This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience. Learn more

parochial

Head Word icon
parochial

parochial Sentence Examples

  • The town hall and the parochial offices are the principal administrative buildings.

    35
    10
  • It continues to the present day in the universal survival of the parochial system.

    20
    11
  • By this statute the term benefice is defined to mean benefice with cure of souls and no other, and therein to comprehend all parishes, perpetual curacies, donatives, endowed public chapels, parochial chapelries and chapelries or districts belonging or reputed to belong, or annexed or reputed to be annexed, to any church or chapel.

    15
    5
  • The church of St Giles, formerly a chapel of ease to All Saints, but made parochial in the 18th century, is'of Norman date, but most of the present structure is modern.

    12
    3
  • In the words of Hallam, "the slow and gradual manner in which parochial churches became independent appears to be of itself a sufficient answer to those who ascribe a great antiquity to the universal payment of tithes."

    11
    2
  • The public-school system was supplemented by parochial schools which had in 1920 650 teachers and 33,000 pupils.

    11
    3
  • The abbey church was partly burnt in 1437, in a riot due to the monks' refusal to recognize the town's chapel of All Hallowes as the parish church, though they had restricted their use of the abbey church for parochial purposes.

    10
    3
  • The colleges and institutions of learning connected with the Church are: Rutgers, already mentioned; Union College (1795), the outgrowth of Schenectady Academy, founded in 1785 by Dirck Romeyn, a Dutch minister; Hope College (1866; coeducational) at Holland, Michigan, originally a parochial school (1850) and then (1855) Holland Academy; the Theological Seminary at New Brunswick (q.v.); and the Western Theological Seminary (1869) at Holland, Michigan.

    10
    3
  • He was commended to the hospitality of Anne Boleyn's father, the earl of Wiltshire, in whose house at Durham Place he resided for some time; the king appointed him archdeacon of Taunton and one of his chaplains; and he also held a parochial benefice, the name of which is unknown.

    6
    5
  • He was educated in the public and parochial schools.

    4
    6
  • The parochial clergy are celibate in so far as they must be married when appointed, but if left widowers may not marry again.

    3
    2
  • Though devoted to his parochial duties, he found time to begin his principal work, the History of Greece.

    2
    1
  • In 1753 a bill was introduced by a private member of the House of Commons, backed by official support, to provide for the annual enumeration of the people and of the persons in receipt of parochial relief.

    2
    3
  • A considerable proportion of the Irish and the French Canadians send their children to the Roman Catholic parochial schools.

    1
    0
  • Among newer churches the most noticeable are the Evangelical church of St Luke, a Transitional building, with an imposing dome, finished in 1896, and the Gothic parochial church of the Giesing suburb, with a tower 312 ft.

    1
    1
  • It has been habitually used of the parochial clergy of the Church of England since the end of the 17th century.

    1
    1
  • Both Protestant churches have a parochial organization and a presbyterian form of church government.

    1
    2
  • These courts consist of every parochial minister or professor of divinity of any university within the limits, and of an elder commissioned from every kirk session.

    1
    2
  • & Mar., c. 18, a'minister, preacher or teacher of a nonconformist congregation is exempt from certain parochial offices, as that of churchwarden.

    1
    2
  • Towards the end of the period we note the beginnings of the triple division of medieval preaching into cloistral, parochial and missionary or popular preaching, a division based at first on audiences rather than on subject-matter, the general character of which - legends and popular stories rather than exposition of Scripture - was much the same everywhere.

    1
    6
  • (I) During his enforced absence from Athens he had evidently acquired a far more extended idea of the future of Athens than had hitherto dawned on the somewhat parochial minds of her leaders.

    1
    8
  • In 1707 Bengel entered the ministry and was appointed to the parochial charge of Metzingen unter-Urach.

    0
    0
  • In certain countries (among them England) where there is a dearth of secular priests, Benedictines undertake parochial work.

