Parvo sentence example

parvo
  • The catechisms of Bellarmine (1603) and Bossuet (1687) had considerable vogue, and a summary of the former known as Schema de Parvo was sanctioned by the Vatican council of 1870.
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  • The flying machine must be multum in parvo.
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  • Virus such as distemper or parvo, irritant poisons, food poisoning or dietary allergies are the most common causes of diarrhea.
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  • As a puppy he had parvo and I spent thousands of dollars to save him, but I just can't do it now.
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  • Mention the word "parvo" and you instantly strike fear into any dog lover's heart.
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  • Most dogs experience the intestinal form of parvo, but this is not the only form the virus can take.
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  • Intestinal parvo is the most common form of the disease.
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  • This is the "classic parvo" that most owners and vets see on a regular basis.
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  • Severe diarrhea: This is the other primary symptom of parvo, and it is quite severe.
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  • The cardiac form of parvo is usually transmitted to unborn pups via the uterus of an infected mother.
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  • Cardiac dog parvo symptoms are sparse and come on quite rapidly.
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  • If a dog survives the initial bout with parvo, there is still a risk of collapse during the recovery period.
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  • This scenario may seem dramatic, but parvo is a very dramatic illness that carries dire consequences, so be proactive and have your dog vaccinated.
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  • This can be something as simple as an upset stomach from a food that did not agree with him to a more dangerous ailment such as poisoning or parvo.
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  • Being able to recognize the signs of parvo is crucial if you're going to have any chance to save your pet's life.
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  • Intestinal Parvovirus is the most common form of parvo.
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  • If you notice any symptoms in your dog that resemble parvo, don't wait to see if he gets better.
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  • If you are getting a new puppy, be sure to keep up with his parvo vaccinations.
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  • The diagnosis of parvo in puppies can devastate an owner or breeder.
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  • Puppies younger than 12 weeks suffer the most severe and dangerous symptoms of the parvo virus.
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  • The parvo virus requires a seven to 14 day incubation period before internal effects and symptoms begin to develop.
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  • Even after the puppy receives treatment for the parvo virus and the symptoms disappear, it will still release the virus in its stool.
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  • A puppy may suffer vulnerability to the parvo virus for several days or several weeks during its young life.
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  • The antibodies provide the young puppies with protection against many diseases such parvo.
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  • As the antibodies drop, the puppy's immunity to parvo weakens.
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  • Maternal antibodies within the puppy will render the parvo virus ineffective, but the plummeting number of antibodies may not offer sufficient protection against parvo.
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  • Until the antibodies in the puppy's bloodstream drop sufficiently, the vaccine will not work, and the puppy may develop parvo.
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  • The transmission of parvo occurs from fecal matter.
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  • You should always immediately take any puppy showing possible symptoms of parvo to the veterinarian.
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  • Parvo in puppies can be treated if caught early.
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  • Any puppy or dog suspected of suffering from parvo should undergo an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antigen test (ELISA), commonly called the CITE test.
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  • A complete physical and blood work will also allow the veterinarian to determine the severity of the parvo infection.
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  • No magic pill exists to treat the parvo virus.
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  • Any puppy that manages to survive parvo will have immunity to the virus for at least 20 months.
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  • Fortunately, there are ways to help protect your pup from parvo virus.
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  • Puppies should receive their first parvo vaccine between five to eight weeks old using a high antigen-density vaccine, according to the Merck Veterinary Manual.
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  • Every three weeks the puppy will require a parvo vaccine booster until it reaches 16 to 20 weeks of age.
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  • Entire litters may still develop parvo even after administering vaccines accordingly because the vaccine can't provide sufficient protection against certain aggressive strains of the parvovirus such as CPV-2c.
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  • Your dog will require a parvo booster vaccine when he reaches his first birthday, and subsequent booster vaccines every one to three years thereafter, depending on the veterinarian's advice.
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  • Maintaining a clean environment, limiting the puppy's contact with other dogs and maintaining a vaccine schedule can all help prevent a puppy from contracting the parvo virus.
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