Parishes sentence example

parishes
  • The dioceses are divided into parishes each under a parish priest known as a cur or desservant (incumbent).
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  • In the large towns there were consistories composed of all the ministers and of delegates from the various parishes.
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  • It comprises eight baronies and nineteen civil parishes.
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  • The municipal borough, incorporated in 1898, includes the parishes of Hove and Aldrington, of which the first is within the parliamentary borough of Brighton, but the second is in the Lewes division of the county.
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  • The urban district consists of parts of the old parishes of Whitstable and Seasalter.
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  • Two parishes, East and West Teignmouth, form the town.
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  • There were in 1901 20,707 parishes in Italy, 68,444 secular clergy and 48,043 regulars (monks, lay brothers and nuns).
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  • The size of parishes varies from province to province, Sicily having larger parishes in virtue of the old Sicilian church laws, and Naples, and some parts of central Italy, having the smallest.
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  • The Italian parishes had in 1901 a total gross revenue, including assignments from the public worship endowment fund, of 1,280,000 or an average of 63 per parish; 51% of this gross sum consists of revenue from glebe lands.
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  • New parishes were created, old parishes were improved, the property of the suppressed religious corporations was assigned to charitable and educational institutions and to hospitals, while property having no special application was used to form a charitable and religious fund.
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  • Sometimes it was given to deans alone or to prebendaries in the parishes whence they derived their prebends.
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  • that of the fifteen parishes in the deanery of the Arches.
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  • The Presbytery has jurisdiction, partly appellate and partly original, over a number of parishes.
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  • Seats, seat rents, pews, the union and disjunction of parishes and formation of district parishes are of secular jurisdiction.
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  • But the majority of parishes are served by mere desservants or vicaires, who have no rights and can be recalled and dismissed by mere administrative order without trial (Migne, ubi sup. s.v.
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  • The minor subdivisions into provinces, counties and parishes, or analogous areas, may also be related in many cases to natural features or racial differences perpetuated by historical causes.
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  • The total number of civil parishes is 314.
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  • The county is mainly in the diocese of Southwell, with small portions in the dioceses of Peterborough and Lichfield, and contains 255 ecclesiastical parishes or districts.
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  • The villages of Appleby, Oakthorpe, Donisthorpe, Stretton-en-le-Field, Willesley, Chilcote and Measham were reckoned as part of Derbyshire in 1086, although separated from it by the Leicestershire parishes of Over and Nether Seat.
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  • The Cronica altinate in the vision of Fra Mauro gives us a picturesque account of the founding of the various parishes, Olivolo or Castello, St Raffaello, St Salvadore, Sta Maria Formosa, S.
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  • There are thirty parishes in the city of Venice and fifteen in the lagoon islands and on the littoral.
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  • Nearly all the parishes in Argyll, Inverness, Ross, Cromarty, Sutherland, Caithness and Orkney and Shetland answer to this description.
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  • Two years later the American Congress annexed the portion of West Florida between the Pearl and the Mississippi rivers to Louisiana (hence the so-called Florida parishes of Louisiana), and that between the Pearl and the Perdido to the Mississippi Territory.
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  • The island is divided into seven parishes.
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  • Some of the clergy in country parishes were devoted workers, but special zeal was resented or discouraged.
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  • In the report of 1835 the borough is said to consist of seventeen parishes and to be unfit for corporate government.
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  • grind, gate), forming the boundary between the parishes of: Northmavine and belting, is only 60 yds.
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  • The island is divided into Mainland district (comprising the parishes of Northmavine, Delting, Nesting, Sandsting, Walls, Tingwall, Bressay, Lerwick and Dunrossness) and North Isles district (the parishes of Unst, Fetlar and Yell).
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  • The diocese includes over half the parishes in Yorkshire, and also covers very small portions of Durham, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.
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  • high are hills in Sabine, Claiborne and Vernon parishes.
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  • to S., west of the Mississippi, and also, save only the prairies, in the so-called " Florida parishes " E.
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  • The " bluffs " (remnants of an eroded plain formed of alluvion deposits over an old, mature and drowned topography) run through the second tier of parishes W.
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  • The marshes encroach most upon the parishes of St Charles, Orleans and Plaquemines.
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  • Even in the coldest localities eight or nine months are wholly free from frost, and in the coast parishes frost occurs only a few days in each year.
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  • A light fall of snow is not uncommon in the northern parishes, but in the southern part of the state snow falls not oftener than once in three to five years.
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  • In 1904 a state oyster commission was created to supplant the independent control by the parishes.
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  • Sugar is grown also in St Landry and the eastern part of Attakapas - a name formerly loosely applied to what are now St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette parishes.
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  • Some rice also is grown on the lowlands of the Mississippi valley, notably in Plaquemines, Jefferson and Lafourche parishes.
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  • This increase was almost wholly in the prairie parishes.
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  • Of the total irrigated area for rice of 387,580 acres in 1902, 310,670 acres were in the parishes of Calcasieu, Acadia and Vermilion.
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  • In some localities, especially in the " Florida parishes," small quantities of rosin and turpentine are taken from the long-leaf pine, but this industry was unimportant in Louisiana before 1908.
