Peat sentence example

peat
  • It likes fibrous peat in fissures of the rocks.
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  • Coal has not been found, but peat may be exploited under favourable economic conditions.
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  • It should be mixed with six or eight times its weight of loam or ashes, charred peat, charcoal-dust or some earthy matter, before it is applied to the soil, as from its causticity it is otherwise not unlikely to kill or injure the plants to which it is administered.
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  • The oak grows most luxuriantly on deep strong clays, calcareous marl or stiff loam, but will flourish in nearly any deep well-drained soil, excepting peat or loose sand; in marshy or moist places the tree may grow well for a time, but the timber is rarely sound; on hard rocky ground and exposed hillsides.
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  • Ironstone, peat and lime are found in the vicinity.
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  • Peat is found in abundance, as well as gypsum, china-clay, potters' earth and salt.
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  • Beautiful terrestrial orchids, requiring to be planted in peat soil, in a cool and rather shady situation.
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  • The evidence of the peat bogs shows that the Scots fir, which is now extinct, was abundant in Denmark in the Roman period.
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  • On the Coastal Plain the soil is generally sandy, but in nearly all parts of this region more or less marl abounds; south of the Neuse river the soil is mostly a loose sand, north of it there is more loam on the uplands, and in the lowlands the soil is usually compact with clay, silt or peat; toward the western border of the region the sand becomes coarser and some gravel is mixed with it.
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  • Many monocotyledons do well in peat, even if they do not absolutely require it.
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  • They succeed best in an open position in sandy peat.
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  • Again, acidic humus does not form in calcareous soils; and hence one does not expect to find plants characteristic of acidic peat or humus on calcareous soils.
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  • By making very thin sections and employing high magnification (1000-1200 diameters), Renault has been enabled to detect numerous forms of bacilli in the woody parts preserved in coal, one of which, Micrococcus carbo, bears a strong resemblance to the living Cladothrix found in trees buried in peat bogs.
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  • Night-soil is an excellent manure for all bulky crops, but requires to be mixed with earth or peat, or coal-ashes, so as both to deodorize it and to ensure its being equally distributed.
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  • Warm sunny situations and rich sandy loam and peat are required.
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  • Again, the well-known action of earthworms may be said to be a biological work; but the resulting aeration of the soil causes edaphic differences; and earthworms are absent from certain soils, such as peat.
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  • A good illustration of it is peat.
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  • Fossil remains of beavers are found in the peat and other superficial deposits of England and the continent of Europe; while in the Pleistocene formations of England and Siberia occur remains of a giant extinct beaver, Trogontherium cuvieri, representing a genus by itself.
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  • The minerals are unimportant, except amber, peat and clay.
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  • Peat is especially abundant on the Erzgebirge.
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  • Many smaller lakes, however, contain them, and they are also found in peat moors on the sites of ancient lakes now drained or silted up, as at Laibach in Carniola.
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  • If leaf-mould is not at hand, turfy peat may be substituted for it.
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  • The soil varies greatly according to the district, being in some cases a rich loam, in others a chalky marl, and elsewhere showing a coating of peat.
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  • The majority of the lakes have rocky shores and islands and great variety of depth, many of the smaller ones, however, are rimmed with marshes and are slowly filling up with vegetable matter, ultimately becoming peat bogs, the muskegs of the Indian.
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  • In the cold regions of the northern lowlands peat occurs in beds of immense thickness.
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  • A narrow strip of level moorland, covered with furze and rich in deposits of peat, coal and amber, stretches inland, from the edge of the sheer cliffs which line the coast, to the foot of the mountains.
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  • - The principal soils used in gardens, either alone, or mixed to form what are called composts, are - loam, sand, peat, leaf-mould and various mixtures and combinations of these made up to suit the different subjects under cultivation.
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  • Peat soil is largely employed for the culture of such plants as rhododendrons, azaleas, heaths, &c. In districts where heather and gritty soil predominate, the peat soil is poor and unprofitable, but selections from both the heathy and the richer peat soils, collected with judgment, and stored in a dry part of the compost yard, are essential ingredients in the cultivation of many choice pot plants, such as the Cape heaths and many of the Australian plants.
