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passion

passion

passion Sentence Examples

  • Jackson possessed a true passion for music.

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  • There was a passion about her.

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  • His dominating passion is his love for children.

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  • At first she was too stunned to respond, and then passion hit her like the fiery breath of a dragon.

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  • Her passion for writing letters and putting her thoughts upon paper grows more intense.

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  • There was passion and a deep longing she innately understood only she was able to fill.

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  • She held herself as erect, told everyone her opinion as candidly, loudly, and bluntly as ever, and her whole bearing seemed a reproach to others for any weakness, passion, or temptation--the possibility of which she did not admit.

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  • She'd wanted a second night with him since the first, and the passion of his kiss reminded her of how incredible it was to be the center of his world.

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  • I owe this passion to my high school friend Jason.

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  • She wasn't going to fall under the spell of Gabriel's strong body, his passion, his taste.

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  • He has a passion for giving audiences, but he does not like talking himself and can't do it, as you will see.

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  • The limestone and marble foyer was lined with artifacts, a sign of Tamer's passion for all things ancient.

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  • When his hands found her waist and drew her close, passion came without warning, completely consuming her body and soul.

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  • Pulling his head down, she met warm lips again and surrendered to the passion he always managed to arouse.

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  • It turns out that, even when doing what you love, both passion and profit matter—but that particular piece of wisdom came later with age.

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  • They released the heartache they had been holding in and were filled with unencumbered passion, melting into each other as they had the first time, but now neither held any secrets, and neither needed to maintain control.

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  • A regular passion flower.

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  • A regular passion flower.

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  • The passion welling up in him was palpable.

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  • The fire flickered feebly, its passion curbed by time as well.

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  • What lit that fire of passion wasn't the romancing – or at least if it did, romance wore a different face for her.

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  • Anger is a passion, Carmen.

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  • The kiss started out playful, but passion put an end to that.

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  • She'd wanted to return home since she arrived, yet when presented with the enormity of her importance in her new world … when she realized how incredible it really would be to have a man like A'Ran in her bed every night … when she saw he was capable of passion … when she found out an entire planet full of people would die if she left … She couldn't help the tears at such a thought.

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  • All this time they had waited, pushing away passion and desire.

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  • During this fast they abstain from the gratification of every appetite and passion whatever.

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  • Any new happening outside the mundane assortment of drug cases, burglaries, domestic disturbances or a semi-annual Saturday night passion killing came as a welcome change.

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  • His passion for wine and women was almost as well known as his learning.

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  • She was to a considerable extent selftaught; and her love of reading made her acquainted first with Plutarch - a passion for which author she continued to cherish throughout her life - thereafter with Bossuet, Massillon, and authors of a like stamp, and finally with Montesquieu, Voltaire and Rousseau.

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  • A microscopic voice inside warned her to stop, but desire put uncontrolled passion into her response.

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  • They clung to each other, molding their bodies as one until the raging fire of passion consumed her.

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  • "I made this awkward again, didn't I?" she said, embarrassed once more by the passion she put into her speech.

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  • His passion for the Emperor had cooled somewhat in Moscow.

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  • Fortunately he went to no perilous lengths; the worst we hear of is a passion for gaming.

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  • They're probably messing up the sheets in a fury of passion as we speak.

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  • Countess Mary was jealous of this passion of her husband's and regretted that she could not share it; but she could not understand the joys and vexations he derived from that world, to her so remote and alien.

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  • It was the passion of full arousal.

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  • He entered her at the same time he bit her, and her world exploded into hot desire and need so intense, she thought his passion would consume her.

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  • She loved the combination of his passion and gentled strength.

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  • He entered her at the same time he bit her, and her world exploded into hot desire and need so intense, she thought his passion would consume her.

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  • Once the fire of passion was gone, it was embarrassing.

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  • When passion brought a moan to her lips, he finally lifted her into his arms and carried her to their bedroom.

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  • The scene of the legend now shifts to Rome, where Diocletian falls in love with a lovely nun named Ripsime; she, rather than gratify his passion, flees with her abbess Gaiana and several priests to Armenia.

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  • On the one hand there is fear and regret for the loss of the whole edifice constructed through the ages, on the other is the passion for destruction.

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  • She didn't remember his passion, the way he tasted and smelled and felt, or the movement of his muscles beneath taut, smooth skin.

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  • "And now, in token of candor, I ask you to reveal to me your chief passion," said the latter.

