Parliament sentence example

parliament
  • A new parliament was called to meet at Oxford, to avoid the influences of the city of London, where Shaftesbury had taken the greatest pains to make himself popular.
    801
    290
  • In this matter the opposition were in the wrong, and by attacking the parliament discredited themselves.
    184
    156
  • With nine other peers he presented a petition to the king in November, praying for the meeting of parliament, of which Charles took no notice.
    111
    129
  • During the Civil War Bolton sided with the parliament, and in February 1643 and March 1644 the royalist forces assaulted the town, but were on both occasions repulsed.
    108
    109
  • On the resignation of this parliament he became a member of the council of state named in the "Instrument."
    106
    103
    Advertisement
  • Being brought before the bar of the House of Lords he made submission as to his conduct in declaring parliament dissolved by the prorogation, and in violating the Lords' privileges by bringing a habeas corpus in the King's Bench.
    83
    94
  • He urged on the bill by which Catholics were prohibited from sitting in either House of Parliament, and was bitter in his expressions of disappointment when the Commons passed a proviso excepting James, against whom the bill was especially aimed, from its operation.
    68
    54
  • His original term of five years would have expired in 1778; but it was annually prolonged by special act of parliament until his voluntary resignation.
    60
    55
  • In 1813 he was called on to give evidence upon Indian affairs before the two houses of parliament, which received him with exceptional marks of respect.
    59
    53
  • On the formation of the kingdom of Italy he returned to Tuscany and was elected member of parliament; he died in 1862.
    57
    54
    Advertisement
  • On St Wolstan's Day, the, 9th of January 44 8 - 1 449, Waynflete was enthroned in Winchester cathedral in the presence of the king; and, probably partly for his sake, parliament was held there in June and July 1449, when the king frequently attended the college chapel, Waynflete officiating (Win.
    57
    60
  • Much of Shaftesbury's career, increasingly so as it came near its close, is incapable of defence; but it has escaped most of his critics that his life up to the Restoration, apparently full of inconsistencies, was evidently guided by one leading principle, the determination to uphold the supremacy of parliament, a principle which, however obscured by self-interest, appears also to have underlain his whole political career.
    51
    65
  • As Albany was strongly supported by the Scottish parliament, Angus found it necessary to withdraw to France till 1524.
    49
    52
  • On the 8th of March he announced to parliament that the declaration had been cancelled, though he did his best to induce Charles to remain firm.
    48
    48
  • For the Long Parliament, which met on the 3rd of November 1640, he was elected for Downton in Wiltshire, but the return was disputed, and he did not take his seat - his election not being declared valid until the last days of the Rump.
    46
    49
    Advertisement
  • From 1832 to 1885 Kendal sent one member to parliament, but since the last date its representation has been merged in that of the southern division of the county.
    44
    56
  • In February 1532 he protested against all acts concerning the church passed by the parliament which met in 1529, but this did not prevent the important proceedings which secured the complete submission of the church to the state later in the same year.
    44
    62
  • Mr. Snowden made himself extremely unpopular during the World War owing to his pacifist opinions, and was one of the Socialist members of Parliament who lost their seats at the general election of 1918.
    43
    47
  • He reformed the administration and extended the powers of the Sicilian parliament, which was composed of the barons, the prelates and the representatives of the towns.
    40
    45
  • In 1337 the industry received an impulse from the settlement of a party of Flemish clothiers, and extended so greatly that when it was found necessary in 1566 to appoint by act of parliament deputies to assist the aulnegers, Bolton is named as one of the places where these deputies were to be employed.
    39
    46
    Advertisement
  • On the 1 9 th of May 1347 heralds invited the people to a parliament on the Capitol, and on the loth, the day being Whit-Sunday, the meeting took place.
    38
    45
  • In the first parliament elected under this "Instrument" he sat for Wiltshire, having been elected also for Poole and Tewkesbury, and was one of the commissioners for the ejection of unworthy ministers.
    37
    41
  • Up to 1848 he was a government official in Nassau; in that year he became a member of the German national parliament and undersecretary of state for foreign affairs.
    35
    35
  • He sat for Wiltshire in the Barebones parliament, of which he was a leading member, and where he supported Cromwell's views against the extreme section.
    35
    42
  • This treaty, however, was kept from public knowledge, and Ashley helped Charles to hoodwink parliament by signing a similar treaty on the 2nd of February 1672, which was laid before them as the only one in existence.
    35
    43
    Advertisement
  • At the meeting of parliament on the 8th of January 1674, he carried a motion for a proclamation banishing Catholics to a distance of 10 m.
    34
    38
  • Throughout the revolutionary years he supported his brother's policy, became a member of the Erfurt parliament, and, after the collapse of the national movement, returned to the service of the duchy of Nassau.
    33
    41
  • Cooper was again elected for Wiltshire for the parliament of 1656, but Cromwell refused to allow him, with many others of his opponents, to sit.
    30
    36
  • Later on he attempted to influence the Prussian Northern Union in the direction of the national policy, and he took part in the sessions of the Erfurt parliament; but, soon realizing the hopelessness of any good results from the vacillating policy of Prussia, he retired from the contest, and, as a major in the service of the SchleswigHolstein government, took part in the Danish War of 1850.
    28
    38
  • Before the prorogation, however, he saw the invaluable Act of Habeas Corpus, which he had carried through parliament, receive the royal assent.
    28
    39
    Advertisement
  • As a matter of fact, the parliament at Leicester, in which the speeches were supposed to have been made, began on the 30th of April 1414 before Chicheley was archbishop. The rolls of parliament show that he was not present in the parliament at all.
    28
    41
  • Upon the replacing of the Rump by the army, after the breaking up of Richard's parliament, Cooper endeavoured unsuccessfully to take his seat on the ground of his former disputed election for Downton.
    24
    31
  • He also assisted to edit the tenth edition of Erskine May's Law, Privileges, Proceedings and Usage of Parliament (London, 1896).
    22
    39
  • Whether, as alleged by some, Waynflete fled and hid himself during the period covered by the battle of Wakefield and Edward's fist parliament in 1461, is very doubtful.
    21
    38
  • Parliament met on the 10th of August.
    19
    3
    Advertisement
  • The whole tendency of the Regulating Act was to establish for the first time the influence of the crown, or rather of parliament, in Indian affairs.
    15
    36
  • Upon the restoration of the parliament on the 26th of December Cooper was one of the commissioners to command the army, and on the 2nd of January was made one of the new council of state.
    15
    38
  • He determined immediately to summon another parliament.
    10
    4
  • There is no record that it ever returned representatives to parliament.
    10
    6
  • The centre of interest now shifts to the India House and to the British parliament.
    9
    6
    Advertisement
  • In parliament he continued to lend the most effective help to the Liberal party.
    7
    3
  • in his struggle with the parliament.
    7
    7
  • Incensed by the dilatory and factious proceedings of the House, Cromwell dismissed the parliament on the 22nd of January 1655.
    5
    2
  • The parliament is summoned annually by the king at Budapest.
    5
    2
  • In the beginning of January 1644, however, for reasons which are variously reported by himself and Clarendon, he resigned his governorship and commissions and went over to the parliament.
    5
    3
    Advertisement
  • His conduct was attacked before the board of directors in London, but events seemed to prove that he was in the right, and in 1769 he became a director of the company, having in the previous year obtained a seat in parliament.
    3
    3
  • He was voted guilty by the Commons; but while the Lords were disputing whether the accused peer should have bail, and whether the charges amounted to more than a misdemeanour, parliament was prorogued on the 30th of December and dissolved three weeks later.
    3
    3
  • and was thanked by parliament.
    3
    5
  • Meanwhile, the affairs of the East India Company had come under the consideration of parliament.
    3
    6
  • In 1650 parliament appointed a commission "for the better propagation and preaching of the gospel in Wales," and Powell acted as one of the principal advisers of this body.
    2
    1
    Advertisement
  • The Manitoba Act constituting the province was passed by the Canadian parliament in 1870.
    2
    1
  • In the charter granted by the Canadian parliament to the Canadian Pacific railway a clause giving it for twenty years control over the railway construction of the province led to a fierce agitation, till the clause was repealed in 1888.
    2
    1
  • His first recorded intervention in debate in the Long Parliament was on the 9th of November 1640, a few days after the meeting of the House, when he delivered a petition from the imprisoned John Lilburne.
    2
    1
  • On his return to London he found the parliament again negotiating Cromwell with Charles, and on the eve of making a treaty which Charles himself had no intention of keeping and the regarded merely as a means of regaining his power, and which would have thrown away in one moment all the advantages gained during years of bloodshed and struggle.
    2
    1
  • He urged Fairfax to attack the Scots at once in their own country and to forestall their The invasion; but Fairfax refused and resigned, and battles of Cromwell was appointed by parliament, on the 26th Dunbar of June 1650, commander-in-chief of all the forces and of the Commonwealth.
    2
    1
  • In 1658 the improved condition of Scotland was the subject of Cromwell's special congratulation in addressing parliament.
    2
    1
  • On the 12th of September 1651 Cromwell made his triumphal entry into London at the conclusion of his victorious campaigns; and parliament granted him Hampton Court as a residence with £4000 a year.
    2
    1
  • These triumphs, however, had all been obtained by force of arms; the more difficult task now awaited Cromwell of governing England by parliament and by law.
    2
    1
  • On the 15th of April they proposed that the parliament should appoint a provisional government and dissolve itself.
    2
    1
  • This compromise was refused by the parliament, which proceeded on the 10th to press through its last stages the "bill for a new representation."
    2
    1
  • You are no parliament, I say you are no parliament.
    2
    1
  • (2) That in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the Crown of England, without the consent of parliament.
    2
    1
  • During the civil wars Knaresborough was held for some time by the Royalists, but they were obliged to surrender, and the castle was among those ordered to be destroyed by parliament in 1646.
