Pausanias sentence example

pausanias
  • The Prytaneum, mentioned by Pausanias, and probably the original centre of the ancient city, was situated somewhere east of the northern cliff of the Acropolis.
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  • Inscriptions found by the recent excavations seem to prove that it must be identified as the shrine of the local goddess Aphaea, identified by Pausanias with Britomartis and Dictynna.
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  • Agis, 3, Demetrius, 35; Pausanias, i.
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  • In the autumn of 429 he died' and was buried near the Academia, where Pausanias (150 A.D.) saw his tomb.
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  • It was, however, in the reigns of Severus and his immediate successors that Roman intercourse with India was at its height, and from the writings of Pausanias (c. 174) it appears that direct communication between Rome and China had already taken place.
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  • 468) the three friends are represented as united in the underworld and walking together in the fields of asphodel; according to Pausanias (iii.
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  • His successful prayer to Zeus for rain at a time of drought (Isocrates, Evagoras, 14) was commemorated by a temple at Aegina (Pausanias ii.
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  • At Alea, in the Peloponnese, women were flogged in the temple of Dionysus (Pausanias, Arcad.
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  • According to Pausanias (v.
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  • Pausanias (iii.
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  • The cave, still called Mavrospelya ("black cave"), was ever afterwards regarded as sacred to Demeter, and in'it, according to information given to Pausanias, there had been set up an image of the goddess, a female form seated on a rock, but with a horse's head and mane, to which were attached snakes and other wild animals.
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  • AGIS, the name of four Spartan kings: (1) Son of Eurysthenes, founder of the royal house of the Agiadae (Pausanias iii.
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  • 72, 73, 107; Pausanias iii.
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  • Pausanias iii.
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  • Pausanias' accounts (ii.
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  • By some she is considered to have been a moon-goddess, her flight from Minos and her leap into the sea signifying the revolution and disappearance of the moon (Pausanias ii.
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  • See Strabo, pp. 401, 418, 424-425; Pausanias x.
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  • According to other versions of the legend, when saved from sacrifice Iphigeneia was transported to the island of Leuke, where she was wedded to Achilles under the name of Orsilochia (Antoninus Liberalis 27); or she was transformed by Artemis into the goddess Hecate (Pausanias _i.
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  • At Hermione, Artemis was worshipped under the name of Iphigeneia, thus showing the heroine in the last resort to be a form of that goddess (Pausanias ii.
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  • Ramsay in Journal of Hellenic Studies, iii.; Frazer's Pausanias, iii.
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  • 576-622; Pausanias x.
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  • 143 and 159 Pausanias visited Athens at a time when the monuments of the great age were still in their perfection and the principal embellishments of the Roman period had already been completed.
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  • Pausanias makes no claim to exhaustiveness; he selected what was best worth noticing (Ta a i coXoyc.,rara).
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  • The list of ancient topographers closes with Pausanias.
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  • The Agora was commonly described as the " Ceramicus," and Pausanias gives it this name; of the numerous buildings which he saw here scarcely a trace remains; their position, for the most part, is largely conjectural, and the exact boundaries of the Agora itself are uncertain.
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  • In 1892 Dorpfeld began a series of excavations in the district between the Acropolis and the Pnyx with the object of determining the situation of the buildings described by Pausanias as existing in the neighbourhood of the Agora, and more especially the position of the Enneacrunus fountain.
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  • It is now generally agreed that the Agora of classical times covered the low ground between the hill of the " Theseum," the Areopagus and the Pnyx; and Pausanias, in the course of his description, appears to have reached its southern end.
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  • high, represented the goddess as fully armed; the gleam of her helmet and spear could be seen by the mariners approaching from Cape Sunium (Pausanias i.
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  • A Doric colonnade with a double row of columns was found to have extended along the base of the Acropolis for a distance of 54 yds.; behind it in a chamber hewn in the rock is the sacred well mentioned by Pausanias.
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  • This cloistered edifice may be identified with the library of Hadrian mentioned by Pausanias; the books were, perhaps, stored in a square building which occupied a portion of the central area.
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  • Strikingly similar in design and construction is a large quadrangular building, the foundations of which were discovered by the British School near the presumed Cynosarges; this may perhaps be the Gymnasium of Hadrian, which Pausanias tells us also possessed ioo columns.
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  • The Stadium had been already completed and the Odeum had not yet been built when Pausanias visited Athens; these buildings were the last important additions to the architectural monuments of the ancient city.
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  • Frazer, Pausanias (translation and commentary; 6 vols., London, 1898.
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  • Plutarch, Theseus; Pausanias i.
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  • See Pausanias ii.