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  • For most of these the lightest spongy but sweet turfy peat must be used, this being packed lightly about the roots, and built up above the pot-rim, or in some cases freely mixed before use with chopped sphagnum moss and small pieces of broken pots or nodules of charcoal.
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  • In other cases they are planted in open baskets of wood or wire, using the porous peat and sphagnum compost.
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  • These conditions of orchid-growing have undergone great changes of late years, and the plants are grown much as other stove and greenhouse plants in ordinary pots with composts not only of peat but of leaf-mould, and fibres from osmunda and polypodium ferns.
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  • It does best in shady peat borders.
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  • They require rich sandy peat and warm sheltered spots.
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  • The spores should be sown in well-drained pots or seed pans on the surface of a mixture of fibrous sifted peat and small broken crocks or sandstone; this soil should be firmly pressed and well-watered, and the spores scattered over it, and at once covered with propagating glasses or pieces of sheet glass, to prevent water or dry air getting to the surface.
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  • Many of the lakes are nothing more than deep pits or marshes from which the peat has been extracted.
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  • It was gradually recognized that the masses of water which collected wherever peat-digging had been carried on were an unnecessary menace to the neighbouring lands, and also that a more enduring source of profit lay in the bed of the fertile sea-clay under the peat.
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  • It became usual, therefore, to make the subsequent drainage of the land a condition of the extraction of peat from it, this condition being established by proclamation in 1595.
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  • Again, a totally different character belongs to the canals in North Brabant, and the east and north-east of Holland where, in the absence of great rivers, they form the only waterways which render possible the drainage of the fens and the export of peat; and unite the lesser streams with each other.
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  • The Levels, as this district is generally named, are of remarkable fertility, and Thorne, having water communication with Goole and the Humber, is consequently an agricultural centre of importance; while some barge-building and a trade in peat fibre are also carried on.
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  • Menier, the French chocolate manufacturer, who converted the island into a game preserve, and attempted to develop its resources of lumber, peat and minerals.
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  • But in the " Drift " maps many other types of deposit are indicated, such, for instance, as the ordinary modern alluvium of rivers, and the older river terraces (River-drift of various ages), including gravels, brickearth and loam; old raised sea beaches and blown-sand (Aeolian-drift); the " Head " of Cornwall and Devon, an angular detritus consisting of stones with clay or loam; clay-with-flints, rainwash (landwash), scree and talus; the " Warp," a marine and estuarine silt and clay of the Humber; and also beds of peat and diatomite.
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  • During recent years in India a new development has taken place in planting tea upon what are termed "bheels," - lands resembling to a great extent the peat bogs of Ireland and Scotland.
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  • In north Germany peat is also of importance as a fuel; the area of the peat moors in Prussia is estimated at 8000 sq.
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  • Beautiful dwarf bulbous plants, thriving in well-worked sandy loam, or sandy peat.
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  • These draining ditches all have their issue in a main drainage canal, along which the transport of the peat and peatlitter takes place and the houses of the colonists are built.
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  • In the dreary country still farther north there is a series of rounded hills covered with peat and mosses, the chief feature being Drygarn Fawr (2115 ft.) on the confines of Cardiganshire.
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  • There are peat and forest beds, which must have grown quietly at the surface, alternating with deposits of gravel, sand and clay.
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  • The gyttja of the lakes is generally covered over by peat of a later date.
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  • A large amount of peat is collected, especially in the south-west of Bohemia, as well as a great quantity of asphalt.
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  • In Bergen, Warren, Sussex and Morris counties are numerous bogs containing peat of a good quality.
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  • The clay resulting from the weathering of the Dartmoor granite has formed marshes and peat bogs, and the desolation of the district has been emphasized by the establishment in its midst of a great convict prison, and in its northern portion of a range for artillery practice.
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  • The soil is composed for the most part of silt and peat.