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  • She wasn't expecting his kiss or the passion behind it.

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  • Darian's response was instant, his passion and need matching her own.

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  • He thought he'd feel anger and a familiar passion for the first and only woman he'd ever made love to.

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  • He thought he'd feel anger and a familiar passion for the first and only woman he'd ever made love to.

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  • He returned her kiss with equal passion, pulling away only when they both were short of breath.

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  • She returned the kiss, thrilled by his passion and her own mounting hunger.

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  • During Thy passion she alone did not forsake Thee.

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  • Brady made love to her with passion and tenderness, a combination that made her fall even harder for the side of him that had kept her company for weeks and protected her.

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  • The majority of his body was moderately awash with passion and Ethel was as warm and soft as ever.

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  • Marriage was supposed to cool that passion, or so they said.

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  • Minos, instead of sacrificing' it, spared its life, and Poseidon, as a punishment, inspired Pasiphae with an unnatural passion for it.

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  • passion for Homer, however he may have been disposed to greyer philosophic theory.

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  • To a man not swayed by passion that welfare is never certain, but he who commits such a crime always knows just where that welfare lies.

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  • Dozing after his insatiable passion, she roused herself when one of Gabriel's hands moved down her body.

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  • Dozing after his insatiable passion, she roused herself when one of Gabriel's hands moved down her body.

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  • "That passion which more than all others caused you to waver on the path of virtue," said the Mason.

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  • Had he changed his mind again now that passion wasn't ruling his mind?

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  • Maybe it was always like that on honeymoons, but the passion that she assumed would go away merely intensified.

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  • Franck combined the humanist's passion for freedom with the mystic's devotion to the religion of the spirit.

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  • Franck combined the humanist's passion for freedom with the mystic's devotion to the religion of the spirit.

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  • In the one case as in the other, on both sides the struggle provokes passion and stifles truth.

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  • Darian kissed her long and deep, his passion flying through her, leaving her breathless and aching for more than a kiss.

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  • We became friends because we both have a passion for food and wine.

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  • She had chosen him partly for his ability to assume control while keeping everyone's best interest in mind... and partly because he aroused a passion she never knew existed.

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  • Exhaustion winked and said goodbye, leaving only passion to direct her.

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  • But Dean knew reality sel­dom replaces the passion of panic thinking.

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  • The cathedral contains other 14th-century and early Renaissance paintings, the former including some Passion scenes, the only certain work of Barna da Siena, and some fine choir stalls.

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  • At Ecbatana the death of Hephaestion for a time plunged Alexander into a passion of mourning.

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  • His kiss began softly, slowly gaining passion.

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  • His kiss had been an act of aggression, not passion.

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  • Their friendship had been destroyed by one night of passion.

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  • He wore her – a goddess! – out with his lovemaking and passion.

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  • I admire your spirit and your passion.

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  • If he channeled that fire, he might find he liked her defiant passion.

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  • You mean you'd start blasting away on the spur of the moment— in the heat of passion.

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  • The first was to maintain enough control to avoid crushing them in the heat of passion.

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  • They began a surreal dance of body and mind that left them both dizzy with passion.

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  • Apparently he mistook her breathless state as an indication of passion.

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  • His kiss was ardent and she returned it with equal passion.

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  • Her heart was in everything she did, and she'd loved him back with both tenderness and passion.

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  • His small social security check was barely enough to provide spending money and keep him sup­plied with paperback mysteries, his passion.

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  • Yet she was always trying to conceal that passion.

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  • Well, that's one way to stave off passion.

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  • It was a long lingering kiss that brought her to full passion.

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  • Finally he drew her close and participated in the passion.

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  • What caused his second thoughts – a moment of passion?

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  • Don't mistake gratitude for passion.

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  • She kissed him hungrily, with the passion she felt.

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  • Xander matched her passion.

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  • After making love to her with such tenderness and passion.

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  • Lydgate had a consuming passion for literature, and it was probably that he might indulge this taste more fully that in 1 434 he retired from the priorate of Hatfield Broadoak (or Hatfield Regis), to which he had been appointed in June 1423.

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  • Foscolo and Leopardi, or a passion.

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  • It tells men to " obey reason " and crush passion, or to live " according to nature."

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  • The activity and love of adventure, which became a passion for two or three generations in Spain and Portugal, spread to other, countries.