    2
    1
  • The enthusiasm of the nation he had saved forgot his tardy adhesion to the popular cause, and at the parliament of Ayr on the 25th of April 1315 the succession was settled by a unanimous voice on him, and, failing males of his body, on his brother Edward and his heirs male, or failing them on his daughter Marjorie and her heirs, if she married with his consent.
    2
    1
  • These votes, however, were cancelled later, on the 26th of July, under the pressure of the royalist city mob which invaded the two Houses; but the two speakers, with eight peers and fifty-seven members of the Commons, themselves joined the army, which now advanced to London, overawing all resistance, escorting the fugitive members in triumph to Westminster on the 6th of August, and obliging the parliament on the 10th to cancel the last votes, with the threat of a regiment of cavalry drawn up by Cromwell in Hyde Park.
    2
    3
  • by negotiating simultaneously with army and parliament, by inflaming their jealousies and differences, and finally by these means securing his restoration with his full prerogatives unimpaired.
    2
    3
  • He retired to Wimborne and urged upon his parliamentary followers the necessity of securing a new parliament.
    2
    4
  • In July 1921 he announced his intention of retiring from Parliament, and he died Aug.
    1
    0
  • On the 26th of June the first Tuscan parliament assembled, but.
    1
    0
  • in the struggle with the Parliament in the Great Rebellion.
    1
    1
  • Within two years uniform customs duties were to be imposed; thereafter the parliament of the Commonwealth had exclusive power to impose customs and excise duties, or to grant bounties; and trade within the Commonwealth was to be absolutely free.
    1
    1
  • Exceptions were made permitting the states to grant bounties on mining and (with the consent of the parliament) on exports of produce or manufactures - Western Australia being for a time partially exempted from the prohibition to impose import duties.
    1
    1
  • On her accession Elizabeth refused to allow him to kiss her hand; but he sat and voted in the parliament and convocation of 1559.
    1
    1
  • Two members were summoned to parliament by Edward VI.
    1
    1
  • The town returned a member to parliament from 1536 to 1728, was again enfranchised in 1832, and now (with Llanfyllin, Llanidloes, Montgomery, Machynlleth and Newtown) forms the Montgomery district of parliamentary boroughs.
    1
    1
  • In 1572 a formal manifesto was published, entitled an Admonition to Parliament, the leading ideas in which were: parity of ministers, appointment of elders and deacons; election of ministers by the congregation; objection to prescribed prayer and antiphonal chanting; preaching, the chief duty of a minister; and the power of the magistrates to root out superstition and idolatry.
    1
    2
  • Large steps were made towards the union of the two kingdoms by the representation of Scotland in the parliament at Westminster; free trade between the two countries was established, the administration of justice greatly improved, vassalage and heritable jurisdictions abolished, and security and good order maintained by the council of nine appointed by the Protector.
    1
    2
  • Although the idol of his victorious army, and in a position enabling him to exercise autocratic power, he laboured unostentatiously for more than a year and a half as a member of the parliament, whose authority he supported to the best of his ability.
    1
    2
  • Cromwell hastened to the House, and at the last moment, on the bill being put to the vote, whispering to Harrison, "This is the time; Y must do it," he rose, and after alluding to the former good services of the parliament, proceeded to overwhelm the members with reproaches.
    1
    2
  • In the afternoon he dissolved the council in spite of John Bradshaw's remonstrances, who said, "Sir, we have heard what you did at the House this morning ...; but you are mistaken to think that the parliament is dissolved, for no power under heaven can dissolve them but themselves; therefore take you notice of that."
    1
    2
  • Cromwell had no patience with formal pedantry of this sort; and in point of strict legality "The Rump" of the Long Parliament had little better title to authority than the officers who expelled it from the House.
    1
    2
  • This was the "Little" or "Barebones Parliament," consisting of one hundred and forty persons selected by the council of officers from among those nominated by the congregations in each county, which met on the 4th of July 1653.
    1
    3
  • The Long Parliament had ordered a strict observance of Sunday, punished swearing severely, and made adultery a capital crime; Cromwell issued further ordinances against duelling, swearing, racemeetings and cock-fights - the last as tending to the disturbance of the public peace and the encouragement of "dissolute practices to the dishonour of God."
    1
    3
  • to demonstrate that military government had given place to civil; for he approached his task in the same spirit that had prompted his declaration to the Little Parliament of his wish "to divest the sword of all power in the Civil administration."
    1
    3
  • Meanwhile, the first parliament of the Protectorate had met in September 16J4.
    1
    3
  • The measure was an amalgam of Cavours scheme for a free church in a free state, of Ricasolis Free Church Bill, rejected by parliament four years previously, and of the proposals presented to Pius IX.
    1
    3
  • He reproached the soldiers for their insubordination against their officers, and the army for its rebellion against the parliament.
    1
    4
  • Both the army and the parliament gave cold replies to his offers to negotiate; and Charles, on the 27th of December 1647, entered into the Engagement with the Scots by which he promised the establishment of Presbyterianism for three years, the suppression of the Independents and their sects, together with privileges for the Scottish nobles, while the Scots undertook to invade England and restore him to his throne.
    1
    4
  • Cromwell therefore did not hesitate to join the army in its opposition to the parliament, and supported the Remonstrance of the troops (loth of November 1648), which included the demand for the king's punishment as "the grand author of all our troubles," and justified the use of force by the army if other means failed.
    1
    4
  • Irish in a league against the supporters of the parliament, and only a few scattered forts held out for the Commonwealth, while the young king was every day expected to land and complete the conquest of the island.
    1
    4
  • The increase in the tonnage of sailing vessels, which in other countries tends to decline, was due to the bounties voted by parliament to its merchant sailing fleet with the view of increasing the number of skilled seamen.
    0
    0
  • The ministers, whether members of parliament or not, have the right to sit in both chambers and can address the house whenever they choose, though a minister may only vote in the chamber of which he happens to be a member.
    0
    0
  • An administrative tribunal called the cour des corn ptes subjects the accounts of the states financial agents (trsorierspayeurs, receveurs of registration fees, of customs, of indirect taxes, &c.) and of the communesi to a close investigation, and a vote of definitive settlement is finally passed by parliament.
    0
    0
  • In Guiana and Cochin-China the franchise is restricted to citizens, in which category the natives (in those colonies) are not included.1 The inhabitants of Tahiti though accorded French citizenship have not been allotted a representative in parliament.
    0
    0
  • The colonial minister is assisted by a number of organizations of which the most important is the superior council of the colonies (created by decree in 1883), an advisory body which inclUdes the senators and deputies elected by the colonies, and delegates elected by the universal suffrage of all citizens in the colonies and protectorates which do not return members to parliament.
    0
    0
  • to open the Union Parliament on behalf of King George V.
    0
    0
  • He became a member of parliament, and was sent in 1562 as ambassador to France, where he remained till 1566; and in 1572 he again went to France in the same capacity for a short time.
    0
    0
  • The immediate result was a conference at Parliament House, Melbourne, of representatives from each of the seven colonies.
    0
    0
  • No alteration to be made in states without the consent of the legislatures of such states, as well as of the federal parliament.
    0
    0
  • Power to impose customs and excise duties to be in the Federal government and parliament.
    0
    0
  • At this meeting all the colonies except New Zealand were represented, and it was agreed that the parliament of each colony should be asked to pass a bill enabling the people to choose ten persons to represent the colony on a federal convention; the work of such convention being the framing of a federal constitution to be submitted to the people for approval by means of the referendum.
    0
    0
  • During the year 1896 Enabling Acts were passed by New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia and Western Australia, and delegates were elected by popular vote in all the colonies named except Western Australia, where the delegates were chosen by parliament.
    0
    0
  • The Enabling Bill passed the various stages in the parliament of that colony, and the question was then adopted by referendum.
    0
    0
  • In accordance with this general verdict of all the states, the colonial draft bill was submitted to the imperial government for legislation as an imperial act; and six delegates were sent to England to explain the measure and to pilot it through the cabinet and parliament.
    0
    0
  • power is vested in a federal parliament, consisting of the sovereign, a senate, and a house of representatives, the sovereign being represented by a governor-general.
    0
    0
  • The legislative powers of the parliament have a wide range, many matters being transferred to it from the colonial parliaments.
    0
    0
  • He challenged the legality of Horne's consecration, and a special act of parliament was passed to meet the point, while the charge against Bonner was withdrawn.
    0
    0
  • Fermanagh returns two members to parliament, one each for the north and south divisions.
    0
    0
  • During the eleven years of government without parliament very little is recorded of Cromwell.
    0
    0
  • He was again later the champion of the commoners of St Ives in the Long Parliament 1 Life of Sir H.
    0
    0
  • His sphere of action, however, was not in parliament.
    0
    0
  • During the earlier part of the year 164 3 the military position of Charles was greatly superior to that of the parliament.
    0
    0
  • He then went to London to give an account of proceedings to the parliament, was thanked for his services and rewarded with the estate of the marquess of Worcester.
    0
    0
  • The petition from the army to the parliament for arrears of pay was suppressed and the petitioners declared enemies of the state.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell, though greatly disliking the policy of the Presbyterians, yet gave little support at first to the army in resisting parliament.
    0
    0
  • The soldiers refused to disband, and on the 3rd of June Cromwell, whom, it was believed, the parliament intended to arrest, joined the army."
    0
    0
  • On the 31st of May 1647 Cromwell had ordered Cornet Joyce to prevent the king's removal by the parliament or the Scots from Holmby, and Joyce by his own authority and with the king's consent brought him to Newmarket to the headquarters of the army.
    0
    0
  • Cromwell soon restored order, and the representative council, including privates as well as officers chosen to negotiate with the parliament, was subordinated to the council of war.
    0
    0
  • It will be conveyed over to posterity."The army faction gradually gathered strength in the parliament.
    0
    0
  • Eleven Presbyterian leaders impeached by the army withdrew of their own accord on the 26th of June, and the parliament finally yielded.