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  • Most distinctive is the ubiquitous carpeting of mosses, varying in colours from the pure white and cream of the reindeer moss to the deep green and brown of the peat moss, all conspicuously spangled in the brief summer with bright flowers of the higher orders, heavy blossoms on stunted stalks.
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  • The thick peat moss or tundra of the undrained lowlands covers probably at least a quarter of Alaska; the ' The trees here grow as large as 10 in.
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  • The timber resources of Alaska are untouched 2 280 species of mosses proper, of which 46 were new to science, and 16 varieties of peat moss (Sphagnum) were listed by the Harriman expedition; and 74 species or varieties of ferns.
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  • Again, certain inferences have been tentatively made from the depth of mud, earth, peat, &c., which has accumulated above relics of human art imbedded in ancient times.
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  • The site of the city being originally a peat bog, the foundations of the houses have to be secured by driving long piles (4-20 yds.) into the firm clay below, the palace on the Dam being supported on nearly 14,000 piles.
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  • Another important part of the cure is the so-called moor or mud-baths, prepared from the peat of the Franzensbad marsh, which is very rich in mineral substances, like sulphates of iron, of soda and of potash, organic acids, salt, &c.
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  • It is interesting to record that during the construction of the works the implements of Neolithic man were found, near the margin of the modern lake, below the peat, and above the alluvial clay on which it rested.
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  • The only seaport of importance in the county, it has a considerable export trade in peat fuel, extensive fisheries, and flagstone quarries; while general fairs, horse fairs and annual agricultural shows are held.
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  • The former supply most of the peat, and some of the tree-trunks dug out of them have been found so flexible from immersion that they might be twisted into ropes.
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  • The soil is of various kinds, loam, clay, sand and peat; most of it is sufficiently fertile, though in the lower portions there are barren patches where the scanty vegetation is covered with an ochreous deposit.
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  • A good sandy loam is common in the Heath division; a sandy loam with chalk, or a flinty loam on chalk marl, abounds on portions of the Wolds; an argillaceous sand, merging into rich loam, lies on other portions of the Wolds; a black loam and a rich vegetable mould cover most of the Isle of Axholme on the north-west; a well-reclaimed marine marsh, a rich brown loam, and a stiff cold clay variously occupy the low tracts along the Humber, and between the north Wolds and the sea; a peat earth, a deep sandy loam, and a rich soapy blue clay occupy most of the east and south Fens; and an artificial soil, obtained by "warping," occupies considerable low strips of land along the tidal reaches of the rivers.
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  • The well of effervescent chalybeate water is largely resorted to for anaemia and as a tonic. A peat bath, similar to those at Franzensbad in Bohemia, has also been established.
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  • Others include beech, ash, birch, heather and peat.
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  • Lowland raised peat bogs have always been a rare habitat in Great Britain.
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  • From New Scientist: THE world's largest frozen peat bog is melting.
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  • Recent peat stratigraphy shows evidence of a history of wooded bog on this site.
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  • A mulch of grass clippings or peat moss will also protect the tree from loss of water in dry weather.
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  • We got down to the bare minimum of small clods of peat but there was no obvious " find " to be seen.
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  • A Russian corer can be used to extract a 2m peat core in 50cm sections.
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  • If the pot has holes, put crocks in the bottom and a layer of coarse peat.
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  • Marginal peat cutting has extended around most of the bog.
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  • Peat, in the simplest terms, is an accumulation of partly decomposed plant material.
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  • Samples of pollen taken from cores bored from deep peat bogs or lake sediments are stratified, with the earliest part lying deepest.
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  • Staff continued to monitor the loss of sand and exposure of prehistoric peat deposits on the Gower beaches.
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  • There is a 12 m depth of peat within the confining basin.
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  • Buried in a peat bog on the Pennines, his sleep was disturbed by peat diggers.
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  • Just inland, you'll enjoy Britain's newest National Park, the Broads, formed from medieval peat diggings.