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  • Among the objects of interest described by Pausanias as extant in Epidaurus are the image of Athena Cissaea in the Acropolis, the temple of Dionysus and Artemis, a shrine of Aphrodite, statues of Asclepius and his wife Epione, and a temple of Hera.
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  • The theatre still deserves the praise given it by Pausanias as the most beautiful in Greece.
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  • See Pausanias i.
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  • His grave and that of Helen were shown at Therapnae, where he was worshipped as a god (Pausanias iii.
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  • Others have regarded it as an empty portable throne, 2 or as a receptacle for sacred serpents (analogies in Frazer, Pausanias, iv.
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  • (1882); Frazer's Pausanias, iii.
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  • pp. 426-427; Pausanias x.
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  • to a board of patronomi (Pausanias ii.
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  • Augustus seems to have reorganized the league in some way, for Pausanias (iii.
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  • 5; Pausanias iii.
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  • In later times the cult of a god Satrapes occurs in Syrian inscriptions from Palmyra and the Hauran; by Pausanias vi.
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  • His reign is dated 731-724 B.C. by Pausanias, and this may be taken as approximately correct, though Duncker (History of Greece, Eng.
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  • Pausanias iv.
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  • The contents of the Erechtheum are described by Pausanias.
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  • Frazer, Pausanias, iv.
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  • It is doubtful whether this should be distinguished from the o-TE¢avos, a crown of the same breadth and design all round, as on the coins of Argos with the head of Hera, who is expressly said by Pausanias to wear a stephanos.
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  • Pausanias (vi.
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  • Frazer's note on Pausanias vi.
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  • According to Pausanias (vii.
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  • 9, 28; Pausanias ii.
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  • It was said to have been founded by Megarians and Argives under Byzas about 6S7 B.C., but the original settlement having been destroyed in the reign of Darius Hystaspes by the satrap Otanes, it was recolonized by the Spartan Pausanias, who wrested it from the Medes after the battle of Plataea (479 B.C.) - a circumstance which led several ancient chroniclers to ascribe its foundation to him.
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  • The greatest hindrance to its prosperity was the miscellaneous character of the population, partly Lacedaemonian and partly Athenian, who flocked to it under Pausanias.
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  • Teiresias' grave was at the Tilphusian spring; but there was a cenotaph of him at Thebes, and also in later times his "observatory," or place for watching for omens from birds, was pointed out (Pausanias ix 16; Sophocles, Antigone, 999).
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  • Pausanias, the victor of Plataea, soon showed himself destitute of the high qualities which the situation demanded.
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  • The Athenian contingent which was sent to aid Pausanias in the task of driving the Persians finally out of the Thraceward towns was under the command of the Athenians, Aristides and Cimon, men of tact and probity.
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  • It is not, therefore, surprising that when Pausanias was recalled to Sparta on the charge of treasonable overtures to the Persians, the Ionian allies appealed to the Athenians on the grounds of kinship and urgent necessity, and that when Sparta sent out Dorcis to supersede Pausanias he found Aristides in unquestioned command of the allied fleet.
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  • Pausanias, however (following Sosibius), interprets a long series of conflicts in Arcadia as stages in a gradual advance southward, ending with the conquest of Amyclae by King Teleclus (c. 800 B.C.) and of Helos by King Alcamenes (c. 770 B.C.).
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  • Pausanias ix.
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  • The plan of the precinct is now easily traced, and with the help of Pausanias many of the buildings have been identified.
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  • In the eastern of these was the main entrance by which Pausanias went in along the Sacred Way.
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  • In describing the monuments discovered by the French excavators, the simplest plan is to follow the route of Pausanias.
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  • Both the forms of the letters and the style of the architecture show that the colonnade cannot date, as Pausanias says, from the time of the Peloponnesian War; Th.
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  • The stadium lies, as Pausanias says, in the highest part of the city to the north-west.
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  • No trace of the marble seats mentioned by Pausanias has been found, but they have probably been carried off for lime or building, as they could easily be removed.
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  • Portions of the pediments of this temple have been found in the excavations; but no sign has been found of the pediments mentioned by Pausanias, representing on the east Apollo and the Muses, and on the west Dionysus and the Thyiades (Bacchantes), and designed by Praxias, the pupil of Calanias.
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  • The temple which was seen by Pausanias, and of which the foundations were found by the excavators, was the one of which the building is recorded in inscriptions of the 4th century.
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  • 59; Pausanias viii.
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  • Its prosperity, as also its profligacy, is attested by the New Testament, by Strabo and Pausanias.
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  • - Strabo, pp. 378-382; Pausanias ii.