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  • The canal system is especially well developed in the parishes of the Mississippi delta, where, at the close of 1907, there were about 50 m.
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  • They serve the trade of Lake Pontchartrain and the Florida parishes, the lumber, coal, fish, oyster and truck trade of New Orleans, and to some extent are the highway of a miscellaneous coasting trade.
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  • The parishes of St Mary, Iberia, Vermilion, St Martin and Lafayette are known as the Attakapas country from an Indian name.
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  • The " parishes " date from 1807; they were based on an earlier Spanish division for religious purposes - whence the names of saints in parish nomenclature.
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  • The money given by the state to the public schools is distributed among the parishes according to their school population, and the constitution of 1898 set a generous minimum to such aid.
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  • The parishes retain primary control of the schools.
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  • A few days later the portion of West Florida between the Mississippi and Pearl rivers (the present " Florida Parishes ") was included in its boundaries, making them as they are to-day.
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  • For administrative purposes the immediate possessions of the sultan are divided into vilayets (provinces), which are again subdivided into sanjaks or mutessarifliks (arrondissements), these into kazas (cantons), and the kazas into nahies (parishes or communes).
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  • The borough, which originally comprised only the parishes of St John's and St Mary's, was in 1875 and 1895 extended so as to include Roath and a large part of Llandaff, known as Canton, on the right of the Taff.
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  • Of the thirty-five churches existing in Hamburg (the old cathedral had to be taken down in 1805), the St Petrikirche, Nikolaikirche, St Katharinenkirche, St Jakobikirche and St Michaeliskirche are those that give their names to the five old city parishes.
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  • Troubles broke out in various parts of Bohemia, and many Romanist priests were driven from their parishes.
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  • The general result of the law previous to the Benefices Act 1898, as gathered from the statutes and decisions, may be exhibited as follows: (1) it was not simony for a layman or spiritual person not purchasing for himself to purchase, while the church was full, as advowson or next presentation, however immediate the prospect of a vacancy; (2) it was not simony for a spiritual person to purchase for himself a life or any greater estate in an advowson, and to present himself thereto; (3) it was not simony to exchange benefices under an agreement that no payment was to be made for dilapidations on either side; (4) it was not simony to make certain assignments of patronage under the Church Building and New Parishes Acts (9 & 10 Vict.
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  • Then the elus in each election divided the contribution due from it among the parishes.
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  • The intendants, by an exercise of their general or special powers, took the place of the elus, and delegated commissaires aux tailles (commissaries of the taille) for the assessment of the parishes, who guided and supervised the elected collectors - for the most part ignorant and partial peasants.
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  • Among his charges was John Parke Custis, the step-son of George Washington, with whom he began a long and intimate friendship. Returning to England, he was ordained by the bishop of London in March 1762, and at once sailed again for America, where he remained until 1775 as rector of various Virginia and Maryland parishes, including Hanover, King George's county, Virginia, and St Anne's at Annapolis, Maryland.
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  • As a municipality covers a large extent of country, the population given is larger than that of the urban parishes, and is therefore not strictly correct according to European practice.
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  • An important accession of territory was gained in 1896, when portions of the parishes of Liberton and Duddingston and the police burgh of Portobello were incorporated.
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  • The communes or parishes are bound to maintain elementary schools, and they are entitled to levy an additional tax of 5% on the state taxes for their maintenance.
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  • By the new constitution of the Lutheran Church, published at first in 1870 for the city only, but in 1876 extended to the rest of the Hamburg territory, the parishes or communes are divided into three church-districts, and the general affairs of the whole community are entrusted to a synod of 53 members and to an ecclesiastical council of 9 members which acts as an executive.
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  • It was formerly in the ancient parish of Eglwysilan, but from that and Bedwas (Mon.) an ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1850, while the whole of the parishes of Eglwysilan and Llanfabon, with a total acreage of 14,426, were in 1893 constituted into an urban district; its population in 1901 was 15,385, of which 4343 were in the "town" ward.
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  • In most parishes its costliness alone would preclude its daily use, while the want of an assistant minister would be a very common reason for omitting the rite almost everywhere.
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  • Such are that of the London Necropolis Company at Brookwood near Woking, Surrey, and that of the parishes of St Mary Abbots, Kensington, and St George, Hanover Square, at Hanwell, Middlesex.
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  • Greater London (in the sense in which that name might then have been applied) was governed by the inhabitants of each parish in vestry assembled, save that in some instances parishes had elected select vestries under the provisions of the Vestries Act 1831.
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  • The vestries so elected for the twenty-two larger parishes were constituted the local authorities.
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  • The fifty-six smaller parishes were grouped together in fifteen districts, each under a district board, the members of which were elected by the vestries of the constituent parishes.
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  • The wealthier metropolitan parishes became discontented with the form of local government to which they remained subject, and in 1897 Kensington and Westminster petitioned to be created boroughs by the grant of charters under the Municipal Corporation Acts.
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  • The county contains 612 ecclesiastical parishes.
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  • In some parishes overseers were appointed in the ordinary manner; in others the vestry, by local acts and by orders under the Local Government Act 1894, was appointed to act as, or empowered to appoint, overseers, whilst in Chelsea the guardians acted as overseers.
