Pediatrician sentence example

pediatrician
  • It is important to consult a dermatologist or pediatrician if a child sheds hair in large amounts (more than 100 hairs per day for longer than four weeks) after combing, brushing, or shampooing or if the hair becomes significantly thinner.
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  • Should the cradle cap persist beyond the aid of dandruff shampoo, your child's pediatrician may prescribe a prescription hydrocortisone cream that works to control the irritation and hormonal activity in affected areas.
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  • We're looking for a new pediatrician in case anyone's wondering!
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  • If double or triple diapering is recommended by the pediatrician after the initial newborn exam, it is imperative that parents follow up with their pediatrician for a more extensive examination of the hips soon after the newborn comes home.
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  • Dr. James Mourilyan Tanner, a British pediatrician, studied the many body changes that occur during these years in a child's life and found they could be divided into various stages used to track progression through puberty.
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  • Parents may find it helpful to designate a physician, usually the primary pediatrician, or an experienced rehabilitation counselor to act as an advocate for their child and to aid them in coordinating their child's treatment program.
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  • If there is concern about a child's weight, a pediatrician should be consulted for advice on whether the child is inappropriately overweight, or whether the apparent chubbiness is normal "puppy-fat" that will dissipate as the child matures.
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  • Because of differences in individual diets and individual needs, the decision regarding any child's need for supplements should be made by the parents after discussion with the pediatrician and, where appropriate, a nutritionist.
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  • Parents who are concerned about their ability to calmly deal with the child's temper tantrums may talk to the child's pediatrician about ways to cope more effectively with this natural part of the child's development.
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  • A pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist, or optometrist licensed to use diagnostic drugs uses drops that dilate the pupils and temporarily paralyze eye-focusing muscles to evaluate visual status and ocular health.
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  • If a newborn being cared for at home shows excessive drooling or begins to cough and struggle when nursing or swallowing, it is essential to contact the pediatrician immediately and to go to an emergency department for immediate care.
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  • Before your baby is born, you'll want to choose a pediatrician that you can trust.
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  • doctor internist pediatrician.
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  • She is a Respiratory Pediatrician with a special interest in asthma particularly pre-school wheeze, non-CF bronchiectasis and congenital lung abnormalities.
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  • consultant pediatrician managing will fend for.
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  • internist pediatrician.
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  • Were deemed eligible reported public insurance chose the renewal plan doctor internist pediatrician.
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  • Serious Condition The pediatrician examined Sam and discovered his hugely enlarged spleen and swollen liver.
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  • While in the antenatal ward they would be seen by an obstetrician and a pediatrician to explain the possible prognosis.
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  • pediatrician's advice if you're in doubt.
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  • pediatrician's office, he weighted 6 pounds 14 ounces.
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  • Ever wished you had a pediatrician you could call every time.. .
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  • For the survey size fewer than options after introduction the only pediatrician.
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  • pediatrician today and he weighed 11 lbs 2 oz!
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  • This may be an audiological physician, ENT specialist, or community pediatrician in audiology.
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  • The first holder of the post is consultant pediatrician Professor Al Aynsley Green, the government's former child health tsar.
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  • The first holder of the post is consultant pediatrician Professor Al Aynsley Green, the government 's former child health tsar.
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  • Your pediatrician may recommend staying away from certain foods such as egg whites, peanuts and other tree nuts, as well as citrus fruits and honey until after your baby's first birthday.
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  • Additionally, if there are close family members with specific allergies, talk to your pediatrician about when to introduce those foods.
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  • You'll want to consult your pediatrician regarding any of the above symptoms.
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  • Always contact your pediatrician about any concerns or abnormal diaper activity.
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  • However, one of the most important baby care tips is to visit your pediatrician regularly throughout the first year.
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  • Watch closely for changes in your infant urination or bowel habits and always keep your pediatrician abreast of any concerns.
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  • A good pediatrician can help to quell the fears of new parents, but he can also spot any developmental or physiological problems early on, which can often lead to more effective treatment.
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  • A newborn infant will visit the pediatrician often throughout the first year of his life.
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  • Of course, if you feel that there is something physically wrong with your child, you should contact your pediatrician and relate your worries and questions to him or her.
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  • Obviously, you should always contact your pediatrician with questions and concerns about your baby's health care.
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  • If you do feed her formula, and she seems to be having digestion problems, contact your pediatrician before switching to another type of formula.
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  • Premature babies will need to make regular well-child visits to the pediatrician for routine examinations and vaccinations.
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  • Parents should maintain an open communication with their pediatrician to gain answers and find support.
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  • Ask your pediatrician for information regarding these groups.
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  • If you have any problems or questions, contact your pediatrician.
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  • Many first time parents are inundated with advice from their family, friends, and even their pediatrician.
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  • If you have any questions or concerns, contact your pediatrician.
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  • Finally, always contact your pediatrician with questions or concerns about your child.