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  • The first object was the locating of the agora, or public square, first because Pausanias says that most of the important monuments of the city were either on or near the agora; and secondly because, beginning with the agora, he mentions, sometimes with a brief description, the principal monuments in order along three of the principal thoroughfares radiating from it.
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  • This theatre was, according to Pausanias, on the street leading from the agora towards Sicyon, and so to the west of the agora.
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  • It required little sagacity to identify it with the street mentioned by Pausanias as leading from the agora towards Lechaeum.
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  • This arch appears on Roman coins from Augustus to Commodus; according to Pausanias it bore two four-horse chariots, one driven by Helios and the other by Phaethon, his son, all in gilded bronze.
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  • Although a considerable part of the agora has been excavated, none of the statues which Pausanias saw in it have been discovered.
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  • of earth, the famous fountain Pirene, tallying exactly with the description of Pausanias, as "a series of chambers that are like caves, and bearing a facade of white marble."
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  • This Pirene originally had a two-storey facade of Roman fashion made of limestone, but, before the time of Pausanias, it had received a covering of marble which has now fallen off, but has left traces of itself in the holes drilled into the limestone, in the rough hacking away of the half columns, and in the numerous marble fragments which lay in front of the facade.
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  • Two uses of water are mentioned by Pausanias.
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  • There is reason for supposing that the marble coating of the facade, and perhaps the erection of the quadrangle, also covered with marble, were the work of Herodes Atticus, and therefore just completed when Pausanias saw them.
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  • Two inscriptions of Roman times make the identity of Pirene certain, if there could be any doubt in the face of the exact agreement of Pausanias's description with the structure.
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  • The number of temples and shrines enumerated by Pausanias along the road leading up to Acro-Corinth is bewildering.
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  • At the highest point of the road, according to Pausanias, there stood the famous temple of Aphrodite, but the remains excavated at this point seem to be those of a late tower, and the few foundations below it do not resemble those of a temple.
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  • - Strabo pp. 337, 388; Pausanias viii.
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  • - The temple of Athena Alea at Tegea is described by Pausanias as excelling all others in the Peloponnese both in size and in beauty of construction.
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  • Pausanias asserts that the outer order was Ionic; but excavations have proved that it was Doric. The pedimental groups of the temple represented at the front, the hunt of the Calydonian boar, and, at the back, the battle of Achilles and Telephus.
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  • 1901; Pausanias viii.
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  • In contrast to these legends, Pausanias tells us that they were regarded as the first to worship the Muses on Mt.
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  • Soon afterwards he was sent to Athens with an army to aid the oligarchs, but Pausanias, one of the kings, followed him and brought about a restoration of democracy.
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  • Lysander invaded Boeotia from the west, receiving the submission of Orchomenus and sacking Lebadea, but the enemy intercepted his despatch to Pausanias, who had meanwhile entered Boeotia from the south, containing plans for a joint attack upon Haliartus.
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  • 19; Pausanias iii., ix.
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  • Pausanias (ix.
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  • Directions for this purpose, written on a gold plate, have been found in a tomb at Petilia, and near Lebadeia, at the oracle of Trophonius, which was counted an entrance to the lower world, the two springs Mnemosyne and Lethe were shown (Pausanias ix.
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  • Of the marching songs ('Eµ 4 6a-rpea), written in the anapaestic measure and the Doric dialect, only scanty fragments remain (Lycurgus, In Leocratem, p. 211, § 107; Pausanias iv.
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  • The agora is of unsymmetrical form; its sides are bordered by porticoes, interrupted by streets, like the primitive agora of Elis as described by Pausanias, and unlike the regular agoras of Ionic type.
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  • 337; Pausanias viii.
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  • This scene was represented upon the chest of Cypselus described by Pausanias (v.
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  • Near Oropus, on the supposed site of his passing, his sanctuary arose, with healing springs, and an oracle famous for its interpretation of dreams (Pausanias i.
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  • At Cyllene in Elis a mere phallus served as his emblem, and was highly venerated in the time of Pausanias (vi.
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  • Pandora afterwards opened the jar, from which all manner of evils flew out over the earth (for parallels in other countries, see Frazer's Pausanias, ii.
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  • The city never revived; Strabo asserts that no trace of it remained in his time, but Pausanias describes the ruins.
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  • Dr Schliemann identified them with the graves of Agamemnon, Cassandra, and their companions, which were shown to Pausanias within the walls; and there can be little doubt that they are the graves that gave rise to the tradition, '15 ' xo Based on a plan in Schuchhardt's Schliemann's Excavations.