    0
    0
  • parochial limits, by accustoming the more godly sort to feel an inner bond peculiar to themselves, prepared many for the congregational idea of the church, and on the other hand made them feel more than ever dissatisfied with the " mixed " services ' of the parish church.

    0
    0
  • In 1888 Lord Selborne published a second work on the Church question, entitled Ancient Facts and Fallacies concerning Churches and Tithes, in which he examined more critically than in his earlier book the developments of early ecclesiastical institutions, both on the continent of Europe and in Anglo-Saxon England, which resulted in the formation of the modern parochial system and its general endowment with tithes.

    0
    0
  • As yet, however, none of the trade or craft gilds, as such, had a share in the government, which continued in the hands of the patrician families, membership of which was necessary even for election to the council and to the parochial offices.

    0
    0
  • Tithe rent charge under these acts is subject to the same liabilities and incidents as tithes, such as parliamentary, parochial, county and other rates, especially the poor rate and highway rate; but the owner of tithe rent charge attached to a benefice has been exempted by an act of 1899 from payment of half the amount of any rate which he would be liable to pay under the Agricultural Rates Act 1896, the other half being borne by the Inland Revenue Commissioners.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile he had published several small historical works; but his college and university duties left little time for writing, and in 1875 he accepted the vicarage of Embleton, a parish on the coast of Northumberland, near Dunstanburgh, with an ancient and beautiful church and a fortified parsonage house, and within reach of the fine library in Bamburgh Keep. Here he remained for nearly ten years, acquiring that experience of parochial work which afterwards stood him in good stead, taking private pupils, studying and writing, as well as taking an active part in diocesan business.

    0
    0
  • In 1845 parochial boards were created for relief of the poor, their powers being afterwards extended to deal with the statutes concerning burial-grounds, the registration of births, deaths and marriages, vaccination, public health, public libraries and other matters.

    0
    0
  • The act of 1894, as we have seen, not only established the Local Government Board, consisting of the secretary for Scotland, the solicitor-general, the under-secretary and three appointed members - a vice-president, a lawyer and a medical officer of public health - but also replaced the parochial boards by parish councils, empowered to deal among other things with poor relief, lunacy, vaccination, libraries, baths, recreation grounds, disused churchyards, rights of way, parochial endowments, and the formation of special lighting and scavenging districts.

    0
    0
  • A later Norman church stands under the Castle Hill, but its parochial status was transferred to the modern church of St James.

    0
    0
  • All children between seven and fourteen years of age must attend a public, private or parochial school during the entire time that the public school of their district is in session unless excused by the district board.

    0
    0
  • His friendship towards the Tractarians exposed him to considerable persecution, but his simple manly character and zealous devotion to parochial work gained him the support of widely divergent classes.

    0
    0
  • The schools are open nine months in the year, and all children between eight and fourteen years of age are required to attend some public, private or parochial school during these months unless excused because of some physical or mental disability.

    0
    0
  • The earlier years of his archiepiscopate were disturbed by his controversy with Edward McGlynn (1839-1900), a New York priest (and a fellow-student with Corrigan at Rome), who disapproved of parochial schools, refused to go to Rome for examination, and was excommunicated in July 1887, but returned to the church five years later.

    0
    0
  • Other communities again devoted themselves to parochial work.

    0
    0
  • The state undertook to pay the bishops and parochial clergy; it was directly to appoint the one, and to have a veto on the appointment of the other.

    0
    0
  • c. 32), exempts the priest from parochial offices, such as those of churchwarden and constable, and from serving in the militia or on a jury, and enables all Roman Catholics scrupling the oaths of office to exercise the office of churchwarden and some other offices by deputy.

    0
    0
  • There are, according to Hoffmann's Directory (Milwaukee, 1907), 4364 parochial schools, in which 1,096,842 children of both sexes receive instruction.

    0
    0
  • These absorbing duties, added to his parochial work, left little time for literature.

