Pathology sentence example

pathology
  • The beginnings of his doctrine of cellular pathology date from the earliest period in his career.
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  • Pathology is the science of disease in all its manifestations, whether structural or functional, progressive or regressive.
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  • It is when studied on these lines that pathology finds its proper place as a department of biology.
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  • This subject brings the domain of pathology, however, into touch with that of variation, and we are profoundly ignorant as to the complex of external conditions which would decide in any given case how far a variation in form would be prejudicial or otherwise to the continued existence of a species.
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  • Since pathology is the science of disease, we are met at the very threshold by the question: What is disease?
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  • Hippocrates had no opportunity of verification by necropsy, and Sydenham ignored pathology; yet the clinical features of many but recently described diseases, such, for example, as that named after Graves, and myxoedema, both associated with perversions of the thyroid gland, lay as open to the eye of physicians in the past as to our own.
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  • While thus rejecting all the lessons of morbid anatomy and pathology, he put forward views respecting the causes of disease which hardly bear to be seriously stated.
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  • medicina: sc. ars, art of healing, from mederi, to heal) may be used very widely, to include Pathology, the theory of the causation of disease, or, very narrowly, to mean only the drug or form of remedy prescribed by the physician - this being more properly the subject of Therapeutics (q.v.) and Pharmacology.
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  • As the prevalence of the conceptions signified and inspired by the word "phlogiston" kept alive ontological notions of disease, so the dissipation of vitalistic conceptions in the field of physics prepared men's minds in pathology for the new views opened by the discoveries of Pasteur on the side of pathogeny, and of J.
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  • In anatomy and physiology little advance had been made, and so of pathology in the sense of an explanation of morbid processes or knowledge of diseased structures there could be very little.
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  • The principle which mainly distinguished it was not merely the use of chemical medicines in addition to the traditional, or, as they were called in distinction, "Galenical" remedies, but a theory of pathology or causation of disease entirely different from the prevailing "humoral" pathology.
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  • There are other factors, however, which have kept pathology in the background.
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  • AUTH0RITne5.General and Historical.Berkeley, Vegetable Pathology, Gardeners Chronicle (1854) p. 4; Plowright, British Uredineae and Ustilagineae (1889); Erik,sson and Henning, Die Getreideroste (Stockholm, 1896); De Bary, Comparative Morph.
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  • Mechanical theories were introduced into pathology, in explanation of the processes of fever and the like, but had little or no influence on therapeutics.
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  • It includes five books; of which the first and second treat of physiology, pathology and hygiene, the third and fourth deal with the methods of treating disease, and the fifth describes the composition and preparation of remedies.
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  • 1163; Coats, Manual of Pathology (London, 1895) Cohnheim, Vorlesungen ub.
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  • Experimental pathology has benefited by the use of antiseptic surgery in operations upon animals, and by the adoption of exact methods of recording.
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  • The origin of the corpuscles, previously a matter of so much difference of opinion, is now pretty fairly set at rest, and has proved the key to the interpretation of the pathology of many diseases of the blood, such as the different forms of anaemia, of leucocythaemia, &c.
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  • This sketch of an enormous subject shuws us that the pathology of plants is a special department of the study of variations which threaten injury to the plant, and passes imperceptibly into the study of variations in general.
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  • With the melting of the ice the more daring spirits dashed into the new current with such ardour that for them all traditions, all institutions, were thrown into hotchpot; even elderly and sober physicians took enough of the infection to liberate their minds, and, in the field of the several diseases and in that of post-mortem pathology, the hollowness of classification by superficial resemblance, the transitoriness of forms, and the flow of processes, broke upon the view.
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  • Despite the general recognition of these facts, the pharmacology of colchicum has hitherto thrown no light on the pathology of gout, and the pathology of gout has thrown no light upon the manner in which colchicum exerts its unique influence upon this disease.
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  • The Royal Society awarded him the Copley medal in 5892, and selected him as Croonian lecturer in the following year, his subject being the position of pathology among the biological sciences; and in 1898 he delivered the second Huxley memorial lecture at Charing Cross Hospital.
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  • Pathology, in fact, is the child of this ancestry; it begins where they end.
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  • The pathology of aphasia, as worked out by a combination of the experimental, the pathological and the anatomical lines of inquiry is a favourable example of what has been accomplished.
