Parlance sentence examples

parlance
  • In common parlance, it may be described as a species of wild dog with close affinity to the bear.

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  • It must be pointed out that in common parlance this distinction does not find its ready expression.

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  • It strictly designates only that district in upper Saxony that is bounded by the Werra, the Harz Mountains, the Saale and the Thuringian Forest; in common parlance, however, it is frequently used as equivalent to the Thuringian states, i.e.

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  • In common parlance, as well as for judicial purposes of circuits, the Principality is divided into North Wales and South Wales, each of which consists of six counties.

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  • man is running or not running; and reasoning is a combination of judgments: conversely, there is a mental analysis of reasoning into judgments, and judgment into conceptions, beneath the linguistic analysis of rational discourse into propositions, and propositions into terms. Logic, according to this new school, which has by our time become an old school, has to co-ordinate these three operations, direct them, and, beginning with conceptions, combine conceptions into judgments, and judgments into inference, which thus becomes a complex combination of conceptions, or, in modern parlance, an extension of our ideas.

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  • LATACUNGA (LLACTACUNGA, or, in local parlance, Tacunga), a plateau town of Ecuador, capital of the province of Leon, 46 m.

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  • In contradistinction to all these somewhat refined meanings, the term "Protestant" is in common parlance applied to all Christians who do not belong to the Roman Catholic Church, or to one or other of the ancient Churches of the East.

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  • As a whole, Australia is rich in parrots, of which it has several very peculiar forms, but Picarians in old-fashioned parlance, of all sorts - certain kingfishers excepted - are few in number, and the pigeons are also comparatively scarce, no doubt because of the many arboreal predaceous marsupials.

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  • known in theological parlance as ' the process of reception ' .

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  • Marijuana 19 What in boxing parlance is a pug?

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  • SeaXEKTOS, discourse, debate; 77 5eaXEKTu01, sc. TEXvn, the art of debate), a logical term, generally used in common parlance in a contemptuous sense for verbal or purely abstract disputation devoid of practical value.

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  • The expense of cutting castings accurately to shape, cutting on them screw threads and what not, called " machining " in trade parlance, is often a very large part of their total cost; and it increases rapidly with the hardness of the metal.

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  • But the appeal to the verbally inspired Bible was stronger than that to a church hopelessly divided; the Bible, and not the consent of the universal church, became the touchstone of the reformed orthodoxy; in the nomenclature of the time, " evangelical " arose in contradistinction to " Catholic," while, in popular parlance, the " protest " of the Reformers against the " corruptions of Rome " led to the invention of the term " Protestant," which, though nowhere assumed in the official titles of the older reformed churches, was early used as a generic term to include them all.

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  • His other works include a Vie de Socrate (1650), a translation of the Cyropaedia of Xenophon (1658), and the Traite de la peinture parlance (1684).

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  • MGM also brought the use of the word "soundtrack" into common parlance when they advertised the album as "recorded directly from the soundtrack."

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  • In common parlance, a ' blast from the past ' .

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  • In legal parlance the individual has to be competent for the job.

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  • So Gregory of Narck upbraids the Thonraki for their "anthropolatrous apostasy, their selfconf erred contemptible priesthood which is a likening of themselves to Satan" (= Christ in Thonraki parlance).

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  • In the parlance of the day, people in mental distress - like everyone else - are awesome.

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  • olibanum of Java), corrupted in the parlance of Europe into benjamin and benzoin; camphor, produced by Cinnamomum Camphora, the "camphor laurel" of China and Japan, and by Dryobalanops aromatica, a native of the Indian Archipelago, and widely used as incense throughout the East, particularly in China; elemi, the resin of an unknown tree of the Philippine Islands, the elemi of old writers being the resin of Boswellia Frereana; gumdragon or dragon's blood, obtained from Calamus Draco, one of the ratan palms of the Indian Archipelago, Dracaena Draco, a liliaceous plant of the Canary Island, and Pterocarpus Draco, a leguminous tree of the island of Socotra; rose-malloes, a corruption of the Javanese rasamala, or liquid storax, the resinous exudation of Liquidambar Altingia, a native of the Indian Archipelago (an American Liquidambar also produces a rose-malloes-like exudation); star anise, the starlike fruit of the Illicum anisatum of Yunan and south-western China, burnt as incense in the temples of Japan; sweet flag, the root of Acorus Calamus, the bath of the Hindus, much used for incense in India.

