return in 1845.

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  • In July 1861 he accepted from Lord Palmerston the office of solicitor-general, a knighthood, and a safe seat for the borough of Richmond in Yorkshire, secured for him through the friendly action of Lord Zetland, and thus began the second spell of Palmer's membership of the House of Commons, which continued till his elevation to the woolsack and the peerage.

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  • At the election of November 1868 Palmer was again returned for Richmond, and Gladstone offered him the office of lord chancellor or the office of a lord justice with a peerage; both offers were declined by Palmer, and he assumed a position of independent opposition to the measure relative to the Irish Church.

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  • In each point the English constitution, which he ardently admires, is, he says, suffering: the prerogatives of the crown are disproportionately great; the peerage has been degraded by new creations; and parliaments are slighted.

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  • He was created a baronet in June 1916, and the same year was raised to the peerage.

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  • But this failure was not on the same footing as that of Minden, and in spite of virulent party attacks, King George III., on the resignation of the North ministry, offered him a peerage.

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  • He unsuccessfully contested Coventry in 1863; in 1865 he was elected in the liberal interest for Warwick, for which he sat until his elevation to the peerage.

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  • He represented Lincolnshire in the parliament of 1559, and Northamptonshire in that of 1563, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the House of Commons until his elevation to the peerage; but there seems no good evidence for the story that he was proposed as speaker in 1563.

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  • On the 25th of February 1571 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Burghley of Burghley 1 (or Burleigh); the fact that he continued to act as secretary after his elevation illustrates the growing importance of that office, which under his son became a secretaryship of state.

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  • Knutsford was the birthplace of Sir Henry Holland, Physician Extraordinary to Queen Victoria (1788-1873); and his son, the second Sir Henry, who was secretary of state for the colonies (1887-1892), was raised to the peerage in 1888 with the title of Baron Knutsford.

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  • When Mr Balfour resigned in 1905 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount St Aldwyn.

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  • This tale, which still finds a place in Burke's Peerage in the account of the baron Kingsale, a descendant of the de Courci family, is a legend without historic foundation which did not obtain currency till centuries after John de Courci's death.

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  • This led to his interest in the development of western Canada, and from 1881 onwards he was associated with his cousin in the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, for his services in connexion with which he was in 1886 made a baronet, in 1891 raised to the peerage; and in 1905 made G.C.V.O.

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  • On his retirement from the office of Whip in 1912 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Murray of Elibank, and entered the firm of Messrs.

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  • 1832) on his elevation to the peerage.

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  • A peerage, with the title of Viscount Wellington and Baron Douro, was conferred upon him for Talavera.

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  • Round, Studies in Peerage and Family History (1901); and S.

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  • In June 1778 Wedderburn was promoted to the post of attorney-general, and in the same year he refused the dignity of chief baron of the exchequer because the offer was not accompanied by the promise of a peerage.

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  • The coveted peerage was not long delayed.

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  • The patent raising him to the peerage as Baron Morden had been made out, but his last act was to refuse his sanction to the sealing of the document.

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  • He resisted, but unsuccessfully, the abolition of the hereditary peerage.

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  • The mass of the working-class population in the Protestant parts of Germany belonged to the Social Democracy, an inclusive term covering variations of opinion from the doctrinaire system of Marx to a degree of Radicalism which in England would not be considered a bar to a peerage.

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  • FRANCIS RAWDON-HASTINGS HASTINGS, 1st Marquess Of (1754-1826), British soldier and governor-general of India, born on the 9th of December 1754, was the son of Sir John Rawdon of Moira in the county of Down, 4th baronet, who was created Baron Rawdon of Moira, and afterwards earl of Moira, in the Irish peerage.

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  • Among the birthday honours of 1906 he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Courtney of Penwith (Cornwall).

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  • Ward) and in Collins's Peerage, and the Correspondence of Lord Clarendon with James, earl of Abingdon,1683-1685(Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • In 1613 Chichester was raised to the peerage as Baron Chichester of Belfast, and in the following year he went to England to give an account of the state of Ireland.

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  • This nobleman's eldest son Arthur(1606-1675),who distinguished himself as Colonel Chichester in the suppression of the rebellion of 1641, was created earl of Donegall in 1647, and was succeeded in his titles by his nephew, whose great-grandson, Arthur, 5th earl of Donegall, was created Baron Fisherwick in the peerage of Great Britain (the other family titles being in the peerage of Ireland) in 1790, and earl of Belfast and marquess of Donegall in the peerage of Ireland in 1791.

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  • His brother Robert was father of Adam Loftus (c. 1568-1643), who became lord chancellor of Ireland in 1619, and in 1622 was created Viscount Loftus of Ely, King's county, in the peerage of Ireland.