    0
    0
  • Meanwhile all hopes of an accommodation with Charles were dispelled by his flight on the 11th of November from Hampton Court to Carisbroke Castle in the Isle of Wight, his Flight object being to negotiate independently with the Scots, the parliament and the army.
    0
    0
  • A merchant named Cony refused to pay customs not imposed by parliament, his counsel declaring their levy by ordinance to be contrary to Magna Carta, and Chief Justice Rolle resigning in order to avoid giving judgment.
    0
    0
  • It was in these embarrassed and perilous circumstances that Cromwell summoned a new parliament in the summer of 1656.
    0
    0
  • On the 23rd of February 1657 the Remonstrance offering Cromwell the crown was moved by Sir Christopher Packe in the parliament and violently resisted by the officers and the army party, one hundred officers waiting upon Cromwell on the 27th to petition against his acceptance of it.
    0
    0
  • On the 8th of May about thirty officers presented a petition to parliament against the revival of the monarchy, and Fleetwood, Desborough and Lambert threatened to lay down their commissions.
    0
    0
  • Instead, however, of proceeding with the work of practical legislation, accepting the Instrument of Government without challenge as the basis of its authority, the parliament immediately began to discuss and find fault with the constitution and to debate about "Fundamentals."
    0
    0
  • Cromwell's government seemed now established on the firmer footing of law and national approval, he himself obtaining the powers though not the title of a constitutional monarch, with a permanent revenue of £1,300,000 for the ordinary expenses of the administration, the command of the forces, the right to nominate his successor and, subject to the approval of parliament, the members of the council and of the new second chamber now established, while at the same time the freedom of parliament was guaranteed in its elections.
    0
    0
  • Difficulties, however, appeared immediately the parliament got to work.
    0
    0
  • The responsibilities and anxieties of government unassisted by parliament, and the continued struggle against the force of anarchy, weighed upon him and exhausted his physical powers.
    0
    0
  • If the Rump or the Little Parliament had in a business-like spirit assumed and discharged the functions of a constituent assembly, such a foundation might have been provided.
    0
    0
  • It was only when five years had passed since the death of the king without any "settlement of the nation" being arrived at, that Cromwell at last accepted a constitution drafted by his military officers, and attempted to impose it on the parliament.
    0
    0
  • In 17 9 4 the United Irishmen, persuaded that their scheme of universal suffrage and equal electoral districts was not likely to be accepted by any party in the Irish parliament, began to found their hopes on a French invasion.
    0
    0
  • The fisheries were held by the Incorporated Company of Dredgers (incorporated by Act of Parliament in 1793), the affairs being administered by a foreman, deputy foreman and jury of twelve; but in 1896 an Act of Parliament transferred the management of the fishery to a company.
    0
    0
  • The report of the committee, which is dated January 1897, was presented to parliament in April 1899, and dealt with the practicability of the project, the route, the cost and the revenue.
    0
    0
  • The borough was never represented in parliament, nor incorporated by charter.
    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for powers to lay wires underground; public discontent with inadequate telephone services was expressed, and at the same time the competition of the telephone with the Post Office telegraph became more manifest.
    0
    0
  • The National Telephone Company again applied to parliament for power to lay wires underground, but was refused.
    0
    0
  • The draft agreement between the government and the National Telephone Company to carry out the policy of 1892 was submitted to parliament and led to much discussion.
    0
    0
  • After the Gunpowder Plot parliament required a new oath of allegiance to the king and a denial of the right of the pope to depose him or release his subjects from their obedience.
    0
    0
  • He holds supreme command by land and sea, appoints ministers and officials, promulgates the laws, coins money, bestows honors, has the right of pardoning, and summons and dissolves the parliament.
    0
    0
  • Treaties with foreign powers, however, must have the consent of parliament.
    0
    0
  • Parliament consists of two chambers, the senate and the Chamber of Deputies, which are nominally on an equal footing, though practically the elective chamber ~s the more important.
    0
    0
  • In addition to the parliament and the councils which have been already enumerated, we now find a council of the party New con- established within the city.
    0
    0
  • The Neapolitans reached Bologna on the 17th of May, but in the meantime a dispute had broken out at Naples between the king and parliament as to the nature of the royal oath; a cry of treason was raised by a group of factious youngsters, barricades were erected and street fighting ensued (May Is).
    0
    0
  • the 17th Ferdinand dissolved parliament and recalled the army.
    0
    0
  • The terrified pope fled in disguise to Gaeta (November 25), and when parliament requested him to return he refused even to receive the deputation.
    0
    0
  • He now prorogued parliament, adopted stringent measures against the Liberals, and retired to Gaeta, the haven of refuge for deposed despots.
    0
    0
  • This same year (1850) Cavour, who had been in parliament avour.
    0
    0
  • At the opening of the Piedmontese parliament in 1859, Victor Emmanuel pronounced the memorable words that he could not be insensible to the cry of pain (ii grido di dolore) which reached him from all parts of Italy.
    0
    0
  • At last, on the 24th of March, the treaty was signed whereby the cession was agreed upon, but subject to the vote of the populations concerned and ratification by the Italian parliament.
    0
    0
  • On the 2nd of April 1860 the new Italian parliament, including members from central Italy, assembled at Turin.
    0
    0
  • ~n the 18th of April the question of the volunteers was :ussed in one of the most dramatic sittings of the ian parliament.
    0
    0
  • In May the Roman stion was discussed in parliament.
    0
    0
  • The convention was kept secret, pital but the last clause leaked out and caused the bitterest arr as- feeling among the people of Turin, who would have asf red to been resigned to losing the capital provided it were La ~rence, transferred to Rome, but resented the fact that it was un to be established in any other city, and that the conntion was made without consulting parliament.
    0
    0
  • A bill known as the Law of Law Guarantees was therefore framed and laid before parliament.
    0
    0
  • The result of their efforts was laid before parliament in one of the most monumental and most painstaking preambles ever prefixed to a bill.
    0
    0
  • Scialoja, who succeeded him, was obliged to adopt a similar proposal, but parliament again proved refractory.
    0
    0
  • Ferrara, successor of Scialoja, met a like fate; but Count Cambray-Digny, finance minister in the Menabrea cabinet of 1868-1869, driven to find means to cover a deficit aggravated by the interest on the Venetian debt, succeeded, with Sellas help, in forcing a Grist Tax Bill through parliament, though in a form of which Sella could not entirely approve.
    0
    0
  • Under the stress of the appalling financial conditions represented by chronic deficit, crushing taxation, the heavy expenditure necessary for the consolidation of the kingdom, the reform of the army and the interest on the pontifical debt, Sella, on the 11th of December 1871, exposed to parliament the financial situation in all its nakedness.
    0
    0
  • His bill, adopted by parliament on the 7th of June 1875, still forms the ground plan of the Italian army.
    0
    0
  • The railway redemption contracts were in fact immediately voted by parliament, with a clause pledging the government to legislate in favor of farming out the railways to private companies.
    0
    0
  • Parliament had degenerated into a congeries of personal groups, whose members were eager only to overturn cabinets in order to secure power for the leaders and official favors for themselves.
    0
    0
  • The administration of finance was as chaotic as the condition of parliament.
    0
    0
  • Notwithstanding this prospective loss of revenue, parliament showed great reluctance to vote any new impost, although hardly a year previously it had sanctioned (3oth June 1879) Depretiss scheme for spending during the next eighteen years 43,200,000 in building 5000 kilometres of railway, an expenditure not wholly justified by the importance of the lines, and useful principally as a source of electoral sops for the constituents of ministerial deputies.
    0
    0
  • On the 6th of March 1885 parliament finally sanctioned the conventions by which state railways were farmed out to three private companiesthe Mediterranean, Adriatic and Sicilian.
    0
    0
  • During the accomplishment of these and other reforms the condition of parliament underwent profound change.
    0
    0
  • to allow him to dissolve parliament, entrusted Signor Giolitti, a Piedmontese deputy, sometime treasury minister in the Crispi cabinet, with the formation of a ministry of the Left, which contrived to obtain six months supply on account, and dissolved the Chamber, The ensuing general election (November 1892), marked by unprecedented violence and abuse of official pressure upon B k the electorate, fitly ushered in what proved to be scandals, the most unfortunate period of Italian history since the completion of national unity.
    0
    0
  • Giolitti scarcely improved matters by creating Tanlongo a member of the senate, and by denying in parliament the existence of any mismanagement.
    0
    0
  • On the 16th of June an attempt by an anarchist named Lega was made on Crispis life; on the 24th of June President Carnot was assassinated by the anarchist Caserio; and on the 3oth of June an Italian journalist was murdered at Leghorn for a newspaper attack upon anarchism a series of outrages which led the government to frame and parliament to adopt (11th July) a Public Safety Bill for the prevention of anarchist propaganda and crime.
    0
    0
  • Presented to parliament in November 1898, the bill was read a second time in the following spring, but its third reading was violently obstructed by the Socialists, Radicals and Republicans of the Extreme Left.
    0
    0
  • The deputies of the Extreme Left, instead of using their influence in favor of pacification, could think of nothing better than to demand an immediate convocation of parliament in order that they might present a bill forbidding the troops and police to use their arms in all conflicts between capital and labor, whatever the provocation might be.
    0
    0
  • The opposition outside parliament was in fact so overwhelming that the ministry decided to drop the bill.
    0
    0
  • In 1678 Charles, taking advantage of the growing hostility to France in the nation and parliament, raised his price, and Danby by his directions demanded through Ralph Montagu (afterwards duke of Montagu) six million livres a year (30o,000) for three years.
    0
    0
  • Simultaneously Danby guided through parliament a bill for raising money for a war against France; a league was concluded with Holland, and troops were actually sent there.
    0
    0
  • He obtained a seat in parliament; and in spite of Danby's endeavour to seize his papers by an order in council, on the 10th of December 1678 caused two of the incriminating letters written by Danby to him to be read aloud to the House of Commons by the Speaker.