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  • After all, if you don't have access to your child's pediatrician, how can you establish a reliable health care system?
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  • You'll need to set up a schedule of well-child doctor's visits, so that your pediatrician can monitor your baby's growth and development, and so that she can make sure your baby receives all of his immunizations.
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  • If you begin to feel overwhelmed and need some help, contact your ob-gyn or pediatrician to get the names of recommended lactation specialists or contact your local La Leche League for guidance and support.
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  • Hopefully, your pediatrician has already steered you in the direction of a good formula.
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  • Again, your pediatrician can help you, but you can also do a little experimenting to see which nipple your infant responds to the best.
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  • If your baby still isn't showing signs of tooth development by the time she reaches her first birthday, you might want to talk to your pediatrician.
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  • Although your pediatrician will check your baby's teeth at her well-care visits, you'll probably want to schedule a visit to a pediatric dentist around her first birthday.
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  • If your not sure, check with your pediatrician.
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  • If you have concerns about traveling with your baby, contact your pediatrician.
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  • As with any condition, if you have questions or concerns, contact your child's pediatrician.
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  • Talk to your baby's pediatrician, and ask for his or her recommendations.
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  • Post a list of emergency numbers, such as the Poison Control Hotline at 1-800-222-1222, your local fire and police departments, your child's pediatrician, and of course 911.
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  • Finally, don't forget to ask your pediatrician.
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  • Your pediatrician will help you decide what formula to feed your baby if that is what you are going to do.
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  • If you are going to breastfeed, your pediatrician can also recommend a good lactation specialist, or you can contact your local La Leche League for more assistance.
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  • Your pediatrician will probably tell you to skip the tub baths until your infant's umbilical has fallen off, and your little boy's circumcision has healed.
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  • First, you'll need to work closely with your pediatrician.
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  • You should work with your pediatrician in order to choose the best formula for your baby.
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  • Always consult your pediatrician before changing formulas, however.
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  • If you feel that the formula your child is using isn't agreeing with her, then you need to discuss this with your pediatrician.
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  • If you do become concerned, of course, you should always contact your pediatrician.
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  • While many doctors recommend using a small amount of Karo syrup, you should never attempt this without the recommendation and guidance of your pediatrician.
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  • Schedule regular well-care visits with your pediatrician.
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  • Sometime between four and six months of age, your pediatrician will probably tell you to begin feeding your infant.
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  • If at any time you are worried about your baby's development, you should contact your pediatrician.
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  • Above all, make sure you choose a pediatrician you can trust.
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  • Your pediatrician may be able to give you the number of local support groups and professionals who specialize in attachment parenting.
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  • In many instances, a pediatrician will place premature babies on a specified amount of nutrients in order to encourage the infant to grow at two and even three times the rate of a full-term baby.
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  • Finally, if your child continues to struggle with developing and/or maintaining a sleep schedule, discuss the problem with your pediatrician.
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  • If not, seek help from your pediatrician.
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  • If your toddler suffers from gastroesophageal reflux, chances are your pediatrician has prescribed the medicine Zantac.
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  • By keeping a log of when your child takes her medicine, what she eats on a daily basis, and how often she has diarrhea, you and your pediatrician may be able to pinpoint what to do for her.
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  • While it's true that the pediatrician who treats your child may need to change her prescription, that should be his decision.
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  • Ask for recommendations from your pediatrician, friends, relatives, etc. Sites like Epinions will often post testimonies from other consumers just like you.
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  • Include the National Poison Hotline (1-800-222-1222), Police, Pediatrician, Dentist, Family Doctor and Fire Department.
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  • In fact in those under the age of 12 weeks of age, medicines are rarely recommended, and in cases where they may be required it is essential that the treatment is prescribed by a pediatrician.
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  • If this is what is happening to your child, it may be time to talk to your pediatrician.
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  • Before you rush to your pediatrician's office with your fears about stuttering, step back, take a deep breath, and wait.
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  • Your pediatrician should refer you to a speech therapist for therapy.
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  • If you really feel that there is a problem, don't hesitate to contact your pediatrician.
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  • Feed your baby breastmilk or the proper formula and introduce solids as your pediatrician recommends.
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  • Most children will continue to be seen by a team of doctors including the pediatrician, cardiologist, and pediatric cardiac surgeon.
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  • The skull and facial asymmetry associated with craniosynostosis are frequently observed by an infant's pediatrician or family physician.
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  • The pediatrician should be consulted if the child is extremely pale, with little or no color in the gums, nail beds, creases of the palm, or lining of the eyelids.
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  • Diagnosing iron deficiency anemia begins with the pediatrician taking a careful history, including the child's age, symptoms, illnesses, general state of health, and a family history of anemias.
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  • If, however, the child does not improve, develops a fever, and becomes lethargic, the pediatrician should be called immediately.
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  • It is important that the pediatrician discusses the possibility of herpes infections with new parents, particularly if they have a history of genital herpes.