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  • C., Complete Peerage vol.

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  • Clive's Plassey, the peerage of Ireland) arrived at Calcutta, Y?

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  • Since the battle of Plassey no event so greatly impressed the native imagination as the capture of Seringapatam, which won for General Harris a peerage and for Wellesley an Irish marquisate.

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  • In 1869 he refused Gladstone's offer of a peerage.

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  • This service was considered by the government as worthy of special acknowledgment; the naval and military commanders, officers, seamen and soldiers received the thanks of both Houses of Parliament, and Admiral Gambier was rewarded with a peerage.

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  • A duke in the British peerage, if not royal, is addressed as "Your Grace" and is styled "the Most Noble."

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  • In July 1765 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Camden, of Camden Place, in the county of Kent; and in the following year he was removed from the court of common pleas to take his seat as lord chancellor (July 30, 1766).

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  • 2 See Peerage.

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  • Under Louis Philippe he received a peerage in 1832.

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  • In the same year his brother William, who from 1798 had filled the office of judge of the High Court of Admiralty, was raised to the peerage under the title of Lord Stowell.

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  • Subject to certain limitations and to a property qualification, any person over 40 years of age was eligible to a peerage.

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  • In suits brought against them personally or involving the rights of their peerage they had the right of being judged by the Parlement, the other peers being present, or having been duly summoned.

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  • He now showed that he had not by his charities wronged his relations by settling on his greatnephew and heir Thomas Wykeham, whom he had educated at Winchester and New College, Broughton Castle and estates, still held by his descendants in the female line, the family of Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes (peerage of Saye and Sele).

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  • By the acceptance of a peerage the great commoner lost at least as much and as suddenly in popularity as he gained in dignity.

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  • The countship, which was restored to Sebastian of Luxemburg, heir of the Brosses through his mother, was erected for him into a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) in 1569, and was afterwards held by the duchess of Merceeur, daughter of the first duke of Penthievre, and then by her daughter, the duchess of Vendome.

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  • 1476), heiress of Aumale, married Anthony of Lorraine, count of Vaudemont, and Aumale was created a duchy in the peerage of France for Claude and Francis of Lorraine in 1547.

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  • These qualities adhered to him through life, and he had scarcely left Harrow, at the age of eighteen, when the death of his father (April 17, 1802) raised him to the Irish peerage.

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  • CHARLES SPENCER SUNDERLAND, 3RD Earl Of (c. 1674-1722), English statesman, was the second son of the 2nd earl, but on the death of his elder brother Henry in Paris in September 1688 he became heir to the peerage.

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  • Having succeeded to the peerage in 1702, the earl was one of the commissioners for the union between England and Scotland, and in 1705 he was sent to Vienna as envoy extraordinary.

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  • Sunderland was especially interested in the proposed peerage bill, a measure designed to limit the number of members of the House of Lords, but this was defeated owing partly to the opposition of Sir Robert Walpole.

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  • His father was raised to the peerage in his son's infancy, and was made earl of Rivers in 1466.

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  • G.) 11VERS, [[Richard Savage, 4th Earl]] (c. 1660-1712), was the second son of Thomas, 3rd earl; and after the death about 1680 of his elder brother Thomas, styled Viscount Colchester, he was designated by that title until he succeeded to the peerage.

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  • C., Complete Peerage, vol.

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  • Until recent years the title " prince " was never conferred on anybody except the heir-apparent to the Crown, and his principality is a peerage.

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  • The children of the sovereign other than his eldest son, though by courtesy " princes " and " princesses, " need a royal warrant to raise them de jure above the common herd; and even then, though they be dubbed " Royal Highness " in their cradles, they remain " commoners " till raised to the peerage.

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  • He was raised to the peerage on his retirement, and took the title of Baron Carnock.

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  • 1768), who made a large fortune out of the law, and married Miss Coke of Melbourne Hall; in 1770 he was made baron and in 1781 Viscount Melbourne in the Irish peerage, and in 1815 was created an English peer.

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  • The influence of Melbourne as a politician dates from his succeeding to the peerage in 1829.

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  • In 1869 he was raised to the peerage by Gladstone as Baron Acton; he was an intimate friend and constant correspondent of the Liberal leader, and the two men had the very highest regard for one another.

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  • and Queen Margaret down through the peerage and the knighthood to the clerks and household retainers of the late king.

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  • The Peerage Bill, introduced at the same time to limit the royal power of creating peers, was happily thrown out in the Commons.

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  • The Lords were at this time, as a matter of fact, not merely wealthier but wiser than the Commons; and it is no wonder that, in days when the Commons, by passing the Septennial Act, had shown their distrust of their own constituents, the peers should show, by the Peerage Bill, their distrust of that House which was elected by those constituencies.