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  • PATHOLOGY OF PLANTS
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  • PATHOLOGY (from Gr.
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  • Influenced by the prevailing philosophy of the day, they interpreted the phenomena of disease through its lights, and endeavoured from time to time to reduce the study of pathology to philosophical order when the very elements of philosophical order were wanting.
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  • Phytopathology or plant pathology (Gr.
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  • The outstanding feature in the history of pathology during the 19th century, and more particularly of the latter half of it, was the completion of its rescue from the thraldom of abstract philosophy, and its elevation to the dignity of one of the natural sciences.
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  • The complexity and mystery of action inherent in living matter have probably been accountable for much of the vague philosophy of disease in the past, and have furnished one reason at least why pathology has been so long in asserting its independence as a science.
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  • Progress in the study of pathology has been greatly facilitated by the introduction of improved methods of technique.
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  • Our starting-point in this, as in all departments of biological study, must be the biological unit, and it is to the alterations to which this is subject, under varying conditions of nutrition and stimulation, that the science of pathology must apply itself.
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  • From the foregoing it will be gathered that the problems in pathology are many-sided and require to be attacked from all points of vantage; and the subject falls naturally into certain great divisions, the chief of which are the following: I.
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  • Assuming, with Sedgwick and others, this amassed and bound condition of the tissues to be true, it would be necessary to reject the cell-doctrine in pathology altogether, and to regard the living basis of the organism as a continuous substance whose parts are incapable of living independently of the whole.
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  • 418, also, Manual of General Pathology (London, 1898); Loeb, " Certain Activities of the Epithelial Tissue of Skin of Guinea-pig, &c.," Johns Hopkins Hosp. Bull., Balt.
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  • The recognition of the dangers accompanying the drinking of polluted water or milk, or of those attached to the breathing of a germ-polluted atmosphere, has been the natural sequence of an improved knowledge of pathology in its bacteriological relationships.
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  • This doctrine, of which the developments need not further be followed, was important chiefly in so far that it was perfectly distinct from, and opposed to, the humoral pathology of Hippocrates.
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  • In pathology, indeed, Virchow's (1821-1902) influence in the transfiguration of this branch of science may almost be compared to that of Darwin and Pasteur in their respective domains.
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  • This phagocytal action of certain cells of the body is held by Metchnikoff and his followers to have an important bearing on the pathology of immunity.
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  • He may, in fact, be called the father of modern pathology, for his view, that every animal is constituted by a sum of vital units, each of which manifests the characteristics of life, has almost uniformly dominated the theory of disease.since the middle of the 59th century, when it was enunciated.
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  • Before Darwin - if the name of Darwin may be used to signify the transformation of thought of which he was the chief artificer - natural objects were regarded, not in medicine and pathology only, as a set of hidebound events; and natural operations as moving in fixed grooves, after a fashion which it is now difficult for us to realize.
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  • Upon this too static a view, both of clinical type and of post-mortem-room pathology, came a despairing spirit, almost of fatalism, which in the contemplation of organic ruins lost the hope of cure of organic diseases.
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  • Such was medicine, statically ordered in pathology, statically ordered in its clinical concepts, when, on the 24th of November 1859 the Origin of Species was published.
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  • But in addition to bringing forward a fundamental and philosophical view of morbid processes, which probably contributed more than any other single cause to vindicate for pathology the place which he claimed for it among the biological sciences, Virchow made many important contributions to histology and morbid anatomy and to the study of particular diseases.
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  • His immense contributions to anatomy and pathology cannot be estimated here, but his services in stimulating research and training investigators belong to the history of general medicine.
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  • This, one of the most difficult problems of pathology, is being attacked by many able workers, who are all striving from different standpoints to elucidate the nature of these new formations, which spring from the normal tissues in which they develop and which they destroy.
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  • Practical Applications Medicine and surgery have never been slow to appropriate and apply the biological facts of pathology, and at no period have they followed more closely in its wake than during the last quarter of the 19th century.
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  • The importance in science of Bichat's classical works, especially of the Anatomie generale, cannot be estimated here; we can only point out their value as supplying a new basis for pathology or the science of disease.
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  • Plant pathology embraces several branches of study, and may be conveniently divided as follows:
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  • Virchow as his teacher in pathology.
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  • The modern system of hygiene is in great part founded upon Decent pathology.