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  • Some people recommend that children have their vision checked by their pediatrician, family physician, ophthalmologist, or optometrist at or before six months of age.
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  • After surgery, care must be taken to follow all postoperative instructions and to obtain follow-up care from both the pediatrician and pediatric urologist.
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  • The pediatrician closely monitors the child's growth rate.
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  • A pediatrician, nurse, or dietitian can assist parents in ways to insure the child is getting proper nutrition.
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  • Parents with a child who is avoiding or refusing school should call their pediatrician and arrange to have physical symptoms evaluated.
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  • The pediatrician should be consulted if vomiting continues beyond that time, if the child shows signs of dehydration, seems extremely lethargic, or if the child is a very young infant.
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  • Parents should consult a pediatrician for treatment options if an infant younger than six months of age vomits multiple times within several hours.
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  • Medical treatment is a multidisciplinary team effort often involving the pediatrician, a neurosurgeon, a rhematologist, and a neurologist.
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  • This treatment should be done only after consultation with a pediatrician, since this shampoo may be irritating to babies.
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  • MMR vaccinations are appropriate for children with chronic diseases such as diabetes and cardiovascular condition as advised by the pediatrician.
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  • Symptoms of low-grade fever, irritability, and soreness at the injection site following the MMR immunization can be relieved with an analgesic such as acetaminophen as recommended by the pediatrician.
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  • When the cause of a child's delay is identified, the pediatrician and family know better what to expect, and the child can begin to receive appropriate treatment and support.
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  • Parents concerned about any of their child's development should seek the opinion of their pediatrician.
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  • Asthma may be diagnosed by the child's primary pediatrician or an asthma specialist, such as an allergist.
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  • During the physical exam, the pediatrician will listen to the patient's chest with a stethoscope to evaluate distinctive breathing sounds.
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  • In most cases, asthma treatment is managed by the child's pediatrician.
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  • If the parent suspects that certain foods trigger asthma symptoms in the child, the pediatrician may recommend keeping a food diary for a few weeks to identify problematic foods.
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  • Parents should report any birthmarks they notice to the child's pediatrician.
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  • They should call the pediatrician if they notice bleeding from the birthmark, if a sore develops on the birthmark, if the mark is growing larger.
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  • Antisocial behavior and childhood antisocial disorders such as conduct disorder may be diagnosed by a family physician or pediatrician, social worker, school counselor, psychiatrist, or psychologist.
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  • A pediatrician, family physician, or other primary care doctor frequently manages the treatment of a child with JA, often with the help of other doctors.
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  • Parents should consult a family physician or pediatrician if their child has any signs or symptoms of hypogonadism.
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  • Before beginning treatment for encopresis, the pediatrician first looks for any physical cause for the inappropriate bowel movements.
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  • If the pediatrician makes a diagnosis of retentive encopresis, the physician may recommend laxatives, stool softeners, or an enema to free the impaction.
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  • If no fecal impaction is found, the pediatrician works with a counselor or psychiatrist to analyze the variables that characterize the encopresis.
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  • Myopia cannot be diagnosed by school screenings or by simply reading eye chart at the pediatrician's office.
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  • Basic nutritional requirements for children with diabetes can be provided by the pediatrician, based on the child's age, sex, weight, activity levels, food preferences, and ethnic or cultural factors.
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  • If the behavior continues for more than a few weeks, parents should talk to the pediatrician.
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  • A healthcare team including a pediatrician, surgeon, and social worker is a valuable asset for parents and most children's hospitals can assist parents in finding the support and resources they need.
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  • It is named for the pediatrician who first described it in 1965.
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  • A newborn born with erythroblastosis should be attended to immediately by a pediatrician who is prepared to perform an exchange transfusion at once if required.
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  • However, the first step in determining if a child has AD/HD is to consult with a pediatrician.
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  • The pediatrician can make an initial evaluation of the child's developmental maturity compared to other children in his or her age group.
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  • A pediatrician can also provide a referral to a psychologist or pediatric specialist for AD/HD assessment.
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  • Atopic dermatitis is rarely a medical emergency and can often be treated by the child's pediatrician.
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  • In addition to followup visits with the pediatrician and allergist, the child should have regular eye examinations as a safeguard against cataracts or other eye complications.
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  • Parents will usually be informed by the pediatrician about any risks associated with an elevated bilirubin, such as liver dysfunction or possible kernicterus.
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  • Dear Mary,I am a qualified pediatrician.
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  • Get ready for school and become an obstetrician/gynecologist or a pediatrician.
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  • A nurse working with children may be employed in a number of different settings ranging from private pediatrician offices to large hospitals.
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  • However, a pediatrician can tell you if the baby is gaining enough weight, if there is a medical problem preventing you from breastfeeding and if your baby is tongue-tied.
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  • Your pediatrician can also snip the frenulum to relieve tongue-tie.
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  • If you are feeding your baby formula and it doesn't seem to agree with her, talk to your pediatrician about changing the formula you are using.