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  • It was in this world of reason and literature that the Whigs of the Peerage Bill moved.

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  • The door of the House of Lords was thus thrown open, and in 1885 Baron Nathan Mayea Rothschild, raised to the peerage, was enabled to take his seat in the upper chamber.

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  • Here follows a curious chapter of the history of the Berkeley peerage.

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  • By these things we may see that peerage law in old time rested upon the pleasure of the sovereign and upon no ascertained and unvarying custom.

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  • But Colonel Berkeley's political influence afterwards procured him (1831) a peerage as Lord Segrave of Berkeley, and ten years later an earldom with the title of Fitzhardinge.

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  • C(okayne)'s Complete Peerage; Jeayes's Descriptive Catalogue of the Charters and Muniments at Berkeley Castle (1892); Dictionary of National Biography; Transactions of Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, 3 vols., viii., xlv., et passim; The Red Book of the Exchequer, Chronicles of Roger of Wendover, Matthew Paris, Adam of Murimuth, Robert of Gloucester, Henry of Huntingdon, &c. (Rolls Series); British Museum Charters, &c. (0.

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  • His position in the chamber was now one of much influence, and he had a large share in the modelling of the new constitution, though his effort to secure a hereditary peerage failed.

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  • He was raised to the peerage in 1839.

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  • His estate of Seurre in Burgundy was created a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) in his favour under the name of Bellegarde, in 1619.

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  • Edgecumbe was a faithful follower of Sir Robert Walpole, in whose interests he managed the elections for the Cornish boroughs, and his elevation to the peerage, which took place in 1742, was designed to prevent him from giving evidence about Walpole's expenditure of the secret service money.

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  • On the resignation of the Gladstone ministry in 1874 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Cardwell of Ellerbeck, but took no further prominent part in politics.

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  • sold the town to France in 1662 Rutherford was consoled by the command of the 2nd or Tangier regiment, was made earl of Teviot in the peerage of Scotland, and was sent in 1663 as governor to Tangier.

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  • The pseudo-chief MacWilliam became earl of Clanricarde, and others reached lower steps in the peerage, or were knighted by the king's own hand.

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  • in 1641 threw off the supremacy of Spain and placed himself under the protectorate of France; he was compensated for the loss of Canosa, &c., with the duchy and peerage of Valentinois and various lesser lordships; and "duke of Valentinois" long continued to be the title of the heir-apparent of the principality.

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  • He was created earl of Malton in the peerage of Ireland in September 1750, and succeeded his father as 2nd marquess of Rockingham in December of the same year.

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  • In 1866, perhaps chiefly in acknowledgment of his services to transAtlantic telegraphy, Thomson received the honour of knighthood, and in 1892 he was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Kelvin of Largs.

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  • He retained his office until May 1919, when he resigned and was raised to the peerage.

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  • Round's Peerage and Pedigree (London, 1910).

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  • In 1821 the 1st earl was further created Viscount Hutchinson of Knocklofty in the peerage of the United Kingdom.

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  • C. Complete Peerage (London, 1890).

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  • A baron was a feudal baron, which was not a peerage rank.

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  • Here we have the confusion between a feudal barony and a peerage barony.

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  • This week's awards The man who invented the zip fastener was today honored with a life peerage.

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  • feudal baron, which was not a peerage rank.

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  • hereditary peerage.

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  • Lord (High) Chancellor a privy councilor, and in 1618 he was appointed lord chancellor and raised to the peerage as Baron Verulam.

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  • He was conferred a peerage in April 2006 and sits on the Conservative benches.

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  • Even if he had accepted a peerage, the title would have become extinct on his death.

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  • Benjamin Britten was awarded a life peerage in 1976.

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  • Dr. David Hope, whose title is now ' Bishop ' Hope, is to be granted a life peerage.

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  • Rogers was knighted in 1991 and received a peerage five years later.

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  • Claims for succession to a hereditary peerage will cease to be dealt with by the House of Lords.

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  • Life peerages were created also in the Scots Peerage.

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  • A version of these arms was registered in Ulster's office and emblazoned on the letters patent creating the Irish peerage in 1776.

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  • New section on errors in the complete peerage added.

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  • Earl of Carrick and Baron of Renfrew Other titles of the Scottish peerage inherited by the heir to the throne under the 1469 Act.

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  • The Howard Family ranks in the British peerage next the Blood Royal.

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  • peerage titles is much more closely regulated than that.

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  • peerage claims are included in TS 11, TS 27 and Home Office classes HO 45 and HO 80.

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  • Elsewhere we shall write of " peerage directories " and " peerage directories " and " peerage titles " .

