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pasteur

pasteur

pasteur Sentence Examples

  • Dumas, a native of the Alais district, where the disease was rampant, urged Pasteur to undertake its investigation.

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  • Shortly afterwards the Pasteur family removed to Arbois, where Louis attended the Ecole primaire, and later the college of that place.

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  • Pasteur one day visited a brewery containing both sound and unsound beer.

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  • LOUIS PASTEUR (1822-1895), French chemist, was born, on the 27th of December 1822, at Dole, Franche-Comte, where his father carried on the business of a tanner.

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  • The veteran Biot whose acquaintance Pasteur had made, was incredulous.

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  • Brown, who described experiments which were in disagreement with Pasteur's dictum.

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  • Pasteur's important researches mark an epoch in the technical aspect of fermentation.

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  • Pasteur first formulated the idea that bacteria are responsible for the diseases of fermented liquids; the corollary of this was a demand for pure yeast.

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  • He emphasized the opinion that yeast derived from one cell was of no good for top fermentation, and advocated Pasteur's method of purification.

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  • He became a member of the Academy of Medicine in 1863, and ten years afterwards entered the Academy of Sciences, of which he became perpetual secretary in 1889 in succession to Louis Pasteur.

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  • In the same year - apparently about June - he saw for the first time, and forthwith loved, the beautiful, intelligent and accomplished Mademoiselle Susan Curchod, daughter of the pasteur of Crassier.

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  • According to Louis Pasteur, about oth of the sugar transformed under ordinary conditions in the fermentation of grape juice and similar saccharine liquids into alcohol and other products becomes converted into glycerin.

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  • But here something (probably the examiner) was at fault, for a note was attached to Pasteur's diploma stating that he was only "mediocre" in chemistry.

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  • In those early days and early trials the dominant note of Pasteur's life was sounded.

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  • A few words of explanation concerning Pasteur's first research are necessary to give the key to all his future work.

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  • Pasteur proved that the inactivity of the one acid depended upon the fact that it was composed of two isomeric constituents: one the ordinary or dextrorotary acid, and the other a new acid, which possessed an equally powerful left-handed action.

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  • Thus at one step Pasteur gained a place of honour among the chemists of the day, and was immediately appointed professor of chemistry at the Faculte of Science at Strasburg, where he soon afterwards married Mlle Laurent, who proved herself to be a true and noble helpmeet.

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  • This was given in the most complete degree by Pasteur.

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  • "The chemical act of fermentation," writes Pasteur, "is essentially a correlative phenomenon of a vital act beginning and ending with it."

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  • But we may ask, as Pasteur did, Why does beer or milk become sour on exposure to ordinary air?

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  • The controversy on this question was waged with spirit on both sides; but in the end Pasteur came off victorious, and in a series of the most delicate and most intricate experimental researches he proved that when the atmospheric germs are absolutely excluded no changes take place.

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  • Pasteur was now the acknowledged head of the greatest chemical movement of the time, the recipient of honours both from his own country and abroad, and installed at the E.

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  • Not, however, was it without grave opposition from powerful friends in the Academy that Pasteur carried on his work.

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  • Biot - who loved and admired him as a son - publicly announced that his enterprise was chimerical and the problem insoluble; Dumas evidently thought so too, for he advised Pasteur not to spend more of his time on such a subject.

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  • To begin with a comparatively small, though not unimportant, matter, Pasteur's discoveries on fermentation inaugurated a new era in the brewing and wine-making industries.

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  • "There is no greater charm," says Pasteur, "for the investigator than to make new discoveries; but his pleasure is heightened when he sees that they have a direct application to practical life."

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  • Pasteur had the good fortune, and just reward, of seeing the results of his work applied to the benefit both of the human race and of the animal world.

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  • The first disease investigated by Pasteur was that of chicken cholera, an epidemic which destroyed io% of the French fowls; after the application of the preventive method the death-rate was reduced to below i %.

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  • The most interesting of Pasteur's investigations in preventive and curative medicine remains to be told.

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  • Nevertheless Pasteur was bold enough to try.

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  • Then, on the 14th of November 1888, the Institut Pasteur was founded.

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  • At the inauguration of the institute Pasteur closed his oration with the following words: "Two opposing laws seem to me now in contest.