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  • We explored the road verge north from the Falcon and then followed the track leading in to the old peat diggings.
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  • These floors were made up of heather, straw and peat interspersed with, often discontinuous, ash and grit layers.
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  • Plant cover becomes discontinuous - exposure of bare peat becoming more frequent and extensive.
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  • The blanket peat erosion in parts of the Semer Water catchment is typical of many parts of the Pennines.
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  • The meadows, untouched by peat extraction, are grazed by cattle to retain their variety of wild flowers.
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  • Heat was provided by a peat fire carried in a horizontal flue.
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  • They are typical of upland bogs, and will spread over areas of stagnohumic gleys or podzols as the surface peat thickens.
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  • This means that coarse sediments may be located in hollows with no drainage exit, leading to the formation of groundwater gleys or peat.
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  • The peat is produced in sod form and then granulated, graded and baled.
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  • Where the track ends is the point at which the ground becomes very hard to cross due to the peat hags.
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  • The product, Glenisla, was distilled from peated malt, the peat being shipped from Shetland.
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  • Cuttings are set in a rooting mixture of two parts sand to one part peat moss, which should be barely moist.
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  • The heather uplands and peat moors form part of a Special Protection Area, that is of international importance for breeding birds.
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  • The water which comes off this peat moorland is often discolored.
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  • A peat or bark mulch in the Spring will assist in keeping weeds at bay.
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  • To the North, East and West lies the Dark Peak which has peat bogs, large expanses of moorland and gritstone outcrops.
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  • Place the pot in a cold frame or cover with a 15cm layer of sharp sand or peat and leave somewhere cold outside.
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  • The peat is got extensively for fuel, and the heaths and commons afford good pasturage for sheep and cattle during summer.
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  • We are working to restore 300 hectares of eroded peat, which is severely eroding.
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  • The first inhabitants made their living digging peat out of the bogs.
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  • Undrained, heavily waterlogged peat is up to 90 per cent water.
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  • Slightly more acidic soil e.g. peat based may be best.
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  • The majority of upland peat is grazed, and as such come under the land that could be used to meet reduction targets.
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  • The Moors for the Future restoration work falls into three main areas: The establishment of moorland vegetation on bare peat damaged by fires.
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  • The cut-over peat extends westward into the second area developed on the flatter Lough Fea platform.
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  • Make a propagating compost from three parts sphagnum moss peat to one part perlite, sieved bark or acid sand.
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  • The succeeding unit consists of organic freshwater silt, grading upwards into fen peat.
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  • They grow best in a 1:1 mixture of lime-free sharp sand and moss peat.
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  • Most of the reddish acid bog peat was removed, exposing older, black, base-rich fen peat underneath.
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  • Peat, brown forest soil and peaty podzols derived from greywackes and shales are the major soils types in the Bladnoch catchment.
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  • Areas of past peat cutting provide the main interest with open water with floating pondweed, bottle sedge and cowbane.
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  • The area of Carrington Moss was formerly a raised peat moss which has suffered from drainage and subsequent agricultural reclamation.
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  • Our peat smoked salmon is made from only the finest Scottish salmon.
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  • Patches of acid peat with heather and acid grasses or with cotton sedge are found on the remnants of the former bogs.
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  • Our lettuce seedlings start their life in a small fertile peat block, planted in specially prepared fields.
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  • Seed buried in a peat soil for 20 years retained 8% viability.
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  • Around bog pools there may sometimes be patches of 7150 Depressions on peat substrates of the Rhynchosporion.
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  • In Scotland, walls can be found which are made using grass turves and peat turves.
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  • Fast plants grow best in a 1:1 mix of sieved moss peat and fine horticultural vermiculite.
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  • At full strength the nose is subtle but interesting with vanilla, toffee bonbons, peat smoke and faint Parma violets.
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  • With malt whiskey the heating of the kiln will come from peat.
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  • Plan to avoid burning peat or very woody material.
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  • In one sense, the accumulation of humus and peat is a biological factor, as it is related to the work of organisms in the soil; but the occurrence or otherwise of these organisms in the soil is probably related to definite edaphic and climatic conditions.