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  • Four years afterwards he made his first appearance as an author with an elegy called Fame's Memorial, or the Earl of Devonshire deceased, and dedicated to the widow of the earl (Charles Blount, Lord Mountjoy, "coronized," to use Ford's expression, by King James in 1603 for his services in Ireland) - a lady who would have been no unfitting heroine for one of his own tragedies of lawless passion, the famous Penelope, formerly Lady Rich.

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  • The Queen, or the Excellency of the Sea, a play of inverted passion, containing some fine sensuous lines, printed in 1653 by Alexander Singhe for private performance, has been recently edited by W.

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  • This different treatment shows the feeling of the poet - the feeling for which he seeks to evoke our inmost sympathy - to oscillate between the belief that an awful crime brings with it its awful punishment (and it is sickening to observe how the argument by which the Friar persuades Annabella to forsake her evil courses mainly appeals to the physical terrors of retribution), and the notion that there is something fatal, something irresistible, and therefore in a sense self-justified, in so dominant a passion.

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  • It is difficult to allow the appositeness of this special illustration; on the other hand, Ford has even in this case shown his art of depicting sensual passion without grossness of expression; for the exception in Annabella's language to Soranzo seems to have a special intention, and is true to the pressure of the situation and the revulsion produced by it in a naturally weak and yielding mind.

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  • Ford owes his position among English dramatists to the intensity of his passion, in particular scenes and passages where the character, the author and the reader are alike lost in the situation and in the sentiment evoked by it; and this gift is a supreme dramatic gift.

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  • Already the desire to make his country a great naval power was becoming his ruling passion, and when he found by experience that the White Sea, Russia's sole maritime outlet, had great practical inconveniences as a naval base, he revived the project of getting a firm footing on the shores of the Black Sea or the Baltic. At first he gave the preference to the former, and with the aid of a flotilla of small craft, constructed on a tributary of the Don, he succeeded in capturing Azov from the Turks.

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  • The government had done wisely in obscuring the passion for democratic ideals by an appeal to Russian chauvinism, an appeal soon to bear fruit in disuniting the revolutionary parties.

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  • (6) But, since the divine injunction had been" Do this in remembrance of me,"the sacrifice was immediately followed by a commemoration of the passion of Christ, and that again by an invocation of the Holy Spirit (epiclesis) that He would make the bread and wine to become the body and blood of Christ.

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  • They have been surmised as originating as early as 1523; but there is nothing to prove that Henry's passion was anterior to the proceedings taken for the divorce in May 1527, the celebrated love letters being undated.

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  • of the 16th of August 1527, 2 during the absence in France of Wolsey, who, not blinded by passion like Henry, naturally opposed the undesirable alliance, and was negotiating a marriage with Renee, daughter of Louis XII.

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  • There were soon signs that Henry's affection, which had before been a genuine passion, had cooled or ceased.

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  • His first introduction to the historic scenes the study of which afterwards formed the passion of his life took place in 1751, when, while along with his father visiting a friend in Wiltshire, he discovered in the library " a common book, the continuation of Echard's Roman History."

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  • Villemain finds in it " peu de vues, nulle originalite surtout, mais une grande passion litteraire, l'amour des recherches savantes et du beau langage."

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  • For pure mathematics he had a special gift - almost a passion.

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  • French Judaism was thus in a sense more human if less humane than the Spanish variety; the latter produced thinkers, statesmen, poets and scientists; the former, men with whom the Talmud was a passion, men of robuster because of more naïve and concentrated piety.

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  • It is clear, however that he did not share the "passion" of his colleagues for "peace with honour," clear also that he wholly misread the intentions of the European powers in the event of war.

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  • An erroneous derivation of the word pascha from the Greek ircthx iv, " to suffer," thus connected with the sufferings or passion of the Lord, is given by some of the Fathers of the Church, as Irenaeus, Tertullian and others, who were ignorant of Hebrew.

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  • The severe impartiality of the sacred historian has concealed no feature in this dark picture, - the brutal passion of Amnon, the shameless counsel of the wily Jonadab, the " black scowl " 1 that rested on the face of Absalom through two long years of meditated revenge, the panic of the court when the blow was struck and Amnon was assassinated in the midst of his brethren.

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  • In the prose version, Lancelot, from his first appearance at court, conceives a passion for the queen, who is very considerably his senior, his birth taking place some time after her marriage to Arthur.