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  • Ask for help from a lactation consultant or your pediatrician if you're having problems with cracked or bleeding nipples.
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  • Ask your pediatrician for recommendations or use the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry website to locate a therapist in your area.
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  • You might want to begin your search for an obstetrician and pediatrician before conception.
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  • Your pediatrician can help you work out a plan to supplement your breast milk with bottle feedings.
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  • After you give birth, you'll be visiting the pediatrician regularly to get the baby's immunizations and to make sure he or she is growing properly.
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  • The pediatrician will weigh the baby and plot his growth on a special chart.
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  • If you're feeling the least bit worried that your baby isn't getting enough milk, pick up the phone and call your pediatrician.
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  • Some of these problems may not be apparent immediately, but your pediatrician should be able to answer any questions you may have about the specific issues your child may face.
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  • If you have a fussy eater on your hands, talk to your child's pediatrician about supplements.
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  • Talk with your pediatrician before supplementing with C powder.
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  • Your pediatrician will know if such an issue is present and prescribe the appropriate dosage.
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  • As with all things related to your baby, you definitely want to use caution and ask your pediatrician before going with any supplement, even something as simple as a vitamin supplement.
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  • When writing about caring for a newborn, it only takes five words to attribute information to a pediatrician.
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  • Stride Rite has developed the three-stage Step System with UCLA trained pediatrician, Dr. Tanya Altmann.
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  • You might have read all the parenting books, and listened to your pediatrician's advice, but still encounter various child behavior problems.
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  • If your child exhibits many of the following symptoms, discuss the possibility of depression with your pediatrician.
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  • Therefore children who have suffered from a major depressive episode should be closely monitored by parents and pediatrician long after the episode has subsided.
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  • If your child has exhibited many of the symptoms of depression for more than two weeks, discuss your concerns with your pediatrician.
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  • Ask your pediatrician to recommend a counselor if it seems necessary.
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  • In many cases, medical treatment isn't recommended until six year of age, but that is a decision that you will need to make with the help of your pediatrician.
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  • If he's reached the six year mark, however, and he is still wetting the bed, talk with your pediatrician.
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  • Discuss your guidelines with your pediatrician or friends, or consult books about your child's age if you are concerned.
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  • Your child's pediatrician can provide a referral.
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  • Contact your pediatrician or your local school district.
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  • If you think your child might be exhibiting symptoms of ADHD, you need to contact your pediatrician.
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  • Before beginning a formal strength training program, a medical evaluation should be performed by a pediatrician.
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  • While some parents turn to traditional medications that have been prescribed by a pediatrician, others look for help through herbs and more organic treatments.
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  • If you have questions about whether or not you should continue this form of feeding, consider your lifestyle and discuss any of your concerns or questions with your child's pediatrician.
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  • Ask your family doctor or pediatrician for recommendations.
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  • In addition, talk to your family doctor or pediatrician, and contact your local chamber of commerce.
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  • Consult with your pediatrician about buying shoes without the option of trying on, because you may find that with certain brands and styles, it is perfectly safe to go ahead and save the money.
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  • The Bennetts started the practice that also includes psychiatrist Violet Turner (Amy Brenneman), pediatrician Cooper Freedman (Paul Adelstein), and alternative medicine specialist Pete Wilder (Tim Daly).
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  • Contact your pediatrician and set up an appointment to address your concerns.
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  • Early intervention is essential, so once you've met with your pediatrician, pursue a referral to a clinician or specialist.
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  • A few visits to a pediatrician or specialist results in a diagnosis for autism spectrum disorder.
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  • Ask your pediatrician to refer your child to a local developmental specialist, or you can contact the Early Intervention program in your area for more information on arranging an evaluation.
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  • Hannah Poling received several vaccines at the age of 19 months in one well-visit to her pediatrician in order to catch up on the required vaccinations for her age.
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  • If you're concerned about your child's development at any age, it's a good idea to speak to your pediatrician or a school professional.
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  • If your child is still too young for enrollment in school, speak with his pediatrician about your concerns and demand a full evaluation for autism.
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  • Your child's pediatrician can refer you to an autism specialist, and will provide you with information on contacting local and state services for your child.
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  • If you spot these conditions in your young children, (even babies) speak to your child's pediatrician about the condition.
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  • If you suspect your child may have autism of any type, speak with your pediatrician about it.
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  • If your child's pediatrician feels you should take a "wait and see" approach, get a second opinion.
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  • If you need to bypass your infant's pediatrician, or simply want additional information on early autism symptoms, there are numerous agencies and not-for-profit organizations available to assist you.
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  • If he experiences one or more of these signs, arrange an appointment with your pediatrician.
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  • Begin with a consultation with your child's pediatrician, and find an early intervention program in your area.
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  • However, if you or your child have several of the typical indicators, it may be a good idea to ask your pediatrician or school district for help assessing the situation.