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  • The greater part of the " camp " (the open country) is formed of peat, which in some places is of great age and depth, and at the bottom of the bed very dense and bituminous.
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  • The use of non-foodstuffs, or cellulosic materials, such as grasses, reeds, straws, peat, waste wood, sawdust, etc., is not yet possible, for, although research work is in progress to discover a process that could be worked on a commercial basis in those regions where such materials exist in sufficient abundance, it has not so far led to any definite results.
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  • Martagon, candidum, chalcedonicum, Szovitzianum (or colchicum), bulbiferum, croceum, Henryi, pomponium - the "Turk's cap lily," and others, will grow in almost any good garden soil, and succeed admirably in loam of a rather heavy character, and dislike too much peat.
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  • Where there is complete freedom from stagnant water in the ground, and abundant room for the spread of its branches to light and air, the larch will flourish in a great variety of soils, stiff clays, wet or mossy peat, and moist alluvium being the chief exceptions; in its native localities it seems partial to the debris of primitive and metamorphic rocks, but is occasionally found growing luxuriantly on calcareous subsoils; in Switzerland it attains the largest size, and forms the best timber, on the northern declivities of the mountains; but in Scotland a southern aspect appears most favourable.
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  • Later came the alluvial silting-up. Slowly, but surely, the deltas of the tributary streams advanced into the lake, floods deposited their burdens of detritus in the deeper places, the lake shallowed and shrank and in its turn yielded to the winding river of an alluvial strath, covered with peat, reeds and alders, and still liable to floods.
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  • Phase 2 Trench A, located over the sinuous channel, found peat intact within the channel.
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  • This is the smallest of the sod peat bogs.
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  • Sphagnum moss peat (enough to fill the other half).
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  • In places, layers of peat lie exposed on the beach, with tree trunks of a prehistoric forest poking out.
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  • At full strength the nose is subtle but interesting with vanilla, toffee bonbons, peat smoke and faint parma violets.
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  • Some techniques for trial excavations in waterlogged peat are also presented.
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  • Peat, which is burned in furnaces, is an example of dirty coal.
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  • Kinds thriving in leaf soil and sandy peat, with broken bits of sandstone:-G. alba, Bigelowi, ciliata, frigida, Freyniana, Froelichii, Kurroo, Parryi, pumila, Wallichiana, Weschniakowi.
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  • Other species are alpinum, macranthum, Musschianum, purpureum, rubrum, niveum, and violaceum, all loving half-shady spots in peat, or in moist, sandy soil.
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  • It is a good peat border plant, thriving best in a moist peaty soil and in shade.
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  • It is hardy, and thrives in sheltered and shaded situations in peat borders in winter.
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  • In fine peat it grows well, and is best on the rock garden or among dwarf alpine shrubs.
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  • Among the known kinds are Breweri, glanduliflorus, gmelini, all peat and rock garden plants.
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  • It is less trouble out of doors than under glass; indeed, it only requires a moderately wet bog in a light spongy soil of fibrous peat and chopped Sphagnum Moss.
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  • The soil is peat with a sub-soil of gravel, the whole well trenched and manured."
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  • Canadian Rhodora (Rhodora) - R. canadensis is an interesting bush, 2 to 4 feet high, allied to the Rhododendron, a native of the swamps of Canada, hardy, and needing a moist light soil, though it prefers peat.
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  • This should consist of equal parts of good fibrous loam and well-decomposed manure, half fibrous peat, and half coarse sand.
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  • Given suitable climatic conditions, they are not difficult to cultivate, for they thrive in well-drained, loamy soil, to which a little peat or leaf-mould has been added.
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  • It thrives in shady spots on the rock garden or the hardy fernery, in sandy peat.
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  • Place it in leaf-mould, peat, and good garden soil mixed together, as it is a hungry plant.
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  • North America, on the borders of rivulets and on mountains, thriving in peat borders and fringes of beds of American plants in moist soil.