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  • In the pseudo-chronicles, the Historia of Geoffrey and the translations by Wace and Layamon, Lancelot does not appear at all; the queen's lover, whose guilty passion is fully returned, is Mordred.

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  • In the Golden Legend of Jacobus de Voragine (13th century) and the Mystbre de la Passion of Jean Michel (15th century) and Arnoul Greban (15th century), the story of Oedipus is associated with the name of Judas.

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  • They have a passion for fine clothes and ornaments, tricking themselves out with glass trinkets, rings and articles of ivory and horn.

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  • An end was put to these disorders only by the mutual agreement of the two contestants, alike horrified and exhausted by the fierce outburst of passion, in September 1905.

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  • In character Turgot was simple, honourable and upright, with a passion for justice and truth.

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  • The " economic man " has, on the other hand, been succeeded by another creation almost as monstrous, if his lineaments are to be supposed to be those of the ordinary individual - a man, that is, who regulates his life in accordance with Gossen's Law of Satiety, and whose main passion is to discover a money measure of his motives.

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  • The news of the strengthening of the British army and navy lately announced in the king's speech had perhaps annoyed him; but seeing that his outbursts of passion were nearly always the result of calculation - he once stated, pointing to his chin, that temper only mounted that high with him - his design, doubtless, was to set men everywhere talking about the perfidy of Albion.

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  • Talk in this Ossian-like vein showed that Napoleon's brain no longer worked clearly: it was a victim to his egotism and passion.

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  • By this time, too, he had conceived a passion for the perils and adventures of warfare.

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  • The remaining six, when, where, action, passion, position and habit, are relative and subordinate (formae assistentes).

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  • The ship to which he was appointed was ordered to China, and he found opportunities during the voyage for indulging his passion for exploration, making a journey from Rio de Janeiro to the base of the Andes, and another from Bombay through India to Ceylon.

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  • If he had a strong passion, it was to provide for his succession to the throne of France, if his nephew, Louis XV., should die, and he indulged in many intrigues against the house of Orleans, whose right to the succession was supposed to be secured by Philip's solemn renunciation of all claim to the French throne, when he became king of Spain.

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  • In any case the native Frank, accustomed to commercial intercourse and diplomatic negotiations with the Mahommedans, could hardly share the unreasoning passion to make a dash for the "infidel."

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  • They are much addicted to gambling, and formerly were much given to fighting, though they never display that passion for war in the abstract which is characteristic of some of the white races, and their courage on the whole is not high if judged by European standards.

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  • The conflict between her passionate fascination and her disgust at her father's vulgarity is finely realized both in music and drama; but, if we are able to appreciate it, then the operatic convention by which Senta avows her passion becomes crude.

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  • The zeal of Ignatius (c. 115), who begs the Roman Church to do nothing to avert from him the martyr's death, was natural enough in a spiritual knight-errant, but with others in later days, especially in Phrygia and North Africa, the passion became artificial.

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  • Of his many mistresses the one for whom his passion lasted longest was a certain Vannozza (Giovanna) dei Cattani, born in 1442, and wife of three successive husbands.

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  • Before his elevation to the papacy Cardinal Borgia's passion for Vannozza somewhat diminished, and she subsequently led a very retired life.

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  • But it was not long before his unbridled passion for endowing his relatives at the expense of the church and of his neighbours became manifest.

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  • A Passion History compiled out of Homeric verses, which Zonaras attributed to Eudocia, is perhaps of different authorship.

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  • The second half of the 15th century was destined to be the age of academies in Italy, and the regnant passion for antiquity satisfied itself with any imitation, however grotesque, of Greek or Roman institutions.

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  • The Crucifixion, and subjects from the Passion, are never represented.

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  • In one of the literary and fashionable circles of Berlin he had met a Fraulein von Ddnniges, for whom he at once felt a passion, which was ardently reciprocated.

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  • In the heyday of his passion for Fraulein von DOnniges, his dream was to be enthroned as the president of the German republic with her seated at his side.

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  • His one passion was lust of power, and he was not in the least attracted by gain.

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  • He has to free himself from the power of passion.

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  • - Trinity Sunday, all festivals of Christ (except those connected with the Passion), festivals of the Blessed Virgin, of the Holy Angels and Confessors, of holy virgins and women (not being martyrs), nativity of St John the Baptist, festivals of the chains of St Peter and of his see (cathedra Petri), Conversion of St Paul, All Saints, consecration of churches and altars, anniversary of election and coronation of popes, and of election and consecration of bishops.

