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patroness

patroness

patroness Sentence Examples

  • This position he lost owing to a quarrel with his patroness, and he was accused of appropriating money to pay a gambling debt.

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  • She was the patroness of hunters, fishermen and sailors, and also a goddess of birth and health.

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  • As the great nature-goddess, the attributes of fertility and reproduction are characteristically hers, as also the accompanying immorality which originally, perhaps, was often nothing more than primitive magic. As patroness of the hunt, later identification with Artemis was inevitable.

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  • Map was, as we have seen, frequently in France; Chretien had for patroness Marie, countess of Champagne, step-daughter to Henry II., Map's patron; Map's position was distinctly superior to that of Chretien.

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  • Diane was a patroness of the arts.

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  • The Pantheon in Paris was the church built in the classical style by Soufflot; it was begun in 1764 and consecrated to the patroness of the city, Sainte Genevieve.

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  • Two festivals are held in the town, a less important one in October, the other, on the 24th and 25th of May, unique for its gathering of gipsies who come in large numbers to do honour to the tomb of their patroness Sara, contained in the crypt below the apse.

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  • While his patroness lived in a convent of her own in Jerusalem, Rufinus, at her expense, gathered together a number of monks in a monastery on the Mount of Olives, devoting himself at the same time to the study of Greek theology.

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  • While his patroness lived in a convent of her own in Jerusalem, Rufinus, at her expense, gathered together a number of monks in a monastery on the Mount of Olives, devoting himself at the same time to the study of Greek theology.

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  • William Howard was employed as counsel by the corporation of Lynn, and it is worthy of note that the "crosslets fitchy" in his shield of arms suggest the cross with which the dragon was discomfited by St Margaret, the patroness of Lynn.

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  • As patroness of the arts, she is associated with Hephaestus (one of her titles is `H4at6Tia) and Prometheus, and in Boeotia she was regarded as the inventress of the flute.

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  • He became professor of architecture at Turin, and his most important works were the excavation of Tusculum in 1829 and of the Appian Way in 1848, the results of which he embodied in a number of works published in a costly form by his patroness, the queen of Sardinia.

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  • The faithful Batt had sought a pension for him from his own patroness, Anne of Borsselen, the Lady of Veere, who resided at the castle of Tournehem near Calais, and whose son Batt was now teaching.

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  • Henrietta Maria was well pleased to become a patroness of so holy a work, especially as she was not asked to take any personal trouble in the matter.

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  • Centeotl, the goddess of the allnourishing maize, was patroness of the earth and mother of the gods, while Mictlanteuctli, lord of dead-land, ruled over the departed in the dim under-world.

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  • The patroness of the order must be a princess of the imperial Austrian house.

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  • She gained an ascendancy as patroness of the south at the time when the two kingdoms were striving for the mastery.

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  • Catherine Howard had been brought to the block (1542) on charges in which there was probably a good deal of truth, and her successor, Catherine Parr, was a patroness of the new learning.

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  • James threw Scotland into the whirlpool of European politics, dealing with Spanish envoys and with the duchess of Burgundy, the patroness of the mysterious Perkin Warbeck, who claimed to be Richard, duke of York, son of Edward IV.

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  • The function of Aphrodite as the patroness of courtesans represents the most degraded form of her worship as the goddess of love, and is certainly of Phoenician or Eastern origin.

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  • It has been observed that she is rather the patroness of the wild beasts of the field than of the more agricultural or domestic animals (Farnell, Cults, ii.

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  • She was a patroness of art and literature, and attracted to Weimar many of the most eminent men in Germany.

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  • The ancient Brigit seems to have been the patroness of the arts and was probably also the goddess of fertility.

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  • She was a liberal patroness of the stage, literature and the arts, and delighted in knowing all the cultured people of the day.

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  • patroness of chamber music, changed all this.

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  • patroness of arts and trades.

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  • patroness of the city.

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  • patroness of poets and writers.

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  • patroness of the little church, is said to have existed here. ' (Horne ).

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  • patroness of the order of Carmel.

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  • When she became patroness, there were only 18 Fellows, compared with the present 78.

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  • However, a meeting with Mrs Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge, the American patroness of chamber music, changed all this.

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  • Our new patroness more than made up for the hiatus.

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  • This position he lost owing to a quarrel with his patroness, and he was accused of appropriating money to pay a gambling debt.

    0
    0
  • The Pantheon in Paris was the church built in the classical style by Soufflot; it was begun in 1764 and consecrated to the patroness of the city, Sainte Genevieve.

    0
    0
  • William Howard was employed as counsel by the corporation of Lynn, and it is worthy of note that the "crosslets fitchy" in his shield of arms suggest the cross with which the dragon was discomfited by St Margaret, the patroness of Lynn.

    0
    0
  • Two festivals are held in the town, a less important one in October, the other, on the 24th and 25th of May, unique for its gathering of gipsies who come in large numbers to do honour to the tomb of their patroness Sara, contained in the crypt below the apse.

    0
    0
  • She was the patroness of hunters, fishermen and sailors, and also a goddess of birth and health.

    0
    0
  • As the great nature-goddess, the attributes of fertility and reproduction are characteristically hers, as also the accompanying immorality which originally, perhaps, was often nothing more than primitive magic. As patroness of the hunt, later identification with Artemis was inevitable.