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  • See Vie de Pasteur, by Rene Vallerey-Radot (Paris, 1900).

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  • Pasteur, J.

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  • In 1888 a school of sericulture was founded by the public debt administration for the rearing of silkworms according to the Pasteur method.

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  • Again, in the early years of the administration (1885), the Pasteur system of selection of silk-worms' eggs for the rearing of silkworms was introduced, and an " Institute of Sericulture " on modern lines was erected (1888) at Brusa for gratuitous instruction in silk-rearing to students from all parts of the empire.

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  • Voltaire published his Le Cafe, ou l'Ecossaise (1760), Londres (really Geneva), as a translation from the work of Mr Hume, described as Pasteur de l'eglise d'Edimbourg, but Home seems to have taken no notice of the mystification.

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  • Of the greatest importance is the alcoholic fermentation brought about by yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae seu vini); this follows the equation CH120 6 =2C 2 H 6 0+2CO 2, Pasteur considering 94 to 95% of the sugar to be so changed.

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  • Pasteur's inoculation against hydrophobia is on the same principle.

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  • The names of Pasteur and Lister will descend to posterity as those of two of the greatest figures in the annals of medical science, and indeed of science in general, during the 19th century.

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  • Pasteur (1895), x.

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  • It was the concepts derived from the experimental methods of Harvey, Lavoisier, Liebig, Claude Bernard, Helmholtz, Darwin, Pasteur, Lister and others which, directly or indirectly, trained the eyes of clinicians to observe more closely and accurately; and not of clinicians only, but also of pathologists, such as Matthew Baillie, Cruveilhier, Rokitansky, Bright, Virchowto name but a few of those who, with (as must be admitted) new facilities for necropsies, began to pile upon us discoveries in morbid anatomy and histology.

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  • In pathology, indeed, Virchow's (1821-1902) influence in the transfiguration of this branch of science may almost be compared to that of Darwin and Pasteur in their respective domains.

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  • As the prevalence of the conceptions signified and inspired by the word "phlogiston" kept alive ontological notions of disease, so the dissipation of vitalistic conceptions in the field of physics prepared men's minds in pathology for the new views opened by the discoveries of Pasteur on the side of pathogeny, and of J.

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  • Medicine and surgery are but two aspects of one art; Pasteur shed light on both surgery and medicine, and when Lister, his disciple, penetrated into the secrets of wound fevers and septicaemia, he illuminated surgery and medicine alike.

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  • The identity of the formulae and osazones of d-mannose and d-glucose showed that the stereochemical differences were situated at the carbon atom adjacent to the aldehyde group. Fischer applied a method indicated by Pasteur in converting dextro into laevo-tartaric acid; he found that both d-mannonic and d-gluconic acids (the latter is yielded by glucose on oxidation) were mutually convertible by heating with quinoline under pressure at 140°.

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  • The first filter which was more or less completely impermeable to bacteria was the Pasteur-Chamberland, which was devised in Pasteur's laboratory, and is made of dense biscuit porcelain.

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  • and the Prophetic Apocalypse" (1900); Benazech, "Le Prophetisme chretienne depuis les origines jusqu'au pasteur d'Hermas," Thesis, (Paris, 1901).

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  • In 1865 Pasteur undertook a Government commission for the investigation of the malady.

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  • Pasteur brought out the fact that the malady had existed from remote periods and in many unsuspected localities.

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  • The cure proposed by Pasteur was simply to take care that the stock whence graine was obtained should be healthy, and the offspring would then be healthy also.

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  • Pasteur showed that the origin of the disease proceeded from microscopic organisms called ferments and vitrios.

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  • He also studied the colouring matters of leaves and flowers, the composition of bone, cerebral matter and other animal substances, and the processes of fermentation, in regard to the nature of which he was an opponent of Pasteur's views.

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  • The group has attained an importance of late even beyond that to which it was brought by Pasteur's researches on alcoholic fermentation, chiefly owing to the exact results of the investigations of Hansen, who first applied the methods of pure cultures to the study of these organisms, and showed that many of the inconsistencies hitherto existing in the literature were due to the coexistence in the cultures of several species or races of yeasts morphologically almost indistinguishable, but physiologically very different.