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  • Bone samples from the broken hip were sent to pathology.
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  • Still in some parts of his system Sylvius shows an anxiety to base his pathology on anatomical changes.
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  • However, only a few posts in plant pathology were lost.
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  • Scrubs that are worn in the operating theater or pathology department tend to get stained rather easily, and would need to be changed and washed often, or even disposed of.
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  • In 1847 he gave his first lecture at St Thomas's Hospital, on the "Aims and Philosophic Method of Pathological Research," followed a little later by lectures on general pathology in relation to the principles of diagnosis, and the treatment of disease.
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  • For different types of anaemia see the article BLOOD, section Pathology.
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  • Pathology >>
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  • Pharmacology is a branch of biology; it is also closely connected with pathology and bacteriology, for certain drugs produce structural as well as functional changes in the tissues, and in germ diseases the peculiar symptoms are caused by foreign substances (toxins) formed by the infective organisms present in the body.
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  • advancement of pathology shall be eligible for election as an honorary member.
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  • amygdala reactivity to threatening or to emotional stimuli in absence of any overt psychiatric pathology.
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  • Corresponding author Z. Xiong, Department of Plant Pathology, Forbes 204, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.
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  • It is also possible to obtain cadavers from the pathology department of universities, where disease-ridden animals are donated for autopsy.
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  • Skeletal pathology Numerous pathological conditions, especially chronic, long lasting disease, affect the human skeleton.
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  • poster Gallery This shows some poster displays of plant pathology topics shown at scientific meetings in recent years.
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  • The Plant Pathology Internet Guide Book is a subject oriented internet resource guide for plant pathology, applied entomology, and all related fields.
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  • As the course ' forest Pathology ' highly useful resource on the web for forest entomology, especially for students.
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  • Staining of collagen in liver granuloma, illustrating fibrotic reaction in the liver, a major aspect of the pathology associated with this disease.
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  • Oral pathology, provides a specialist diagnostic histopathology reporting service.
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  • Synopsis Oral Pathology for the Dental hygienist is written to meet the specific needs of dental hygiene students and practicing hygienists.
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  • jitter on single-fiber electromyography has been noted in other diseases with NMJ pathology (Stalberg et al.
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  • Every area will have a pathology lab, which will do toxicology screens.
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  • They were submitted through the pathology laboratory by 1 of the 16 general hospitals in the region.
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  • Robbin's text on pathology also contains sections on mitochondrial myopathy, stating that this kind of muscle wasting results in severe weakness.
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  • Two groups, based on pathology in suckling mice: Group A: Cause acute myositis (muscular inflammation) with inflammation and necrosis.
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  • pathology of infection The first symptoms appear toward the end or the incubation periods, when the flukes reach maturity.
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  • pathology of laboratory animals is provided and include ferrets, rats and rabbits.
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  • associated pathology must be ruled out in older children with FIA.
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  • You will be expected to examine your fellow students, so the chances of finding ocular pathology in such a young population is low.
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  • Numerous images can be employed allowing imaging of intra-articular pathology.
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  • Of course, I had written and edited texts in forensic pathology.
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  • His main research interest is the molecular pathology of cancer particularly the differential expressions of proteins.
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  • Of course, in reality, we treat the underlying pathology.
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  • Cytology has now become firmly established in the field of cellular pathology with the Society in the forefront of developments in the United Kingdom.
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  • pathology laboratory to identify which type of cancer is present.
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  • pathology lab, which will do toxicology screens.
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  • pathology modernisation group.
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  • pathology specimen 41.1 ' Horseshoe Kidney ', above, shows this anomaly in the trunk of a young child.
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  • pathology departments at the Royal Free underpin the whole practice of medicine.
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  • However, in many cases, the VQ scan can be difficult to interpret especially with the presence of other lung pathology.
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  • In terms of science, we have a lively program of departmental seminars, complemented by specialist seminars in areas such as cereal pathology.
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  • The aim of this work was to study the brain pathology in the knockout mouse model for Sandhoff disease by MRI.
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  • It may even include techniques from speech pathology that solicit from children the kinds of practice they need to build their language skills.
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  • plant pathology topics shown at scientific meetings in recent years.
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  • He would hope to reassert the primacy of plant pathology to which many other disciplines contribute.