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  • Again, with regard to rates, there were in all cases three different rates leviable in each parish-the poor rate, the general rate and the sewers rate-whilst in many parishes in addition there was a separate lighting rate.
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  • A complete re-valuation of properties in the county of London is made every five years, valuation lists being prepared in duplicate by the borough councils acting as overseers of the parishes in their respective boroughs.
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  • Reference has already been made to a Danish settlement, and there seems some reason for placing it on the ground now occupied by the parishes of St Clement Danes and Aldwich.
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  • The early history of the parishes of London is one of great difficulty and complexity.
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  • Although some of the parishes must be of great antiquity, we have little authentic information respecting them before the Conquest.
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  • It is not easy, however, to understand how it was that when the first parishes were formed so small an area was attached to each.
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  • These figures include (1) the City of London within and (2) without the walls, (3) the City and Liberties of Westminster, (4) the outparishes within the bills of mortality and (5) the parishes not within the bills of mortality.
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  • 69,000 57,300 As the increase in Westminster is not great (130,000 in 1700 and 152,000 in 1750) and there is little difference in the totals it will be seen that the amount is chiefly made up by the increase in the parishes without the bills of mortality.
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  • The board consists of representatives of the various parishes, called "way wardens" together with the justices for the county residing within the district.
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  • the commissioners of supply, certain elected trustees representing ratepayers in parishes and others.
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  • In the same year his views found expression in the formation of a society "separate from the multitude" numbering nearly a hundred, and drawn from his own and neighbouring parishes.
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  • The surrounding district, exceptionally fertile marshland, is known as Die Vierlande, being divided into four parishes, whence the name is derived.
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  • Armagh is divided into eight baronies, and contains twenty-five parishes and parts of parishes, the greater number of which are in the Protestant and Roman Catholic dioceses of Armagh, and a few in the Roman Catholic diocese of Dromore.
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  • Pop of urban district, which includes several neighbouring parishes (1901), 16,665.
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  • He was one of those who took a middle course in the non-intrusion controversy, holding that the fitness of those who were presented to parishes should be judged by the presbyteries - the principle of Lord Aberdeen's Bill.
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  • On the secession of 1843 he was offered many different parishes, and having finally settled at Dalkeith, devoted himself to parish work and to questions affecting the Church as a whole.
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  • By this statute the term benefice is defined to mean benefice with cure of souls and no other, and therein to comprehend all parishes, perpetual curacies, donatives, endowed public chapels, parochial chapelries and chapelries or districts belonging or reputed to belong, or annexed or reputed to be annexed, to any church or chapel.
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  • The country is divided into 21 administrative districts (Bezirke), each composed of a number of communes or civil parishes.
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  • Hounslow is divided between the parishes of Heston and Isleworth.
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  • The schism extended down to the bishoprics, and even to the monasteries and parishes, where partisans of the rival popes struggled to obtain possession of sees and benefices.
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  • During his absence two priests from parishes near Wittenberg married; while several monks, throwing aside their cowls, left their cloisters.
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  • The Bermudas are a British crown colony, with a governor resident at Hamilton, who is assisted by an executive council of 6 members appointed by the crown, a legislative council of 9 similarly appointed, and a representative assembly of 36 members, of whom four are returned by each of nine parishes.
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  • In 1900 there were 16 parishes, with 18 pasteurs and 22 temples, and also 2 Sunday schools (3017 children) and 194 day schools (with 4218 children); the full members (i.e.
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  • The urban district of Barry, with a population in 1901 of 27,030, comprises the ecclesiastical parishes of Barry, Cadoxton, Merthyr-Dovan, and a portion of Sully in which is included Barry Island (194 acres), now, however, joined to the mainland.
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  • " The kingdom of God was not to be begun by whole parishes, but rather of the worthiest, were they never so few."
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  • This includes the civil parishes of Swadlincote, Church Gresley and Stanton and Newhall, which together form a large industrial township, mainly devoted to the manufacture of earthenware and fireclay goods.
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  • "Your majesty is not perhaps aware that the most unpopular person in the parish is the relieving officer, and if the queen were to constitute herself a relieving officer for all the parishes in the kingdom she would find her money go a very little way, and she would provoke more grumbling than thanks."
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  • The central criminal court has jurisdiction over certain parishes adjacent to London.
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  • All those civil parishes within the county of Kent of which any part is within twelve miles of, or of which no part is more than fifteen miles from, Charing Cross are within the metropolitan police district.
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  • The total number of civil parishes is 427.
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  • It contains 476 ecclesiastical parishes or districts, wholly or in part.
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  • There were then neither dioceses nor parishes in Ireland and Celtic Scotland; and by the Columbite rule the bishops themselves, although they ordained the clergy, were subject to the jurisdiction of the abbots of Iona, who, like the founder of the order, were only presbyters.
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  • The county comprises 14 baronies and 79 civil parishes and parts of parishes.
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  • for instance canon 12 of the council of Chalcedon, which forbids more than one metropolitan see in a province; also canon 17 of the same council: " And if any city has been or shall hereafter be newly erected by imperial authority, let the arrangement of ecclesiastical parishes follow the political and municipal forms ").
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  • The parishes were further grouped together into rural deaneries and archdeaconries.