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  • zip fastener was today honored with a life peerage.

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  • But when Dorset was replaced by the duke of Devonshire in 1755, Boyle was raised to the peerage as earl of Shannon and received a pension, and other members of the opposition also obtained pensions or places; and the archbishop, finding himself excluded from power, went into opposition to the government in alliance with John Ponsonby.

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  • In 1836 he was elected a member of the Academie des sciences politiques et morales, was raised to the peerage in 1839 and in 1843 became doyen of the faculty of law.

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  • He would have taken his title from Beaconsfield had he survived to enter the peerage.

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  • A peerage was openly talked of as his due, while his own ambition pointed to some responsible office at home.

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  • Her children he adopted as his own; and it was chiefly for her sake that he desired the peerage which was twice held out to him.

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  • He was raised to the peerage in 1895, and died in London Jan.

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  • About the end of the year 1579 his wife died, leaving him one son, Archibald (who in 1627 was raised to the peerage by the title of Lord Napier), and one daughter, Jane.

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  • When the Liberals returned to power in 1880 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Sherbrooke, but from 1875 till his death at Warlingham, Surrey, on the 27th of July 1892, his health was constantly failing, and by degrees he figured less and less in public life.

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  • Saigo's patriotism and his great services in the cause of the restoration of the administrative power to the throne were so fully recognized that his son was raised to the peerage with the title of marquess, and his own memory was honoured by the erection of a bronze statue in Tokyo.

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  • The Terre d'Auvergne was first an appanage of Count Alphonse of Poitiers (1241-1271), and in 1360 was erected into a duchy in the peerage of France (duch y -pairie) by King John II.

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  • He was created Viscount Osborne in the Scottish peerage on the 2nd of February 1673, and a privy councillor on the 3rd of May.

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  • On the 19th of June, on the resignation of Lord Clifford, he was appointed lord treasurer and made Baron Osborne of Kiveton and Viscount Latimer in the peerage of England, while on the 27th of June 1674 he was created earl of Danby, when he surrendered his Scottish peerage of Osborne to his second son Peregrine Osborne.

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  • Its head, the duke of Norfolk, is the first of the dukes and the hereditary earl marshal of England, while the earls of Suffolk, Carlisle and Effingham and the Lord Howard of Glossop represent in the peerage its younger lines.

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  • At this time came his sudden lifting to the highest rank in the peerage.

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  • A patent of 1604 created Henry Howard (1540-1614), younger son of Surrey the poet, earl of Northampton, a peerage which ended with the death of this, the most unprincipled of his house.

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  • Roger Stafford, the impoverished heir male of the ancient Staffords, had been forced to surrender his barony to the king by a deed dated in the preceding year, a piece of injustice which is in the teeth of all modern conceptions of peerage law.

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  • C., Complete Peerage; J.

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  • Round, Peerage Studies; Howard of Corby, Memorials of the Family of Howard; Brenan and Statham, House of Howard; Howard, Historical Anecdotes of the Howard Family; Morant, Essex; Blomefield, Norfolk.

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  • In England nobility is apt to be confounded with the peculiar institution of the British peerage.

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  • Yet nobility, in some shape or another, has existed in most places and times of the world's history, while the British peerage is an institution purely local, and one which has actually hindered the existence of a nobility in the sense which the word bears in most other countries.

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  • The peerage, as it exists in the three British kingdoms, is something which is altogether peculiar to the three British kingdoms, and which has nothing in the least degree like it elsewhere.

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  • nobility and peerage.

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  • The word "gentleman" has lost its original meaning in a variety of other uses, while the word "nobleman" has come to be confined to members of the peerage and a few of their immediate descendants.

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  • That the English peerage does not answer to the true idea of a nobility will be seen with a very little thought.

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  • His remoter descendants have no advantage of any kind over other people, except their chance of succeeding to the peerage.

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  • But perhaps no cause was more important than the growth of the peerage.

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  • In a word, the growth of the peerage hindered the existence in England of any nobility in the continental sense of the word.

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  • If coat-armour, and thereby the rank of gentry, has been lavishly granted, some may think that the rank of peerage has often been lavishly granted also.

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  • See also the articles Titles Of Honour, Peerage, Feudalism, Gentleman, Duke, Count, &C.

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  • After a marriage between the prince and Lady Diana Spencer, afterwards the wife of John, 4th duke of Bedford, had been frustrated by Walpole, Frederick was married in April 1736 to 1 Frederick was never actually created duke of Gloucester, and when he was raised to the peerage in 1736 it was as duke of Edinburgh only.

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  • C(okayne), Complete Peerage, sub "Gloucester."