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  • Some of them were visible in the time of Pausanias, who calls them the places where Atreus and his sons kept their treasures.
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  • porticus) given to a building, the roof of which is supported by one or more rows of columns, the stoai at Elis described by Pausanias being important examples.
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  • This is a colossal seated image cut in a niche of the rock, of "Hittite" origin, and perhaps that called by Pausanias the "very ancient statue of the Mother of the Gods," carved by Broteas, son of Tantalus, and sung by Homer.
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  • Near it lie many remains of a primitive city, and about half a mile east is the rock-seat conjecturally identified with Pausanias' "Throne of Pelops."
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  • roo; Pausanias ix.
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  • She fled to Rhodes, where she was hanged on a tree by her former friend Polyxo, to avenge the loss of her husband Tlepolemus in the Trojan War (Pausanias iii.
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  • In producing Plato, Athenaeus and Aristophanes, the scholar-printer was largely aided by Musurus, who also edited the Aldine Pausanias (1516) and the Etymologicum printed in Venice by another Greek immigrant, Callierges (1499) The Revival of Learning in Italy ends with the sack of Rome (1527).
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  • 68, 102; Pausanias viii.
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  • The subject was a commonplace of ancient writers, and was depicted by the painter Polygnotus on the walls of the Lesche at Delphi (Pausanias x.
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  • 125, 126; see also Frazer's Pausanias, iii.
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  • Pausanias has left us a description of the city (iv.
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  • Frazer, Pausanias's Description of Greece, iii.
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  • His constitution was said to have formed the basis of that of Lycurgus (Pausanias iii.
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  • The temple of Artemis was still to be seen in the time of Pausanias.
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  • 63; Pausanias ii.
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  • When Mt Helicon, enchanted by the song of the Muses, began to rise to heaven, Pegasus stopped its ascent by stamping on the ground (Antoninus Liberalis 9), and where he struck the earth Hippocrene (horsespring), the fountain of the Muses, gushed forth (Pausanias ii.
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  • 19; Pausanias ii.
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  • At length Eira was betrayed to the Spartans (668 B.C. according to Pausanias), and after a heroic resistance Aristomenes and his followers had to evacuate Messenia and seek a temporary refuge with their Arcadian allies.
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  • Aristomenes retired to Ialysus in Rhodes, where Damagetus, his son-in-law, was king, and died there while planning a journey to Sardis and Ecbatana to seek aid from the Lydian and Median sovereigns (Pausanias iv.
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  • For further details see Pausanias iv.; Polyaenus ii.
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  • Zeus grants the petition as in the version of Pausanias, but permits the hair of Attis to grow, and his little finger to move.
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  • Frazer's Pausanias.
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  • It is said that fire occasionally blazed forth from Mosychlos, one of its mountains; and Pausanias (viii.
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  • (a) The church itself occupies the site of an older brick building, which is perhaps a remnant of the " workshop of Pheidias " seen by Pausanias.
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  • This may have been occupied by the 4cuSpimrae, those alleged " descendants of Pheidias " (Pausanias v.
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  • The traces agree with the account of Pausanias.
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  • The statement of Pausanias that the two pediments were made by Paeonius and Alcamenes is now generally supposed to be an error.
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  • When Pausanias saw it, one of the two columns of the opisthodomos (at the west end of the cella) was of wood; and for a long period all the columns of this temple had probably been of the same material.
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  • Pausanias, therefore, would not have seen treasure-houses Nos.
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  • Taken in order from the west, the treasure-houses were founded by the following states: 1, Sicyon; 2, 3, unknown; 4, Syracuse (referred by Pausanias to Carthage); 5, Epidamnus; 6, Byzantium; 7, Sybaris; 8, Cyrene; 9, Selinus; 10, Metapontum; 11, Megara; 12, Gela.
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  • The exedra must have been seen by Pausanias, but he does not mention it.
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  • The temple seems to have been burnt again during the Sacred War, and was in a very dilapidated state when seen by Pausanias (x.
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  • These and a special treatise on Philopoemen (now lost) were used by Plutarch (Philopoemen), Pausanias (viii.
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  • 24.5; Pausanias x.
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  • Among his works are: Types of Greek Coins (1883): A Numismatic Commentary on Pausanias (with F.
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  • the stone throwing, which, like the OaXX ris at the Eleusinia and the XiOof30aia at Troezen (Pausanias ii.
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  • But it may be well in this place to observe that his successors continued his work by giving Pausanias, Strabo, Aeschylus, Galen, Hippocrates and Longinus to the world in first editions.
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  • 2, 3; Pausanias i.
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  • He also published Pausanias and other Greek sketches (1900) and Sir Roger de Coverley and other literary pieces (1920).