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  • Appointments to benefices are in the hands of the state (sometimes with consent of parishes), of private patrons and of local parish councils.
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  • The ignorance of the people of the north made it very difficult for Methodism to benefit from these manifestations, until the advent of the Rev. Thomas Charles (1755-1814), who, having spent five years in Somersetshire as curate of several parishes, returned to his native land to marry Sarah Jones of Bala.
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  • Since then the jurisdiction of the Cinque Ports' justices has ceased within its limits, which include the parishes of Ramsgate and St Lawrence Intra.
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  • He declared that twenty new churches, with parishes, should be erected in Glasgow, and he set to work to revivify, remodel and extend the old parochial economy of Scotland.
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  • At this time there were not more than 20 parishes north of the Forth and Clyde where there was a compulsory assessment for the poor, but the English method of assessment was rapidly spreading.
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  • He, his immediate follower, Gilbert Tennent (1703-1764), other clergymen, such as James Davenport, and many untrained laymen who took up the work, agreed in the emotional and dramatic character of their preaching, in rousing their hearers to a high pitch of excitement, often amounting to frenzy, in the undue stress they put upon "bodily effects" (the physical manifestations of an abnormal psychic state) as proofs of conversion, and in their unrestrained attacks upon the many clergymen who did not join them and whom they called "dead men," unconverted, unregenerate and careless of the spiritual condition of their parishes.
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  • The ecclesiastical parish of Brecon consists of the two civil parishes of St John the Evangelist and St Mary, both on the left bank of the Usk, while St David's ih Llanfaes is on the other side of the river, and was wholly outside the town walls.
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  • The earliest comitia was one organized on the basis of parishes (curiae) and known in later times as the comitia curiata.
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  • If, however, there is any special custom of the place, the custom prevails, and the most common custom is for the minister to appoint one, and the parishioners another, and this has been established by English statute, in the case of new parishes, by the Church Building and New Parishes Acts 1818-1884.
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  • in some of the larger parishes in the north of England a churchwarden is chosen for each township of the parish; in the old ecclesiastical parishes of London both churchwardens are chosen by the parishioners; in some cases they are appointed by the select vestry, or by the lord of the manor, and in a few exceptional cases are chosen by the outgoing churchwardens.
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  • In general, churchwardens are appointed in Easter week, usually Easter Monday or Easter Tuesday, but in new parishes the first appointment must be within twenty-one days after the consecration of the church, or two calendar months after the formation of the parish, subsequent appointments taking place at the usual time for the appointment of parish officers.
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  • In the United States, too, the usual practice is for the parishes to elect both the churchwardens.
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  • Brings Up A Large Family, And Founds A Settlement Which Grows Into Several Parishes And Finally Becomes The Centre Of The Electoral, District Of " Rivardville," Which Returns Him To Parliament.
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  • The Loyalist sentiment was so strong that only five of the twelve parishes sent representatives to the First Provincial Congress, which met on the 18th of January 1775, and its delegates to the Continental.
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  • But six months later all the parishes sent representatives to another Provincial Congress which met on the 4th of July 1775.
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  • The diocese includes rather less than one-third of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also a small part of Lancashire.
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  • The churches of the two parishes of Holy Cross and St Andrew face one another across a road.
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  • in length was constructed, and the villages of Berchem and Borgerhout, now parishes of Antwerp, were absorbed within the city.
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  • During the Protectorate, in 1649, an ordinance was passed for " the promoting and propagating of the gospel of Jesus Christ in New England " by the erection of a corporation, to be called by the name of the President and Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in New England, to receive and dispose of moneys for the purpose, and a general collection was ordered to be made in all the parishes of England and Wales; and Cromwell himself devised a scheme for setting up a council for the Protestant religion, which should rival the Roman Propaganda, and consist of seven councillors and four secretaries for different provinces.'
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  • Church Army mission and colportage vans circulate throughout the country parishes, if desired, with 3 The Ascension, p. 254.
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  • Burton, A History of Kidderminster, with Short Accounts of some Neighbouring Parishes (1890).
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  • Whether or not, as it is said, before the Council of Lateran in 1180, a man could have given his tithes to any church or monastery that he pleased, at any rate since that time, with the division of dioceses into parishes, they now of common right belong to the church Acts.
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  • Provision was made by statute after the fire of London for certain annual tithes to be paid in parishes whose churches had been destroyed, and there have been local acts from time to time with regard to particular parishes therein.
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  • The parts of Virginia and Louisiana not affected were those then considered to be under Federal jurisdiction; in Virginia 55 counties were excepted (including the 48 which became the separate state of West Virginia), and in Louisiana 13 parishes (including the parish of Orleans).
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  • The 34 1,359 parishes (Pfarreien) are grouped into dioceses 7I 1,824 (Sprengel), presided over by superintendents, 95 1,351 who are subordinate to the superintendent- 06 ~ general of the province.
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  • Within a year six Prussian bishops were imprisoned, and in over 1300 parishes the administration of public worship was suspended.
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  • The result was that in numerous parishes the police were occupied in searching for the priest who was living there among the people; although his habitation was known to hundreds of people, the police seldom succeeded in arresting him.