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  • In November 1660 by his father's death he had become Viscount Valentia and Baron Mountnorris in the Irish peerage, and on the 20th April 1661 he was created Baron Annesley of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire and earl of Anglesey in the peerage of Great Britain.

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  • 1761), left a son Arthur, whose legitimacy was doubted, and the peerage became extinct.

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  • He was created in 1793 earl of Mountnorris in the peerage of Ireland.

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  • The 1st viscount was also the ancestor of the Earls Annesley in the Irish peerage.

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  • In 1793 he was raised to the peerage of Ireland as Baron O'Neill of Shane's Castle, and in 1795 was created a viscount.

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  • By the death of his elder brother, killed near Ticonderoga on the 6th of July 1758, he became Viscount Howe - an Irish peerage.

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  • He at first supported the opposition to Charles's arbitrary government, but soon allied himself with the king's cause, on which side his sympathies were engaged, and was raised to the peerage by the title of Baron Capel of Hadham on the 6th of August 1641.

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  • Doyle's Official Baronage of England (1886), the Complete Peerage of G.

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  • In reward for his devotion to the court party during the Fronde he obtained many signal favours, and Saint Aignan was raised to a duchy in the peerage of France (duchepairie) in 1663.

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  • He did not, however, sit long in the House of Commons; for, on the death of his mother in 1837, he succeeded to the peerage which had been conferred on her with remainder to her only surviving son, and as Viscount Canning took his seat in the House of Lords.

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  • It passed into the hands of the houses of Rieux and Lorraine, and was raised to the rank of a duchy in the peerage of France by Henry III.

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  • The peerage became extinct or dormant on the death of the 8th viscount in 1767.

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  • In 1781 John Bourke, a Mayo man, believed to be descended from the line of "MacWilliam Oughter," was created Viscount Mayo, and four years later earl of Mayo, a peerage still extant.

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  • and privy councillor, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Milner of St James's and Cape Town.

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  • During his absence he was elected member for King's Lynn, which he represented till October 1869, when he succeeded to the peerage.

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  • Next year, as the Melbourne administration was near its close, Plunkett, the venerable chancellor of Ireland, was forced by discreditable pressure to resign, and the Whig attorney-general, who had never practised in equity, became chancellor of Ireland, and was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Campbell of St Andrews, in the county of Fife.

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  • C[okayne], Complete Peerage (1887-1898); W.

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  • 1 Hostilities were still proceeding, but in the areas under control Lord Milner (who was raised to the peerage in May) speedily set the machinery of government in motion.

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  • A peerage of Great Britain was conferred on his wife as Baroness Hood of Catherington in 1 795, and he was himself created Viscount Hood of Whitley in 1796.

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  • The marquis de Ruvigny has compiled The Jacobite Peerage (Edinburgh, 1904), a work which purports to give a list of all the titles and honours conferred by the kings of the exiled House of Stuart.

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  • During the voyage Gladstone had determined to offer Tennyson a peerage.

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  • On the 10th of November 1834 Lord Althorp succeeded to his father's peerage, and thereby vacated the leadership of the House of Commons.

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  • The peerage became extinct at his death.

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  • He was created a baronet in 1886, and was raised to the peerage in 1896, a few days before his death.

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  • He entered Parliament in 1874 as Conservative member for the city of Dublin, holding the seat till 1880, when he was raised to the peerage.

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  • The protector, hearing of his "grievous complaint," sent him a writ, and Lenthall was elated at believing he had secured a peerage.

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  • In 1581 it was erected into a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) for Albert de Gondi, marshal of France and general of the galleys.

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  • JOHN STUART BUTE, 3RD Earl Of (1713-1792), English prime minister, son of James, 2nd earl, and of Lady Jane Campbell, daughter of the 1st duke of Argyll, was born on the 25th of May 1713; he was educated at Eton and succeeded to the earldom (in the peerage of Scotland; created for his grandfather Sir James Stuart in 1703) on his father's death in 1723.

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  • the Fair, in September 1297, attached a peerage of France.

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  • C(okayne)), Complete Peerage; corrigenda to vol.

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  • Lord Armstrong, who was raised to the peerage in 1887, was the author of A Visit to Egypt (1873), and Electric Movement in Air and Water (1897), besides many professional papers.

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  • in September 1889; and in February 1892 was raised to the peerage as Lord Hood of Avalon, but on his death the title became extinct.

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  • MOUNTSTUART ELPHINSTONE (1779-1859), Indian statesman and historian, fourth son of the 11th Baron Elphinstone in the peerage of Scotland, was born in 1779.

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  • 9 peerage shortly after his return in 1845.