    0
    0
  • In March 1679 a new parliament hostile to Danby was returned, and he was forced to resign the treasurership; but he received a pardon from the king under the Great Seal, and a warrant for a marquessate.
    0
    0
  • The proceedings against him were revived, a committee of privileges deciding on the 19th of March 1679 that the dissolution of parliament was no abatement of an impeachment.
    0
    0
  • For some time all appeals to the king, to parliament, and to the courts of justice were unavailing; but on the 12th of February 1684 his application to Chief Justice Jeffreys was at last successful, and he was set at liberty on finding bail to the amount of X40,000, to appear in the House of Lords in the following session.
    0
    0
  • In June and July new motions were made in parliament for his removal; but notwithstanding his great unpopularity, on the retirement of Halifax in 1690 he again acquired the chief power in the state, which he retained till 1695 by bribery in parliament and by the support of the king and queen.
    0
    0
  • He was a member of parliament in 1774 and 1775; in 1776 he became a peer as Baron Osborne, and in 1777 lord chamberlain of the queen's household.
    0
    0
  • Both in parliament and in Convocation he opposed the Six Articles of 1539, but he stood almost alone.
    0
    0
  • But Edward's title had been expressly sanctioned by act of parliament, so that there was no more room for election in his case than in that of George I., and the real motive of the changes was to shorten the weary ceremony for the frail child.
    0
    0
  • Renard thought he would be executed, but so true a Romanist as Mary could scarcely have an ecclesiastic put to death in consequence of a sentence by a secular court, and Cranmer was reserved for treatment as a heretic by the highest of clerical tribunals, which could not act until parliament had restored the papal jurisdiction.
    0
    0
  • His difficulty consisted in the fact that, like all Anglicans of the 16th century, he recognized no right of private judgment, but believed that the state, as represented by monarchy, parliament and Convocation, had an absolute right to determine the national faith and to impose it on every Englishman.
    0
    0
  • This feeling was fostered by its many confirmations, and in subsequent ages, especially during the time of the struggle between the Stewart kings and the parliament, it was regarded as something sacrosanct, embodying the very ideal of English liberties, which to some extent had been lost, but which must be regained.
    0
    0
  • It is very interesting, but it does not constitute any marked advance in the history of parliament, as it merely expresses the customary method of summoning a council.
    0
    0
  • The earliest commentator of note was Sir Edward Coke, who published his Second Institute, which deals with Magna Carta, by order of the Long Parliament in 1642.
    0
    0
  • Two years later he was consecrated bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, and resigned his presidentship. Parliament declared his estates forfeited for treason in 1652, and Cromwell afterwards set a price on his head.
    0
    0
  • Then parliament enacted a new system of Church courts which, though to some extent in its turn superseded by the revival of episcopacy under James VI., was revived or ratified by the act of 1690, c. 7, and stands to this day.
    0
    0
  • Musselburgh joins with Leith and Portobello (the Leith Burghs) in returning one member to parliament.
    0
    0
  • About 760 it became the capital of Northumbria; later it was a borough and was long represented in parliament.
    0
    0
  • He was in parliament for many years, representing Plympton from 1685, Windsor from 1689, and Weymouth from 1700.
    0
    0
  • He assisted the elder Calamy in writing Smectymnuus (1641), and preached before parliament in 1643.
    0
    0
  • However, in 1691, he was permitted to return to England, and he declared himself a Protestant and began to attend the sittings of parliament.
    0
    0
  • He joined Mary at Paris in September, and in 156 1 was sent by her as a commissioner to summon the parliament; in February he arrived in Edinburgh and was chosen a privy councillor on the 6th of September.
    0
    0
  • Again imprisoned, this time on a charge of witchcraft, he escaped from captivity in 1 59 1, and was deprived by parliament of his lands and titles; as an outlaw his career was one of extraordinary lawlessness.
    0
    0
  • The marriage, which had not been consummated, was dissolved by a special act of parliament.
    0
    0
  • In 1854 he appeared in the first New Zealand parliament as extra-official adviser of the acting governor, a position which excited great jealousy, and as the mover of a resolution demanding the appointment of a responsible ministry.
    0
    0
  • Excluded from parliament by the fatal error of his youth, he was compelled to resort to indirect means of working out his plans by influencing public men.
    0
    0
  • ACT OF SETTLEMENT, the name given to the act of parliament passed in June 1701, which, since that date, has regulated the succession to the throne of Great Britain and Ireland.
    0
    0
  • (3) That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges' commissions be made quamdiu se bene gesserint and their salaries ascertained and established; but upon,the address of both houses of parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
    0
    0
  • (4) That no pardon under the great seal of England be pleadable to an impeachment by the Commons in parliament.
    0
    0
  • Finally a clause said that "no person born out of the kingdoms of England, Scotland or Ireland, or the dominions thereunto belonging (although he be naturalized or made a denizen) except such as are born of English parents, shall be capable to be of the Privy Council, or a member of either House of Parliament, or enjoy any office or place of trust, either civil or military, or to have any grant of lands, tenements or hereditaments from the Crown to himself, or to any other or others in trust for him."
    0
    0
  • Its founder was a Norfolk lawyer, William Howard or Haward, who was summoned to parliament as a justice in 1295, being appointed a justice of the common pleas in 1297.
    0
    0
  • The head of her elder brother, the boy earl marshal, had been stricken off in the cornfield under the walls of York, but her younger brother's right to his father's dukedom was allowed by parliament in 1425.
    0
    0
  • Offices and lands came to John Howard by reason of that fellowship. Henry VI., when restored, summoned him to parliament in 1470 as Lord Howard, a summons which may have been meant to lure him to London into Warwick's power, but he proclaimed the Yorkist sovereign on his return and fought at Barnet and Tewkesbury.
    0
    0
  • An attainder by the first parliament of Henry VII.
    0
    0
  • He was not released until the accession of Mary, parliament restoring his dukedom on his petition for reversal of the attainder.
    0
    0
  • The next year an act of parliament restored the earl in blood.
    0
    0
  • His great-grandson Charles Howard, although fledged in a nest of cavaliers, changed sides and fought at Worcester for the parliament.
    0
    0
  • The council was empowered to elect one burgess to parliament, and this right continued until the Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885.
    0
    0
  • But his preference for a sedentary and not for an active life and his increasing attachment to favourites of humble birth diminished his popularity, and he had some differences with his parliament.
    0
    0
  • Peace with Albany followed, but soon afterwards the duke was again in communication with Edward, and was condemned by the parliament after the death of the English king in April 1483.
    0
    0
  • Here you find articles in the encyclopedia about British Members of Parliament.
    0
    0
  • In 1892 he was elected to the Dominion Parliament, but in 1899 he interrupted his political career to serve in the South African War, where he commanded a mixed force of English and colonial scouts in western Cape Colony.
    0
    0
  • The borough returned two members to parliament from 1558 until disfranchised by the Reform Act of 1832.
    0
    0
  • Shortly afterwards, however, he retired both from parliament and from public life, professing his disgust at the party intrigues of politics, and devoted himself to conducting his newspaper, the Newcastle Daily Chronicle, and to his private business as a mine-owner.
    0
    0
  • When the German confederation was re-established in 1850 in place of the parliament of Frankfort, Gorchakov was appointed Russian minister to the diet.
    0
    0
  • In this way the Moravian orders were maintained; the "ecclesiola" became an independent body, and the British parliament recognized the Brethren as "an ancient Protestant Episcopal Church" (1 749, 22 Geo.
    0
    0
  • As such he was elected to the Frankfort parliament in 1848.
    0
    0
  • Other important buildings are the Sobranye, or parliament house, the palace of the synod, the ministries of war and commerce, the university with the national printing press, the national library, the officers' club and several large military structures.
    0
    0
  • As a legislative body the powers of the Council are co-ordinate with those of the Duma; in practice, however, it has seldom if ever initiated legislation.6 The Duma of the Empire or Imperial Duma (Gosudarstvennaya Duma), which forms the Lower House of the Russian parliament, consists (since the ukaz of the znd of June 1907) on the 27th of April 1906, while the name and princi p le of autocracy was jealously preserved, the word " unlimited " vanished.
    0
    0
  • The competence of the Russian parliament' thus constituted is strictly limited.
    0
    0
  • But, so far as the parliament is concerned, this power is subject to numerous and important exceptions.
    0
    0
  • Ministers are responsible, moreover, not to parliament but to the emperor.
    0
    0
  • The powers of the parliament over the budget are even more limited, though not altogether illusory.
    0
    0
  • This deprives parliament of control over the administrative departments, all the ministries being thus " armour-plated " - to use the cant phrase current in Russia - except that of ways and communications (railways).
    0
    0
  • Altogether, half the annual expenditure of the country is outside the control of parliament.
    0
    0
  • The word parliament may, however, be used as a convenient term, failing a better.
    0
    0
  • was pressed by the more reactionary elements to model his parliament on this rough equivalent of the Western states-general.
    0
    0
  • The name was first suggested by Speranski, under Alexander I., for the suggested parliament of delegates from the zemstvos and local dumas.
    0
    0
  • ' In his speech at the opening of the first Polish parliament at Warsaw in 1818, Alexander I.
    0
    0
  • That in the work of restoring its military position the Russian government had the support of the Russian parliament was proved by a subsidy of Li 1,000,000 voted by the Duma, on the 30th of December 1909, for the special service of the reorganization and redistribution of the army.
    0
    0
  • In the parliament, which assembled on the 30th of September, Richard was forced to abdicate.
    0
    0
  • Parliament formally accepted him, and thus Henry became king, "not so much by title of blood as by popular election" (Capgrave).
    0
    0
  • His necessities had all along enabled the Commons to extort concessions in parliament, until in 1406 he was forced to nominate a council and govern by its advice.
    0
    0
  • But that political Lollardry was strong is shown by the proposal in the parliament of 1410 for a wholesale confiscation of ecclesiastical property.
