Pedantry sentence example

pedantry
  • His poems are elegant and free from the conceits and pedantry of the earlier writers.
    21
    11
  • Learning, indeed, was often ridiculed as pedantry in a gentleman of good family.
    7
    3
  • Marot and his school reacted against this pedantry.
    2
    0
  • He poses too much as a fine gentleman, and is so anxious not to be taken for a pedant of the vulgar scholastic kind that he falls into the hardly more attractive pedantry of the aesthete and virtuoso.
    2
    1
  • He was an admirer of Marx's learning and analytical power, but he would never submit to the tyrannical pedantry of Marx's school and stood up for an elemental awaking of revolutionary instincts.
    1
    0
    Advertisement
  • The great orators of all times were a special object of study with him, and he describes his boyish pedantry pleasantly enough, but by no means without a touch of self-satisfaction in the memory.
    0
    0
  • Atterbom and some fellow-students founded about 1810 a society for the deliverance of the country from French pedantry, which with this end carried on a periodical entitled Phosphoros (1810-1813), to propagate the opinions of Schlegel and Schelling.
    0
    0
  • This gives certain of his arguments an air of pedantry, and seems to lead him to find evidences of continuity in institutions which in reality and spirit were different from what they once had been.
    0
    0
  • The opportunity came with the old king's death in 1625, for James, with all his pedantry, was too wise and cautious to embark in Laud's rash undertakings, and had already shown a prudent moderation, after setting up bishops in Scotland, in going no further in opposition to the religious feelings of the people.
    0
    0
  • His writings are marked by vigour and vitality of style, as well as by the highest qualities of the historian who recreates the past from the original sources; he had no sympathy with either legal or historical pedantry; and his death at Grand Canary on the, 9th of December 1906 deprived English law and letters of one of their most scholarly and most inspiring representatives, notable alike for sweetness of character, acuteness in criticism, and wisdom in counsel.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • At the same time, the significance which the word " viking " has had in our language is due in part to a false etymology, connecting the word with " king "; the effect of which still remains in the customary pronunciation vi-king instead of vik-ing, now so much embedded in the language that it is a pedantry to try and change it.
    0
    0
  • The man of the world who had cultivated it in his youth regarded it in riper years as a foolish pedantry, or at best as a propaedeutic exercise; while the serious student, necessarily preferring that form of disputation which recognized truth as the end of this, as of other intellectual processes, betook himself to one or other of the philosophies of the revival.
    0
    0
  • All three were disciples of Erasmus, the great apostle of a new, tolerant, scholarly religion very different from the grimy pedantry of the medieval doctors.
    0
    0
  • Owing to the uncritical veneration for antiquity which then prevailed, it had received a strong tincture of pedantry.
    0
    0
  • In the drama the pedantry of the Revival, which had not injured romantic literature, made itself perniciously felt.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It was only at a later period that the formalism of pseudo-classic pedantry reduced natural and national originality to a dead unanimity.
    0
    0
  • To his personal characteristics can be traced the hair-splitting and formal pedantry which ever afterwards marked the activity of the school, the dry repellent technical procedure of the Dialecticians par excellence, as they were called.
    0
    0
  • The prevailing European fashion of literary academies was not long in reaching Portugal, and 1647 saw the foundation of the Academia dos Generosos which included in its ranks the men most illustrious by learning and social position, and in 1663 the Academia dos Singulares came into being; but with all their pedantry, extravagances and bad taste, it must be confessed that these and similar corporations tended to promote the pursuit of good literature.
    0
    0
  • Instead of the wearisome prolixity and the misplaced pedantry which make the latter almost unreadable, we find the old tales briefly and simply told.
    0
    0
  • Swift inoculated the Scriblerus Club with his own hatred of pedantry, cant and circumlocution.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • In 1824 Constable's pictures were shown in the Salon, and confirmed the younger men in their resolution to abandon the lifeless pedantry of the schools and to seek inspiration from nature.
    0
    0
  • He worked little but rapidly, with none of the bureaucratic pedantry of a Philip II.
    0
    0
  • Even by free-trade ministers like Gladstone it had been left up to 1869 untouched, and its removal by Robert Lowe (Lord Sherbrooke) had since then been widely regarded as a piece of economic pedantry.
    0
    0
  • And it would be mere pedantry to ignore the peculiar claims which Christianity has upon our notice.
    0
    0
  • All this sounds like cartographical pedantry of the highest order, and so it is.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The brilliant and enterprising Christian Thomasius brought out periodically, in dialogue form, his Monatsgesprdche (1688-1690), written by himself in the vernacular, to defend his novel theories against the alarmed pedantry of Germany, and, together with Strahl, Buddeus and others, Observationes selectae ad rem litterariam spectantes (1700), written in Latin.
    0
    0
  • His knowledge of pedagogy was displayed in his public lectures and his addresses, in his private lessons, where he taught a small number of pupils the historical method, and in his books, where he wrote ad probandum at least as much as ad narrandum: class-books, collections of articles, intermingled with personal reminiscences (Questions d'enseignement national, 1885; Etudes et etudiants, 1890; A propos de nos ecoles, 1895), rough historical sketches (Vue generale de l'histoire politique de l'Europe, 1890), &c. Even his works of learning, written without a trace of pedantry, are remarkable for their lucidity and vividness.
    0
    0
  • Monstrelet's own writings, dealing with the latter part of the Hundred Years' War, are valuable because they contain a large number of documents which are certainly, and reported speeches which are probably, authentic. The author, however, shows little power of narration; his work, although clear, is dull, and is strongly tinged with the pedantry of its century, the most pedantic in French history.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell had no patience with formal pedantry of this sort; and in point of strict legality "The Rump" of the Long Parliament had little better title to authority than the officers who expelled it from the House.
    1
    1
  • If so, apologetics is literally a science, and it is pedantry to claim the defensive and pretend to throw the onus probandi upon objectors.
    1
    1
    Advertisement
  • This seeming pedantry is, however, atoned for by the clear practical aim of his sermons, the noble ideal he keeps before his hearers, and the skill with which he handles spiritual experience and urges incentives to virtue.
    0
    1
  • He was a naturalist, but absolutely devoid of the pedantry of science; a keen observer, but no retailer of disjointed facts.
    7
    7
  • These are effects of pedantry, and seem rather to be founded on a cold-blooded analysis of celebrated sermons than on any instinctive sense of the duty of the preacher.
    1
    2
  • But we may discount most such talk in these writers as bellettristic pedantry, copied as a rule from Philo of Alexandria, their literary model.
    3
    3
  • None of them had literary pedantry enough to question the consistency of the divine revelation on that ground.
    0
    1
    Advertisement
  • But he rejects Taylor's derivation of this alphabet from the Sabaean script, and contends that it is borrowed from the North Semitic. To the pedantry of the Hindu he attributes its main characteristics, viz.
    1
    1
  • Pedantry was an inevitable effect of the early Renaissance.
    2
    4
  • He was disgusted with the brutality of English manners, which he paints in no flattering colours, and he found pedantry and superstition as rampant in Oxford as in Geneva.
    1
    3
  • Some English applications of free trade theory in recent times in the matter of import duties have been pedantic - the abolition of the shilling corn duty in 1869 by Robert Lowe (Lord Sherbrooke) being typical of this pedantry, though it is not the only instance.
    2
    4