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  • In July 1861 he accepted from Lord Palmerston the office of solicitor-general, a knighthood, and a safe seat for the borough of Richmond in Yorkshire, secured for him through the friendly action of Lord Zetland, and thus began the second spell of Palmer's membership of the House of Commons, which continued till his elevation to the woolsack and the peerage.

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  • At the election of November 1868 Palmer was again returned for Richmond, and Gladstone offered him the office of lord chancellor or the office of a lord justice with a peerage; both offers were declined by Palmer, and he assumed a position of independent opposition to the measure relative to the Irish Church.

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  • In each point the English constitution, which he ardently admires, is, he says, suffering: the prerogatives of the crown are disproportionately great; the peerage has been degraded by new creations; and parliaments are slighted.

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  • He was created a baronet in June 1916, and the same year was raised to the peerage.

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  • But this failure was not on the same footing as that of Minden, and in spite of virulent party attacks, King George III., on the resignation of the North ministry, offered him a peerage.

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  • He unsuccessfully contested Coventry in 1863; in 1865 he was elected in the liberal interest for Warwick, for which he sat until his elevation to the peerage.

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  • He represented Lincolnshire in the parliament of 1559, and Northamptonshire in that of 1563, and he took an active part in the proceedings of the House of Commons until his elevation to the peerage; but there seems no good evidence for the story that he was proposed as speaker in 1563.

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  • On the 25th of February 1571 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Burghley of Burghley 1 (or Burleigh); the fact that he continued to act as secretary after his elevation illustrates the growing importance of that office, which under his son became a secretaryship of state.

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  • Knutsford was the birthplace of Sir Henry Holland, Physician Extraordinary to Queen Victoria (1788-1873); and his son, the second Sir Henry, who was secretary of state for the colonies (1887-1892), was raised to the peerage in 1888 with the title of Baron Knutsford.

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  • When Mr Balfour resigned in 1905 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount St Aldwyn.

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  • This tale, which still finds a place in Burke's Peerage in the account of the baron Kingsale, a descendant of the de Courci family, is a legend without historic foundation which did not obtain currency till centuries after John de Courci's death.

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  • This led to his interest in the development of western Canada, and from 1881 onwards he was associated with his cousin in the construction of the Canadian Pacific railway, for his services in connexion with which he was in 1886 made a baronet, in 1891 raised to the peerage; and in 1905 made G.C.V.O.

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  • On his retirement from the office of Whip in 1912 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Murray of Elibank, and entered the firm of Messrs.

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  • 1832) on his elevation to the peerage.

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  • A peerage, with the title of Viscount Wellington and Baron Douro, was conferred upon him for Talavera.

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  • Round, Studies in Peerage and Family History (1901); and S.

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  • In June 1778 Wedderburn was promoted to the post of attorney-general, and in the same year he refused the dignity of chief baron of the exchequer because the offer was not accompanied by the promise of a peerage.

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  • The coveted peerage was not long delayed.

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  • The patent raising him to the peerage as Baron Morden had been made out, but his last act was to refuse his sanction to the sealing of the document.

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  • He resisted, but unsuccessfully, the abolition of the hereditary peerage.

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  • The mass of the working-class population in the Protestant parts of Germany belonged to the Social Democracy, an inclusive term covering variations of opinion from the doctrinaire system of Marx to a degree of Radicalism which in England would not be considered a bar to a peerage.

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  • FRANCIS RAWDON-HASTINGS HASTINGS, 1st Marquess Of (1754-1826), British soldier and governor-general of India, born on the 9th of December 1754, was the son of Sir John Rawdon of Moira in the county of Down, 4th baronet, who was created Baron Rawdon of Moira, and afterwards earl of Moira, in the Irish peerage.

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  • Among the birthday honours of 1906 he was elevated to the peerage as Baron Courtney of Penwith (Cornwall).

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  • Ward) and in Collins's Peerage, and the Correspondence of Lord Clarendon with James, earl of Abingdon,1683-1685(Clarendon Press, 1896).

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  • In 1613 Chichester was raised to the peerage as Baron Chichester of Belfast, and in the following year he went to England to give an account of the state of Ireland.

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  • This nobleman's eldest son Arthur(1606-1675),who distinguished himself as Colonel Chichester in the suppression of the rebellion of 1641, was created earl of Donegall in 1647, and was succeeded in his titles by his nephew, whose great-grandson, Arthur, 5th earl of Donegall, was created Baron Fisherwick in the peerage of Great Britain (the other family titles being in the peerage of Ireland) in 1790, and earl of Belfast and marquess of Donegall in the peerage of Ireland in 1791.

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  • His brother Robert was father of Adam Loftus (c. 1568-1643), who became lord chancellor of Ireland in 1619, and in 1622 was created Viscount Loftus of Ely, King's county, in the peerage of Ireland.