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  • The government tried to nd priests to occupy the vacant parishes; few consented to do so, and the Slaalskatholiken who consented to the new laws were avoided by their parishioners.
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  • It was therefore for every reason desirable to remedy a state of things by which so many parishes were left without incumbents, a condition the result of which must be either to diminish the hold of Christianity over the people, or to confirm in them the belief that the government was the real enemy.
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  • It was opposed by the Liberals on the ground that it conceded too much, by the Clericals that it granted too little, but, though carried only in a mutilated form, it enabled the priests who had been ejected to appoint substitutes, and religious worship was restored in nearly a thousand parishes.
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  • Bismarck hoped by this to relieve the parishes of the Compul burden of the poor-rate, which would be transferred ~ to the empire; at the same time the power of the government would be greatly extended.
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  • He visited all the neighbouring parishes where the contagion raged, distributing money, providing accommodation for the sick, and punishing those, especially the clergy, who were remiss in discharging their duties.
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  • Within its limits are comprised the parishes of Urquhart and Logie Wester, Killearnan, Knockbain (Gaelic cnoc, hill; ban, white), Avoch (pron.
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  • Antiquarian remains are somewhat numerous, such as forts and cairns in Cromarty parish, and stone circles in Urquhart and Logie Wester and Knockbain parishes, the latter also containing a hut circle and rock fortress.
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  • According to the letters patent the almspeople and scholars were to be chosen in equal proportions from the parishes of St Giles (Camberwell), St Botolph without Bishopsgate, and St Saviour's (Southwark), and " that part of the parish of St Giles without Cripplegate which is in the county of Middlesex."
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  • The Ecclesiastical Commissioners Act 1836, which created two new dioceses (Ripon and Manchester), remodelled the state of the old dioceses by an entirely new adjustment of the revenues and patronage of each see, and also extended or curtailed the parishes and counties in the various jurisdictions.
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  • There are 94 civil parishes, while the ecclesiastical parishes or districts wholly or in part within the county number 70, of which 67 are in the diocese of St David's and the archdeaconry of Brecon, the remaining 3 being in the diocese of Llandaff.
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  • Eastwood, Great Wakering and Little Wakering are parishes in the neighbourhood.
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  • Between the parishes of Collessie and Monimail the boundary line takes the form of a crescent known as the Bow of Fife.
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  • The Education Act of 1872 abolished the old management of the parish schools and provided for the creation of districts (burgh, parish or group of parishes) under the control of school boards, of which there are 972 in Scotland, elected every three years by the ratepayers, male and female.
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  • These provisions had reference chiefly to what afterwards came to be known as " statute labour roads," intended primarily to supply a means of communication within the several parishes.
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  • Andrew, who behaved with injudicious violence, was banished to France, James to Newcastle; other preachers were confined to their parishes; and by a mixture of chicanery (as at the pseudo assembly of Linlithgow) and of violence, the king established his tottering episcopacy, and sowed the dragon's teeth of civil war.
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  • Episcopacy being restored, some three or four hundred preachers were driven from their parishes (1663).
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  • The three principal parishes of the city are known as Sao Jose do Recife, occupying the sandy peninsula or beach north of the outlet of the united rivers; Santo Antonio, on the island of Antonio Vaz, which was called Mauritia or Mauritzstad during the Dutch occupation; and Boa Vista, on the mainland to the westward, which is the most modern and the most rapidly growing part.
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  • The members are elected by the various diocesan conferences, which are in turn elected by the laity of their respective parishes or rural deaneries.
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  • They are charged especially with the care of sick priests and in case of death with the celebration of their funerals and the charge of their vacant parishes.
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  • Hence in England the distinction between rectors, who draw both the greater and lesser tithes, and vicars, who are attached to parishes of which the great tithes, formerly held by monasteries, are now drawn by lay rectors.
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  • As the insular government could not safely allow the friars to return to their parishes the friars' lands were bought for $7,000,000.
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  • Ecclesiastically Riigen is divided into 75 parishes, in which the pastoral succession is said to be almost hereditary.
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  • 2) a few isolated cases were observed in the parishes of St Giles and St Martin's, Westminster, and a few occurred in the following winter, which was very severe.
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  • It has long ceased, however, to be their every-day walking dress and is now usually only worn in church, at home, or more rarely by clergy within the precincts of their own parishes.
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  • But as the Premonstratensians were not monks but canons regular, their work was preaching and the exercise of the pastoral office, and they served a large number of parishes incorporated in their monasteries.
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  • There are now some 20 monasteries and 'coo canons, who serve numerous parishes; and there are two or three small houses in England.
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  • (See Archbishop and BIsHoP.) The dioceses are divided into parishes, variously grouped, the most usual organization being that of deaneries.
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  • The diocese includes about one-seventh of the parishes of Yorkshire, and also covers a very small portion of Lancashire.
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  • In 1574 there were 289 ministers and 715 readers; in the district of the presbytery of Auchterarder, which now has fifteen parishes, there were then four ministers and sixteen readers.
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  • In that year it was found that there were 9 24 parishes in Scotland, but not nearly all supplied with ministers; it was proposed that there should be so presbyteries (in 1910 there are 84) and 400 ministers.
