Parkman sentence example

parkman
  • On this greater " Louisiana " the student should also consult the works of Francis Parkman.
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  • Parkman, Montcalm and Wolfe (London, 1884); Twelve British Soldiers (London, 1899); General Wolfe's Instructions to Young Officers (1768-1780); Beckles Willson, The Life and Letters of James Wolfe (1909); and A.
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  • FRANCIS PARKMAN (1823-1893), American historian, was born in Boston on the 16th of September 1823.
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  • His greatgrandfather, Ebenezer Parkman, a graduate of Harvard in 1721, was for nearly sixty years minister of the Congregational Church in Westborough, and was noted for his devotion to the study of history.
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  • One of this good clergyman's sons, Samuel Parkman, became an eminent merchant in Boston, and exhibited much skill in horticulture.
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  • Samuel's son, Francis Parkman, a graduate of Harvard in 1807, was one of the most eminent of the Boston clergymen, a pupil and friend of Channing, and noted among Unitarians for a broadly tolerant disposition.
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  • This Dr Parkman, a man of rare sagacity and exquisite humour, was the father of Francis Parkman, the historian.
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  • Francis Parkman was the eldest of her six children.
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  • There young Parkman spent his leisure hours in collecting eggs, insects and reptiles, trapping squirrels and woodchucks, and shooting birds with arrows.
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  • At the age of fourteen Parkman began to show a strong taste for literary composition.
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  • Parkman had become an adept in woodcraft and a dead shot with the rifle, and could do such things with horses, tame or wild, as civilized people never see done except in a circus.
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  • Knowledge, intrepidity and tact carried Parkman through these experiences unscathed, and good luck kept him clear of encounters with hostile Indians, in which these qualities might not have sufficed to avert destruction.
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  • This outdoor life, however, did not suffice to recruit Parkman's health, and by 1848, when he began writing The Conspiracy of Pontiac, he had reached a truly pitiable condition.
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  • Undeterred by this inhospitable reception, Parkman took up at the beginning his great work on France and England in the New World, to which the book just mentioned was in reality the sequel.
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  • The significance of Parkman's work consists partly in the success with which he has depicted the North-American Indians, those belated children of the Stone Age, who have been so persistently misunderstood alike by romancers, such as Cooper, and by detractors like Dr Palfrey.
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  • Parkman was the first great literary author who really understood the Indian's character and motives.
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  • Against this savage background of the forest Parkman shows the rise, progress and dramatic termination of the colossal struggle between France and Great Britain for colonial empire.
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  • There is no more eloquent commentary upon the wholesome results of British self-government than is to be found in Parkman's book.
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  • In judicial impartiality Parkman may be compared with Gardiner, and for accuracy of learning with Stubbs.
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  • In history, Winthrop and Bradford laid the foundations of her story in the very beginning; but the best example of the colonial period is Thomas Hutchinson, and in later days Bancroft, Sparks, Palfrey, Prescott, Motley and Parkman.
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  • Milwaukee Bay is distinctly marked in the map attributed to Marquette, the original of which is now in the Jesuit College at Montreal, Canada; it was discovered in a convent in Montreal by Felix Martin (1804-1886), of the Society of Jesus, and was copied by Parkman.
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  • Here was the beginning, and in some measure doubtless the cause, of a long suite of murderous conflicts, bearing havoc and flame to generations yet unborn" (Parkman).
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  • Two great objects eclipsed all others, - to find a route to the Indies, and to bring the heathen tribes into the embraces of the Church, since, while he cared little for their bodies, his solicitude for their souls knew no bounds" (Parkman).
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  • Parkman, Pioneers of France in the New World (1865); J.
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  • Parkman, Pioneers of France in the New World and The Jesuits in North America (Boston, 1868); Lettres edifiantes et curieuses, ecrites des missions etrangeres, avec les Annales de la propagation de la foi (40 vols., Lyons, 1819-1854); Saint-Priest, Histoire de la chute des Jesuites au X VIII € Siecle (Paris, 1844); Ranke, Romische Pcipste (3 vols., Berlin, 1838); E.
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  • Parkman sandstone 350,,
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  • Barring The Work Of Francis Parkman, Who Was Not A Canadian, .No History Of The First Rank Has Yet Been Written In Or Of Canada.
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  • Farnham'S Life Of Francis Parkman And H.
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  • Sedgwick'S Francis Parkman (1901); And Articles On " Parkman," By E.
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  • See Parkman, The Jesuits in North America (1898).
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  • She was educated at an academy in her native town and by her brother Con y ers Francis (1795-1863), a Unitarian minister and from 1842 to 1863 Parkman professor in the Harvard Divinity School.
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  • des Frangais dans l'ouest et dans le sud de l'Amerique septentrionale (1614-1754); Memoires et documents originaux (Paris, 1875), containing Joliet's Details and Relations; Francis Parkman, La.
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  • See Francis Parkman, The Oregon Trail (Boston, 2849).
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  • 3, 32nd Congress Special Session); Francis Parkman, The California and Oregon Trail (New York, 1849; revised ed., Boston, 1892), - a narrative of personal experience, as are the two following books: Bayard Taylor, Colorado; A Summer Trip (New York, 1867); Samuel Bowles, The Switzerland of America, A Summer Vacation in Colorado (Springfield, Mass., 1869); F.
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  • Parkman called him " the poet of New England," but as the North and West then were charged with the spirit of the New England states, the two verdicts were much the same.
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  • The Parkman Society Papers (Milwaukee, 1895-1899) provide a collection of good articles on special topics of Wisconsin history, and the Original Narratives and Reprints published by the Wisconsin History Commission (created by an act of 1905) deal with Wisconsin in the Civil War.
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  • Parkman, The Jesuits in North America (Boston, 1870); and the volumes of the Jesuit Relations, edited by R.
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  • Le Sueur (Toronto, 1906); Count Frontenac and New France under Louis XIV, by Francis Parkman (Boston, 1878); Le Comte de Frontenac, by Henri Lorin (Paris, 1895); Frontenac et ses amis, by Ernest Myrand (Quebec, 1902).
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  • Burton, "Cadillac's Village" or Detroit under Cadillac (Detroit, 1896); Francis Parkman, A Half Century of Conflict (Boston, 1897); and The Conspiracy of Pontiac (Boston, 1898); and the annual Reports of the Detroit Board of Commerce (1904 sqq.).
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  • As one obstacle after another was surmounted, as one grand division of the work after another became an accomplished fact, the effect upon Parkman's condition seems to have been bracing, and he acquired fresh impetus as he approached the goal.
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  • Thyroid Foundation of America. 350 Ruth Sleeper Hall, RSL 350, Parkman St., Boston, MA 02114.
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  • The line the actress refers to is in direct response to Matt Parkman protesting that they didn't search everywhere in the Odessa paper factory.
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  • Matt Parkman - Matt Parkman is a detective who has an ability that many police officers probably wish they had - the power to read the mind of others.
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