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  • C., Complete Peerage vol.

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  • Clive's Plassey, the peerage of Ireland) arrived at Calcutta, Y?

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  • Since the battle of Plassey no event so greatly impressed the native imagination as the capture of Seringapatam, which won for General Harris a peerage and for Wellesley an Irish marquisate.

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  • In 1869 he refused Gladstone's offer of a peerage.

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  • This service was considered by the government as worthy of special acknowledgment; the naval and military commanders, officers, seamen and soldiers received the thanks of both Houses of Parliament, and Admiral Gambier was rewarded with a peerage.

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  • There were, under the ancien regime, three classes of dukes in France: (1) dukes who were peers (see Peerage) and had a seat in the parlement of Paris; (2) hereditary dukes who were not peers; (3) "brevet" dukes, created for life only.

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  • British dukes rank next to princes and princesses of the blood royal, the two archbishops of Canterbury and York, the lord Chancellor, &c., but beyond this precedence they have no special privileges which are not shared by peers of lower rank (see Peerage).

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  • A duke in the British peerage, if not royal, is addressed as "Your Grace" and is styled "the Most Noble."

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  • In July 1765 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Camden, of Camden Place, in the county of Kent; and in the following year he was removed from the court of common pleas to take his seat as lord chancellor (July 30, 1766).

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  • 2 See Peerage.

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  • Under Louis Philippe he received a peerage in 1832.

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  • In the same year his brother William, who from 1798 had filled the office of judge of the High Court of Admiralty, was raised to the peerage under the title of Lord Stowell.

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  • Subject to certain limitations and to a property qualification, any person over 40 years of age was eligible to a peerage.

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  • In suits brought against them personally or involving the rights of their peerage they had the right of being judged by the Parlement, the other peers being present, or having been duly summoned.

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  • He now showed that he had not by his charities wronged his relations by settling on his greatnephew and heir Thomas Wykeham, whom he had educated at Winchester and New College, Broughton Castle and estates, still held by his descendants in the female line, the family of Twisleton-Wykeham-Fiennes (peerage of Saye and Sele).

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  • By the acceptance of a peerage the great commoner lost at least as much and as suddenly in popularity as he gained in dignity.

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  • The countship, which was restored to Sebastian of Luxemburg, heir of the Brosses through his mother, was erected for him into a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) in 1569, and was afterwards held by the duchess of Merceeur, daughter of the first duke of Penthievre, and then by her daughter, the duchess of Vendome.

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  • 1476), heiress of Aumale, married Anthony of Lorraine, count of Vaudemont, and Aumale was created a duchy in the peerage of France for Claude and Francis of Lorraine in 1547.

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  • These qualities adhered to him through life, and he had scarcely left Harrow, at the age of eighteen, when the death of his father (April 17, 1802) raised him to the Irish peerage.

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  • CHARLES SPENCER SUNDERLAND, 3RD Earl Of (c. 1674-1722), English statesman, was the second son of the 2nd earl, but on the death of his elder brother Henry in Paris in September 1688 he became heir to the peerage.

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  • Having succeeded to the peerage in 1702, the earl was one of the commissioners for the union between England and Scotland, and in 1705 he was sent to Vienna as envoy extraordinary.

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  • Sunderland was especially interested in the proposed peerage bill, a measure designed to limit the number of members of the House of Lords, but this was defeated owing partly to the opposition of Sir Robert Walpole.

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  • His father was raised to the peerage in his son's infancy, and was made earl of Rivers in 1466.

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  • G.) 11VERS, [[Richard Savage, 4th Earl]] (c. 1660-1712), was the second son of Thomas, 3rd earl; and after the death about 1680 of his elder brother Thomas, styled Viscount Colchester, he was designated by that title until he succeeded to the peerage.

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  • C., Complete Peerage, vol.

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  • To the indignation with which he regarded Oxford's refusal to advance him in the peerage the active St John added an old disgust at the treasurer's pedantic and dilatory formalism, as well as his evident propensity, while leaving his colleague the fatigues, to engross for himself the chief credit of the administration.

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  • Until recent years the title " prince " was never conferred on anybody except the heir-apparent to the Crown, and his principality is a peerage.

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  • The children of the sovereign other than his eldest son, though by courtesy " princes " and " princesses, " need a royal warrant to raise them de jure above the common herd; and even then, though they be dubbed " Royal Highness " in their cradles, they remain " commoners " till raised to the peerage.

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  • He was raised to the peerage on his retirement, and took the title of Baron Carnock.

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  • 1768), who made a large fortune out of the law, and married Miss Coke of Melbourne Hall; in 1770 he was made baron and in 1781 Viscount Melbourne in the Irish peerage, and in 1815 was created an English peer.