    0
    0
  • Works published in Keble's lifetime: Christian Year (1827); Psalter (1839); Praelectiones Academicae (1844); Lyra Innocentium (1846); Sermons Academical (1848); Argument against Repeal of Marriage Law, and Sequel (1857); Eucharistical Adoration (1857); Life of Bishop Wilson (1863); Sermons Occasional and Parochial (1867).

    0
    0
  • In his powerful defence of establishments against the voluntaries in both Scotland and England, in which his ablest assistants were those who afterwards became, along with him, the leaders of the Free Church, he pleaded that an established church to be effective must divide the country territorially into a large number of small parishes, so that every corner of the land and every person, of whatever class, shall actually enjoy the benefits of the parochial machinery.

    0
    0
  • By the Poor Law Act of 1845 parishes were enabled to remove the care of the poor from the minister and the kirksession, in whom it was formerly vested, and to appoint a parochial board with power to assess the ratepayers.

    0
    0
  • In addition to the state university, Madison is the seat of several Roman Catholic and Lutheran parochial schools, two business schools, and the Wisconsin academy, a non-sectarian preparatory school of high grade.

    0
    0
  • This cosmopolitan citizenship remained all through a distinctive Stoic dogma; when first announced it must have had a powerful influence upon the minds of men, diverting them from the distractions of almost parochial politics to a boundless vista.

    0
    0
  • Whilst the parochial clergy are still as unlearned as ever, there are not a few amongst the higher clergy who are distinguished for their learning beyond the limits of their own communion: for example, the metropolitan Ph.

    0
    0
  • west of the city, also claim notice; while besides parochial and industrial schools several of the religious orders located here devote themselves to education.

    0
    0
  • Hyde, Parochial Annals of Bengal (1901); K.

    0
    0
  • Avignon, at a distance from the party strife and somewhat parochial politics of the Italian commonwealths, impressed his mind with an ideal of civility raised far above provincial prejudices.

    0
    0
  • A person so qualified is entitled to be enrolled as a burgess, or registered as a county elector (as the case may be), unless he is alien, has during the qualifying period received union or parochial relief or other alms, or is disentitled under some act of parliament such as the Corrupt Practices Act, the Felony Act, &c. The lists of burgesses and county electors are prepared annually by the overseers of each parish in the borough or county, and are revised by the revising barrister at courts holden by him for the purpose in September or October of each year.

    0
    0
  • Any person may be elected who is either a parochial elector of some parish within the district or has during the whole of the twelve months preceding his election resided in the district, and no person is disqualified by sex or marriage.

    0
    0
  • The electors both in urban and rural districts are the body called the parochial electors.

    0
    0
  • A rural district council may delegate their entire powers in any parish to a parochial committee.

    0
    0
  • In every rural parish, that is to say, in every parish which is not included within an urban district, there is a parish meeting, which consists of the parochial electors of the parish.

    0
    0
  • Any person who is a parochial elector, or who has for twelve months preceding the election resided in the parish, or within 3 m.

    0
    0
  • Among the duties transferred to parish councils may be mentioned the provision of parish books and of a vestry room or parochial office, parish chest, fire engine or fire escape, the holding or management of parish property, other than property Powers relating to affairs of the church or held for an ecclesiastical and duties charity, the holding or management of village greens or of parish of allotments, the appointment of trustees of parochial councils.

    0
    0
  • This has been done almost universally, as far as regards the power to appoint overseers and assistant overseers, and in many cases urban councils have also obtained powers to appoint trustees of parochial charities.

    0
    0
  • The influence of other Transcendental teachers, Dr Hedge, Dr Ripley, Bronson Alcott, Orestes Brownson, Theodore Parker, Margaret Fuller, Henry Thoreau, Jones Very, was narrow and parochial compared with that of Emerson.