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  • Indulgences were tried, and were successful in bringing back about loo ministers to their parishes and introducing a new cause of division among the clergy.
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  • With regard to Episcopalian ministers, by whom the majority of parishes were served, there was more difficulty.
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  • Those ministers who resigned their parishes to accept calls to Relief congregations, in places where forced settlements had taken place, and who might have been and claimed to be recognized as still ministers of the church, were deposed and forbidden to look for any ministerial communion with the clergy of the Establishment.
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  • The need of an increase in the number of parishes was urgently felt, and, though chapels began to be built about 1796, they were provided only in wealthy places by local voluntary liberality; for the supply of the necessities of poor outlying districts no one as yet looked to any agency but the state.
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  • In every part of the country many of the ministers were miserably poor; there were many stipends, even of important parishes, not exceeding £40 a year; and it was not till after many debates in the assembly and appeals to the government that an act was obtained in 1810 which made up the poorer livings to £150 a year by a grant from the public exchequer.
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  • In his powerful defence of establishments against the voluntaries in both Scotland and England, in which his ablest assistants were those who afterwards became, along with him, the leaders of the Free Church, he pleaded that an established church to be effective must divide the country territorially into a large number of small parishes, so that every corner of the land and every person, of whatever class, shall actually enjoy the benefits of the parochial machinery.
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  • Sir James Graham's Act, 1844, provided for the erection of new parishes, and thus created the legal basis for a scheme under which chapel ministers might become members of church courts.
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  • Under Dr James Robertson, professor of church history in Edinburgh, one of the leading champions of the Moderate policy in the Ten Years' Conflict, the extension scheme was transformed into the endowment scheme, and the church accepted it as her duty and her task to provide the machinery of new parishes where they were required.'
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  • By 1854, 30 new parishes had been added at a cost of X130,000, and from this time forward the work of endowment proceeded still more rapidly.
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  • In 1843 the number of parishes had been 924; in 1909 it was 1437.
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  • By the Poor Law Act of 1845 parishes were enabled to remove the care of the poor from the minister and the kirksession, in whom it was formerly vested, and to appoint a parochial board with power to assess the ratepayers.
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  • The Church of Scotland in 1909 had 1437 parishes and 251 chapels and preaching stations.
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  • The parliamentary return of 1888 showed the value of the teinds of 876 parishes to be £375,678 and the stipends paid to amount (exclusive of manses and glebes) to £242,330.
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  • The exchequer pays to 190 poor parishes and 42 Highland churches, from church property in the hands of the crown, £17,040.
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  • The church has herself added to her endowments, for the equipment of 453 new parishes, £ 1,681,330, yielding over £54,000 a year.
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  • On leaving the university he apparently took Anglican orders, and officiated in several parishes, Hastings among them.
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  • Except in some districts of the Marches and in certain tracts lying along the South Wales coast, nearly all parishes, villages, hamlets, farms, houses, woods, fields, streams and valleys possess native appellations, which in most cases are descriptive of natural situation, e.g.
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  • Tudno, Afan, Padarn, &c. To the second division - those place-names which have been corrupted by English usage - belong most of the older historic towns, in striking contrast with the rural villages and parishes, which in nearly all cases have retained unaltered their original Celtic names.
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  • The see of Llandaff comprises Monmouthshire, all Glamorganshire as far west as the Tawe, and some parishes in Brecon and Hereford.
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  • the royal family, and contributors of £50o or more to the funds), of the council of almoners (which administers the endowments), or of certain of the city companies; (2) by competition, on the nomination of a donation governor (for boys only), or from public elementary schools in London, certain city parishes and certain endowed schools elsewhere.
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  • There was no civil parish of Bridgend previous to 1905, when one was formed out of portions of the parishes of Newcastle and Coity.
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  • The control of the primary schools in the parishes is similarly centralized; whereas in Sweden generally each parish has its school-board.
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  • The city is in the diocese of Upsala, but has a separate consistory, composed of the rectors of the city parishes, the president of which is the rector of St Nicholas (Storkyrka).
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  • Gradually too stipends for most Scottish parishes were assigned to the ministers out of the yearly teinds; and the Church received - what it retained even down to recent times - the administration both of the public schools and of the Poor Law of Scotland.
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  • The census is taken in an unusual manner, being drawn up from the registries of the clergy according to parishes every ten years.
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  • Of the forests about one-third are public; the majority of these belong to the Crown, while a small proportion belongs to hundreds and parishes.
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  • The parishes number 2556, but one living may include more than one parish.
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  • He served in succession the parishes of Newton-on-Ayr, Kirkpatrick-Irongray near Dumfries, St Bernard's, Edinburgh, and finally, in 1865, became minister of the first charge at St Andrews.
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  • Political and Administrative Divisions.The empire of Persia, officially known as Mamalik i Mahruseh i Iran, the protected kingdoms of Persia, is divided into a number of provinces, which, when large, and containing important sub-provinces and districts, are called mamlikat, kingdom, when smaller, vilayat and ayalat, and are ruled by governors-general and governors appointed by and directly responsible to the Crown, These provinces are further divided into sub-provinces, vilayats districts, sub-districts and parishes, buluk, na/ziyeh, mahal, and towns, cities, parishes and villages, shehr, kassabeh, mahalleh diii, which are ruled by lieutenant-governors and other functionaries appointed by and responsible to the governors.
