Parnell sentence example

parnell
  • Of the suburbs, Newton, Parnell and Newmarket are in reality outlying parts of the town itself.
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  • In Parnell is the former residence of Bishop Selwyn, who, arriving in the colony in 1842, assisted to draw up the constitution of the Anglican church.
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  • 2, 1710-1711), Steele, Addison, Swift, Hughes, &c.; Spectator (March I,1710-1711to Dec. 20, 1714), Addison, Steele, Budgell, Hughes, Grove, Pope, Parnell, Swift, &c.; Guardian (March 12, 1713 to Oct.
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  • One Parnell was put forward to complain of a decree pronounced against him in favour of the contending party Vaughan, who he said had presented a gilt cup to the chancellor.
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  • The disclosures before the Parnell Commission, the O'Shea divorce proceedings, the downfall of Mr Parnell and the disruption of the Irish party, assisted him in his task; but the fact remains that by persistent courage and undeviating thoroughness he reduced crime in Ireland to a vanishing point.
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  • He was in the secrets of the "new departure" in 1879-1881, and in the latter year had an interview with Parnell at the House of Commons, when the Irish leader spoke sympathetically of an armed revolution in Ireland.
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  • The Parnell Commission of 1889 put an end to this.
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  • The report of the Parnell Commission is his monument.
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  • Cunninghame Graham and Mr John Burns for their share in the riot in Trafalgar Square; and in 1889 he was junior to Sir Charles (afterwards Lord) Russell as counsel for the Irish Nationalists before the Parnell Commission - an association afterwards bitterly commented upon by Mr T.
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  • Stead in 1885, as he had earlier supported Mrs Josephine Butler in a similar cause; he attacked the trade in alcohol; was an anti-vivisectionist; he advocated arbitration; and his vehement attacks on Sir Charles Dilke and Charles Stewart Parnell originated the phrase the "Nonconformist conscience."
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  • But Pope excelled, not only in the voluptuous and in the didactic epistle, but in that of compliment as well, and there is no more graceful example of this in literature than is afforded by the letter about the poems of Parnell addressed, in 1721, to Robert, earl of Oxford.
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  • The Clarks, South Gate, Parliament and Parnell bridges cross the South Channel to the southern parts of the city.
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  • Electric tramways connect the city and suburbs and traverse the principal streets and the St Patrick's and Parnell bridges.
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  • Henry Brooke Parnell, 1st baron Congleton >>
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  • First as the associate of Steele, with whom he quarrelled, and of Addison, whose esteem for him survived all differences, afterwards as the intimate comrade of Pope and Arbuthnot, the friend of Congreve and Atterbury, Parnell and Gay, he entered deeply into the literary life of the period.
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  • At Avondale, above the upper "meeting," by the Avonmore, Charles Stewart Parnell was born.
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  • Parnell in 1890 until January 1896; but his Nationalism was of a temperate and orderly kind, and though his personal distinction singled him out for the chairmanship during the party dissensions of this period, he was in no active sense the political leader.
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  • On the 13th of October Mr Parnell was arrested, and on the 10th the Land League was proclaimed.
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  • On the 2nd of May Mr Gladstone announced that the government intended to release Mr Parnell and his fellow-prisoners in Kilmainham, and that both Lord Cowper and Mr Forster had in consequence resigned; and the following Saturday Forster's successor, Lord Frederick Cavendish, was, with Mr Burke, murdered in Phoenix Park.
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  • But Mr Gladstone's influence with the Liberal party was paramount, in spite of the damaging appearance of the compact made with Parnell, and Forster's pointed criticisms only caused thoroughgoing partisans to accuse him of a desire to avenge himself.
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  • It was not till the next session that he delivered his fiercest attack on Parnell in the debate on the address, denouncing him for his connexion with the Land League, and quoting against him the violent speeches of his supporters and the articles of his newspaper organs.
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  • It was on this occasion that Parnell, on Forster's charging him, not with directly planning or perpetrating outrages or murder, but with conniving at them, ejaculated "It's a lie"; and, replying on the next day, the Irish leader, instead of disproving Forster's charges, bitterly denounced his methods of administration.
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  • arne These tactics were destined to be raised to a fine art by Parnell, who succeeded to the head of the Irish party about the time of the formation of Gladstones government.
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  • A measure was passed on his initiation, in 1881, authorizing him to arrest and detain suspected persons; and many well-known Irishmen, including Parnell himself and other members of parliament, were thrown into prison.