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  • Pasteur prosecuted his investigations into the silkworm disease at Alais, and the town has dedicated a bust to his memory.

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  • An antitoxic serum has been prepared from horses by the Institut Pasteur in France, but has not met with success.

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  • A commission, consisting of Sir Lawrence Jenkins, Lieut.-Colonel Bomford, M.D., principal of the Medical College, Calcutta, and Major Semple, R.A.M.C., director of the Pasteur Institute, Kasauli, was appointed by the government of India to inquire into the disaster.

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  • Pasteur filled glass tubes entirely with new wine and then sealed them up. It was found that wine so treated remained unchanged in taste and flavour for years.

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  • It was found by Pasteur that by heating wine out of contact with air to about 66° C. the various germs causing wine maladies could be checked in their action or destroyed.

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  • Pasteur, Ann., 1853, 88, p. 212); by heating tartaric or racemic acid for some time with water to 165° C.; by the oxidation of laevulose; and by the oxidation of phenol or maleic acid with an alkaline solution of potassium permanganate (0.

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  • Of late years enormous impulse has been given to our knowledge of the causation of disease by microbes, through the works of Gaspard, who injected putrid matter into the veins of a living animal; by Villemin, who discovered that tuberculosis is infective; by Davaine; and especially by Pasteur, Koch and others too numerous to mention, who have worked, and are still working, at the microbic causation of disease with marvellous success.

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  • Pasteur found that the germs of anthrax could be cultivated outside the body and their virulence weakened either by growing them at too high a temperature or in an unsuitable medium.

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  • When Pasteur in 1857 showed that the lactic fermentation depends on the presence of an organism, it was already known from the researches of Schwann (1837) and Helmholtz (1843) that fermentation and putrefaction are intimately connected with the presence of organisms derived from the air, and that the preservation of putrescible substances depends on this principle.

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  • In 1862 Pasteur placed it beyond reasonable doubt that the ammoniacal fermentation of urea is due to the action of a minute Schizomycete; in 1864 this was confirmed by van Tieghem, and in 1874 by Cohn, who named the organism Micrococcus ureae.

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  • Pasteur and Cohn also pointed out that putrefaction is but a special case of fermentation, and before 1872 the doctrines of Pasteur were established with respect to Schizomycetes.

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  • In 1862 Pasteur repeated and extended such experiments, and paved the way for a complete explanation of the anomalies; Cohn in 1872 published confirmatory results; and it became clear that no putrefaction can take place without bacteria or some other living organism.

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  • Such vague notions began to take more definite shape as the ferment theory of Cagniard de la Tour (1828), Schwann (1837) and Pasteur made way, especially in the hands of the last-named savant.

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  • Rayer in 1850 and Davaine had observed the bacilli in the blood of animals dead of anthrax (splenic fever), and Pollender discovered them anew in 1855 In 1863, imbued with ideas derived from Pasteur's researches on fermentation, Davaine reinvestigated the matter, and put forth the opinion that the anthrax bacilli caused the splenic fever; this was proved to result from inoculation.

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  • In 1870 Pasteur had proved that a disease of silkworms was due to an organism of the nature of a bacterium; and in 1871 Oertel showed that a Micrococcus already known to exist in diphtheria is intimately concerned in producing that disease.

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  • About 1880 Pasteur first showed that Bacillus anthracis cultivated in chicken broth, with plenty of oxygen and at a temperature of 42-43° C., lost its virulence after a few " generations," and ceased to kill even the mouse; Toussaint and Chauveau confirmed, and others have extended the observations.

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  • C. Zoogloea stage of a Micrococcus, forming a close membrane on infusion - Pasteur's Mycoderma.

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  • In effect the urea first becomes carbonate of ammonia by a simple hydrolysis brought about by bacteria, more and more definitely known since Pasteur, van Tieghem and Cohn first described them.

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  • 52, p. 455; Maze, Annales de l'Institut Pasteur, t.

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  • The demonstration by Pasteur that definite diseases could be produced by bacteria, proved a great stimulus to research in the etiology of infective conditions, and the result Historical was a rapid advance in human knowledge.