    0
    0
  • Ellis, Original Letters illustrative of English History (London, 1825-1846); Rolls of Parliament; Royal and Historical Letters, Henry IV.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Loretto, Eton and Oriel College, Oxford, and in 1869 was restored by Act of Parliament to the barony of Balfour of Burleigh, to which he was entitled by his descent from the 5th baron, who was attainted after the Jacobite rebellion of 1715.
    0
    0
  • In most parts of England the plate-rail was preferred, and it was used on the Surrey iron railway, from Wandsworth to Croydon, which, sanctioned by parliament in 1801, was finished in 1803, and was the first railway available to the public on payment of tolls, previous lines having all been private and reserved exclusively for the use of their owners.
    0
    0
  • On the Stockton & Darlington railway, which was authorized by parliament in 1821, animal power was at first proposed, but on the advice of Stephenson, its engineer, steam-engines were adopted.
    0
    0
  • of railway were sanctioned by parliament, including the beginnings of most of the existing trunk-lines, and in 1840 the actual mileage reached 1331 m.
    0
    0
  • The amount of capital which parliament authorized railway companies to raise was about 42 millions on the average of the two years 1842-1843, 174 millions in 1844, 60 millions in 1845, and 132 millions in 1846, though this last sum was less than a quarter of the capital proposed in the schemes submitted to the Board of Trade; and the wild speculation which occurred in railway shares in 1845 contributed largely to the financial crisis of 1847.
    0
    0
  • H.) British Railway Legislation The first thing a railway company in Great Britain has to do is to obtain a special or private act of parliament authorizing the construction of the line.
    0
    0
  • railway, and to work the line when completed without interference, it is essential that the authority of parliament should be obtained.
    0
    0
  • The company therefore promotes a bill, which is considered first by select committees of the two houses of parliament, and afterwards by the two houses themselves, during which period it faces the opposition, if any, of rival concerns, of local authorities and of hostile landowners.
    0
    0
  • If this is successfully overcome, and the proposals meet with the Con approval of parliament, the bill is passed and, after securing the Royal Assent, becomes an act of parliament.
    0
    0
  • From the early days of railways parliament has also been careful to provide for the safety of the public by inserting in the general or special acts definite conditions, and by laying upon the Board of Trade the duty of protecting the public using a railway.
    0
    0
  • The reports are subsequently included in a Blue-book and presented to parliament.
    0
    0
  • In 1893 an act was passed by parliament giving the Board power to interfere if or when representations are made to them by or on behalf of any servant or class of servants of a railway company that the hours of work are unduly long, or do not provide sufficient intervals of uninterrupted rest between the periods of duty, or sufficient relief in respect of Sunday duty.
    0
    0
  • Although the administration of the above-mentioned acts of parliament has had a beneficial effect upon the safety of the public, and has enabled an enormous volume of traffic Safety to be handled with celerity, punctuality and absence Y?
    0
    0
  • The public acts of parliament referring to British railways are collected in Bigg's General Railway Acts.
    0
    0
  • C. Behr, to connect Liverpool and Manchester, was sanctioned by Parliament in 1901.
    0
    0
  • No adequate definition is to be found even in the British statute-book; for although g parliament has on different occasions passed acts dealing with such railways both in Great Britain and Ireland, it has not inserted in any of them a clear and sufficient statement of what it intends shall be understood by the term, as distinguished from an ordinary railway.
    0
    0
  • Still, they do differ from ordinary tramways in the important fact that the procedure by which they have been authorized is simpler and cheaper than the methods by which special private acts of parliament have to he obtained for tramway projects.
    0
    0
  • Economy in capital outlay and cheapness in construction is indeed the characteristic generally associated with light railways by the public, and implicitly attached to them by parliament in the act of 1896, and any simplifications of the engineering or mechanical features they may exhibit compared with the standard railways of the country are mainly, if not entirely, due to the desire to keep down their expenses.
    0
    0
  • The saving of cost is effected in two ways: (I) Instead of having to incur the expenses of a protracted inquiry before parliament, the promoters of a light railway under the act of 1896 make an application to the light railway commissioners, who then hold a local inquiry, to obtain evidence of the usefulness of the proposed railway, and to hear objections to it, and, if they are satisfied, settle the draft order and hand it over to the Board of Trade for confirmation.
    0
    0
  • But once the order is confirmed by the Board, with or without modifications, it has effect as if it had been enacted by parliament, and it cannot afterwards be upset on the ground of any alleged irregularity in the proceedings.
    0
    0
  • The Light Railways Act 1896 was to remain in force only until the end of 1901 unless continued by parliament, but it was continued year by year under the Expiring Laws Continuance Act.
    0
    0
  • It provided that the powers of the light railway commissioners should continue until determined by parliament, and also provided, inter alia, that in cases where the Board of Trade thought, under section (9) subsection (3) of the original act, that a proposal should be submitted to parliament, the Board of Trade itself might submit the proposals to parliament by bringing in a bill for the confirmation of the light railway order, with a special report upon it.
    0
    0
  • This son (by name Edward) was educated at Westminster' and Cambridge, but never took a degree, travelled, became member of parliament, first for Petersfield (1734), then for Southampton (1741), joined the party against Sir Robert Walpole, and (as his son confesses, not much to his father's honour) was animated in so doing by " private revenge " against the supposed " oppressor " of his family in the South Sea affair.
    0
    0
  • Two years before the publication of this first volume Gibbon was elected member of parliament for Liskeard (1774).
    0
    0
  • He did not like to depend on statesmen's promises, which are proverbially uncertain of fulfilment; he as little liked to retrench; and he was wearied of parliament, where he had never given any but silent votes.
    0
    0
  • Gibbon was eight-and-thirty when he entered parliament; and the obstacles which even at an earlier period he had not had courage to encounter were hardly likely to be vanquished then.
    0
    0
  • But while it may be doubted whether his presence in parliament was of any direct utility to the legislative business of the country, there can be no question of the present advantage which he derived from it in the prosecution of the great work of his life - an advantage of which he was fully conscious when he wrote: " The eight sessions that I sat in parliament were a school of civil prudence, the first and most essential virtue of an historian."
    0
    0
  • The burgesses returned two members to parliament in 1320 and again in 1338 and 1341, but were never represented again.
    0
    0
  • George proposed to allow the prince 50,000 a year; but this sum was regarded as insufficient by the latter, whose appeal to parliament was unsuccessful.
    0
    0
  • Having made the grand tour he returned to Ireland; and being employed by the parliament in a mission to the duke of Ormonde, now reduced to the last extremities, he succeeded in concluding a treaty with him on the 19th of June 1647, thus securing the country from complete subjection to the rebels.
    0
    0
  • He sat in Richard Cromwell's parliament for Dublin city, and endeavoured to take his seat in the restored Rump Parliament of 1659.
    0
    0
  • He was made president of the council in February 1660, and in the Convention Parliament sat for Carmarthen borough.
    0
    0
  • He supported the king's administration in parliament, but opposed strongly the unjust measure which, on the abolition of the court of wards, placed the extra burden of taxation thus rendered necessary on the excise.
    0
    0
  • He was summoned to the Irish House of Peers as Viscount Valentia, but was denied his writ to the parliament of Great Britain by a majority of one vote.
    0
    0
  • He came into Parliament as Labour member for N.-E.
    0
    0
  • Tooley Street, leading east from Southwark by London Bridge railway station, is well known in connexion with the story of three tailors of Tooley Street, who addressed a petition to parliament opening with the comprehensive expression "We, the people of England."
    0
    0
  • In May of this year he had an important interview with Bismarck, who wished to secure his support for the reform of the confederation, and after the war was over at once accepted the position of a Prussian subject, and took his seat in the diet of the North German Confederation and in the Prussian parliament.
    0
    0
  • It was chiefly owing to him that the building up of the internal institutions of the empire was carried on without the open breach between Bismarck and the parliament, which was often imminent.
    0
    0
  • In 1883 he resigned his seat in parliament owing to the reactionary measures of the government, which made it impossible for him to continue his former co-operation with Bismarck, but returned in 1887 to support the coalition of national parties.
    0
    0
  • When Kildare became viceroy in 1524, O'Neill consented to act as his swordbearer in ceremonies of state; but his allegiance was not to be reckoned upon, and while ready enough to give verbal assurances of loyalty, he could not be persuaded to give hostages as security for his conduct; but Tyrone having been invaded in 1541 by Sir Anthony St Leger, the lord deputy, Conn delivered up his son as a hostage, attended a parliament held at Trim, and, crossing to England, made his submission at Greenwich to Henry VIII., who created him earl of Tyrone for life, and made him a present of money and a valuable gold chain.
    0
    0
  • In the following year he was allowed to attend parliament as earl of Tyrone, though Conn's title had been for life only, and had not been assumed by Brian.
    0
    0
  • In 1613 Tyrone was outlawed and attainted by the Irish parliament, and he died in Rome on the 20th of July 1616.
    0
    0
  • In that year he was elected member of the Irish parliament for Dungannon, and joined the earl of Antrim and other lords in concerting measures for supporting Charles I.
    0
    0
  • Phelim married a daughter of the marquis of Huntly, by whom he had a son Gordon O'Neill, who was member of parliament for Tyrone in 1689; fought for the king at the siege of Derry and at the battles of Aughrim and the 1 See W.
    0
    0
  • But John O'Neill (1740-1798), who represented Randalstown in the Irish parliament 1761-1783, and the county of Antrim from the latter year till his death, took an active part in debate on the popular side, being a strong supporter of Catholic emancipation.
    0
    0
  • He was one of the delegates in 1789 from the Irish parliament to George, prince of Wales, requesting him to assume the regency as a matter of right.
    0
    0
  • 1839), who was member of parliament for Co.
