Parthenon sentence example

parthenon
  • The name was subsequently applied to the cella, or eastern chamber, of the Parthenon, which is exactly ioo ft.
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  • It is important to observe that in resting the fame of Pheidias upon the sculptures of the Parthenon we proceed with little evidence.
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  • The Parthenon, the Erechtheum, the " Theseum " and other temples were converted into Christian churches and were thus preserved throughout the middle ages.
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  • The reliefs of the frieze of the cella of the Parthenon enable us to form an idea of the procession.
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  • The visit of the French physician Jacques Spon and the Englishman, Sir George Wheler or Wheeler (1650-1723), fortunately took place before the catastrophe of the Parthenon in 1687; Spon's Voyage d'Italie, de Dalmatie, de Grece et du Levant, which contained the first scientific description of the ruins of Athens, appeared in 1678; Wheler's Journey into Greece, in 1682.
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  • To him are ascribed also the original Parthenon on the Acropolis, afterwards burned by the Persians, and replaced by the Parthenon of Pericles.
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  • The State Capitol (1840) is surmounted by a dome and modelled to some extent after the Parthenon and other buildings of ancient Greece; the first Capitol (begun in 1794) was burned in 1831.
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  • The difference is much like that between the Parthenon and the Niobids, or between Jacopo Avanzi and Caracci.
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  • The colossal statues of ivory and gold by Pheidias were the most notable examples of this use of gold, especially his statue of Athena in the Parthenon, and the one of Zeus at Olympia.
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  • In form they resemble those of the Parthenon and Theseum, but they have only sixteen flutings.
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  • After 445 Athens was hardly in a position to summon such a congress, and would not have sent to envoys out of 20 to northern and central Greece, where she had just lost all her influence; nor is it likely that the building of the Parthenon (begun not later than 447) was entered on before the congress.
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  • It is therefore probable that most if not all of the sculptural decoration of the Parthenon was the work of pupils of Pheidias, such as Alcamenes and Agoracritus, rather than his own.
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  • Among the more prominent buildings are the court-house - the portion first erected being designed after the Parthenon - the Steele high school, St Mary's college, Notre Dame academy, the Memorial Building, the Arcade Building, Reibold Building, the Algonquin Hotel, the post office, the public library (containing about 75,000 volumes), the Young Men's Christian Association building and several churches.
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  • The more imposing of the two is the Walhalla, a costly reproduction of the Parthenon, erected as a Teutonic temple of fame on a hill rising from the Danube at Donaustauf, 6 m.
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  • The subject of the frieze of the Parthenon is an idealized treatment of this great procession.
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  • In 869 the see of Athens became an archbishopric. In 995 Attica was ravaged by the Bulgarians under their tsar Samuel, but Athens escaped; after the defeat of Samuel at Belasitza (1014) the emperor Basil II., who blinded 15,000 Bulgarian prisoners, came to Athens and celebrated his triumph by a thanksgiving service in the Parthenon (1018).
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  • Michaelis, Der Parthenon (1871), with full bibliography; P. Stengel, Die griechischen Kultusaltertilmer (1898); L.
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  • (1) Athena Parthenos, in the Parthenon.
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  • The Parthenon was transformed into a mosque; the existing minaret at its south-western corner was built after 1466.
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  • which still stand the reproduced Parthenon of Athens, the History Building, which in general outline is a reproduction of the Erectheum and contains a museum and an art gallery, and a monument to the memory of James Robertson (1742-1814), the founder of the city.
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  • As regards the decorative sculptures of the Parthenon, which the Greeks rated far below their colossus in ivory and gold, see the article Parthenon.
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  • All belong to the " archaic " epoch; only a few remains of the greater age were found, including some fragments of sculptures from the Parthenon and Erechtheum.
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  • From the inner exit of the Propylaea a passage led towards the east along the north side of the Parthenon; almost directly facing the entrance was the colossal bronze statue of Athena (afterwards called Athena Promachos) by Pheidias, probably set up by Cimon in commemoration of the Persian defeat.
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  • On both sides of the passage were numerous statues, among them that of Athena Hygeia, set up by Pericles to commemorate the recovery of a favourite slave who was injured during the building of the Parthenon, a colossal bronze image of the wooden horse of Troy, and Myron's group of Marsyas with Athena throwing away her flute.
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  • Beyond the Parthenon, a little to the north-east, was the great altar of Athena, and near it the statue and altar of Zeus Polieus.
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  • Under Francesco Morosini the Venetians again attacked Athens in September 1687; a shot fired during the bombardment of the Acropolis caused a powder magazine in the Parthenon to explode, and the building was rent asunder.
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  • Omont, Athenes au X VII I siecle (Paris, 1898, with plans and views of the town and acropolis and drawings of the sculptures of the Parthenon); J.
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  • For the Parthenon, A.
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  • Michaelis, Der Parthenon (texts and plates, Leipzig, 1871); L.
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  • Magne, Le Parthenon (Paris, 1895); J.