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  • Hypaepa, Pausanias v.
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  • A third class of Cyclopes are the builders of the so-called "Cyclopean" walls of Mycenae and Tiryns, giants with arms in their belly, who were said to have been brought by Proetus from Lycia to Argos, his original home (Pausanias ii.
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  • We have, on the other hand, Pausanias's evidence for the existence in his day at Olympia of statues offered by Acragas out of spoil won from Motya, assigned to Calamis, an artist of this period (Freeman ii.
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  • The most celebrated statue of Hera was the chryselephantine work of Polyclitus, made for the Heraeum at Argos soon after 423 s.c. It is fully described by Pausanias, who says that Hera was seated on a throne, wearing a crown (crTEg5avos), and carrying a sceptre in one hand and a pomegranate in the other.
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  • He is reproached by Pausanias (i.
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  • I I; Pausanias x.
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  • 73; Pausanias vi.
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  • 4; Pausanias iii.
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  • At the fountain of Dine in Argolis horses bitted and bridled were sacrificed to him by being drowned (Pausanias viii.
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  • But the mines continued to be worked, though Strabo records that in his time the tailings were being worked over, and Pausanias speaks of the mines as a thing of the past.
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  • Herodotus and Pausanias (iii.
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  • 8r - is borne witness to by Pausanias's mention of the bronze temple of Athena X aXKioucos in Sparta, and the bronze chamber dedicated to Myron in 648 B.C., as well as by the discovery of the stains and bronze nails, which show that the whole interior of the so-called treasury of Atreus at Mycenae was once covered with a lining of bronze plates.
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  • Of the two chief methods of working bronze, gold and silver, it is probable that the hammer process was first practised, at least for statues, among the Greeks, who themselves attributed the invention of the art of hollow casting to Theodorus and Rhoecus, both Samian sculptors, about the middle of the 6th century B.C. Pausanias specially mentions that one of the oldest statues he had ever seen was a large figure of Zeus in Sparta, made of hammered bronze plates riveted together.
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  • It is described by both Herodotus and Pausanias.
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  • - Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon; Plutarch, Pyrrhus, 30-34; Strabo pp. 373-374; Pausanias ii.
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  • - Since 1892 investigation has added considerably to our knowledge concerning the Argive Heraeum or Heraion, the temple of Hera, which stood, according to Pausanias, " on one of the lower slopes of Euboea."
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  • The term Euboea did not designate the eminence upon which the Heraeum is placed, or the mountain-top behind the Heraeum only, but, as Pausanias distinctly indicates, the group of foothills of the hilly district adjoining the mountain.
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  • Pausanias tells us that the Heraeum is 15 stadia from Mycenae.
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  • Pausanias describes the temple and its contents (ii.
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  • On the uppermost terrace, defined by the great Cyclopean supporting wall, exactly as described by Pausanias, the excavations revealed a layer of ashes and charred wood, below which were found numerous objects of earliest date, together with some remains of the walls resting on a polygonal platform - all forming part of the earliest temple.
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  • From Pausanias we learn that " the image of Hera is seated and is of colossal size: it is made of gold and ivory, and is the work of Polyclitus."
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  • Pausanias (especially vi.
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  • 358 sqq.; Pausanias iv., and the commentary in J.
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  • Frazer, Pausanias's Description of Greece, vol.
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  • 57, 58; Pausanias i.
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  • The sanctuary of the deified healer at Cos marked the site where another serpent brought from Epidaurus dived into the earth (Pausanias, ii.
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  • Brinton, op. cit., 176 sqq.; Frazer, Pausanias, v.
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  • 16 Pausanias, i.
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  • the serpent-pillars found in the old Roman provinces of Europe (Frazer, Pausanias, ii.
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  • The temple of Dodona was destroyed by the Aetolians in 219 B.C., but the oracle survived to the times of Pausanias and even of the emperor Julian.
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  • To the same effect Pausanias (vii.
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  • With regard to the statements which attribute some work in connexion with Homer to Peisistratus, it was noticed by Wolf that Cicero, Pausanias and the others who mention the matter do so nearly in the same words, and, therefore, appear to have drawn from a common source.
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  • The Roman populace for a long time reverenced his memory as that of an open-handed patron, and in Greece the recollections of his magnificence, and his enthusiasm for art, were still fresh when the traveller Pausanias visited the country a century later.
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  • Under the empire it was quite obscured by the restored cities of Corinth and Patrae; in Pausanias' age (A.D.
    0
    0
  • 102; Pausanias ii.
    0
    0
  • 89; Pausanias iii.