    0
    0
  • In order to meet the universal discontent and the financial difficulties constitutional government was introduced; a parliament was established in which all races of the empire were represented, and in place of centralized despotism was established Liberal centralization under Schmerling and the German Liberals.
    0
    0
  • But the Magyars refused to send representatives to the central parliament; the Slays, resenting the Germanizing policy of the government, withdrew; and the emperor had really withdrawn his confidence from Schmerling long before the constitution was suspended in 1865 as a first step to a reconciliation with Hungary.
    0
    0
  • deprived him of this designation, but in 1544 the title of "Defender of the Faith" was confirmed to Henry by parliament, and has since been used by all his successors on the English throne.
    0
    0
  • He was criticised by the vestals of constitutional tradition for having declared war without consulting Parliament and for not having summoned it until several months later.
    0
    0
  • 2 1913); although a Giolittian majority was again returned, his opponents, not only among the Socialists but also among the constitutional parties, were now more numerous, and he felt that opposition to his rule was growing in the country at large even more than in Parliament.
    0
    0
  • At the end of the 12th century was established the " exchequer of the Jews," which chiefly dealt with suits concerning money-lending, and arranged a " continual flow of money from the Jews to the royal treasury," and a so-called " parliament of the Jews " was summoned in 1241; in 1275 was enacted the statute de Judaismo which, among other things, permitted the Jews to hold land.
    0
    0
  • Jews were settled in Canada from the time of Wolfe, and a congregation was founded at Montreal in 1768, and since 1832 Jews have been entitled to sit in the Canadian parliament.
    0
    0
  • The preface to this last was condemned to public burning by parliament, but, as No.
    0
    0
  • Two burgesses had attended parliament in 1343, but none had been summoned since.
    0
    0
  • A triennial parliament, a cabinet, a privy council, and an elaborate judicial system were established, and the cumbrous machinery was placed in the hands of a " prime minister," a retired Wesleyan missionary, Mr Shirley Baker.
    0
    0
  • As for Gramont, he had "no conception of the exigencies of this regime; he remained an ambassador accustomed to obey the orders of his sovereign; in all good faith he had no idea that this was not correct, and that, himself a parliamentary minister, he had associated himself with an act destructive of the authority of parliament."
    0
    0
  • In spite of the admission of their co-religionists to high office in the government, the Mussulmans, it is true, still complained of continuous ill-treatment having for its object their expatriation; but these complaints were declared by Sir Edward Grey, in answer to a question in parliament, to be exaggerated.
    0
    0
  • Henderson was mainly responsible for the final form of this document, which consisted of (1) the " king's confession " drawn up in 1581 by John Craig, (2) a recital of the acts of parliament against " superstitious and papistical rites," and (3) an elaborate oath to maintain the true reformed religion.
    0
    0
  • To suit the convenience of the parliament, however, it removed to Edinburgh; Henderson was elected moderator of the Edinburgh meeting.
    0
    0
  • In 1642 Henderson, whose policy was to keep Scotland neutral in the war which had now broken out between the king and the parliament, was engaged in corresponding with England on ecclesiastical topics; and, shortly afterwards, he was sent to Oxford to mediate between the king and his parliament; but his mission proved a failure.
    0
    0
  • The " Solemn League and Covenant," which pledged both countries to the extirpation of prelacy, leaving further decision as to church government to be decided by the " example of the best reformed churches," after undergoing some slight alterations, passed the two Houses of Parliament and the Westminster Assembly, and thus became law for the two kingdoms. By means of it Henderson has had considerable influence on the history of Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • A writ for the election of a member to parliament was issued in the reign of Edward III., but no return was made.
    0
    0
  • He entered Parliament for Barnard Castle as a Labour member, at a by-election in 1903.
    0
    0
  • When the Labour party were first returned to Parliament in force, in 1906, he soon made his mark as one of their leaders.
    0
    0
  • This policy cost Mr. Henderson his seat in Parliament at the General Election of Dec. 1918.
    0
    0
  • He was defeated by a candidate of the National Democratic party in East Ham, and none of the Pacifist Labour men with whom he had made common cause found their way into Parliament.
    0
    0
  • The borough was represented by two members in parliament in 1300 and 1311, and then not again till 1640, from which date it returned two members until disfranchised by the act of 1868, the returning officer being the portreeve, who was also the chief magistrate of the borough until its incorporation by charter of 1846.
    0
    0
  • In that year an act was passed by parliament establishing an agreement with seven of the Lords Proprietors for the surrender of their claims to both provinces.
    0
    0
  • In 1809 its exclusive trading rights were taken away by Parliament, but its administrative status was thus made clearer, and when after the mutiny of 1857 it was desirable to define British authority in India there seemed nothing unnatural in declaring it to be a possession of the crown.
    0
    0
  • The citizens of London having suffered from the depredations of thieves and felons who escaped into Southwark, petitioned parliament for protection.
    0
    0
  • Having entered the army at an early age, Conway was elected to the Irish parliament in 1741 as member for Antrim, which he continued to represent for twenty years; in the same year he became a member of the English House of Commons, sitting for Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire, and he remained in parliament, representing successively a number of different constituencies, almost without interruption for more than forty years.
    0
    0
  • Returning to England he took part in the debates in parliament on the Wilkes case, in which he opposed the views of the court, speaking strongly against the legality of general warrants.
    0
    0
  • His dismissal along with other officers was the occasion of another paper controversy in which Conway was defended by Horace Walpole, and gave rise to much constitutional dispute as to the right of the king to remove military officers for their conduct in parliament - a right that was tacitly abandoned by the Crown when the Rockingham ministry of 1765 reinstated the officers who had been removed.
    0
    0
  • Dunster was only represented in parliament in conjunction with Minehead, one of its tithings being part of that borough.
    0
    0
  • After a period of work in Holland he betook himself to England, where his treatise on lettres de cachet had been much admired, being translated into English in 1787, and where he was soon admitted into the best Whig literary and political society of London, through his old schoolfellow Gilbert Elliot, who had now inherited his father's baronetcy and estates, and become a leading Whig member of parliament.
    0
    0
  • From 1555 to 1867 the town returned two members to parliament, but in the latter year the number was reduced to one, and in 1885 the representation was merged in that of the West Riding.
    0
    0
  • In 1848 he was elected to the lower legislative chamber of Baden, and in 1850 advocated the project of union with Prussia at the parliament held at Erfurt.
    0
    0
  • But Henry VII.'s accumulations had disappeared; parliament resisted in 1523 the imposition of new taxation; and the attempts to raise forced loans and benevolences in1526-1528created a storm of opposition.
    0
    0
  • Parliament, which he had kept at arm's length, was hostile; he was hated by the nobility, and his general unpopularity is reflected in Skelton's satires and in Hall's Chronicle.
    0
    0
  • Grimsby returned two members to the parliament of 1298, but in 1833 the number was reduced to one.
    0
    0
  • He was a preacher of great power, and influenced the elections for the Short Parliament of 1640.
    0
    0
  • He represented the English Parliament in Scotland in 1643, and attended the parliamentary commissions at the Uxbridge Conference in 1645.
    0
    0
  • By the bill for the incorporation of Alsace and German Lorraine, introduced into the German parliament in May 1871, it was provided that the sole and supreme control of the two provinces should be vested in the German emperor and the federal council until the 1st of January 1874, when the constitution of the German empire was established.
    0
    0
  • Dumfries, Annan, Kirkcudbright, Lochmaben and Sanquharthe "Five Carlins" of Burns's Election Ballads - combine to return one member to Parliament.
    0
    0
  • This scheme, which it was alleged would render transportation unnecessary, was eventually abandoned, and Bentham received in 1813, in pursuance of an act of parliament, 2 3, 000 by way of compensation.
    0
    0
  • On the outbreak of the Civil War of the 17th century, the county at first inclined to support the king, who received an enthusiastic reception when he visited Derby in 1642, but by the close of 1643 Sir John Gell of Hopton had secured almost the whole county for the parliament.
    0
    0
  • From 1295 until the Reform Act of 1832 the county and town of Derby each returned two members to parliament.
    0
    0
  • To him a parliament seemed little better than a mob.
    0
    0
  • In 1889 the Board of Agriculture (for Great Britain) was formed under an act of parliament of that year (see Agriculture, Board Of).
    0
    0
  • c. 14, known as the Pleuro-pneumonia Act 1890, which transferred the powers of local authorities to slaughter and pay compensation in cases of pleuro-pneumonia to the Board of Agriculture, and provided further for the payment of such compensation out of money specifically voted by parliament.
    0
    0
  • Chadwick, Studies on Anglo-Saxon Institutions (1905); and the article PARLIAMENT.
    0
    0
  • But he watched all public incidents with a vigilant eye, and seized every passing opportunity of exposing departures from sound principle in parliament and courts of justice.
    0
    0
  • His position in the India Office, where alone he did work enough for most men, cut him off from entering parliament; but he laboured hard though ineffectually to influence the legislature from without by combating the disposition to rest and be thankful.
    0
    0
  • In his Autobiography he admits that the attempt to form a Radical party in parliament at that time was chimerical.
    0
    0
  • In parliament he adhered to his life-long principle of doing only work that needed to be done, and that nobody else seemed equally able or willing to do.
    0
    0
  • The impression made by him in parliament is in some danger of being forgotten, because he was not instrumental in carrying any great measure that might serve as an abiding memorial.
    0
    0
  • The only speech made by him during his three years in parliament that was listened to with impatience was, curiously enough, his speech in favour of counteracting democracy by providing for the representation of minorities.
    0
    0
  • His attack on the conduct of Governor Eyre in Jamaica was listened to, but with repugnance by the majority, although his action in this matter in and out of parliament was far from being ineffectual.
    0
    0
  • Viewed as a candidate for ministerial office, he might be regarded as a failure in parliament, but there can be no doubt that his career there greatly extended his influence.
    0
    0
  • It is at once obvious that we are dealing not with an abstract scheme of regulation in a hypothetical world, but with an act of parliament nominally in force for two hundred and fifty years, and applicable to a great variety of trades whose organization and history can be ascertained.