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  • Since the passing of the Light Railways Act of 1896, which did not apply to Ireland, it is possible to give a formal definition by saying that a light railway is one constructed under the provisions of that act; but it must be noted that the commissioners appointed under that act have authorized many lines which in their physical characteristics are indistinguishable from street tramways constructed under the Tramways Act, and to these the term light railways would certainly not be applied in ordinary parlance.

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  • The slopes of the plateau, which receive a better rainfall, are more heavily forested, some districts being covered with deciduous trees, forming catingas in local parlance.

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  • But as the most dreaded of these Celtic tribes came down from the shores of the Baltic and Northern Ocean, the ancients applied the name Celt to those peoples who are spoken of as Teutonic in modern parlance.

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  • By the time he got a call from an old drinking buddy in 1934, Wilson had, in AA parlance, hit bottom.

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  • However, in the milieu of general obscenity it passes as harmless parlance.

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  • Little wonder that " mutual gains " is becoming more common parlance in British workplaces.

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  • The car received a " soft " launch, to use modern parlance, in late 1967.

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  • In everyday parlance a public good is a good or service produced by the public sector.

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  • In ordinary parlance the breakdown had plainly caused the delay.

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  • Her argument may one day give the phrase ' triggering the placebo effect ' a place in popular parlance.

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  • Three times the picture has ' hung ' (in computer parlance ).

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  • Every class striker needs, in marketing parlance, a Unique Selling Point.

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  • FAQ Yes, here it is, the obligatory frequently asked questions, or in Internet parlance " FAQ " .

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  • Or in modern day parlance if you vandalize and cover something in filth, don't be surprised if it doesn't look attractive.

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  • In cricketing parlance ' bowling ' is the deli every of the ball to the batsman.

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  • The east roundhouse catered for passenger engines, whilst the west one catered for goods (freight in 1990's railroad parlance) engines.

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  • Banff was where we ' chilled ' in today's parlance.

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  • parlance of the times it seems more like a ` vapor service ' .

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  • parlance of complexity theory, cyberspace is an emergent phenomena, something that is more than the sum of its parts.

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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical Puritans.

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  • & Xj jsa, a double proposition, from 81- and Xaµ(3avav), a term used technically in logic, and popularly in common parlance and rhetoric. (I) The latter use has no exact definition, but in general it describes a situation wherein from either of two (or more) possible alternatives an unsatisfactory conclusion results.

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  • The Church of Rome alone, officially and in popular parlance, is " the Catholic Church " (katholische Kirche, eglise catholique), a title which she proudly claims as exclusively her own, by divine right, by the sanction of immemorial tradition, and by reason of her perpetual protest against the idea of " national " churches, consecrated by the Reformation (see Church History, and Roman Catholic Church).

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  • For the Asiatic provinces and Egypt, the old Persian name of satrapy (see Satrap) was still retained, but the governor seems to have been styled of Govern- officially in Greek strategos, although the term satrap certainly continued current in common parlance.

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  • In ordinary parlance fly is often used in the sense of the common house-fly (Musca domestica); and by English colonists and sportsmen in South Africa in that of a species of tsetse-fly (Glossin g), or a tract of country ("belt") in which these insects abound (see Tsetse-Fly).

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  • This is to emphasize their status as the allies and patrons of local cadres of godly Protestant fundamentalists; in common parlance radical puritans.

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  • Although now called a "vest" in American parlance, this garment is perhaps the most important in Victorian men's clothes.

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  • In the parlance of the modeling world, however, it makes her a plus size bikini model, not likely to be featured in Sports Illustrated's swimsuit edition any time soon.

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  • parlance today might be supposed to represent a dangerous threat to society.

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