    0
    0
  • Pausanias (viii.
    0
    0
  • (1895); and Frazer's Pausanias, iv.
    0
    0
  • According to Pausanias (ii.
    0
    0
  • the letter to Pausanias in Thuc. i.
    0
    0
  • Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Pausanias, i.
    0
    0
  • Strabo describes it as a mere village, and in Pausanias's time (A.D.
    0
    0
  • The names of the gates vary, but four are constant - the Proetides, Electrae, Neistae or Neitae, and Homoloides; Pausanias gives the others as Ogygiae, Hypsistae, Crenaeae.
    0
    0
  • The gates shown to Pausanias as Neistae and Proetides led respectively north-west and north-east.
    0
    0
  • The description of Pausanias was written at a time when the lower city was deserted, and only the temples and the gates left; and the references to Thebes in the Attic dramatists are, like those to Mycenae and Argos, of little or no topographical value.
    0
    0
  • - ix.; Thucydides and Xenophon (Hellenica), passim; Diodorus xvii., xix.; Pausanias ix.
    0
    0
  • xxxii.-xxxv., xxxviii., &c.); Pausanias vii.
    0
    0
  • 576; Sophocles, Philocte6es, 604, who probably follows the Little Iliad of Lesches; Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • From this blow it never recovered; the Athenian control was resumed in 4 2 B.C., but Pausanias (viii.
    0
    0
  • (Leipzig, 1868); Pausanias iv.
    0
    0
  • I; Plutarch, Cleomenes; Aratus, 35-46; Philopoemen, 5, 6; Pausanias ii.
    0
    0
  • 2; Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • He was worshipped not only at Anthedon, but on the coasts of Greece, Sicily and Spain, where fishermen and sailors at certain seasons watched for his arrival during the night in order to consult him (Pausanias ix.
    0
    0
  • On the isthmus of Corinth, and also at Olympia and Nemea, he was worshipped as Taraxippus ("terrifier of horses"), his ghost being said to appear and frighten the horses at the games (Pausanias vi.
    0
    0
  • 132) has to say is that the Magi sang "the theogony " at their sacrifices, Pausanias is able to add (v.
    0
    0
  • At Delphi he built a treasure-house for Corinthian votive offerings; at Olympia he dedicated a colossal statue of Zeus and the famous "chest of Cypselus," supposed to be identical with the chest of the legend, of which Pausanias (v.
    0
    0
  • Cleomenes seems to have received scant justice at the hands of Herodotus or his informants, and Pausanias (iii.
    0
    0
  • See Callimachus, Hymn to Delos, 305; Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • In the neighbourhood of Poros-Calauria are two small islands, the more westerly of which contains the ruins of a small temple, and is probably the ancient Sphaeria or Hiera mentioned by Pausanias as the seat of a temple of Athena Apaturia.
    0
    0
  • Frazer's Pausanias, note on x.
    0
    0
  • In the classical period it was a place of no importance, and when Pausanias lived, about A.D.
    0
    0
  • - Strabo pp. 388 sq.; Pausanias viii.; W.
    0
    0
  • Nubes, 485; Pausanias, i.
    0
    0
  • Further, the statue seen by Pausanias may not have been intended for Telesilla; it would equally represent Aphrodite, in her character as wife of Ares and a warlike goddess (the books, however, seem out of place).
    0
    0
  • 60; Pausanias iv.
    0
    0
  • The grave of Idas and Lynceus was shown at Sparta, according to Pausanias (iii.
    0
    0
  • The deity most worshipped at Thespiae, according to Pausanias, was Eros, whose primitive image was an unwrought stone.
    0
    0
  • vi.; Pausanias, ix.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Pausanias's Description of Greece, vols.
    0
    0
  • In the time of Pausanias the throne of Pelops was still shown on the top of Mt Sipylus.
    0
    0
  • that Hissarlik, not Bunarbashi, was the site of Troy, and that the Atreid graves, seen by Pausanias at Mycenae, lay within the citadel wall.
    0
    0
  • This stone was carefully preserved at Delphi, anointed with oil every day and on festal occasions covered with raw wool (Pausanias x.
    0
    0
  • 91; Pausanias ii.
    0
    0
  • According to Pausanias, Narcissus, to console himself for the death of a favourite twin-sister, his exact counterpart, sat gazing into the spring to recall her features by his own.
    0
    0
  • 341-510; Pausanias ix.
    0
    0
  • When Pausanias (iii.
    0
    0
  • 212, 758; Pausanias, v.
    0
    0
  • For example, the Cretans showed the tomb of Zeus, and the Phocians (Pausanias x.