    0
    0
  • It has, like the Greek Church, two kinds of clergy - parochial and monastic. The former are supported by their parishes; the latter by the revenues of the monasteries, which own about one-sixth of the Lebanon lands.

    0
    0
  • A striking feature of the movement is the adoption of the parochial system for the purpose of local work.

    0
    0
  • Having left the university in 1816 he held successively a number of curacies, and in 1827 he published Essays on the Philosophical Evidence of Christianity, followed by a volume of Parochial Sermons illustrative of the Importance of the Revelation of God in Jesus Christ (1828).

    0
    0
  • The social fabric was built up not on the towns, but on the great landlords; and when the centre of gravity began to move, first of all in Italy, to the towns, and crowded populations began to be massed together in them, the parochial systems broke down under the weight of the new conditions, and the people were in a state of spiritual and moral no less than physical destitution.

    0
    0
  • So, when the friars came and established themselves in the poorest localities of the towns, and brought religion to the destitute and the outcasts of society, assimilating themselves to the conditions of life of those among whom they worked, they supplied a need with which the parochial clergy were unable to cope.

    0
    0
  • In 1695 he published Parochial Antiquities.

    0
    0
  • In process of time the title abbot was improperly transferred to clerics who had no connexion with the monastic system, as to the principal of a body of parochial clergy; and under the Carolingians to the chief chaplain of the king, Abbas Curiae, or military chaplain of the emperor, Abbas Castrensis.

    0
    0
  • The parochial clergy were probably in a healthier condition; but the old abuses of pluralism and non-residence were as rampant as ever, and though their work may have been in many cases honorably carried out, it is certain that energy and intelligence were at a low ebb.

    0
    0
  • In 1889 the passage of the Bennett law, providing for the enforcement of the teaching of English in all public and parochial schools, had a wide political effect.

    0
    0
  • The last, in regulated forms, are a permanent feature of Catholicism; and the rivalries of these " regular " clergy with their " secular" or parochial brethren continue to make history to-day.

    0
    0
  • In addition to U.S. government buildings (marine hospital and barracks, agricultural experiment station, wireless telegraph station and magnetic observatory), there are two public schools (one for whites and one for Thlinkets), the Sheldon Jackson (ethnological) Museum, which is connected with the Presbyterian Industrial Training School, a parochial school of the Orthodox Greek (Russian) Church, a Russian-Greek Church, built in 1816, and St Peter's-by-the-Sea, a Protestant Episcopal mission, built in 1899.

    0
    0
  • The more special objects of the association are the following: the development of the Churches on the basis of a representative parochial and synodal system of government in which the laity shall enjoy their full rights; the promotion of a federation of all the Churches in one national Church; resistance to all hierarchical tendencies both within and without the Protestant Churches; the promotion of Christian.

    0
    0
  • One of the objects of the association was to some extent obtained by their organization of the Prussian Church when Dr Falk was cultus minister, on the basis of parochial and synodal representation, which came into full operation in 1879.

    0
    0
  • Parson imparsonee (persona impersonata) is he that as rector is in possession of a church parochial, and of whom the church is full, whether it be presentative or impropriate (Coke upon Littleton, 300 b).

    0
    0
  • In addition to the secular clergy there are several communities of regular priests scattered over the country, ministering in their own churches but without parochial jurisdiction.

    0
    0
  • The educational institutions, in addition to those of the general public school system, include several parochial schools, schools of art and of music, and commercial colleges; Detroit College (Catholic), opened in 1877; the Detroit College of Medicine, opened in 1885; the Michigan College of Medicine and Surgery, opened in 1888; the Detroit College of law, founded in 1891, and a city normal school.

    0
    0
  • Here for two years he was busily engaged in parochial work, but he found time to write articles on "Apollonius of Tyana," on "Cicero" and on "Miracles" for the Encyclopaedia Metropolitana.