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  • festival of the instruments of the Passion, of the Precious Blood, of the invention and elevation of the Cross; all festivals of apostles, except those above noted; festivals of martyrs; masses for a papal election; the Feast of the Holy Innocents, when it falls on a Sunday (violet if on a week-day), and its octave (always red).

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  • Violet vestments are also worn on days of intercession, at votive masses of the Passion, at certain other masses of a pronouncedly intercessory and penitential character, at intercessory processions, at the blessing of candles on Candlemas Day, and at the blessing of the baptismal water.

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  • These doctrinal interpretations introduce the economy of blinding the Jews into the parabolic teaching; the declaration as to the redemptive character of the Passion into the sayings; the sacramental, institutional words into the account of the Last Supper, originally, a solemnly simple Messianic meal; and the formal night-trial before Caiaphas into the original Passion-story with its informal, morning decision by Caiaphas, and its one solemn condemnation of Jesus, by Pilate.

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  • It is popularly used of a relation between persons amounting to more than goodwill or friendship. By ethical writers the word has been used generally of distinct states of feeling, both lasting and spasmodic; some contrast it with "passion" as being free from the distinctively sensual element.

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  • that it does not involve anxiety or excitement, that it is comparatively inert and compatible with the entire absence of the sensuous element - it is generally and usefully distinguished from passion.

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  • This work gives an account of the Passion (i.

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  • If this machinery is to act smoothly we must improve our motive power, the source of which is human passion and sentiment.

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  • The same infatuated passion for mining speculation which had characterized the Spanish settlers in South America now began to actuate the Portuguese; labourers and capital were drained off to the mining districts, and Brazil, which had hitherto in great measure supplied Europe with sugar, sank before the competition of the English and French.

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  • developed into a passion, and he discontinued his theological course to devote himself entirely to them.

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  • Holy orders are to be conferred on the Ember Saturdays, on the Saturday before Passion Sunday or on Holy Saturday (Easter Eve).

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  • and the Jews - he to establish the tribunal and they to prevent him - was compiled, as the preface showed, to stem the Ultramontane reaction, but none the less carried weight because it was a recital of events with little or no comment or evidence of passion in its author.

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  • A rare capacity for tedious work, a dour Catonian rectitude, a passion for truth, pride, irritability at criticism and independence of character, are the marks of Herculano as a man.

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  • All forms of monism from Plotinus downwards tend to ignore personal individuality and volition, and merge all finite existence in the featureless unity of the Absolute; this, indeed, is what inspires the passion of the protest against monism.

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  • Philosophy, as Haureau finely says, was the passion of the 13th century; but in the 15th humanism, art and the beginnings of science and of practical discovery were busy creating a new world, which was destined in due time to give birth to a new philosophy.

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  • His abhorrence of war amounted to a passion.

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  • Marie de' Medici had turned against her "ungrateful" minister with a hatred intensified, it is said, by unrequited passion.

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  • His love for literature was a passion.

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  • Love, in the form of pathetic sentiment rather than of irregular passion, is the chief motive of his pieces.

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  • Lamartine has been extolled as a pattern of combined passion and restraint, as a model of nobility of sentiment, and as a harmonizer of pure French classicism in taste and expression with much, if not all, the better part of Romanticism itself.

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  • What chiefly distinguishes him from his Greek prototypes is that his purpose is rather ethical than purely speculative; the zeal of a teacher and reformer is more strong in him than even the intellectual passion of a thinker.

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  • He conceives of them as living a life of eternal peace and exemption from passion, in a world of their own; and the highest ideal of man is, through the exercise of his reason, to realize an image of this life.

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  • The victory to be won by man is the triumph over fear, ambition, passion, luxury.

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  • He appears to have had no great sense of natural beauty, in which point he resembled his generation (though one remarkable story is told of his being deeply affected by Alpine scenery); and, except in his passion for the stage, he does not seem to have cared much for any of the arts, Conversation and literature were, again as in Johnson's case, the sole gods of his idolatry.

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  • It is true that there is nothing, or hardly anything, that properly deserves the name of poetry in them - no passion, no sense of the beauty of nature, only a narrow "criticism of life," only a conventional and restricted choice of language, a cramped and monotonous prosody, and none of that indefinite suggestion which has been rightly said to be of the poetic essence.