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  • Reassess risk factors for serious pathology (see red flags ). Reassess presence of nerve root pain.
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  • The first algorithm is for diagnostic triage, which includes red flags for possible serious spinal pathology and nerve root problems.
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  • turn back the clock to the days when extension pathology was generously resourced.
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  • underlying pathology, helping to make your differentials more precise.
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  • Although the concept of problem-based learning is deemed educationally valuable, the name itself suggests pathology.
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  • In many passages of his works on pathology, physiology, and psychology Lotze had distinctly stated that the method of research which he advocated there did not give an explanation of the phenomena of life and mind, but only the means of observing and connecting them together; that the meaning of all phenomena, and the reason of their peculiar connexions, was a philosophical problem which required to be attacked from a different point of view; and that the significance especially which lay in the phenomena of life and mind would only unfold itself if by an exhaustive survey of the entire life of man, individually, socially, and historically, we gain the necessary data for deciding what meaning attaches to the existence of this microcosm, or small world of human life, in the macrocosm of the universe.
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  • MORTIFICATION, a term used in pathology and surgery, signifying a local death (Lat.
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  • The term by itself is usually applied to animal or human pathology, rather than to vegetable pathology or Phytopathology (see Plants: Pathology).
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  • The pathology of the present day is more modest; it is content to labour and to wait.
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  • Experimental pathology has benefited by the use of antiseptic surgery in operations upon animals, and by the adoption of exact methods of recording; while the employment of solid culture media in bacteriology - the product of Koch's fertile genius - is responsible for a great part of the extraordinary development which has taken place in this department of pathological research.
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  • The pathology of intra-cardiac and vascular murmurs has also been inquired into experimentally, the general impression being that these abnormal sounds result, in most cases at least, from the production of a sonorous liquid vein.
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  • (See Heredity.) The Cellular Doctrine In Pathology The cellular pathology is the pathology of to-day; indeed, protoplasm - its vital characteristics under abnormal influences and its decay - will be regarded most likely as the basis of pathology in all time.
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  • The only evidence we have in pathology of living structures in which apparently a differentiation into cell-body and nucleus does not exist, is in the case of bacteria, but then there comes the question whether they may not possess chromatin distributed through their substance, in the form of metachromatic points, as is the case in some infusoria (Trachelocerca, Gruber).
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  • 385; Text-Book of Pathology (London,1894); Hansemann, " Pathological Mitosis," Arch.
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  • Disease (see Pathology) is the correlative of health, and the word is not capable of a more penetrating definition.
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  • The treatment of wounds, injuries and deformities, with operative interference in general, is the special department of surgical practice (the corresponding parts of pathology, including inflammation, repair, and removable tumours, are sometimes grouped together as surgical pathology); and where the work of the profession is highly subdivided, surgery becomes the exclusive province of the surgeon, while internal medicine remains to the physician.
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  • In the last quarter of the 19th century the conception grew clearer that morbid anatomy for the most part demonstrates disease in its static aspects only, and also for the most part in the particular aspect of final demolition; and it became manifest as pathology and clinical medicine became more and more thoroughly integrated, that the processes which initiate and are concerned in this dissolution were not revealed by the scalpel.
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  • The study of comparative pathology, yet in an inchoate stage, and of embryology, illuminated and enlarged biological conceptions, both normal and abnormal; and the ens reale subsistens in corpore disappeared for ever - at any rate from physiology and medicine.
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  • Fortunately Germany, which at the beginning of the century was delivered over to Brownism and vitalism and was deaf to Bichat, was rescued from this sort of barrenness by the brilliant experimental work of Claude Bernard and Pasteur in France - work which, as regards the attenuated virus, was a development of that of Edward Jenner, and indeed of Schwann, Robert Koch worthily following Pasteur with his work on the bacillus of anthrax and with his discovery of that of tuberculosis; and by the cellular doctrine and abundant labours in pathology of Virchow.
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  • By his researches on the migration of the white corpuscles of the blood Cohnheim, on the bases laid by Virchow, brought the processes of inflammation within the scope of the normal, seeing in them but a modification of normal processes under perturbations of relatively external incidence; even the formation of abscess was thus brought by him within the limits of perversion of processes not differing essentially from those of health; and "new formations," "plastic exudations," and other discontinuous origins of an "essential" pathology, fell into oblivion.