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  • Your child's pediatrician should conduct regular developmental screenings during well visits, but it is helpful to communicate any concerns about your child's development.
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  • After giving an accurate diagnosis, your child's pediatrician should offer guidance in getting the services your child needs.
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  • The vaccine prevents the spread of potentially deadly diseases, and it is a routine component of a child's visits to his or her pediatrician.
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  • To find out more, ask your neurologist or developmental pediatrician to put you in touch with any studies in your area.
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  • If this is something that concerns you, you should discuss the issue with your pediatrician.
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  • If you are the parent of a newly diagnosed child, it is likely your child's pediatrician has made suggestions for finding early intervention services.
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  • If the pediatrician recommends a weight-reducing diet, then the best approach is to adjust the eating habits of the entire family to prevent the child's being humiliated by being singled out.
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  • If you are concerned about your child's weight, make an appointment to speak with your pediatrician.
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  • For more information about how to encourage your child to have healthier habits, talk to your pediatrician.
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  • Insurance information, including the name and contact details of the insurance company, the policy number, the name of the child's pediatrician, and hospital preference.
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  • You can also call your child's pediatrician or your local health department and ask for free emergency medical release forms to keep on hand.
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  • Additionally, you can obtain a medical release form from your child's pediatrician.
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  • Name and contact details for the child's pediatrician, dentist, and preferred hospital.
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  • This usually clears up on its own as baby gets older, but check with you pediatrician about topical treatments if it persists.
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  • It often needs to be treated with topical or oral medications, so talk with your pediatrician if you notice irritation that doesn't improve with careful skin care.
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  • Call your child's pediatrician if this occurs, or take your infant to the emergency room.
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  • If treating a child, rely on the pediatrician's dosage recommendation.
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  • After all, how many cats, lizards, and horses does a pediatrician treat in a given day?
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  • reproductive endocrinology is another area of increasing interest to the pediatrician.
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  • Arrangements were made to see a pediatrician whilst in the hospital.
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  • Your pediatrician will expect you to schedule regular visits for your baby so that he or she can track your child's progress.
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  • If you fail to notice any progressive development, however, and you are worried that your child is not developing normally, you should contact your pediatrician.
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  • Many parents will make the mistake of speaking with their pediatrician only; however, pediatricians are not qualified to determine if a child needs therapy.
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  • If your baby doesn't appear to be reaching those milestones within a preferred time frame, it may be time for a consultation with your pediatrician.
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  • If you have any concerns regarding your baby's developmental progress, please contact your pediatrician immediately.
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  • Your pediatrician may be able to help you with information as well.
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  • Your pediatrician will play an important role in the introduction of baby food to your son or daughter.
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  • Your pediatrician will probably advise you to only introduce one food at a time.
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  • If you notice any problems associated with the introduction of your new foods into your baby's diet, please contact your pediatrician immediately.
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  • It's the overall pattern that provides your pediatrician with the important information they need regarding your baby's health.
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  • If this is the case for your child, your pediatrician will monitor him or her closely.
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  • Hearing-Not all hospitals perform a hearing test on newborns, so ask your pediatrician if this is standard.
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  • Mouth-Your pediatrician will examine your baby's mouth to check for conditions such as a cleft palate or a tongue tie.
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  • Lungs-Using a stethoscope, your pediatrician will listen to your baby's breathing patterns.
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  • You will usually be instructed to bring your infant in to your pediatrician's office at two weeks after birth and on a regular basis thereafter, in which many of these same examinations will continue to be given.
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  • For instance if your baby quickly drops from the 70th percentile to the 50th percentile in height or weight, notify your pediatrician.
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  • If your pediatrician isn't concerned, relax and enjoy your baby.
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  • For instance, if your baby was born six weeks early, the pediatrician will compare the rate of her physical development with full term infants that were born six weeks earlier than your child.
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  • Finally, if your child continues to have sleep issues, talk to his pediatrician to see if there might be other issues that need to be addressed.
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  • If your child continues to have problems staying dry at night, talk to his or her pediatrician.
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  • If your child is regularly not reaching other developmental milestones and not showing any readiness signs for toilet-training by age three, it might be a good idea to check in with your pediatrician.
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  • Not every child responds to the same training methods, so talk with your pediatrician, family and friends to see what they recommend.
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  • When your child's pediatrician moves your baby's arms and legs, she is checking his muscle tone.
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  • While your pediatrician will certainly examine your child at each well-child visit, you may pick up on developmental delays before he does.
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  • So long as your pediatrician feels your infant is developing normally, enjoy this precious time.
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  • If sleep issues don't go away after making changes, speak with your baby's pediatrician.
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  • In cases of severe diaper rash, parents should get a diagnosis and treatment plan from their baby's pediatrician.
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  • Formula-Your pediatrician will probably suggest a certain formula to start with, but you may decide to change later.
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  • Discuss the choice of milk with your pediatrician in order to determine what type of milk to give your baby, and when to transition away from whole milk.