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  • Greenfield in Great Britain, and Pasteur, Toussaint and Chauveau in France, were pioneers.

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  • In the laboratory of Pasteur probably the first filter which successfully accomplished this object was produced.

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  • Pasteur that the occurrence of abiogenesis in the microscopic world was disproved as much as its occurrence in the macroscopic world.

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  • p. 781 (1907); Skschivan and Stefansky in Berliner klinische Wochenschrift (February II, 1907); Vaillard and Dopter, on the treatment by antidysenteric serum, Annales de l'Institut Pasteur, No.

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  • Pasteur, Ann.Chim.

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  • Duclaux, director of the Pasteur Institute at Paris), led him to translate her poems into French in 1888.

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  • Catch a cable car at the station at 520 Avenida Pasteur, price 30 reals, and scale the great hunk of rock.

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  • Sanofi pasteur has signed a contract with the Australian government for the supply of vaccine in the event of a pandemic influenza outbreak.

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  • Immediately transfer plasma to a labeled glass or plastic tube using a disposable glass pasteur pipette.

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  • Pasteur believed that they caused the putrefaction of the beer not that they were the result of the putrefaction.

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  • Using two kits, the Abbot and Diagnostic Pasteur, in one study, p24 was detected transiently in 12/14 kidney recipients.

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  • tercentenary celebrations of 1884, Louis Pasteur visited Edinburgh University.

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  • Fermentation, according to Pasteur, was caused by the growth and multiplication of unicellular organisms out of contact with free oxygen, under which circumstance they acquire the power of taking oxygen from chemical compounds in the medium in which they are growing.

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  • Brown writes: "If for the theory ` life without air ' is substituted the consideration that yeast cells can use oxygen in the manner of ordinary aerobic fungi, and probably do require it for the full completion of their lifehistory, but that the exhibition of their fermentative functions is independent of their environment with regard to free oxygen, it will be found that there is nothing contradictory in Pasteur's experiments to such a hypothesis."

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  • In 1879 C. Nageli formulated his well-known molecularphysical theory, which supported Liebig's chemical theory on the one hand and Pasteur's physiological hypothesis on the other: "Fermentation is the transference of the condition of motion of the molecules, atomic groups and atoms of the various compounds constituting the living plasma, to the fermenting material, in consequence of which equilibrium in the molecules of the latter is destroyed, the result being their disintegration."

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  • Thus, Pasteur showed that Penicillium glaucum, when grown in an aqueous solution of ammonium racemate, decomposed the dextro-tartrate, leaving the laevotartrate, and the solution which was originally inactive to polarized light became dextro-rotatory.

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  • The remarkable discoveries of Fischer and Buchner to a great extent confirm Traube's views, and reconcile Liebig's and Pasteur's theories.

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  • In this connexion Pasteur showed that ioo parts of cane sugar on inversion gave 105.4 parts of invert sugar, which, when fermented, yielded 51.1 parts alcohol, 49.4 carbonic acid, o.

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  • The antiseptic method of treating wounds (see Surgery) was introduced by Lord Lister, and was an outcome of Pasteur's germ theory of putrefaction.

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  • To begin with, Pasteur, in studying the malady in dogs, came to the conclusion that the virus had its seat in the nerve centres, and he proved that the injection of a portion of the matter of the spinal column of a rabid dog into the body of a healthy one produces in the latter with certainty the symptoms of rabies.

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  • Mention need only be made of Pasteur's chief works, as follows: Etudes sur le y in (1866), Etudes sur le vinaigre (,868), Etudes sur la maladie des vers a soie (1870), Etudes sur la biere (1876).

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  • Inaugurated by Pasteur's early work, progress in this subject was first marked by the discovery of the parasite of anthrax and of those organisms productive of fowl-cholera and septic disease.

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  • Fortunately Germany, which at the beginning of the century was delivered over to Brownism and vitalism and was deaf to Bichat, was rescued from this sort of barrenness by the brilliant experimental work of Claude Bernard and Pasteur in France - work which, as regards the attenuated virus, was a development of that of Edward Jenner, and indeed of Schwann, Robert Koch worthily following Pasteur with his work on the bacillus of anthrax and with his discovery of that of tuberculosis; and by the cellular doctrine and abundant labours in pathology of Virchow.