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  • Together, then, with the necessary multiplication of specialism, one of the chief lessons of the latter moiety of the 19th century was the unity of medicine in all its branches - a unity strengthened rather than weakened by special researches, such as those into "medical" and "surgical" pathology, which are daily making more manifest the absurdity of the distinction.
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  • Hygiene became for pathology what "milieu" is for physiology.
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  • In 1871 the Anatomical Act of 1832 was amended; and in 1876 the Vivisection Act was passed, a measure which investigators engaged in the medical sciences of physiology and pathology resented as likely to prevent in England the advance of knowledge of living function, both in its normal balance and in its aberrancies, and moreover to slacken that habit of incessant reference of propositions to verification which is as necessary to the clinical observer as to the experimentalist.
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  • ab, from or away, errare; to wander), a deviation or wandering, especially used in the figurative sense: as in ethics, a deviation from the truth; in pathology, a mental derangement; in zoology and botany, abnormal development or structure.
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  • For the scientific aspects of the processes involved in life and its cessation see Biology, Physiology, Pathology, and allied articles; and for the consideration of the prolongation of life see Longevity.
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  • XXoopos, pale green), the botanical term for loss of colour in a plant-organ, a sign of disease; also in medicine, a form of anaemia (see BLOOD: Pathology).
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  • In pathology a great name was left by Nils Rosen von Rosenstein (1706-1773), in navigation by Admiral Fredrik Henrik of Chapman (d.
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  • (For the pathology see Digestive Organs.) Recently considerable advance has been made in our knowledge of dysentery, and it appears that there are two distinct types of the disease: (1) amoebic dysentery, which is due to the presence of the amoeba histolytica (of Schaudinn) in the intestine; (2) bacillary dysentery, which has as causative agent two separate bacteria, (a) that discovered by Shiga in Japan, (b) that discovered by Flexner in the Philippine Islands.
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  • In the herbals and older treatises on materia medica and therapeutics no explanation is usually offered of the action of medicines, and in such works as that of Cullen (1789) only a few of the more obvious actions are occasionally explained according to the current theories of physiology and pathology.
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  • Reassess risk factors for serious pathology (see red flags). Reassess presence of nerve root pain.
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  • Plant Pathology is an applied science, at some point research findings should be put into a practical context.
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  • Anterior cingulate pathology has been implicated in emotional disorders such as depression and schizophrenia.
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  • We can not turn back the clock to the days when extension pathology was generously resourced.
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  • The lesions enable you to identify the underlying pathology, helping to make your differentials more precise.
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  • Adult Pathology 40yr laborer old with bilateral varus knees, bone on bone.
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  • Scott recently retired after a 30-year career in the Air Force, while Paula retired from a career in medical Speech-Language Pathology.
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  • You must need at least one of the following: intermittent (and not full-time) skilled nursing care; physical therapy or speech-language pathology services; or continued occupational therapy.
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  • Fishback, who is also the department chair of the Anatomy and Pathology departments at EVMS.
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  • Dr. Fishback received her MD in 1970 from Indiana University, and completed residencies in Internal Medicine at Tulane University in New Orleans, and in Anatomic Pathology at the University of Texas Health Science Center.
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  • Dr. Fishback is board certified in Sleep Medicine, Pathology, and Internal Medicine, and is accepting new patients.
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  • Peters. Skeletal Muscle: Pathology, Diagnosis, and Management of Disease, 3rd ed. Edited by Kenneth J.
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  • The outcome of coughs due to a more serious underlying disease depends on the pathology of that disease.
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  • Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontics 97 (January 2004): 23-7.
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  • Since there is no evidence of family pathology being the cause of most cases of mutism, this type of therapy is not necessary in most cases.
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  • Ippolito, E., et al. "The influence of treatment on the pathology of club foot.
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  • J., et al. Handbook on Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.
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  • It is named for Sir Charles Bell, a Scottish surgeon who, over two hundred years ago, did much of the earliest research regarding the anatomy and pathology of the cranial nerves.
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  • Endocrine Pathology 11, no. 1 (2004): 69-76.
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  • In the early and mid-twentieth century, the prevailing view of runaways underwent a partial shift in emphasis from crime to pathology.
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  • Secondary dysmenorrhea is defined as menstrual pain due to pelvic pathology.