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  • A pediatrician uses an infant growth chart to track the progress of your infant.
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  • During each well-baby appointment, the pediatrician or nurse will measure the baby's length, weight and head circumference and record it on a growth chart that is kept in the baby's permanent chart.
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  • Your pediatrician can give you a growth chart of your own at the office.
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  • Finally, if your child's behavior is really beyond your control, it may be time to consult your pediatrician to see if the issue is health-related.
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  • Finally, the next time you visit your child's pediatrician, ask if he has any coupons or samples of Enfamil to give away.
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  • Now, not to alarm you, but as a precaution, I'd make an appointment with your pediatrician to discuss the children's possible exposure to the worms.
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  • Your pediatrician will advise you on anything that may need to be done.
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  • The best way to choose a veterinarian, is the same way you pick your child's pediatrician.
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  • If you have more questions about puberty, don't be afraid to discuss them with your parents or your pediatrician.
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  • More studies need to be undertaken, but you should discuss raw food with your child's pediatrician before making it the new family way of eating.
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  • Ask your healthcare provider or your child's pediatrician to recommend a qualified mental health professional in your area.
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  • Ask your child's pediatrician to recommend a qualified therapist in your area.
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  • It's best to consult the child's pediatrician before starting him or her on the supplement.
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  • Most parents consult a pediatrician or primary care doctor after noticing their child has the typical purpuric skin rash, frequent nosebleeds, or bleeding from the digestive or urinary tract.
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  • Parents can ask the pediatrician when in doubt and understand that simple blood and coagulation tests can be performed to rule out ITP.
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  • The pediatrician will advise when solid foods can be started, usually around six months of age.
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  • At the first signs of eye and vision problems, parents should consult their pediatrician, optometrist, or ophthalmologist.
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  • Parents should report any such symptoms to the pediatrician along with unexplained fever or frequent infections.
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  • They should look for it first in the face and upper body and if it progresses downward this means the concentration is getting too high and it is time to call the pediatrician.
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  • Unusual bleeding or bruising of the site should be reported to the pediatrician.
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  • Parents should work closely with the child's pediatrician and other specialists who may be involved to monitor the child's progress through regular follow-up appointments.
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  • It is named for the Japanese pediatrician who first identified it in 1967.
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  • The pediatrician may order the TORCH test to be performed when a newborn has these symptoms, in order to determine if any of the five types of infection may be involved.
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  • Besides general symptoms that may encourage a pediatrician to order the TORCH panel of tests, each of the TORCH infections has its own origins and may have a characteristic cluster of symptoms in newborns.
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  • Since the TORCH test is a screening or first-level test, the pediatrician may order tests of other body fluids or tissues to confirm the diagnosis of a specific infection.
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  • If this is suspected, a pediatrician, psychologist, or other specialist should be consulted.
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  • All children should have regular well-child check ups according to the schedule recommended by their physician or pediatrician.
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  • It is named for the French pediatrician, Antoine Marfan (1858-1942), who first described it in 1896.
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  • After a child has missed several developmental milestones, the pediatrician may refer the child to a specialist for diagnosis.
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  • The child's pediatrician can help provide some guidelines to help the family understand how the child's development may be affected by the illness and treatment.
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  • Tests may be administered in an outpatient or hospital setting by a pediatrician, general practitioner, social worker, psychiatrist, or psychologist.
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  • Parents should consult their child's pediatrician or physician if they are unsure the child's diet is nutritionally adequate.
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  • Developmental pediatrician: a pediatrician with specialized training in children's social, emotional, and intellectual development as well as health and physical growth.
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  • Battered child syndrome is most often diagnosed by an emergency room physician or pediatrician, or by teachers or social workers.
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  • A pediatrician may discontinue certain medications prior to the performance of growth hormone tests.
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  • The pediatrician may make recommendations for the child's activity prior to testing.
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  • A pediatrician may limit activities for the immediate pre-test period.
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  • Some children may experience sleepiness, sweating, and/or nervousness, all of which can be corrected after the test by ingestion of juice or a glucose infusion, as recommended by the pediatrician.
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  • Medical personnel and the pediatrician may provide instruction before, during, and after the tests, as well as close observation to minimize any risks.
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  • Because congenital coarctation of the aorta is unpredicted, parents may be unprepared for the diagnosis and need careful, sensitive medical explanation by the pediatrician or surgeon.
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  • Conduct disorder may be diagnosed by a family physician or pediatrician, social worker, school counselor, psychiatrist, or psychologist.
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  • If a painful sore appears on the child's eyelid, eye surface, or on the end of his nose, call the pediatrician right away.
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  • But if a newborn gets a cold sore, the pediatrician should be called right away.
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  • Choices for pain relief include medication, ointments, or mouth rinses recommended by the pediatrician.
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  • Parents should call the child's pediatrician if the child has not had a cold sore before, especially in the case of babies.