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  • It was generally understood that H Lord Carnarvon, who had been made viceroy of ome Ireland, had been in communication with Parnell; that Lord Salisbury was aware of the interviews which had taken place; and it was whispered that Lord Carnarvon was in favor of granting some sort of administrative autonomy to Ireland.
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  • The hostility of the Irish members was perhaps increased by some natural indignation at the charges brought against Parnell.
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  • The Times, in April 1887, printed the facsimile of a letter purporting to be signed by Parnell, in which he declared that he had no other course open to him but to denounce the Phoenix Park murders, but that, while he regretted the accident of Lord Frederick Cavendishs death, he could not refuse to admit that Burke got no more than his deserts.
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  • His flight practically settled the question; and an inquiry, which many people had thought at its inception would brand Parnell as a criminal, raised him to an influence which he had never enjoyed before.
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  • He was made co-respondent in a divorce suit brought by Captain OShea another Irishmanfor the dissolution of his marriage; and the disclosures made at the trial induced Gladstone, who was supported by the Nonconformists generally throughout the United Kingdom, to request Parnell to withdraw from the leadership of the Irish party.
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  • Parnell refused to comply with this request, and the Irish party was shattered into fragments by his decision.
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  • Parnell himself did not long survive Nation- the disruption of the party which he had done so alist split.
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  • Parnell) .
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  • William Shaw succeeded him as chairman of the Irish party in Parliament; but after the election of 1880, Parnell, who had the Land League at his back, ousted him by 23 votes to 18.
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  • The Land League, of which Michael Davitt was the founder, originated in Mayo in August, and at a meeting in Dublin in October the organization was extended to all Ireland, with Parnell as president.
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  • The country was thickly covered with branches before the end of the year, and in December Parnell went to America to collect money.
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  • Parnell had to conciliate the Clan-na-Gael and the Fenians generally, both in Ireland and America, while abstaining from action which would make his parliamentary position untenable.
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  • Forster (q.v.) as chief; secretary, and Parnell remained chairman of his own party in parliament.
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  • Parnell with four other members of parliament and the chief officers of the Land League were indicted for conspiracy in the Queen's Bench.
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  • On the 25th of January 1881 the jury disagreed, and Parnell became stronger than ever.
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  • The system originated by Parnell's Ennis speech became an all-devouring tyranny.
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  • Parnell cared nothing for the dignity of the House of Commons.
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  • Parnell and 35 of his colleagues were suspended, and the bill became law on the 2nd of March, but not before great and permanent changes were made in parliamentary procedure.
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  • Drastic as the bill was, Parnell refused to be a party to it, and on the second reading, which was carried by 352 to 176, he walked out of the House with 35 of his followers.
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  • In September a convention was held in Dublin, and Parnell reported its action to the American Land League: " Resolutions were adopted for national self-government, the unconditional liberation of the land for the people, tenants not to use the rent-fixing clauses of the Land Act, but follow old Land League lines, and rely on the old methods to reach justice.
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  • Parnell, i.
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  • Speaking at Leeds on the 7th of October, Gladstone said " the resources of civilization were not exhausted," adding that Parnell " stood between the living and the dead, not like Aaron to stay the plague, but to spread the plague."
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  • Two days later Parnell called the prime minister a " masquerading knight-errant," ready to oppress the unarmed, but submissive to the Boers as soon as he found " that they were able to shoot straighter than his own soldiers."
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  • Parnell is said to have disapproved of the no-rent manifesto, as also Mr John Dillon, who was in Kilmainham with him, but both of them signed it (ib.
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  • At Liverpool on the 27th of October Gladstone described Parnell and his party as " marching through rapine to the disintegration and dismemberment of the empire."
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  • It was decided to check evictions by an Arrears Bill, and the three imprisoned members of parliament - Messrs Parnell, Dillon and O'Kelly - were released on the 2nd of May 1882, against the wishes of the Irish government.
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  • On the 22nd of February 1883 Forster made his great attack on Parnell in the House of Commons, accusing him of moral complicity with Irish crime.
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  • On the 11th of December Parnell received a present of £37,000 from his followers in Ireland.
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  • In January 1885 Parnell visited Thurles, where he gave a remarkable proof of his power by breaking down local opposition to his candidate for Tipperary.
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  • In May it was intended to renew the Crimes Prevention Act, but before that was done the government was beaten on a financial question by 264 to 252, Parnell and 39 of his followers voting with the Conservatives.
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  • The lord-lieutenant had an interview with Parnell, of which very conflicting accounts were given, but the Irish leader issued a manifesto advising his friends to vote against the Liberals as oppressors and coercionists, who promised everything and did nothing.