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  • The influence of Melbourne as a politician dates from his succeeding to the peerage in 1829.

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  • In 1869 he was raised to the peerage by Gladstone as Baron Acton; he was an intimate friend and constant correspondent of the Liberal leader, and the two men had the very highest regard for one another.

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  • and Queen Margaret down through the peerage and the knighthood to the clerks and household retainers of the late king.

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  • The Peerage Bill, introduced at the same time to limit the royal power of creating peers, was happily thrown out in the Commons.

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  • The Lords were at this time, as a matter of fact, not merely wealthier but wiser than the Commons; and it is no wonder that, in days when the Commons, by passing the Septennial Act, had shown their distrust of their own constituents, the peers should show, by the Peerage Bill, their distrust of that House which was elected by those constituencies.

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  • It was in this world of reason and literature that the Whigs of the Peerage Bill moved.

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  • The door of the House of Lords was thus thrown open, and in 1885 Baron Nathan Mayea Rothschild, raised to the peerage, was enabled to take his seat in the upper chamber.

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  • Here follows a curious chapter of the history of the Berkeley peerage.

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  • By these things we may see that peerage law in old time rested upon the pleasure of the sovereign and upon no ascertained and unvarying custom.

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  • But Colonel Berkeley's political influence afterwards procured him (1831) a peerage as Lord Segrave of Berkeley, and ten years later an earldom with the title of Fitzhardinge.

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  • C(okayne)'s Complete Peerage; Jeayes's Descriptive Catalogue of the Charters and Muniments at Berkeley Castle (1892); Dictionary of National Biography; Transactions of Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society, 3 vols., viii., xlv., et passim; The Red Book of the Exchequer, Chronicles of Roger of Wendover, Matthew Paris, Adam of Murimuth, Robert of Gloucester, Henry of Huntingdon, &c. (Rolls Series); British Museum Charters, &c. (0.

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  • His position in the chamber was now one of much influence, and he had a large share in the modelling of the new constitution, though his effort to secure a hereditary peerage failed.

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    0
  • He was raised to the peerage in 1839.

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  • His estate of Seurre in Burgundy was created a duchy in the peerage of France (duche-pairie) in his favour under the name of Bellegarde, in 1619.

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    0
  • Edgecumbe was a faithful follower of Sir Robert Walpole, in whose interests he managed the elections for the Cornish boroughs, and his elevation to the peerage, which took place in 1742, was designed to prevent him from giving evidence about Walpole's expenditure of the secret service money.

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  • On the resignation of the Gladstone ministry in 1874 he was raised to the peerage as Viscount Cardwell of Ellerbeck, but took no further prominent part in politics.

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  • sold the town to France in 1662 Rutherford was consoled by the command of the 2nd or Tangier regiment, was made earl of Teviot in the peerage of Scotland, and was sent in 1663 as governor to Tangier.

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    0
  • The pseudo-chief MacWilliam became earl of Clanricarde, and others reached lower steps in the peerage, or were knighted by the king's own hand.

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    0
  • in 1641 threw off the supremacy of Spain and placed himself under the protectorate of France; he was compensated for the loss of Canosa, &c., with the duchy and peerage of Valentinois and various lesser lordships; and "duke of Valentinois" long continued to be the title of the heir-apparent of the principality.

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  • He was created earl of Malton in the peerage of Ireland in September 1750, and succeeded his father as 2nd marquess of Rockingham in December of the same year.

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    0
  • In 1866, perhaps chiefly in acknowledgment of his services to transAtlantic telegraphy, Thomson received the honour of knighthood, and in 1892 he was raised to the peerage with the title of Baron Kelvin of Largs.

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    0
  • He retained his office until May 1919, when he resigned and was raised to the peerage.

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    0
  • Round's Peerage and Pedigree (London, 1910).

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    0
  • In 1821 the 1st earl was further created Viscount Hutchinson of Knocklofty in the peerage of the United Kingdom.

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    0
  • C. Complete Peerage (London, 1890).

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    0
  • Burke's Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage is a definitive resource for those who may have ancestors who were nobility or royalty in great Britain.

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    0
  • If coat-armour, and thereby the rank of gentry, has been lavishly granted, some may think that the rank of peerage has often been lavishly granted also.

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    1
  • bestowed it on his son John the Good, who, when he became king in turn (22nd of August 1350), gave the countship to his second son Louis I., raising it to a duchy in the peerage of France by letters patent of the 25th of October 1360.

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    1
  • bestowed it on his son John the Good, who, when he became king in turn (22nd of August 1350), gave the countship to his second son Louis I., raising it to a duchy in the peerage of France by letters patent of the 25th of October 1360.

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    1
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