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  • An infant under three months should be seen as soon by a pediatrician as possible if a fever develops.
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  • If a toddler or older child has a fever for more than a day or two (48 to 72 hours), with or without other symptoms, the pediatrician should be consulted so that an early diagnosis can be made and treatment begun.
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  • A crying child with fever may have pain associated with a specific condition and should be seen by the pediatrician as soon as possible.
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  • For children experiencing serious or recurrent urinary tract infections, the pediatrician will search for underlying abnormalities.
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  • Parents should contact their pediatrician if they observe any A-T signs or symptoms in their child.
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  • The pediatrician will advise when to introduce solid foods, usually around six months of age.
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  • Macrocephaly is usually diagnosed by the pediatrician during a physical examination.
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  • An increase in insulin may also be necessary; parents of children with diabetes should talk with their pediatrician about a sick day plan for their child before they need it.
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  • Parents of a newborn who have taken the baby home should call the child's pediatrician if they notice the baby has episodes of not breathing during sleep.
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  • Frequent nosebleeds should be followed up with the pediatrician.
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  • Parents should call the pediatrician if they are concerned.
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  • If the physical exam demonstrates nothing else is wrong, the pediatrician may diagnose colic by the parent's description of the crying.
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  • Those with bleeding gums should see their pediatrician urgently, as this is also a symptom of leukemia in some children.
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  • Neonatologist-A physician (pediatrician) who has special training in the care of newborn infants.
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  • If the child is consistently below the fifth percentile on standard growth charts or if a child stops growing at all, the parent(s) should discuss the implications with the child's pediatrician.
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  • Persistence of neonatal reflexes is not threatening to life and, therefore, can be discussed with the pediatrician during normal well-baby visits.
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  • Hearing development is always one of the first things checked if a pediatrician or parent suspects a language delay.
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  • Parents should talk to their pediatrician immediately if their child appears to have hearing impairment.
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  • Speech and language disorders are usually diagnosed by a speech and language pathologist, often with the help of a pediatrician, audiologist (hearing specialist), and neurologist.
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  • In addition, any time they have questions about their child's growth and development, they should talk to their pediatrician.
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  • If a child continues to wet the bed after the age of six, parents may feel the need to seek evaluation and diagnosis by the family doctor or a children's specialist (pediatrician).
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  • In some instances the family may have been referred to a specialist in family therapy by their pediatrician or other primary care provider.
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  • RSV infection is usually diagnosed during a physical examination by the pediatrician or primary care doctor.
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  • Parents should call their pediatrician if the child shows unhealthy physical or emotional symptoms that may be in response to family problems or transitions.
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  • Any low-grade fever or soreness can be treated with ibuprofen or acetaminophen as recommended by the pediatrician.
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  • Parents who are vegetarians and want their baby to be one should discuss the topic with a pediatrician.
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  • Parents should consult their child's pediatrician or physician if they are unsure the child's vegetarian diet is nutritionally adequate.
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  • When a child is hurt while playing sports, the family physician, pediatrician, or an orthopedic surgeon, should evaluate symptoms that persist, intensify, or reduce the athlete's ability to play without pain.
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  • If selective mutism persists for more than a month, parents should discuss this pattern with their child's teachers, family physician, or pediatrician.
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  • It is all too common for parents to question their child's pediatrician about the child's inability to speak in public and be told that the child is just shy and will outgrow the behavior.
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  • Individuals with developmental delay or birth defects may be referred to a clinical geneticist for genetic testing or to a developmental pediatrician or neurologist for evaluation and diagnosis of FAS.
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  • Children with any one or combination of developmental coordination disorder symptoms should be seen by a pediatrician who specializes in motor skills development delays.
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  • Still, there are certain signs that may point to a problem, and these should be discussed with a pediatrician or physician.
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  • It may be better for parents, with the guidance of their pediatrician, to depart from these recommendations in the case of infants with certain health problems, such as gastroesophageal reflux (GER).
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  • Otherwise, they should contact their pediatrician if the child is showing any signs of delayed or abnormal growth or unexplained muscle weakness.
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  • Frequent or constant vomiting, unsuccessful feeding, and poor weight gain should be reported to the pediatrician as soon as noted.
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  • A pediatrician or a child and adolescent psychiatrist often coordinates these tests.
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  • Children with any one or combination of these symptoms should be seen by a pediatrician who specializes in motor skills development delays.
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  • Parents may want to consider seeking the advice of a pediatrician and/or child and adolescent psychiatrist if their child appears addicted to television and videos.
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  • Treatment should be provided by a pediatric cardiologist or pediatrician with special knowledge and experience in the treatment of high blood pressure.
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  • A pediatrician can calculate a healthy range of body weight for the child, recommend dietary guidelines, and provide activity guidelines to help the child safely and effectively lose weight.
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  • Children who have symptoms of retinoblastoma are usually first evaluated by their pediatrician.