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  • In October 1884, only fourteen months before, he had told political friends that he had a sneaking regard fbr Parnell, and that Home Rule might be a matter for serious consideration within ten years (Sir A.
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  • The shortening of the time was perhaps accounted for by the fact that the new House of Commons consisted of 331 Liberals, 249 Conservatives, 86 Home Rulers and Independents, Parnell thus holding the balance of parties.
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  • In February Parnell again showed his power by forcing Captain O'Shea upon the unwilling electors of Galway.
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  • Parnell accepted the bill, but without enthusiasm.
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  • Parnell had now gained the bulk of the Liberal party, including Lord Spencer (in spite of all that he had said and done) and Sir G.
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  • Cecil Rhodes, hoping to help imperial federation, gave Parnell 10,000 for the cause.
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  • Smith, to inquire into certain charges made by The Times against Parnell and his party.
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  • What caused most excitement was the publication by The Times on the 15th of May 1887 of a facsimile letter purporting to have been written by Parnell on the 15th of May 1882, nine days after the Phoenix Park murders.
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  • Parnell at once declared that this was a forgery, but he did nothing more at the time.
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  • A few days later, on the 8th of March 1889, Parnell was entertained at dinner by the Eighty Club, Lords Spencer and Rosebery being present; and he was well received on English platforms when he chose to appear.
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  • Parnell was invited, but neither came nor answered.
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  • An action begun by Parnell against The Times was settled by the payment of a substantial sum.
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  • The " plan of campaign " was started, against Parnell's wishes, towards the end of 1886.
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  • Parnell's subsequent marriage with the respondent before a registrar did him no good with his Roman Catholic supporters.
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  • The result was an enthusiastic vote of confidence in Parnell, moved by Mr Justin M`Carthy and seconded by Mr T.
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  • Five days later he was unanimously re-elected chairman by his party in parliament, but the meeting was scarcely over when Gladstone's famous letter to Mr Morley became public. The writer in effect demanded Parnell's resignation of the leadership as the condition upon which he could continue at the head of the Liberal party.
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  • Long and acrimonious debates followed in committee-room 15, and on the 6th of December Parnell was left in the chair with only 26 supporters.
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  • Parnell then began a campaign as hopeless as that of Napoleon after Leipzig.
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  • Barry O'Brien, Life of Parnell (1898).
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  • See also the Report of the Parnell Special Commission (1890); the Report of the Bessborough Commission (1881), of the Richmond Commission (1881), of the Cowper Commission (1887), and of the Mathew Commission (1893), and the Report of the Congested Districts Board (1899).
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  • Parnell's and Edward Saunderson's shared penchant for "eighteenth-century modes of thought and expression," is another example.
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  • Charles Stewart Parnell - brief biography from Clare Library.
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  • Brian Parnell, 66, was jailed for two years for attempting to incite an under-age boy in Sri Lanka to commit buggery.
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  • His close confidants advised Parnell to take time-off from politics to allow the issue to die a natural death.
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  • In October 1891, aged forty-five, Parnell died in Brighton, Sussex.
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  • Ring Larner Jr: It was a question that would... J. Parnell Thomas: (pounding gavel) Leave the witness chair.
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  • Parnell publicly condemned the murders and rode out the storm of public indignation to push for a policy of Home Rule for Ireland.
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  • A puzzle For You A crossword puzzle from Parnell Hall, author of " A Clue For The Puzzle Lady " .
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  • stately pile where Charles Stewart Parnell lived, in the Wicklow hills.
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  • I have seen some of the others mentioned visiting there; Thomas J. Clarke had a tobacconist 's shop at 75a Parnell Street.
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  • Four days after this Parnell was arrested under the Coercion Act and lodged in Kilmainham gaol.
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  • (See Parnell.) The conduct of the agrarian war had in the meantime almost passed from Parnell's hands.
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  • He was a strenuous advocate of the abolition of the House of Lords (see 20.845, 846); at the time of the Parnell Commission he had much to do with the unmasking of Pigott; and he was a member of the inquiry into the Jameson Raid, his hostility to Mr. Chamberlain being as pronounced as against Lord Rosebery when the latter became leader of the Liberal party.
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  • A Puzzle For You A crossword puzzle from Parnell Hall, author of " A Clue For The Puzzle Lady ".
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  • Most of the conference was based at Avondale House, a modest stately pile where Charles Stewart Parnell lived, in the Wicklow hills.
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