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  • Aubrey, however, lived gaily, and used his means to gratify his passion for the company of celebrities and for every sort of knowledge to be gleaned about them.

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  • The Last Supper, Passion and Resurrection.

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  • But passion tormented him to the end, and his.

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  • In 1849 he came to London, where, according to his own account, his passion for open-air preaching caused his severance from the Wesleyans.

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  • His passion for intrigue is curiously illustrated by his letter to the tsarevich: Alexius at Vienna, assuring his "future sovereign" of his devotion, and representing his sojourn in England as a deliberate seclusion of a zealous but powerless well-wisher.

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  • Passion had always been too large an ingredient in his diplomacy.

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  • He was well versed in state affairs and loyal to those who advised and served him, personally brave, humane and kindly when not maddened by passion, active and energetic, and always a man of his word.

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  • Among his other numerous works may be mentioned Les Plus anciens monuments de la langue francaise (1875); a Manuel d'ancien Frangais (1888); an edition of the Mystere de la passion d'Arnoul Greban (1878), in collaboration with M.

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  • He now uses his knowledge to warn his readers, with intense passion, against all compromise between Judaism and the Gospel.

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  • Papineau, in pursuing towards the end a policy of blind passion, overlooked real grievances, and prevented remedial action.

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  • Of special interest is the fact that Walafrid, in his exposition of the Mass, shows no trace of any belief in the doctrine of transubstantiation as taught by his famous contemporary Radbertus (q.v.); according to him, Christ gave to his disciples the sacraments of his Body and Blood in the substance of bread and wine, and taught them to celebrate them as a memorial of his Passion.

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  • In 1341 the two girls left Penafiel; Costanca's marriage was celebrated in the same year, and the young infanta and her cousin went to reside at Lisbon, or at Coimbra, where Dom Pedro conceived that luckless and furious passion for Inez which has immortalized them.

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  • She was famous during her life-time for the weekly ecstasy of the Passion, during which in a trance she experienced the sufferings of the Holy Virgin contemplating the Passion of her Son.

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  • Girolamo was a precocious child, with an early passion for learning.

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  • For the opera he had a genuine passion, which he gratified as often as he could, until his means became too narrow to afford even that single relaxation.

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  • Yet we cannot help feeling that it is a grotesque and unseemly anachronism to apply in grave prose, addressed to the whole world, those terms of saint and angel which are touching and in their place amid the trouble and passion of the great mystic poet.

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  • He had risen in Maud far above his ordinary serenity of style, to ecstasies of passion and audacities of expression which were scarcely intelligible to his readers, and certainly not welcome.

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  • Otto was of tall and commanding presence, and although subject to violent bursts of passion, was liberal to his friends and just to his enemies.

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  • But there is a limit of imperturbability, and when that limit is reached, the subsequent passion is desperately vehement.

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  • Pain, pleasure, passion and peril must all find him unperturbed.

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  • Francis showed an even greater love for violent exercises, such as hunting, which was his ruling passion, and tennis, and for tournaments, masquerades and amusements of all kinds.

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  • When quite a boy he checked his own tendency to fits of passion on learning that his father trusted him to cure his defects.

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  • The affection of Charles Fox for his father was unbounded, but the passion for gambling which had been instilled in him as a boy proved the ruin of the family fortune.

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  • In the ardour of his passion Fox took his losses and their consequences with an attractive gaiety.

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  • "I am," he wrote, "certainly ambitious by nature, but I really have, or think I have, totally subdued that passion.

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  • I have still as much vanity as ever, which is a happier passion by far, because great reputation I think I may acquire and keep, great situation I never can acquire, nor if acquired keep, without making sacrifices that I never will make."

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  • In these circumstances his accession could not have the political importance which would otherwise have attached to it, though it was disfigured by a vicious outburst of party passion in which the names of the emperor and the empress were constantly misused.

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  • He also succeeded in passing an Act of Grace and Indemnity in 1690, by which he calmed the violence of party passion.

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  • Exquisite as was already his susceptibility to beauty and his mastership of the rarest poetic material, we cannot doubt that Chenier was preparing for still higher flights of lyric passion and poetic intensity.

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  • In his Commentaries, by laying aside the ornaments of oratory, he created the most admirable style of prose narrative, the style which presents interesting events in their sequence of time and dependence on the will of the actor, rapidly and vividly, with scarcely any colouring of personal or moral feeling, any oratorical passion, any pictorial illustration.