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  • Some pieces of sculpture were found here, among them fragments of the Parthenon and a singular relief of Asclepius with a kneeling woman suppliant.
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  • These statues bear the same relation to the sculptor Polyclitus which the Parthenon marbles hold to Pheidias; and the excavations have thus yielded most important material for the illustration of the Argive art of Polyclitus in the 5th century B.C.
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  • occupation of a sufficient hinterland on the terra firma, nonsufferance of the rivalry of Genoa, and, finally, maintenance of trade-supremacy in the eastern Mediterranean through a series of alternating wars and treaties with Turkey, the lasting monument of which was the destruction of the Parthenon in 1685 by a Venetian bomb.
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  • On his pages, close beside the Parthenon, the Sphinx, St Paul's, Etna and Vesuvius, you will find the White Mountains, Monadnock, Agiocochook, Katandin, the pickerelweed in bloom, the wild geese honking through the sky, the chick-a-dee braving the snow, Wall Street and State Street, cotton-mills, railroads and Quincy granite.
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  • On the other hand, inscriptions prove that the marble blocks intended for the pedimental statues of the Parthenon were not brought to Athens until 434 B.C., which was probably after the death of Pheidias.
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  • Frazer maintains the hitherto current theory that the earlier temple of Athena and Erechtheus was on the site of the Erechtheum; that the Erechtheum inherited the name apXa ios veclis from its predecessor, and that the " opisthodomos " in which the treasures were kept was the west chamber of the Parthenon; Furtwangler and Milchh6fer hold the strange view that the " opisthodomos " was a separate building at the east end of the Acropolis, while Penrose thinks the building discovered by Dorpfeld was possibly the Cecropeum.
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  • As in the Parthenon, there is a sculptured zophoros above the exterior of the cella walls; this, however, extends over the east and west fronts only and the east ends of the sides; the eastern zophoros represents a battle-scene with seated deities on either hand, the western a centauromachia.
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  • The central sculptures of the western pediment of the Parthenon, which Morosini intended to take to Venice, were unskilfully detached by his workmen, and falling to the ground were broken to pieces.
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  • The removal to London in 1812 of most of the remaining sculptures of the Parthenon by Lord Elgin possibly rescued many of them from injury in the period of warfare which followed.
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  • The Parthenon step, celebrated as 100 ft.
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  • The stateliest is the national monument to commemorate the victory of Waterloo, originally intended to be a reproduction of the Parthenon.
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  • Figure ' D ' from the east pediment of the Parthenon.
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  • Pericles likewise is responsible for the epoch-making splendour of Attic art in his time, for had he not so fully appreciated and given such free scope to the genius of Pheidias, Athens would hardly have witnessed the raising of the Parthenon and other glorious structures, and Attic art could not have boasted a legion of first-rate sculptors of whom Alcamenes, Agoracritus and Paeonius are only the chief names.
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  • The greater monuments of the classical epoch on the Acropolis are described in separate articles (see Parthenon, Erechtheum, narrow, crooked streets remained; the influence of Themistocles who aimed at transferring the capital to the Peiraeus, was probably directed against any costly scheme of restoration, except on the Acropolis.
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  • The best preserved Greek temple in the world, it possesses no record of its origin; the style of its sculptures and architecture leads to the conclusion that it was built about the same time as the Parthenon; it seems to have been finished by 421 B.C. It has been known as the Theseum since the middle ages, apparently because some of its sculptures represent the exploits of Theseus, but the Theseum was an earlier sanctuary on the east of the Agora (see above).
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  • But he reconciled the dignity with the loyalty of Athens by carrying a decree that Harpalus should be arrested, and that his treasure should be deposited in the Parthenon, to be held in trust for Alexander.
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  • Sphinxes were represented on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae and on the metopes at Selinus; in the best period of Greek art a sphinx was sculptured on the helmet of the statue of Athena in the Parthenon at Athens; and sphinxes carrying off children were sculptured on the front feet of the throne of Zeus at Olympia.
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  • 8 Von Soden notes (History of Early Christian Literature, p. 114) that "it is as if we heard the ripple of the waves at the meeting of the two streams which have their source in Zion and the Parthenon."
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  • the religious processions of Egypt, those illustrated by the rock-carvings of Boghaz-Keui (see Pteria), the many representations of processions in Greek art, culminating in the great Panathenaic procession of the Parthenon frieze, and Roman triumphal reliefs, such as those of the arch of Titus.
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  • My friend said, she would sometime show me the copies of the marbles brought away by Lord Elgin from the Parthenon.
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  • New York: Parthenon Publishing Group, 2000.
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  • The master builders of the past understood the value and significance of the Golden Ratio and applied it to such structures as the Great Pyramid at Giza and the Parthenon.
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  • The Greek Parthenon is a true example of endless Golden Rectangles that create many Golden Ratios.
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  • The Greeks in the design and proportions used in building the Parthenon from 448-432 B.C.
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