    0
    0
  • The parish as an institution is in reality later in date than the township. The latter has been in fact the unit of local administration ever since England was settled in its several states and kingdoms; the beginnings of the parochial system in England are attributed to Theodore of Tarsus, who was archbishop of Canterbury towards the close of the 7th century.

    0
    0
  • It has been considered that the intimate connexion of church and state militates against the view that the parochial system was founded as a national institution, since any legislation on the subject of the township and parochial systems would probably have resulted in the merging of the one into the other.

    0
    0
  • The select committee of 1873, appointed to inquire into parochial boundaries, reported to the effect that the parish bears no definite relation to any other administrative area, except indeed to the poor-law union.

    0
    0
  • The chief part of the parochial organization was the vestry-meeting.

    0
    0
  • It seems probable (though the point is obscure) that the bishops presided at the first formation of the parishes - the parish being a subdivision of the diocese - and at any rate down to the date of the Reformation they exercised the power of creating new parishes within their respective dioceses (Duncan, Parochial Law, p. 4).

    0
    0
  • The existing parochial districts being found unsuited to the ecclesiastical requirements of the time, a general act was passed in 1581, which made provision for the parochial clergy, and, inter alia, directed that "a sufficient and competent" district should be appropriated to each church as a parish (1581, cap. ioo).

    0
    0
  • Thereafter, by a series of special acts in the first place, and, subsequent to the year 1617, by the decrees of parliamentary commissions, the creation of suitable parochial districts was pro - ceeded with.

    0
    0
  • For ecclesiastical purposes, the minister and kirk - session constitute the parochial authority.

    0
    0
  • It also possessed power to assess under the Parochial Buildings Acts of 1862 and 1866.

    0
    0
  • - This division of parishes depends, as the names imply, upon local character and situation of the parochial districts.

    0
    0
  • The importance of the distinction arose in connexion with the rule of assessment adopted for various parochial burdens, and the nature of the rights of the minister and corresponding obligations of the parishioners.

    0
    0
  • It established a local government board for Scotland, with a parish council in every parish, and abolished all parochial boards.

    0
    0
  • - The principal records from which information may be gained as to the oldest parochial system in England are the records called Nomina villarum, the Taxatio papae Nicholai made in 1291, the Nonarum inquisitiones relating to assessments made upon the clergy, the Valor ecclesiasticus of Henry VIII., the lay subsidies from the reign of Edward III.

    0
    0
  • Reichel, Rise of the Parochial System in England (1905).

    0
    0
  • For fuller information regard - ing the Scottish parish see Connell on Teinds; Duncan's Parochial Ecclesiastical Law; the Cobden Club essays on Local Government and Taxation in the United Kingdom (1882); Goudy and Smith's Local Government in Scotland; Atkinson, Local Government in Scotland.

    0
    0
  • The priest of the parish with the churchwardens and the parochial officials headed a crowd of boys who, armed with green boughs, beat with them the parish border-stones.

    0
    0
  • He may, and often does, accept a parochial office or chaplaincy in addition.

    0
    0
  • beautiful to look at, the cityscape in winter particularly memorable, and yet remains parochial and small minded.

    0
    0
  • churchwardens accounts are the most valuable of parochial records for the wealth of information on such a diverse range of topics.

    0
    0
  • At the same time, several bishops and many parochial clergy were sympathetic to the evangelicals.

    0
    0
  • colorize apologize for taking such a parochial attitude about colorizing shell scripts -- thanks for correcting this important oversight!

    0
    0
  • locative networking outwith the arts on the rise, is networking within the arts in danger of becoming self-referential and parochial?

    0
    0
  • parochial in outlook.

    0
    0
  • parochial in that sense.

    0
    0
  • parochial chapelry of Barnard Castle.

    0
    0
  • parochial schoolmaster 's salary is £ 32.

    0
    0
  • parochial clergy to confirm.

    0
    0
  • parochial reords held in Edinburgh and available internationally on microfilm.

    0
    0
  • parochial relief.