    0
    0
  • There is no reason why we should apply to this particular act a different method of inquiry from that we should apply to any other of the numerous acts, of more or less economic importance, passed in the same session of parliament.
    0
    0
  • The first step is to see whether there is a prima facie case for inquiry, for many acts of parliament have been passed which have never come into operation at all, or have been administered only for a short time on too limited a scale to have important or lasting results.
    0
    0
  • In studying, therefore, such an apparently simple question as the effect of an act of parliament on wages in a small group of trades we want a general theory which we can use as a kind of index of the factors we have to consider.
    0
    0
  • On the passing of the act of parliament in 1545 enabling the king to dissolve chantries and colleges, Parker was appointed one of the commissioners for Cambridge, and their report saved its colleges, if there had ever been any intention to destroy them.
    0
    0
  • He took advantage of the new reign to marry in June, 1547, before clerical marriages had been legalized by parliament and convocation, Margaret, daughter of Robert Harlestone, a Norfolk squire.
    0
    0
  • Parker's consecration was, however, only made legally valid by the plentitude of the royal supremacy; for the Edwardine Ordinal, which was used, had been repealed by Mary and not re-enacted by the parliament of 1559 Parker owes his fame to circumstances rather than to personal qualifications.
    0
    0
  • Parker was therefore left to stem the rising tide of Puritan feeling with little support from parliament, convocation or the Crown.
    0
    0
  • Parliament even contested the claim of the bishops to determine matters of faith.
    0
    0
  • A statement of Peter Langtoft that he was at the parliament of Lincoln in 1301, when the English barons repudiated the claim of Pope Boniface VIII.
    0
    0
  • A parliament in London in September 1305 to which Scottish representatives were summoned, agreed to an ordinance for the government of Scotland, which, though on the model of those for Wales and Ireland, treating Scotland as a third subject province under an English lieutenant, was in other respects not severe.
    0
    0
  • Then crossing to Argyllshire he surprised another body of his enemies in the pass of Brander early in 1309, took Dunstaffnage, and in March of this year held his first parliament at St Andrews.
    0
    0
  • In December he held a parliament at Scone, where he displayed the same wisdom as a legislator which he had shown as a general.
    0
    0
  • Pope John, who had excommunicated Bruce, was addressed by the parliament of Arbroath in April 1320 in a letter which compared Bruce to a Joshua or Judas Maccabaeus, who had wrought the salvation of his people, and declared they fought "not for glory, truth or honour, but for that liberty which no virtuous man will survive."
    0
    0
  • By James I.'s charter the burgesses sent one member to parliament, and continued to do so until 1885.
    0
    0
  • The Scottish parliament agreed to the marriage of the young queen with the dauphin of France, and, on the plea of securing her safety from English designs, she set sail from Dumbarton in August 1548 to complete her education at the French court.
    0
    0
  • The reformers submitted on condition that no foreign garrison was to be imposed on Perth and that the religious questions in dispute should be brought before the Scottish parliament.
    0
    0
  • But he was not qualified to hold his own in the intrigues of court and parliament in London.
    0
    0
  • But he was in the van of controversy over the Parliament bill, over Home Rule, and especially over the Ulster resistance.
    0
    0
  • On his return, he outlined to Parliament a scheme by which the cost might be greatly reduced, mainly through the transference of authority to Arab chiefs.
    0
    0
  • parliament.
    0
    0
  • Since the Reform Act of 183 2 the burgesses have returned two members to parliament.
    0
    0
  • A council of the army accordingly established itself in opposition to the parliament, and demanded on the 6th of April a justification and confirmation of former proceedings, to which the parliament replied by forbidding meetings of the army council without the permission of the protector, and insisting that all officers should take an oath not to disturb the proceedings in parliament.
    0
    0
  • At Sigismund's first diet (1397) it was declared that the king might choose his counsellors where he listed, and at the diet of 1397 he invited the free and royal towns to send their deputies to the parliament.
    0
    0
  • 1902) once more brought up the question of the common army, the parliament refusing to pass the bill, except in return for the introduction of the Hungarian national flag into the Hungarian regiments and the substitution of Magyar for German in the words of command.
    0
    0
  • This was followed by the fall of Khuen-Hedervary (September 29), and a quarrel a outrance between crown and parliament seemed unavoidable.
    0
    0
  • The parliament was at the same time prorogued.
    0
    0
  • Three times the parliament was again prorogued - from the 15th of September to the 10th of October, from this date to the 19th of December, and from this yet again to the 1st of March 1906 - in spite of the protests of both Houses.
    0
    0
  • On the 19th of February 1906 the parliament was dissolved, without writs being issued for a new election, a fact accepted by the country with an equanimity highly disconcerting The agreement with the crown which had made this course possible included the postponement of the military questions that had evoked the crisis, and the acceptance of the principle of Universal Suffrage by the Coalition leaders, who announced that their main tasks would be to repair the mischief wrought by the " unconstitutional " Fejervary cabinet, and then to introduce a measure of franchise reform so wide that it would be possible to ascertain the will of the whole people on the questions at issue between themselves and the crown.
    0
    0
  • constitutional, the natural course would have been for the king to have sent for Mr Kossuth, who commanded the strongest party in the parliament, and to have entrusted him with the formation of a government.
    0
    0
  • The matter was urgent; for parliament was to meet on the 28th, and it was important that a new cabinet, acceptable to it, should be appointed before that date, or that the Houses should be prorogued pending such appointment; otherwise the delegations would be postponed and no credits would be voted for the cost of the new Austro-Hungarian " Dreadnoughts " and of the annexation of Bosnia-Herzegovina.
    0
    0
  • In the event, neither of these courses proved possible, and on the 28th Dr Wekerle once more announced his resignation to the parliament.
    0
    0
  • On the previous day the Hungarian parliament had adopted a proposal in favour of an address to the crown asking for a separate state bank.
    0
    0
  • On the 28th the Hungarian parliament adjourned sine die, pending the settlement of the crisis, without having voted the estimates for 1910, and without there being any prospect of a meeting of the delegations.
    0
    0
  • They were never mere royal officials, but peers of parliament, holding their temporalities as baronies under the crown.
    0
    0
  • The enfranchisement of villeins granted by Richard at the Mile End conference was revoked by parliament in 1382, and no permanent results were obtained for the peasants by Wat.
    0
    0
  • - The advocates of political cooperation between Serb and Croat saw their opportunity in the constitutional conflict which broke out between Crown and Parliament in Hungary: and on Oct.
    0
    0
  • Baron Paul Rauch, the Magyar nominee as Ban, failed, with all his official apparatus, to secure a single seat for his creatures at the general election of 1908, and therefore proceeded to govern without Parliament, by an elaborate system of administrative pressure, press persecution and espionage.
    0
    0
  • This gave rise to sympathetic demonstrations in many Dalmatian and Bosnian towns, and to a series of interpellations and speeches by the Yugoslav and Czech deputies in the Parliament of Vienna.
    0
    0
  • Their first public pronouncement was an appeal to the British Parliament and nation (May 1915) for sympathy with the cause of Yugoslav unity and the dissolution of Austria-Hungary.
    0
    0
  • The growing self-confidence of the Austrian Sla y s was shown by the bluntness of their refusal to cooperate with the new Premier, Doctor von Seidler, whose offer of portfolios to their leaders drew from Count Tisza a strong protest in the Hungarian Parliament.
    0
    0
  • So long as vital frontier disputes were unregulated, the central Government in Belgrade held that elections could not be held, and governed for the first two years through a provisional Parliament, for which no one could claim a really representative character.
    0
    0
  • This law was the last serious act of the provisional Parliament, which had shown itself singularly barren in legislation, and contrasts most unfavourably with the first assemblies of all the other " Succession States."
    0
    0
  • But though he was thus able to carry the first reading of the new constitution by 227 to 93 votes, he was faced by the passive resistance of the great majority of Croats and Slovenes, who regarded with suspicion his " Great Serbian " and centralizing aims. It is significant that Protic, hitherto Pasic's most intimate associate, withdrew from the Radical party and from Parliament rather than sanction a constitution so inimical to provincial interests: while Trumbic, the foremost advocate of full national unity, recorded his vote against it.
    0
    0
  • When then on July 21 Draskovic was murdered by a young Bosnian Communist, Parliament resolved on reprisals, and io days later passed by 190 to 54 laws of extraordinary severity for "the Defence of the State," terrorist agitation being made punishable by death, prolonged penal servitude or heavy fines.
    0
    0
  • The province is represented in the Union Parliament by eight senators and thirty-six members of the House of Assembly.
    0
    0
  • Since 1910 education other than elementary is under the control of the Union parliament.
    0
    0
  • The British government was also of opinion that the time was near for the setting up of such institutions, and the pending grant of a constitution to the Transvaal was announced in parliament in July 1904.
    0
    0
  • He resigned office to contest a seat for the Transvaal parliament.
    0
    0
  • P. Solomon, became a senator of the Union parliament.
    0
    0
  • P. Hillier, Raid and Reform (1898) and South African Studies (1900); Report of the Trial of the (Johannesburg) Reform Prisoners (1896); Report of the Select Committee of the House of Commons on the Jameson Raid, Blue-book (165) of 1897; Report of the Select Committee of the Cape Parliament on the Jameson Raid (Cape Town, 1896); Jameson Trial, Transcript from Shorthand Writers' Notes and Copies of Exhibits (2 vols., 1896); E.
    0
    0
  • It is regularly built with long and straight streets, and contains the parliament buildings, government house, the Anglican cathedral, the provincial university and several other educational establishments.
    0
    0
  • Mr Arch nevertheless retained sufficient popularity to be returned to parliament for north-west Norfolk in 1885; and although defeated next year owing to his advocacy of Irish Home Rule, he regained his seat in 1892, and held it in 1895, retiring in 1900.