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  • In sun or shade it is most valuable for the spring or rock garden, or for a border of choice hardy bulbs, and where it is sufficiently plentiful, for edgings to American plants in peat soil.
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  • In a peat bed, with Lilies and other peat-loving plants, it is very fine, and produces as many as five flowers on a stem.
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  • It grows well in sandy loam, or this with peat added.
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  • It flourishes best in a deep bed of moist peat in a low part of the rock garden, where its distinct habit is attractive at all seasons.
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  • In cultivation, all the Haberleas are happy in cool shaded places between rocks in deep sandy loam, or with peat added.
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  • Austrian Hairbell (Campanula Pulla) - One of the most beautiful of the Alpine Hairbells, a native of the Austrian Alps, on high mountain pastures; in the rock garden it should have a shelf of soil in which peat and sand have been mixed.
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  • A suitable soil consists of equal portions of fibrous peat and loam, good sharp sand being added, together with broken oyster-shells or limestone.
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  • The best plan is to raise small banks of peat, and plant them on the top, taking care that they do not want for water both at the roots and overhead.
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  • It is a good plant for the bog garden or for damp spots in the rock garden, in an open and fully-exposed position with the choicer bog plants, in fibrous peat well mixed with Sphagnum Moss, which is common in marshy places.
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  • It has lived on grass in peat, and, no doubt, could be naturalised easily enough on sandy peat soils which are wet in winter and spring and dry in summer and autumn.
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  • It is a moisture-loving plant, thriving in peat or leafy soil in a half-shady place.
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  • It was supposed to require a particular kind of rock, but its wonderful coruscations have lately been seen to spread over sods of turf and masses of peat, as well as over chips of rock brought from its native place.
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  • It is well suited for the rock garden, is hardy, and prefers a soil mixture of peat and loam.
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  • Some place on a well-constructed rock garden should be chosen, where it will thrive in peat.
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  • It requires much the same treatment as Shortia, thriving in well-drained sandy loam and peat, in cool and moist but not wet or shady places.
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  • Since I brought it home I have kept it in a pot with peat and sand.
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  • They like a compost of loam, leafmould, and peat, mixed in about equal proportions, with the addition of some sharp sand.
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  • This pretty rock plant is of slow growth, and should have a place in sandy peat and partial shade.
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  • America, hardy, thriving in light soil, preferring peat, and are suitable for the margins of groups of American shrubs and for low parts of rock gardens.
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  • It is one of the choicest of evergreen hardy shrubs, and thrives with Rhododendrons and Azaleas in peat soil.
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  • It grows freely in peat or loam, a mixture of both with a little road-scrapings best fulfilling its requirements.
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  • All the L. elegans group are perfectly hardy; they grow vigorously in almost any soil, but prefer a deep loamy one with an admixture of peat.
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  • The roots cannot make way, nor can the plants thrive in a strong adhesive soil of clay or heavy loam, and if the soil be heavy, it must be lightened by a plentiful addition of leaf-mould, sand, or peat.
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  • Its true home is the rock garden, and it prefers deep sandy peat.
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  • The site should be well prepared by trenching or forking peat and leaf soil freely into common garden soil, or, better still, fresh loam, a space not less than 3 feet by 30 inches being prepared for each tree.
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  • It is fit for the hardy fernery, shady peat borders, near cascades, or among shrubs, and grows in any moist soil.
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  • This is a handsome plant for shady plots of deep moist soil in the wild garden or the margins of peat borders, but it dies away quite early in summer, so must be grouped with other things for autumn effect.
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  • The Rhexias must not be divided much, and healthy tufts should be obtained from their native localities and planted in a sandy peat bed.
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  • Happiest in loam, leaf-mould, and peat where moisture is not absent during the growing season.
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  • Menziesia - Dwarf shrubs resembling Heaths, and, like them, admirably suited for large rock gardens or wherever there is a moist peat soil.
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  • Though not common in gardens, it is one of the brightest gems for the choice rock garden, and thrives in exposed positions in moist sandy peat soil, and should be associated with the dwarfest rock plants.