    0
    0
  • parochial ministry with two Anglican parishes in the North of England.

    0
    0
  • I also think business people are far too parochial in their intake of stimuli that could help them innovate.

    0
    0
  • And it is also, perhaps, a rather parochial parallel.

    0
    0
  • Even so, that's only true of Britain, why so parochial?

    0
    0
  • The Council is generally very parochial, with seats being handed down from father to son.

    0
    0
  • Quite apart from that, we have always had a policy of making sure that our digital content is not parochial.

    0
    0
  • There have also been problems with the 222 bus service, but perhaps my remarks are becoming a little parochial.

    0
    0
  • Thus with Europe, peripheral Ireland became cosmopolitan; metropolitan Whitehall became parochial.

    0
    0
  • These buried tablets would make the art of many of his contemporaries seem very parochial indeed.

    0
    0
  • For such a world icon the study of handaxes has remained curiously parochial.

    0
    0
  • As fashion designer Shelley Fox says: " When you say Russia or the UK, it sounds parochial.

    0
    0
  • On a more parochial not (can you get more parochial than the Daily Mail?

    0
    0
  • He died a pauper at the age of 81, 8th August 1897, at the Parochial Hospital, Dundee.

    0
    0
  • Upon opening the envelope I remembered just how slim parochial pentameter is.

    0
    0
  • His parochial loyalty was such that he would rather face death than seek a new life in any other principality.

    0
    0
  • The yearly amount of the parochial schoolmaster 's salary is £ 32.

    0
    0
  • Prestonkirk), in East Lothian; and about 1501 was preferred to the deanery or provostship of the collegiate church of St Giles, Edinburgh, which he held with his parochial charges.

    0
    0
  • The consequence is, that the village priests, being too much occupied with their parochial duties, cannot give more than casual or perfunctory attention to the schools, and the numerous pupils either exist on paper only, or are handed over to half-educated cantors, deacons.

    0
    0
  • A constitutional amendment of 1902 exempted from parochial and municipal taxes between 1900 and 1910 practically all factories and mines in the state, employing at least five hands.

    0
    0
  • a priest or minister without parochial charge who is attached for special duties to a sovereign or his representatives (ambassadors, judges, &c.), to bishops, to the establishments of nobles, &c., to institutions (e.g.

    0
    0
  • Other classes of chaplains are: - (r) Parochial or Auxiliary Chaplains, appointed either by a parish priest (under a provision authorized by the Council of Trent) or by a bishop to take over certain specified duties which he is unable to perform; (2) Chaplains of Convents, appointed by a bishop: these must be men of mature age, should not be regulars unless secular priests cannot be obtained, and are not generally to be appointed for life; (3) Pontifical Chaplains, some of whom (known as Private Chaplains) assist the pontiff in the celebration of Mass; others attached directly to the pope are honorary private chaplains who occasionally assist the private chaplains, private clerics of the chapel, common chaplains and supernumerary chaplains.

    0
    0
  • Between 1580 and 1581, when Browne formed in Norwich the first known church of this order on definite scriptural theory, and October 1585, when, being convinced that the times were not yet ripe for the realization of the perfect polity, and taking a more charitable view of the established Church, he yielded to the pressure brought to bear on him by his kinsman Lord Burghley, so far as partially to conform to parochial public worship as defined by law (see Browne, Robert), the history of Congregationalism is mainly that of Browne and of his writings.

    0
    0
  • He diagnosed this evil as being due to the absence of personal influence, spiritual oversight, and the want of parochial organizations which had not kept pace in the city, as they had done in rural parishes, with the growing population.

    0
    0
  • In 1903 Count Billow declared in the Reichstag that the government was endeavouring to pursue a middle course between the extravagant aspirations of the Pan-Germans and the parochial policy of the Social Democrats, which forgets that in a struggle for life and death Germanys means of communication might be cut off.