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  • He avoids not only every unusual but every superfluous word; and, although no writing can be more free from rhetorical colouring, yet there may from time to time be detected a glow of sympathy, like the glow of generous passion in Thucydides, the more effective from the reserve with which it betrays itself whenever he is called on to record any act of personal heroism or of devotion to military duty.

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  • It became also the organ of the pleasures and interests of private life, the chief motives of which were the love of nature and the passion of love.

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  • His passion for Cynthia, the theme of his most finished poetry, is second only in interest to that of Catullus for Lesbia; and Cynthia in her fascination and caprices seems a more real and intelligible personage than the idealized object first of the idolatry and afterwards of the malediction of Catullus.

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  • As an amatory poet he is the poet of pleasure and intrigue rather than of tender sentiment or absorbing passion.

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  • The idealizing poetry of passion, which found a genuine voice in Catullus and the elegiac poets, could not prolong itself through the exhausting licence of successive generations.

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  • Here he endeavoured to satisfy his passion for activity, partly by sharing in the municipal government of the town and the regulation of itsc commons, woods and pastures, and partly by the composition of the apology he published under the title of El Nicandro, which was perhaps written by an agent, but was undeniably inspired by the fallen minister.

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  • Up to the year 1826 the Confession (sometimes also known as the Confession of Miihlhausen from its adoption by that town) was publicly read from the pulpits of Basel on the Wednesday of Passion week in each year.

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  • Their enthusiasm and their prophesyings were denounced as demoniacal; their expectation of a glorious earthly kingdom of Christ was stigmatized as Jewish, their passion for martyrdom as vainglorious and their whole conduct as hypocritical.

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  • He was received into the Roman Catholic Church by Father Brownbill, S.J., at the church in Farm Street, on Passion Sunday, the 6th of April 1851.

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  • PASSION WEEK, the fifth week in Lent, beginning with Passion Sunday (dominica passionis or de passione domini), so called from very early times because with it begins the more special commemoration of Christ's passion.

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  • Passion week is of ten incorrectly identified with Holy week.

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  • In the north of England Passion Sunday was formerly known as Carle or Carling Sunday, a name corrupted from "care," in allusion to the sorrowful season which the day heralds.

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  • that the barely extending of a single passion too far or the continuance.

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  • The other heads are badly damaged owing to the fact that the white marble from Doliana, of which they are made, does not resist damp. But they still show in the intensity of their expression the power of expressing passion for which Scopas was famous beyond all other ancient sculptors.

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  • At the conclusion of his philosophical studies at the university, some geometrical figures, which fell in his way, excited in him a passion for mathematical pursuits, and in spite of the opposition of his father, who wished him to be a clergyman, he applied himself in secret to his favourite science.

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  • It was reserved for Dr Benrath to justify him, and to represent him as a fervent evangelist and at the same time as a speculative thinker with a passion for free inquiry.

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  • That is the attitude of a patriot, who saw with open eyes the ruin of his country, who burned above all things to save Italy and set her in her place among the powerful nations, who held the duty of selfsacrifice in the most absolute sense, whose very limitations and mistakes were due to an absorbing passion for the state he dreamed might be reconstituted.

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  • Anne took advantage of his absence to demand possession of the prince, and, on the "flat refusal" of the countess of Mar, fell into a passion, the violence of which occasioned a miscarriage and endangered her life.

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  • He is the Christian emperor directly inspired by angels; his sword Joyeuse contained the point of the lance used in the Passion; his standard was Romaine, the banner of St Peter, which, as the oriflamme of Saint Denis, was later to be borne in battle before the kings of France; and in 1164 Charles was canonized at the desire of the emperor Frederick I.

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  • The hero of the second part is Gui de Bourgogne, who recovers the relics of the Passion, lost in the siege of Rome.

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  • This work, generally known as the chronicle of Weihenstephan, gives among other legends a curious history of the emperor's passion for a dead woman, caused by a charm given to Charles by a serpent to whom he had rendered justice.

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  • He thus acted for twelve years (1541-1553), making money by his practice, and also by renewed editorial work for the Lyons publishers - work in which he constantly displayed his passion for original discovery in all departments.

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  • The end of the period of mourning for the late king was the signal for a succession of gaieties, during which the queen displayed a passion for amusement and excitement which led to unfortunate results.