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  • It is a small evergreen shrub, bearing in summer numerous urn-shaped flowers about 1 1/2 inches long and of a brilliant scarlet, thriving in a mixture of sandy peat and loam, in a moist sheltered spot with perfect drainage.
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  • These plants thrive under the same conditions as the others, but, being much smaller, require more care in planting, viz., in a mixture of peat and good loam with plenty of sharp sand, and associated with minute alpine plants.
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  • It is best increased by seeds, and may be cultivated with success in the moraine, and grows well in sandy loam and peat.
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  • It thrives in damp boggy soil, in peat or leaf-mould.
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  • A native of sandy places and cool damp woods from Canada to Virginia, and often found in the shade of evergreens, it does best in moist peat, and forms edgings to beds where the soil is of that nature, but it will also grow in loam.
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  • Gaultheria Trichophylla - An elegant little plant for the rock garden, doing admirably in sandy peat and leaf-soil.
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  • The plant should be grown on warm sheltered borders in sandy peat or sandy loam and leaf-mould.
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  • It is a precious shrub for the cooler parts of the rock garden and succeeds admirably in the more favourable coast gardens, and in moist peat or turfy loam.
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  • Plant them in fibry loam and tough and fibry peat, with a liberal admixture of leaf-mould and well-decayed woody matter, to which add a thin top-dressing of similar material every autumn.
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  • They thrive best in peat, loam, and sharp sand, with some broken lumps of sandstone, and prefer a dry situation in the rock garden, or any situation which is not fully exposed to the sun.
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  • It flourishes in a dry position in a mixture of limestone grit, peat, sand, and loam, and has violet-blue flowers in July.
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  • P. Sieberi is neat for the rock garden, requiring a moist, sunny situation, and a mixture of leaf-mould, peat, and sand.
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  • It is a true rock plant, suitable for a fissure, vertical or sloping to the sun, and does best amongst a mixture of a little loam, peat, sand, or grit, where it can root to the depth of 2 feet.
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  • For outdoor culture, a partially-shaded spot should be prepared with about equal parts of leaf-mould or peat and sand, and well mulched with leaves, grass, or other material, to keep it moist.
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  • It is rarely seen in good health in gardens, and is best in limestone fissures, filled with peat, loam, and sand, mixed in about equal proportions.
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  • They are easily obtained from nurseries, and are well suited for the large rock garden, where they attain, in deep peat soil, a height of about 18 inches, with red flowers from June to August, hirsutum having hairy leaves and stems.
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  • The compost should consist mainly of good loam, to which a small proportion of peat may be added, and which should be free from calcareous matter.
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  • The plants succeed best in a soil composed of two parts of peat, one of loam, and one of sand and leafmould.
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  • Instead of choosing a shady spot I selected a fully exposed one, and here two plants have been for over a year, one in peat and the other in sandy loam.
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  • The plant thrives in a mixture of peat and loam, in full sun, and is fully hardy.
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  • The Skimmias thrive as well in strong clay as in poor sandy soil and peat, doing best in partial shade and never growing fast at any time.
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  • If grown in pots, the plant should be on broken stones, and the roots in light sandy loam with peat.
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  • The soil for this plant should be a mixture of two parts of rich loam and two parts composed of peat, leaf-mould, and sand.
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  • Healthy well-rooted plants are not difficult to establish among dwarf shrubs in some half-shady part of the rock garden, in peat soil.
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  • It should be grown in gritty peat mixed with a small portion of loam.
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  • America. In gardens its place is among small shrubs and on the margins of peat beds.
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  • Not more than 6 inches in height, it is of easy culture, and growing freely in peat and loam.
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  • It is best grown in pots or tubs pierced with holes, in a mixture of stiff peat and clayey soil, and river mud and sand.
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  • Where the plant cannot be grown in the border it will bloom in a sunny, airy greenhouse potted in a mixture of loam, peat, and sand, and treated as one would a Cineraria.