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  • Medicine and surgery are but two aspects of one art; Pasteur shed light on both surgery and medicine, and when Lister, his disciple, penetrated into the secrets of wound fevers and septicaemia, he illuminated surgery and medicine alike, and, in the one sphere as in the other, co-operated in the destruction of the idea of "essential fevers" and of inflammation as an "entity."

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  • The identity of the formulae and osazones of d-mannose and d-glucose showed that the stereochemical differences were situated at the carbon atom adjacent to the aldehyde group. Fischer applied a method indicated by Pasteur in converting dextro into laevo-tartaric acid; he found that both d-mannonic and d-gluconic acids (the latter is yielded by glucose on oxidation) were mutually convertible by heating with quinoline under pressure at 140°.

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  • Pasteur (1901), 15, p. 673, 2 pls.; (24) idem, " Des Trypanosomes des poissons," Arch.

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  • Pasteur established (I) that the corpuscles are the special characteristic of the disease, and that these invariably manifest themselves, if not in earlier stages, then in the mature moths; (2) that the corpuscles are parasites, and not only the sign but the cause of the disease; and (3) that the disease manifests itself by heredity, by contagion with diseased worms, and by the eating of leaves on which corpuscles are spread.

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  • It was found by Pasteur that by heating wine out of contact with air to about 66° C. the various germs causing wine maladies could be checked in their action or destroyed.

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  • Pasteur, Ann., 1853, 88, p. 212); by heating tartaric or racemic acid for some time with water to 165° C.; by the oxidation of laevulose; and by the oxidation of phenol or maleic acid with an alkaline solution of potassium permanganate (0.

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  • About 1880 Pasteur first showed that Bacillus anthracis cultivated in chicken broth, with plenty of oxygen and at a temperature of 42-43° C., lost its virulence after a few " generations," and ceased to kill even the mouse; Toussaint and Chauveau confirmed, and others have extended the observations.

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  • (July 1905); Ford in Journal of Tropical Medicine (July 15, 1904); Korentchewsky in Bulletin de l'Institut Pasteur (February 1905); Shiga: Osler and M'Crae's System of Medicine, vol.

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  • Absence of rotary power when asymmetric carbon atoms are present, may be caused by an internal compensation within the molecule as with the inactive tartaric acid (mesotartaric acid), or may be due to the fact that the compound is an equimolecular mixture of leftand right-hand varieties, this being the case with racemic acid that was broken by Louis Pasteur into laevoand dextro-tartaric acid (see Stereo-Isomerism).

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  • Louis Pasteur came along around this same time and proffered the germ theory of disease and a vaccine for rabies.

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  • If you were a scientist in Pasteur's time, you had more resources.

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  • On July 6 1885, Pasteur tested his pioneering rabies vaccine on man for the first time.

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  • During the tercentenary celebrations of 1884, Louis Pasteur visited Edinburgh University.

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  • Louis Pasteur first observed garlic's antibacterial qualities in 1858, and until World War II is was routinely used to prevent gangrene in patients with infected wounds.

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  • Louis Pasteur noted its antibacterial qualities in 1858.

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  • The French scientist Louis Pasteur developed the first vaccine against rabies.

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  • In 1857 Pasteur decisively proved that fermentation was a physiological process, for he showed that the yeast which produced fermentation was no dead mass, as assumed by Liebig, but consisted of living organisms capable of growth and multiplication.

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  • The Bacterium acidi lacti described by Pasteur decomposes milk sugar into lactic acid.

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  • He agreed with Pasteur that the presence of living cells is essential to the transformation of sugar into alcohol, but dissented from the view that the process occurs within the cell.

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  • Although the direct object of Pasteur was to prove a negative, yet it was on these experiments that sterilization as known to us was developed.

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  • Liebig and Pasteur were in agreement on the point that fermentation is intimately connected with the presence of yeast in the fermenting liquid, but their explanations concerning the mechanism of fermentation were quite opposed.

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  • Pasteur found that, when cane sugar was fermented by yeast, 49.4% of carbonic acid and 51.1% of alcohol were produced; with expressed yeast juice cane sugar yields 47% of carbonic acid and 47.7% of alcohol.

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