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  • His passion for the stage completely engrossed him; he tried his hand both at dramatic criticism and at dramatic authorship. His first dramatic piece, Lethe, or Aesop in the Shades, which he was thirty-seven years later to read from a splendidly bound transcript to King George III.

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  • For the stately declamation, the sonorous, and beyond a doubt impressive, chant of Quin and his fellows, Garrick substituted rapid changes of passion and humour in both voice and gesture, which held his audiences spellbound.

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  • In the same work, chap. x., he speaks of " the Sacrament of the Passion foreshadowed in prophecies."

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  • With the Mexicans war was a passion, but warfare was little above the raid (Bandelier; Farrand).

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  • 2 (Passion of Perpetua, 1890); see also Analecta Bollandiana (1889), viii.

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  • Oranges, lemons, grapes, passion fruit, figs, pine-apples, guavas and other fruits grow abundantly; while potatoes, onions, maize and arrowroot can be cultivated.

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  • (v.) The Passion (xviii.

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  • John has, besides the passion, seven accounts in common with the Synoptists: the Baptist and Jesus, (i.

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  • John omits, at the last supper, its central point, the great historic act of the holy eucharist, carefully given by the Synoptists and St Paul, having provided a highly doctrinal equivalent in the discourse on the living bread, here spoken by Jesus in Capernaum over a year before the passion (vi.

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  • xiii.), and to the anointing, last supper, and passion (xiv.

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  • With greater passion Flourens declares " Our enemy is God.

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  • Here he soon became a good workman, developed a passion for politics and especially for political statistics, came to be depended upon for more or less of the editing of the paper, and was a figure in the village debating society.

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  • (iii) The Journey from Galilee to Jerusalem, the Last Days, Passion and Resurrection, x.

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  • Here the central glory of the Cross as "the power of God unto salvation" suffered some eclipse, although the passion of Christ was felt to be a transcendent act of Divine Grace in one way or another.

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  • Here he wrote La Nouvelle Heloise; here he indulged in the passion which that novel partly represents, his love for Madame d'Huodetot, sister-in-law of Madame d'Epinay, a lady young and amiable, but plain, who had a husband and a lover (St Lambert), and whom Rousseau's devotion seems to have partly pleased and partly annoyed.

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  • nobis sua sanctissima passione ligno crucis justificationem meruit et pro nobis deo patri satisfecit," " Christ earned our justification by His most holy passion and satisfied God the Father for us."

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  • At present the belief in an objective atonement is still widely held; whether in the form of penal theories - the old forensic view that the death of Christ atones by paying the penalty of man's sin - or in the form of governmental theories; that the Passion fulfilled a necessity of divine government by expressing and vindicating God's righteousness.

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  • But there is also a widespread inclination to minimize, ignore or deny the objective aspect of the atonement, the effect of the death of Christ on God's attitude towards men; and to follow the moral theories in emphasizing the subjective aspect of the atonement, the influence of the Passion on man.

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  • His passion for details not only swelled his volumes to a portentous size, but was fatal to artistic construction.

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  • Erasmus was at Deventer from 1475 to 1484, and when he left, had learnt from Johannes Sinthius (Syntheim) and Alexander Hegius, who had come as headmaster in 1483, the love of letters which was the ruling passion of his life.

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  • And when a theological position was emphasized by party passion it became odious to him.

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  • The truly happy man must have Opovna es (prudence), which alone can save him from falling a prey to mere passion.

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  • Unhappily, on the voyage, by some mistake (accounted for in different ways), Tristan and Iseult drink the love drink, and are forthwith seized with a fatal passion each for the other.

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  • Like the story of Perceval that of Tristan has been made familiar to the present generation by Richard Wagner's noble music drama, Tristan and Isolde, founded upon the poem of Gottfried von Strassburg; though, being a drama of feeling rather than of action, the story is reduced to its simple elements; the drinking of the love-potion, the passion of the lovers, their discovery by Mark and finally their death.

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  • Indistinguishable from his personal ambition was his passion for the aggrandisement of the church and its predominance in the state.

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  • He had a passion for play, and was a friend of Ninon de l'Enclos; and his enemies found ready weapons against him in the undisguised looseness of his life.

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  • While Latin was declining in Gaul, even Greek was not unknown in Ireland, and the Irish passion for travel led to the spread of Greek learning in the west of Europe.

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