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  • These officers are responsible to the governor for the collection of the taxes and the orderly state of their towns, parishes and villages.
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  • The watchmen appointed by parishes were useless, inadequate, inefficient and untrustworthy, acting often as accessories in aiding and abetting crime.
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  • In other parishes there was no police whatever, no defence, no protection afforded to the community but the voluntary exertions of individuals and "the honesty of the thieves."
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  • The communes were subdivided into parishes (freguesias), which were administered by the elected council (junta de parochia) over which the parish priest (presbitero) presided, and by the regedor, an official who represented the mayor of the commune and was nominated by the civil governor.
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  • There are 9 ecclesiastical parishes and parts of two or three others, all in the diocese of St Davids.
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  • In 1832 St John's, St Thomas and parts of the parishes of Llansamlet and Llangyf elach were added to the parliamentary borough of Swansea, to which along with the boroughs of Neath, Aberavon, Kenfig and Loughor a separate representative was given.
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  • In 1888 Swansea was made a county borough and in 1 9 00 the various parishes constituting it were consolidated into the civil parish of Swansea.
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  • The churchwardens, who are representative officers of the parishes, are also executive officers of the bishops in all matters touching the decency and order of the churches and of the churchyards, and they are responsible to the bishops for the due discharge of their duties; but the abolition of church rates has relieved the churchwardens of the most onerous part of their duties, which was connected with the stewardship of the church funds of their parishes.
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  • Immediately after the death of Huss many priests who refused to administer communion in the two kinds - now the principal tenet of the adherents of Huss - had been expelled from their parishes.
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  • All of these are chosen by an electoral body, consisting of all the members of the Holy Synod and the National Mixed Council, and twenty-five representatives of the parishes of Constantinople.
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  • An electoral assembly is formed for the purpose consisting 1 of the twelve members of the Holy Synod, the eight lay members of the National Mixed Council, twentyeight representatives of as many dioceses (the remaining dioceses having only the right to nominate a candidate by letter), ten representatives of the parishes of Constantinople, ten representatives of all persons who possess political rank, ten representatives of the Christian trades of Constantinople, the two representatives of the secretariat.
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  • His plan is stated at the very beginning of the work: "It is my purpose to write an account of the successions of the holy Apostles as well as of the times which have elapsed from the day of our Saviour to our own; to relate how many and important events are said to have occurred in the history of the church; and to mention those who have governed and presided over the church in the most prominent parishes, and those who in each generation have proclaimed the divine word either orally or in writing.
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  • Brynmawr was formed into an ecclesiastical parish in 1875 out of portions of the civil parishes of Llanelly and Llangattock.
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  • The boundaries of the parishes, the fundamental units of English political geography, are very often either rivers or watersheds, and they frequently show a close relation to the strike of the geological strata.
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  • The hundreds, or groups of parishes, necessarily share their boundaries, and groups of hundreds are often aggregated to form larger subdivisions of counties.
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  • These again are subdivided into 14,080 parishes (1901), the smallest ecclesiastical units, which are grouped for certain administrative purposes into 810 rural deaneries.
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  • Poor-law unions are groups of parishes for the local administration of the Poor Laws.
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  • In 1782 Gilbert's Act introduced the grouping of parishes for poor law purposes, and boards of guardians appointed by the justices of the peace.
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  • Reform began with the Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, grouping the parishes into Unions, making the boards of guardians mainly elective, and creating a central poor law board in London.
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  • The Metropolis Management Act of 1855 established (outside the city) two classes of parishes - the first class with vestries of their own, the second class grouped under district boards elected by the component vestries; and the Metropolitan Board of Works (abolished in 1888), elected by the vestries and the district boards, was made the central authority.
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  • Since then the entire system of the government of districts and parishes has been reorganized with due regard to the preceding legislation.
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  • The parish is, speaking generally, the smallest area, though, as will hereafter be seen, part of a parish may be a separate area for certain purposes; and there may be united districts or parishes for certain purposes.
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  • When a contribution is required from county rate, the county council assess the amount payable by each parish according to the basis previously made, and send their precept to the guardians of the unions comprising the several parishes in the county, the guardians in their turn requiring the overseers of each parish to provide the necessary quota of that parish out of the poor rate, and the sum thus raised goes into the county fund.
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  • The things referred to include the alteration of the boundary of the district or parish; the division or union thereof with any other district or districts, parish or parishes; the conversion of a rural district or part thereof into an urban district or vice versa.
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  • A considerable extension of the same powers was made by the Local Government Act 1894, which practically required every council to take into consideration the areas of sanitary districts and parishes within the entire administrative county, and to see that a parish did not extend into more than one sanitary district; to provide for the division of a district which did extend into more than one district into separate parishes, so that for the future the parish should not be in more than one county district; and to provide for every parish and rural sanitary district being within one county.
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  • Under the Allotments Acts 1887 to 1907, it is the duty of a county council to ascertain the extent to which there is a demand for Allot allotments in the urban districts and parishes in the county,.
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  • The county council may establish a parish council in a parish which has a population of less than 300, and may group small parishes under a common parish council; in every case they fix the number of members of the parish council.