    0
    0
  • From the date of Queen Mary's charter until the Redistribution of Seats Act of 1885 the borough was represented by one member in parliament.
    0
    0
  • The castle never had any military history, and having been seized by parliament together with the other royal possessions, and being considered of insufficient importance for repair, was demolished during the Commonwealth.
    0
    0
  • The town was first represented in parliament by two members in 1572; it lost its franchise by the Reform Act of 1832.
    0
    0
  • Both houses of parliament, who viewed this union with abhorrence, now passed the Test Act, forbidding Catholics to hold office.
    0
    0
  • He followed up this measure by dissolving parliament and attacking the universities.
    0
    0
  • The borough returned a member only to the parliament of 1658; its elected member, Secretary Thurloe, chose then to represent another constituency.
    0
    0
  • During the peace he entered parliament as member for Westminster in the fiercely contested election of 1784, was promoted vice-admiral in 1787, and in July of 1788 was appointed to the Board of Admiralty under the second earl of Chatham.
    0
    0
  • On the 31st of May 1902 the articles of peace whereby the Boer leaders recognized British sovereignty were signed at Pretoria, and five years later there assembled in the capital the first parliament of the Transvaal as a self-governing state of the British Empire.
    0
    0
  • The Transvaal parliament was replaced by a Provincial Council (see Transvaal: § History).
    0
    0
  • Crispi resigned his seat in parliament, but was re-elected by an overwhelming majority in April 1898 by his Palermo constituents.
    0
    0
  • For a few months indeed Lamartine, from being a distinguished man of letters, an official of inferior rank in diplomacy, and an eloquent but unpractical speaker in parliament, became one of the foremost men in Europe.
    0
    0
  • His attempt at reform, which was taken to be, as in effect it was, a revolt against the authority of the Arabian masters, led to his expulsion from Paris, and the formal prohibition by the parliament of his method.
    0
    0
  • In 1783 Fitzgerald returned to Ireland, where his brother, the duke of Leinster, had procured his election to the Irish parliament as member for Athy.
    0
    0
  • In parliament he acted with the small Opposition group led by Grattan (q.v.), but took no prominent part in debate.
    0
    0
  • French revolutionary doctrines had become ominously popular, and no one sympathized with them more warmly than Lord Edward Fitzgerald, who, fresh from the gallery of the Convention in Paris, returned to his seat in the Irish parliament and threw himself actively into the work of opposition.
    0
    0
  • He was educated at Glasgow University and at Trinity College, Cambridge (senior optime, and classical honours); was returned to parliament for Stirling as a Liberal in 1868 (after an unsuccessful attempt at a by-election); and became financial secretary at the war office (1871-1874; 1880-1882), secretary to the admiralty (1882-1884), and chief secretary for Ireland (1884-1885).
    0
    0
  • He brought bills into parliament to reform Church patronage and Church discipline, and worked unremittingly for years in their behalf.
    0
    0
  • came into use under an Act of Parliament (2 and 3 Ed.
    0
    0
  • Parliament was dissolved in July 1865, and the university elected Mr Gathorne Hardy in his place.
    0
    0
  • At public meetings, in the press, and in parliament he denounced the Turkish government and its champion, Disraeli, who had now become Lord Beaconsfield.
    0
    0
  • A new Crimes Act, courageously administered by Lord Spencer and Sir George Trevelyan, abolished exceptional crime in Ireland, but completed the breach between the British government and the Irish party in parliament.
    0
    0
  • When parliament met they executed, for form's sake, some confused manoeuvres, and then they were beaten on an amendment to the address in favour of Municipal Allotments.
    0
    0
  • Gladstone immediately advised the queen to dissolve parliament.
    0
    0
  • Throughout the existence of the new parliament Gladstone never relaxed his extraordinary efforts, though now nearer eighty than seventy, on behalf of the cause of self-government for Ireland.
    0
    0
  • Parliament was dissolved on the 28th of June 1892.
    0
    0
  • As soon as the new parliament met a vote of want of confidence in Lord Salisbury's government was moved and carried.
    0
    0
  • Parliament reassembled in January 1893.
    0
    0
  • On the 28th of May the coffin, preceded by the two Houses of Parliament and escorted by the chief magnates of the realm, was carried from Westminster Hall to Westminster Abbey.
    0
    0
  • 1854), sat in parliament for Leeds from 1880 to 1910, and filled various offices, being home secretary 1905-1910; in 191() he was created Viscount Gladstone, on being appointed governor-general of united South Africa.
    0
    0
  • The Paulskirche, the principal Evangelical (Lutheran) church, built between 1786 and 1833, is a red sandstone edifice of no architectural pretensions, but interesting as the seat of the national parliament of 1848-1849.
    0
    0
  • During the revolutionary period of 1848 the people of Frankfort, where the united German parliament held its sessions, took a chief part in political movements, and the streets of the town were more than once the scene of conflict.
    0
    0
  • The two Anstruthers, Kilrenny and Pittenweem unite with St Andrews, Cupar and Crail, in sending one member to parliament.
    0
    0
  • Previous to the Union Ballyshannon returned two members to the Irish parliament and it was incorporated by James I.
    0
    0
  • The sympathies of the people, and even, it is said, of the clergy, throughout Scotland, were so unmistakably on the side of the rioters that the original stringency of the bill introduced into parliament for the punishment of the city of Edinburgh had to be reduced to the levying of a fine of 2000 for Porteous's widow, and the disqualification of the provost for holding any public office.
    0
    0
  • for the establishment of a parliament for united Germany.
    0
    0
  • parliament, led to more serious trouble.
    0
    0
  • Ardglass was a royal burgh and sent a representative to the Irish parliament.
    0
    0
  • counsellor of the parliament of Paris and a man of rare merit and learning, to actually carry the project into effect.
    0
    0
  • Louis Auguste de Bourbon, sovereign prince of Dombes, having transferred his parliament to Trevoux, set up a printing press, and was persuaded by two Jesuits, Michel le Tellier and Philippe Lalleman, to establish the Me-moires pour servir d l'histoire des sciences et des arts (1701-1767), more familiarly known as the Journal des Trevoux, long the best-informed and best-written journal in France.
    0
    0
  • A detailed account of his activity from 1774 to 1782 would entail the mention of every crisis of the American War of Independence and of every serious debate in parliament.
    0
    0
  • The introduction of the India Bill in November 1783 alarmed many vested interests, and offended the king by the provision which gave the patronage of India to a commission to be named by the ministry and removable only by parliament.
    0
    0
  • When parliament was dissolved at the end of the session of 1784, the country showed its sentiments by unseating 180 of the followers of Fox and North.
    0
    0
  • In his place in parliament he sometimes supported Pitt and sometimes opposed him with effect.
    0
    0
  • He was left almost alone in parliament, and was denounced as the enemy of his country.
    0
    0
  • In 1797 he withdrew from parliament, and only came forward in 1798 to reaffirm the doctrine of the sovereignty of the people at a great Whig dinner.
    0
    0
  • After carrying his motion for the abolition of the slave trade on the 10th of June, he was forced to give up attendance in parliament, and he died in the house of the duke of Devonshire, at Chiswick, on the 13th of September 1806.
    0
    0
  • Settled soon after the close of the War of Independence, the township of Barre (pop. in 1900, 334 6) was organized in 1793 and named in honour of Isaac Barre (1726-1802), a defender of American rights in the British parliament.
    0
    0
  • c. i is regarded by lawyers as limiting for the first time the description of heresy to tenets declared heretical either by the canonical Scripture or by the first four general councils, or such as should thereafter be so declared by parliament with the assent of Convocation.
    0
    0
  • Hale, as quoted by Phillimore (Ecc. Law), says that before the time of Richard II., that is, before any acts of Parliament were made about heretics, it is without question that in a convocation of the clergy or provincial synod" they might and frequently did here in England proceed to the sentencing of heretics."But later writers, while adhering to the statement that Convocation might declare opinions to be heretical, doubted whether it could proceed to punish the offender, even when he was a clerk in orders.
    0
    0
  • In the political troubles which preceded the outbreak of the Civil War, Hopton, as member of parliament successively for Bath, Somerset and Wells, at first opposed the royal policy, but after Strafford's attainder (for which he voted) he gradually became an ardent supporter of Charles, and at the beginning of the Great Rebellion he was made lieutenant-general under the marquess of Hertford in the west.
    0
    0
  • It was no longer possible to stem the tide of the parliament's victory, and Hopton, defeated in his last stand at Torrington on the 16th of February 1646, surrendered to Fairfax.
    0
    0
  • After this final flight of James, William, on the advice of an assembly of notables, summoned a convention parliament on the 22nd of January 1689.
    0
    0
  • A constitutional settlement was effected by the end of 1689, almost all the disputed points between king and parliament being settled in favour of the latter.
    0
    0
  • But though he was unable to extract the best results from parliament he was always able to avert its worst excesses.
    0
    0
  • The main cause of the humiliations William suffered from parliament lay in his incapacity to understand the party or cabinet system.
    0
    0
  • When it suited his interests he sanctioned the systematic corruption of members of parliament, and he condoned massacres like those at the Hague or in Glencoe.
    0
    0
  • After some years spent in journalism at Chicago, he was in 1874 elected as the Liberal candidate to represent Levis in the Canadian parliament.
    0
    0
  • He almost immediately, however, returned to Germany and, throwing himself into the political fray in Berlin, was elected mamber for Freienwalde, in the first German parliament at Frankfort-on-Main.
    0
    0
  • He was returned to parliament in 1701 for the family borough of Wootton Bassett in Wiltshire.
    0
    0
  • In 1708 he quitted office with Harley on the failure of the latter's intrigue, and retired to the country till 1710, when he became a privy councillor and secretary of state in Harley's new ministry, representing Berkshire in parliament.
    0
    0
  • He supported the bill for requiring a real property qualification for a seat in parliament.
    0
    0