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  • American Journal of Clinical Pathology 121, Supplement (June 2004): S71-S80.
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  • Journal of Cutaneous Pathology 29 (2002): 207-14.
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  • Thus it was, partly because the habit of acceptance of authority, waning but far from extirpated, dictated to the clinical observer what he should see; partly because the eye of the clinical observer lacked that special training which the habit and influence of experimental verification alone can give, that physicians, even acute and practised physicians, failed to see many and many a symptomatic series which went through its evolutions conspicuously enough, and needed for its appreciation no unknown aids or methods of research, nor any further advances of pathology.
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  • von Barensprung (1822-1865) and Ludwig Traube (1818-1876) did the same service; but it is to the work of Karl August Wunderlich (1815-1877) that we owe the establishment of this means of precision as a method of regular observation both in pathology and in clinical medicine.
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  • It is proper to point out here how intimately a pathology thus regenerated modified current conceptions of disease, in the linking of disease to oscillations of health, and the regarding many diseases as modifications of the normal set up by the impingement of external causes; not a few of which indeed may be generated within the body itself - "autogenetic poisoning."
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  • By his eminent labours in cellular pathology, Virchow, and Metchnikoff later, gave the last blow to the mere humoral pathology which, after an almost unchallenged prevalence for some two thousand years, now finds a resting-place only in our nurseries.
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  • Now the cellular pathology of the blood, investigated by the aid of modern staining methods, is as important as that of the solid organs; no clinical investigator - indeed, apart from research, no practitioner at this day - can dispense with examination of the blood for purposes of diagnosis; its coagulability and the kinds and the variations of the cells it contains being evidence of many def i nitely morbid states of the body.
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  • By the approach of skilled pathologists to the clinical wards, a link is forged between practitioners and the men of science who pursue pathology disinterestedly.
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  • While pathology then, which is especially the "science of medicine," was winning territory on one side from physiology,.
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  • As regards infections, it is not to be supposed that our knowledge of these maladies has been advanced by pathology and bacteriology only.
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  • Lockhart Clarke (1817-1880), one of the earliest investigators of nervous pathology, the improvement of the compound microscope had not attained the achromatism, the penetration and the magnification which have since enabled J.
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  • The life of these insane patients is as bright, and the treatment as humane, as a barrack life can be; but of science, whether in pathology or medicine, there can be little.
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  • His knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathology was necessarily defective, the respect in which the dead body was held by the Greeks precluding him from practising dissection; thus we find him writing of the tissues without distinguishing between the various textures of the body, confusing arteries, veins and nerves, and speaking vaguely of the muscles as " flesh."
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  • His most important scientific work is his Zoonomia (1794-1796), which contains a system of pathology, and a treatise on generation, in which he, in the words of his famous grandson, Charles Robert Darwin, "anticipated the views and erroneous grounds of opinions of Lamarck."
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  • Their primary object is to gratify the pleasure most persons take in viewing at close range the curious and beautiful living products of nature, but they serve also as means of instruction in natural history, providing material for museums and for investigations in comparative anatomy and pathology, while they may have a commercial value as pleasure resorts, or as show grounds for the display of animals that have been imported or bred for sale.
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  • For historical pathology the examination of mummies and skeletons is yielding good results.
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  • After the gift of $500,000 by Andrew Carnegie there were established in 1909 the Andrew Carnegie School of Engineering, the James Madison School of Law, the James Monroe School of International Law, the James Wilson School of Political Economy, the Edgar Allan Poe School of English and the Walter Reed School of Pathology.
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  • In this account of the development of an independent, active and intelligent being from the stage where man like the Dryad is a portion of the natural life around him, Hegel has combined what may be termed a physiology and pathology of the mind - a subject far wider than that of ordinary psychologies, and one of vast intrinsic importance.
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  • The word, more usually in the Latin form "pleonasmus," is used in pathology of an abnormal growth or formation.
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  • Toxic substances have also been separated by corresponding methods from the bodies of those who have died of certain diseases, and the action of such substances on animals is in some cases an important point in the pathology of the disease.
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  • a demonstrator of anatomy, and was assistant surgeon to King's College Hospital for several years; and in the autumn of 1847 he was appointed surgeon and lecturer on pathology at his old school, St Thomas's, where, with progressive changes, he continued to remain an officer.
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