    0
    0
  • In i 501 he became vice-chancellor; and later on, when chancellor, he was able to forward, if not to initiate entirely, the beneficent schemes of his patroness in the foundations of St.

    0
    0
  • She is the patroness and protectress of those heroes who are distinguished for their prudence and caution, and in the Trojan War she sides with the more civilized Greeks.

    0
    0
  • As patroness of the arts, she is associated with Hephaestus (one of her titles is `H4at6Tia) and Prometheus, and in Boeotia she was regarded as the inventress of the flute.

    0
    0
  • Map was, as we have seen, frequently in France; Chretien had for patroness Marie, countess of Champagne, step-daughter to Henry II., Map's patron; Map's position was distinctly superior to that of Chretien.

    0
    0
  • He became professor of architecture at Turin, and his most important works were the excavation of Tusculum in 1829 and of the Appian Way in 1848, the results of which he embodied in a number of works published in a costly form by his patroness, the queen of Sardinia.

    0
    0
  • The faithful Batt had sought a pension for him from his own patroness, Anne of Borsselen, the Lady of Veere, who resided at the castle of Tournehem near Calais, and whose son Batt was now teaching.

    0
    0
  • The next few years were spent still in preparation, supported by pupils' fees and the dedications of books; the Collectanea adagiorum in June 1500 to Mountjoy, and some devotional and moral compositions to Batt's patroness and her son.

    0
    0
  • Henrietta Maria was well pleased to become a patroness of so holy a work, especially as she was not asked to take any personal trouble in the matter.

    0
    0
  • Centeotl, the goddess of the allnourishing maize, was patroness of the earth and mother of the gods, while Mictlanteuctli, lord of dead-land, ruled over the departed in the dim under-world.

    0
    0
  • The announcement of the apparition of the Virgin to an Indian near Mexico City provided a place of pilgrimage and a patroness in Our Lady of Guadalupe; and the friars ingeniously used the hieroglyphic writing for instruction in Christian doctrine, and taught the natives trades, for which they showed much aptitude.

    0
    0
  • The patroness of the order must be a princess of the imperial Austrian house.

    0
    0
  • She gained an ascendancy as patroness of the south at the time when the two kingdoms were striving for the mastery.

    0
    0
  • Catherine Howard had been brought to the block (1542) on charges in which there was probably a good deal of truth, and her successor, Catherine Parr, was a patroness of the new learning.

    0
    0
  • James threw Scotland into the whirlpool of European politics, dealing with Spanish envoys and with the duchess of Burgundy, the patroness of the mysterious Perkin Warbeck, who claimed to be Richard, duke of York, son of Edward IV.

    0
    0
  • It is pointed out by Farnell that this cult of Aphrodite, as the patroness of married life, is probably a native development of the Greek religion, the oriental legends representing her by no means as an upholder of the purer relations of man and woman.

    0
    0
  • The function of Aphrodite as the patroness of courtesans represents the most degraded form of her worship as the goddess of love, and is certainly of Phoenician or Eastern origin.

    0
    0
  • It has been observed that she is rather the patroness of the wild beasts of the field than of the more agricultural or domestic animals (Farnell, Cults, ii.

    0
    0
  • She was a patroness of art and literature, and attracted to Weimar many of the most eminent men in Germany.

    0
    0
  • Diane was a patroness of the arts.

    0
    0
  • The ancient Brigit seems to have been the patroness of the arts and was probably also the goddess of fertility.

    0
    0
  • She was a liberal patroness of the stage, literature and the arts, and delighted in knowing all the cultured people of the day.

    0
    0
  • In i 501 he became vice-chancellor; and later on, when chancellor, he was able to forward, if not to initiate entirely, the beneficent schemes of his patroness in the foundations of St.

    0
    1
  • She is the patroness and protectress of those heroes who are distinguished for their prudence and caution, and in the Trojan War she sides with the more civilized Greeks.

    0
    1
  • The next few years were spent still in preparation, supported by pupils' fees and the dedications of books; the Collectanea adagiorum in June 1500 to Mountjoy, and some devotional and moral compositions to Batt's patroness and her son.

    0
    1
  • The announcement of the apparition of the Virgin to an Indian near Mexico City provided a place of pilgrimage and a patroness in Our Lady of Guadalupe; and the friars ingeniously used the hieroglyphic writing for instruction in Christian doctrine, and taught the natives trades, for which they showed much aptitude.

    0
    1
  • St Frediano or Frigidian dates originally from the 7th century, but was built in the Romanesque style in 1112-1147, though the interior, originally with four aisles and nave, shows traces of the earliest structure; the front occupies the site of the ancient apse; in one of its chapels is the tomb of Santa Zita, patroness of servants and of Lucca itself.

    0
    1
  • It is pointed out by Farnell that this cult of Aphrodite, as the patroness of married life, is probably a native development of the Greek religion, the oriental legends representing her by no means as an upholder of the purer relations of man and woman.

    0
    1
  • St Frediano or Frigidian dates originally from the 7th century, but was built in the Romanesque style in 1112-1147, though the interior, originally with four aisles and nave, shows traces of the earliest structure; the front occupies the site of the ancient apse; in one of its chapels is the tomb of Santa Zita, patroness of servants and of Lucca itself.

    0
    1
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