    0
    0
  • Christians would be less caught up in activities that often seem trifling, trivial, parochial in the narrow sense of the word.

    0
    0
  • Children who don't attend parochial schools are usually required to take religious education for a year or two before this big event.The dress can help make First Communion an exciting time in any little Catholic girl's life.

    0
    0
  • For parents who desire a local alternative to traditional public and parochial schools, several charter and magnet schools may be available, especially in urban areas.

    0
    0
  • Many people associate the wearing of school uniforms with private or parochial schools, and these schools typically have a history of requiring their students to wear uniforms each day.

    0
    0
  • In the United States, uniforms were typically worn only by those children who attended private or parochial schools up until the 1980s when some public school systems began to require uniforms as well.

    0
    0
  • Supplementary stipends to bishops and parochial clergy, assignments to Sardinian clergy and expenditure for education and charitable purposes - - 142,912 f28,52f Roman Charitable and Religious Fund.The law of the 19th of June 1873 contained special provisions, in conformity with the character of Rome as the seat of the papacy, and with the situation created by the Law of Guarantees.

    0
    1
  • The board has no administrative or executive power, but makes annual inspections of all public charitable, correctional or reformatory institutions, all private institutions which receive aid from, or are used by municipal or parochial authorities, and all private asylums for the insane; and reports annually to the governor on the actual condition of the institutions.

    0
    1
  • Besides the public school system there are many parochial schools; the University school, with an eight years' course; the Western Reserve University, with its medical school (opened in 1843), the Franklin T.

    0
    1
  • Thirty years after the Ridsdale judgment, the ritual confusion in the Church of England was worse than ever, and the old ideal expressed in the Acts of Uniformity had given place to a desire to sanctify with some sort of authority the parochial "uses" which had grown up. In this respect the dominant opinion in the Church, intent on compromise, seems to have been expressed in the Report presented in 1908 to the convocation of the province of Canterbury by the sub-committee of five bishops appointed to investigate the matter, namely, that under the Ornaments Rubric the vestments prescribed in the first Prayer Book of Edward VI.

    0
    1
  • Spring Rice(afterwards Lord Monteagle) on the repair and maintenance of parochial churches and chapels.

    0
    1
  • Under Ferdinand the parochial clergy were tempted to become Lutherans by the prospect of matrimony, and, in reply to the remonstrances of their bishops, declared that they would rather give up their cures than their wives.

    0
    1
  • There are a number of parochial and conventual schools, the church being hostile to the public-school system.

    0
    1
  • He took a prominent part in educational affairs, strongly opposed the Roman Catholic claims for public funds for parochial schools, and conducted the campaign of the Free School Society to its successful issue in 1842, when a state law was passed forbidding the support from public funds of any "religious sectarian doctrine."

    0
    1
  • The brigade was confined to the central part of the metropolis; for the rest, the parochial authorities had charge of protection from fire.

    0
    1
  • The establishment of polytechnics was provided for by the City of London Parochial Charities Act 1883; the charities being administered by trustees.

    0
    1
  • These are places of worship supplementary to a parish church, and may be either "chapels of ease," to ease or relieve the mother-church and serve those parishioners who may live far away, "parochial chapels," the "churches" of ancient divisions of a very large and widely scattered parish, or "district chapels," those of a district of a parish divided under the various church building acts.

    0
    1
  • He was arrested in November 1775 by a mob o¢ lawless Whigs, and was kept in prison in Connecticut for six weeks; his parochial.

    0
    1
  • Commissioners (now the board of agriculture) are appointed to execute the acts; a rent charge on all lands liable to tithes at the time of the passing of the first act is substituted for those tithes, of which the gross amount is ascertained either by voluntary parochial agreement, or, failing that, by compulsory award confirmed by the commissioners; and the value of the tithes is fixed in the latter case by their average value in the particular parish during the seven years preceding Christmas 1835, without deduction for parochial or county and other rates, charges and assessments falling on tithes, the rent charge being liable to all the charges to which tithes were liable.