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  • The pediatrician will often perform a red reflex test to diagnose or confirm leukocoria.
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  • If the pediatrician suspects retinoblastoma on the basis of these evaluations, he or she will most likely refer the patient to an ophthalmologist (eye doctor) who has experience with retinoblastoma.
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  • Parents who suspect that their child may be deliberately hurting themselves or falsifying symptoms should contact their pediatrician immediately for assessment.
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  • The pediatrician should be consulted if the child is also extremely pale or has little or no color in the gums, nail beds, creases of the palm, or lining of the eyelids.
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  • A pediatrician should be consulted at birth, the usual time clubfoot is initially diagnosed.
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  • While there is no immediate urgency, the condition should be evaluated by a pediatrician or an orthopedic surgeon in the first weeks of life so that treatment can be started.
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  • When worried about their child's behavior, parents can start by talking to the child's pediatrician or family physician about their concerns.
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  • A physician, pediatrician, sports medicine physician, or orthopedic surgeon should evaluate symptoms that persist, intensify, or reduce the athlete's ability to play without pain.
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  • See specific drugs references or ask a pediatrician.
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  • See specific drugs references or ask a pediatrician about interactions for an antiviral drug that has been prescribed.
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  • Any unusual conditions or reactions should be reported to the pediatrician.
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  • Artificial tear products may be ordered by the pediatrician or specialist.
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  • This involves following the American Dietetic Association (ADA) nutritional guidelines for children, and possibly the addition of a multivitamin if the pediatrician feels it is advisable.
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  • Markel, Howard, MD. Practical Pediatrician.
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  • If pain and crying occur every 15 or 30 minutes, it is critical to see the pediatrician or go to the emergency room so that early diagnosis can be made and treatment begun.
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  • Parents should be aware of the child's bowel habits and report constipation, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting to the pediatrician when it occurs.
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  • Otherwise, they should contact their pediatrician if the child shows any signs of delayed or abnormal growth, or unexplained muscle weakness.
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  • An evaluation by a pediatrician is recommended in such circumstances.
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  • If, by age three, a child has problems understanding simple directions or is perplexed when asked to do something simple, the parents or primary caregiver should consult a physician or pediatrician.
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  • If the child actually hurts himself or others or has very frequent tantrums, it may be a sign of behavior problems, and the child should be assessed by a pediatrician.
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  • Testing continues with well-baby visits to the pediatrician.
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  • In 1973 Harvard University pediatrician T.
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  • These tests often are administered by a development assessment specialist, a developmental pediatrician, or an early-childhood special educator.
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  • So, any eye problem in the newborn needs to be diagnosed properly and treated as indicated by the pediatrician or eye-care provider.
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  • If a small child, especially an infant, has a bulge in the abdominal or groin area, the child's pediatrician should be consulted.
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  • For infants with mild hip clicks, they suggest the child be seen by the regular pediatrician in two weeks for follow up since most benign hip clicks will resolve within that time period.
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  • A pediatrician should be consulted when girls under age eight start to show signs breast development and menstruation, or if boys under age 10 show enlarged genitals and body hair.
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  • When a child's deviation from the average milestones of development causes the parents concern, a pediatrician or other professional may be contacted for advice.
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  • In some severe cases, a pediatrician may prescribe a benzodiazepine tranquilizer, such as diazepam, known to suppress the stage four level of deep sleep.
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  • Any pediatrician who is unable to care for and counsel nonheterosexual youth should refer these patients to an appropriate colleague."
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  • Parents should consult a pediatrician or physician when their child shows signs of either early or delayed puberty.
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  • Because Kawasaki syndrome is primarily a disease of infants and young children, the disease is most likely to be diagnosed by a pediatrician.
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  • Any worsening or unexplained new symptoms should be reported to the treating pediatrician.
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  • Most children continue to be seen by a team of doctors including the pediatrician, cardiologist, and pediatric cardiac surgeon.
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  • Parents should call the pediatrician immediately if they suspect that their child may have a language delay or a hearing problem.
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  • The child's pediatrician, parents, or teacher may ask for psychological assessment to gain a greater understanding of the child's development and needs.
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  • Parents may also want to discuss appropriate assessments with their child's pediatrician and ask for a referral to a child psychologist or psychiatrist.
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  • The screening tool uses a short questionnaire with two sections, one prepared by the parents, the other by the child's family doctor or pediatrician.
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  • During each visit the pediatrician monitors, advises, and answers questions on a baby's growth and development.
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  • A pediatrician performs a thorough physical exam at birth to determine the physical status of the newborn.
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  • If the hospital pediatrician is not the same as the one used for follow-up exams, it is important to obtain the birth records to bring to the first office visit.
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  • The pediatrician will continue in the same manner as before-doing a physical exam and noting changes, asking questions about development, and inquiring about feeding and sleeping habits.
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  • The primary preparation for a well-baby exam involves the parent or guardian making a list of questions for the pediatrician.
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