    0
    0
  • Thomas Taylor, at the end of the i 8th century, indulged in much mystical allegorizing of myths, as in the notes to his translation of Pausanias (1794) At an earlier date (1760) De Brosses struck on the true line of interpretation in his little work Du Culte des dieux fetiches, ou parallele de l'ancienne religion de l'Egypte avec la religion actuelle de Nigritie.
    0
    0
  • As the ancestors of the Greeks, with the Aryans of India, the Egyptians, and others advanced in civilization, their religious thought was shocked and surprised by myths (originally dating from the period of savagery, and natural in that period) which were preserved down to the time of Pausanias by local priesthoods, or which were stereotyped in the ancient poems of Hesiod and Homer, or in the Brahmanas and Vedas of India, or were retained in the popular religion of Egypt.
    0
    0
  • Pausanias seems to have found human sacrifices to Zeus still lingering in Arcadia in the 2nd century of our era.
    0
    0
  • In other places there were manifest commutations of human sacrifice, as at the altar of Artemis the Implacable at Patrae, where Pausanias saw the wild beasts being driven into the flames.'
    0
    0
  • Pausanias gives full and interesting details of the worship of rude stones, the oldest worship, he says, among the Greeks.
    0
    0
  • The stone came forth first, and Pausanias saw it at Delphi (Paus.
    0
    0
  • Of these " sacred chapters " we have fragments and hints in Herodotus, Pausanias, in the mythographers, like Apollodorus, in the tragic poets, and in the ancient scholia or notes on the classics.
    0
    0
  • Sparta felt that an effort was necessary to recover her position, and Pausanias, the victor of Plataea, was sent out as admiral of the Greek fleet.
    0
    0
  • Moreover, Sparta's attention was at this time fully occupied by troubles nearer home - the plots of Pausanias not only with the Persian king but with the Laconian helots; the revolt of Tegea (c. 473-71), rendered all the more formidable by the participation of Argos; the earthquake which in 464 devastated Sparta; and the rising of the Messenian helots, which immediately followed.
    0
    0
  • Besides the actual buildings discovered, a number of points were fixed which greatly facilitate the study of Spartan topography, based upon the description left us by Pausanias.
    0
    0
  • 119 sqq.; Pausanias, iii.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Pausanias, iii.
    0
    0
  • For this, it is said, Dionysus, to whose worship Dirce had been devoted, visited Antiope with madness, which caused her to wander restlessly all over Greece till she was cured, and married by Phocus of Tithorea, on Mount Parnassus, where both were buried in one grave (Pausanias ix.
    0
    0
  • At Sparta a cenotaph was erected in his memory near the tombs of Pausanias and Leonidas, and yearly speeches were made and games celebrated in their honour, in which only Spartiates could compete (Paus.
    0
    0
  • From his blood sprang a red flower, as at the death of Hyacinthus, which bore on its leaves the initial letters of his name AI, also expressive of lament (Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • Like Achilles, he is represented as living after his death in the island of Leuke at the mouth of the Danube (Pausanias iii.
    0
    0
  • Ajax, who in the post-Homeric legend is described as the grandson of Aeacus and the greatgrandson of Zeus, was the tutelary hero of the island of Salamis, where he had a temple and an image, and where a festival called Aianteia was celebrated in his honour (Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • His oracles, of which specimens are extant in Herodotus and Pausanias, were written in hexameter verse, and were considered to have been strikingly fulfilled.
    0
    0
  • 43; Pausanias iv.
    0
    0
  • 13; Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • 270; and Frazer's Pausanias, ii.
    0
    0
  • CECROPS (KEKpol,G), traditionally the first king of Attica, and the founder of its political life (Pausanias ix.
    0
    0
  • The name Dead Sea first appears in late Greek writers, as Pausanias and Galen.
    0
    0
  • 15; Pausanias i.
    0
    0
  • When, in 1837, the baronial fiefs were suppressed by Charles Albert, and the land transferred to the state, the ademprivio was maintained on the lands subject to it, and it was thus to the interest of all that 'The herb y Sardoa, said to cause the risus Sardonicus (sardonic laugh), cannot be certainly identified (Pausanias x.
    0
    0
  • The image was destroyed by fire, replaced by the sculptor Onatas from inspiration in a dream, but disappeared again before the time of Pausanias.
    0
    0
  • Although the dominant position of Lysander had been broken in 403 by King Pausanias, the Spartan government gave him all the support which was possible without going into open war against the king; it caused a partisan of Lysander, Clearchus, condemned to death on account of atrocious crimes which he had committed as governor of Byzantium, to gather an army of mercenaries on the Thracian Chersonesus, and in Thessaly Menon of Pharsalus, head of a party which was connected with Sparta, collected another army.