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  • At Castlewellan it is planted in a shady border near a large Yew hedge, in peat, leaf soil, and loam in equal proportions.
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  • They should have a mixture of fibry peat and loam, which has some broken-up sandstone mixed with it.
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  • F. Gardeni enjoys a light loam, and grows all the better if peat and leaf-soil are mixed with the loam at planting-time.-W.
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  • It grows best in a mixture of sandy peat and leaf-mould, with plenty of moisture during growth, and is increased by cuttings.
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  • The best soil is a mixture of peat moss and sharp sand.
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  • Most experienced gardeners prefer to use a non-soil mixture of perlite, peat moss and vermiculite.
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  • You can also start watermelon seeds indoors about three weeks before planting them outside, but they should be started in peat pots to minimize transplant shock.
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  • If you are planting strawberries in the ground and you are dealing with a heavy clay soil, compost or peat moss not only enriches the soil but improves drainage as well.
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  • They sell the bare-rooted stalks, wrapped in dampened peat moss or some form of polymer gel.
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  • Besides the mineral water baths there are also moor or mud-baths, and the peat used for these baths is the richest in iron in the world.
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  • Chalk, from which blanc de Troyes is manufactured, and clay are abundant; and there are peat workings and quarries of building-stone and limestone.
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  • Obviously no more than this is possible until physiologists are able to state much more precisely than at present what is the influence of common salt on the plants of salt-marshes, of the action of calcium carbonate on plants of calcareous soils, and of the action of humous compounds on plants of fens and peat moors.
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  • The peat is different in character from that of northern Europe: cellular plants enter but little into its composition, and it is formed almost entirely of the roots and stems of Empetrum rubrum, a variety of the common crowberry of the Scottish hills with red berries, called by the Falklanders the " diddle-dee " berry; of Myrtus nummularia, a little creeping myrtle whose leaves are used by the shepherds as a substitute for tea; of Caltha appendiculata, a dwarf species of marsh-marigold; and of some sedges and sedge-like plants, such as Astelia pumila, Gaimardia australis and Bostkovia grandif ora.
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  • Peat is largely used as fuel, coal being obtained only at a cost of £3 a ton.
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  • With the exception of the almost inexhaustible layers of peat, the mineral wealth of the province is insignificant.
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  • Five well-contrasted types of scenery in Derbyshire are clearly traceable to as many varieties of rock; the bleak dry uplands of the north and east, with deep-cut ravines and swift clear streams, are due to the great mass of Mountain Limestone; round the limestone boundary are the valleys with soft outlines in the Pendleside Shales; these are succeeded by the rugged moorlands, covered with heather and peat, which are due to the Millstone Grit series; eastward lies the Derbyshire Coalfield with its gently moulded grasscovered hills; southward is the more level tract of red Triassic rocks.
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  • Most of the inland scenery is bleak and dreary, consisting of treeless and barren tracts of peat and boulders.
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  • In 1862 Fleck passed a mixture of steam, nitrogen and carbon monoxide over red-hot lime, whilst in 1904 Woltereck induced combination by passing steam and air over red-hot iron oxide (peat is used in practice).
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  • As a preliminary to the melting process, the "browse" left in the preceding operation (half-fused and imperfectly reduced ore) is introduced with some peat and coal, and heated with the help of the blast.
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  • Brown coal has been discovered in Courland, while peat is already a valuable fuel.
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  • If applied in too great an amount to light soils and peat land it may do much damage by rendering them too loose and open.
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  • Requires gritty peat soil and cool situations, but must be protected from frost in winter.
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  • For potting or basketing purposes, or for plants requiring blockculture, the materials used are light fibrous peat, special leaf-mould, osmunda or polypodium fibre and living sphagnum moss, which supply free drainage for the copious supply of water required.
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  • They all thrive in a moist peat border, partially shaded, and if somewhat protected so much the better.
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  • Brilliant erect-growing caryophyllaceous plants, thriving best in beds of peat earth or of deep sandy loam.
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