    0
    1
  • Besides the tithes dealt with by local acts as already mentioned, certain other kinds of tithes are outside the scope of the Commutation Acts, namely, tithes of fish and fishing, personal tithes other than tithes of mills, and mineral tithes, unless the landowners and tithe-owners consent to make a parochial agreement for commutation before the confirmation of an apportionment after a compulsory award in such parish.

    0
    1
  • This parochial machinery enabled him to make a singularly successful experiment in dealing with the problem of poverty.

    0
    2
  • The ecclesiastical importance of the monks in the various branches of the Orthodox Church lies in this, that as bishops must be celibate, whereas the parochial clergy must be married, the bishops are all recruited from the monks.

    0
    2
  • The whole of the work is done in loyal subordination to the diocesan and parochial organization of the Church of England.

    0
    2
  • In the domain of the Knights the gentry, parochial clergy and townsmen, who, beneath its protection, had attained to a high degree of wealth and civilization, for long remained without the slightest political influence, though they bore nearly the whole burden of taxation.

    0
    3
  • 26 a to the life of his own time by his experiments in parochial organization.

    0
    3
  • Churches, as the outcome of the organization of the Catholic Church, are divided into classes as " cathedral," " conventual " and " collegiate," " parochial " and " district " churches.

    0
    3
  • James parochial school and for several years was employed in the Fulton Fish Market.

    0
    4
  • The Municipal Elections (Corrupt and Illegal Practices) Act 1884 applied to school board elections subject to certain variations, and has been extended by the Local Government Act 1888 to county council elections, and by the Local Government Act 1894 to elections by parochial electors.

    0
    4
  • In England, for quite two centuries after its conversion, the clergy administered only pro tempore in the parochial churches, receiving their maintenance from the cathedral church, all the appointments within the diocese lying with the bishop. But in order to promote the building and endowment of parochial churches those who had contributed to their erection either by a grant of land, by building or by endowment, became entitled to present a clerk of their own choice to the bishop, who was invested with the revenues derived from such contribution.

    0
    4
  • Lastly, in regard to the object aimed at there was an important difference, for the professed object of the friars was to be clerical helpers of the parochial clergy in meeting the specifically religious needs of the time.

    0
    4
  • The pueblo was created after 1773; but the history of the settlement goes back to 1571, and the parochial church dates from 1710.

    0
    5
  • In some cases a parish priest is also appointed to a chaplaincy, but in so far as he is a chaplain he has no parochial duties.

    0
    5
  • He declared that twenty new churches, with parishes, should be erected in Glasgow, and he set to work to revivify, remodel and extend the old parochial economy of Scotland.

    0
    5
  • Pelotas was only a small settlement at the beginning of the 19th century and had no parochial organization until 1812.

    0
    5
  • Large sums have been voted in Holland for the establishment of primary and secondary schools, and the government has undertaken to assist in the establishment of parochial schools, the object being that every village, at least in Java, should possess one.

    0
    6
  • With these conditions, and with the diminution of the ascendancy of town over country that resulted from the Teutonic conquests, is connected the rise of the parochial system in the country.

    0
    6
  • But each parish elects its own council for parochial affairs, which has a legal status and deals with such matters as the ecclesiastical assessments.

    0
    6
  • It generally contained the tomb of the founder, and, as the officiator or mass-priest was often unconnected with the parochial clergy, had an entrance from the outside.

    0
    6
  • When the news of this reached Paris, it created a strong feeling against the planters; and on the motion of the Abbe Gregoire it was resolved by the assembly on the 15th of May 1791 " that the people of colour resident in the French colonies, born of free parents, were entitled to, as of right, and should be allowed, the enjoyment of all the privileges of French citizens, and among others those of being eligible to seats both in the parochial and colonial assemblies."

    0
    7
Browse other sentences examples →