    0
    0
  • (2) Literary traditions of subsequent civilizations, especially the Hellenic, such as, e.g., those embodied in the Homeric poems, the legends concerning Crete, Mycenae, &c.; statements as to the origin of gods, cults and so forth, transmitted to us by Hellenic antiquarians such as Strabo, Pausanias, Diodorus Siculus, &c.
    0
    0
  • 816), the first to mention .the sound, declares that he himself heard it, and Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • On the other hand, Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • 16), and it was still standing in the time of Pausanias, who applies to it the same name (i.
    0
    0
  • Immediately west of the Erechtheum is the Pandroseum or temenos of Pandrosos, the daughter of Cecrops, the excavation of which has revealed no traces of the temple (va6s) seen here by Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • The building has been supposed by Curtius, Wachsmuth and others to be the Heracleum in Melite, but its identification with the temple of Hephaestus and Athena seen in this neighbourhood by Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • Bliimner, Pausanias (text and commentary; vol.
    0
    0
  • The commentary on Pausanias' description of Athens, contained in vol.
    0
    0
  • In 478 or 477 Aristides was in command of the Athenian squadron off Byzantium, and so far won the confidence of the Ionian allies that, after revolting from the Spartan admiral Pausanias, they offered him the chief command and left him with absolute discretion in fixing the contributions of the newly formed confederacy (see DELIAN LEAGUE).
    0
    0
  • This "Niobe," described by Pausanias (i.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Pausanias's Description of Greece (London, 1898), vol.
    0
    0
  • The suggested substitution in the text of Pausanias of the 28th for the 8th Olympiad (i.e.
    0
    0
  • The numerous details and variant legends preserved by later writers, particularly Strabo and Pausanias, may go back to early sources (e.g.
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Pausanias, vol.
    0
    0
  • The rape of Cassandra by Ajax was frequently represented in Greek works of art, for instance on the chest of Cypselus described by Pausanias (v.
    0
    0
  • 50-70, vii.; later writers either reproduce or embellish his narrative (Pausanias iii.
    0
    0
  • Though there seems to be no conclusive reason for doubting the existence of Aristomenes, his history, as related by Pausanias, following mainly the Messeniaca of the Cretan epic poet Rhianus (about 230 B.C.), is evidently largely interwoven with fictions.
    0
    0
  • 76 -101; Xenophon, Hellenica, iii.-vii.; Strabo, pp. 400-412; Pausanias ix.; Theopompus (or Cratippus) in the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, vol.
    0
    0
  • The story that he was struck blind for slandering Helen in a poem and afterwards recovered his sight when, in consequence of a dream, he had composed a palinode or recantation (in which he declared that only Helen's phantom had been carried off to Troy), is told by Plato (Phaedrus 243 A.), Pausanias (iii.
    0
    0
  • xxi., 1901, pp. 30 seq.) We also learn from Pausanias that the temple was decorated with " sculptures over the columns, representing some the birth of Zeus and the battle of the gods and giants, others the Trojan War and the taking of Ilium."
    0
    0
  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed., London, 1907), p. 153; also his notes on Pausanias, vol.
    0
    0
  • To the great half-serpent monster Typhon were ascribed numerous springs; he was also the cause of earthquakes, and when he buried himself in the earth he formed the bed of the Syrian 1 See Frazer's notes on Pausanias (1898), vol.
    0
    0
  • In spite of all their bravery, they succumbed to the Greek phalanx, when once the generalship of a Miltiades or a Pausanias had brought matters to a hand to hand conflict; and it was with justice that the GrecksAeschylus, for instance viewed their battles against the Persian as a contest between spear and bow.
    0
    0
  • His sex was discovered while bathing, and he was slain by the nymphs (Pausanias viii.
    0
    0
  • Heitsi Eibib, like countless other gods and heroes, is also said to have been the son of a virgin who tasted a particular plant, and so became pregnant, as in the German and Gallophrygian marchen of the almond tree, given by Grimm and Pausanias.
    0
    0
  • 8, 5; Pausanias iv.
    0
    1
  • 38; Plutarch, Theseus, Pausanias i.
    0
    1
  • Pausanias (x.
    0
    1
  • His reign, which began soon after the close of the second Messenian War, is said to have been quiet and uneventful (Pausanias iii.
    0
    1
  • Agis, 3, Camillus, 19, Agesilaus, 25, 33, 34, 40; Pausanias iii.
    0
    1
  • 68; Pausanias iii.
    0
    1
  • 1; Pausanias x.
    0
    1