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  • They may dispense with the disqualification of a parish or district councillor arising only by reason of his being a shareholder in a water company or similar company contracting with the council, and, as has above been stated, they have large powers of altering the boundaries of parishes.
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  • It should be added that the grant of a court of quarter sessions to any borough other than a county borough after the passing of the Local Government Act 1888, does not affect the powers, duties or liabilities of the county council as regards that borough, nor exempt the parishes in the borough from being assessed to county rate for any purposes to which such parishes were previously liable to be assessed.
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  • These acts will be mentioned later in connexion with the powers of parish councils, for in general they are adopted for a parish, part of a parish or combination of parishes, and are administered by a burial board, except where that body has been superseded by a parish council or joint committee.
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  • Except in these cases the highway authority in a parish was the surveyor of highways, elected annually by the inhabitants in vestry, or in a highway district consisting of a number of parishes united by order of quarter sessions, the highway board composed of waywardens representing the several parishes.
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  • These expenses are payable out of a common fund which is raised out of the poor rate of the several parishes in the district, according to the rateable value of each.
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  • For the most part it has reference only to what is called a special drainage district, that is to say, a district formed out of one or more parishes or parts of parishes for the purpose of the provision of a common water-supply, or scheme of sewerage, or the like, and in the event of such a district including part only of a parish, the remaining portion would, so far as the special expenses for which the district was created are concerned, be a separate contributory place.
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  • Two or more parishes may be grouped together under a common parish council by order of the county council if the parish meetings of each parish consent.
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  • They still have power to give relief to poor persons in case of sudden and urgent necessity, but their principal duty is that of rating authority, and they are bound to make out the lists for their parishes of jurors and electors.
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  • It has, like the Greek Church, two kinds of clergy - parochial and monastic. The former are supported by their parishes; the latter by the revenues of the monasteries, which own about one-sixth of the Lebanon lands.
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  • Grieved at the ignorance and superstition which the remissness of the clergy permitted to flourish in the neighbouring parishes, he used every year to visit the most neglected parts of Northumberland, Yorkshire, Cheshire, Westmorland and Cumberland; and that his own flock might not suffer, he was at the expense of a constant assistant.
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  • The city is divided into fifty parishes purely for ecclesiastical purposes, and there are 237 Roman Catholic churches and 57 chapels.
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  • In England "the perambulations of the circuits of the parishes ...
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  • There are 133 civil parishes.
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  • Bedfordshire forms an archdeaconry in the diocese of Ely, with 125 ecclesiastical parishes and parts of 6 others.
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  • In 1291 Bedfordshire was an archdeaconry including six rural deaneries, which remained practically unaltered until i 880, when they were increased to eleven with a new schedule of parishes.
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  • He enlisted in the Parliamentary army, 2 and served 1 The name, in various forms as Buignon, Buniun, Bonyon or Binyan, appears in the local records of Elstow and the neighbouring parishes at intervals from as far back as 1199.
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  • Andorra comprises the six parishes or communes of Andorra Vicilla, Canillo, Encamp, La Massana, Ordino and San Julian de Loria, which are subdivided into fifty-two hamlets or pueblos.
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  • The parishes have a permanent patrol of six armed men besides the militia.
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  • The city comprises eleven wards and eighteen ecclesiastical parishes, and is under the jurisdiction of a council with lord provost, bailies, treasurer and dean of guild.
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  • Lying at the mouth of the Water of Leith, which is crossed by several bridges and divides it into the parishes of North and South Leith, it stretches for 34 m.
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  • Six years later he made application for the chair of natural philosophy in his own university, but again without success, and in 1773 he was offered and accepted the living of the united parishes of Liff and Benvie, vacant by the death of his father.
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  • The bishops registers of the diocese of Norwich show that many parishes had three and some four successive vicars admitted in eighteen months.
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  • Their services to society and the Church include 6 houses for fallen women, 7 orphanages, 9 elementary and high schools and colleges, 5 hospitals, mission work in 13 parishes and visiting in several " married quarters " of barracks.
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  • The dean of the Arches originally had jurisdiction over the thirteen London parishes above mentioned, but as the official principal was often absent as ambassador on the continent, he became his substitute, and gradually the two offices were blended together.
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  • For ecclesiastical purposes the island is divided into 20 deaneries and 142 parishes, and the affairs of each ecclesiastical parish are administered by a parish council, and in each deanery by a district (hjera6) council.
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  • and E.) 1056, and Holar (N.) 1106, and about 175 parishes (two-thirds of which belonged to the southern bishopric).
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  • But desiring both security and solitude for study he left the city again about New Year of 1534 and became the guest of Louis du Tillet, a canon of the cathedral, at Angouleme, where at the request of his host he prepared some short discourses, which were circulated in the surrounding parishes, and read in public to the people.
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  • But he and his colleagues insisted, on the other hand, that for the proper maintenance of discipline, there should be a division of parishes - that excommunications should be permitted, and should be under the power of elders chosen by the council, in v.
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  • Pugin, and the Protestant Episcopal church for the united parishes of Clonmel and Temple Robin.
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  • Aberdare, with the ecclesiastical parishes of St Fagan's (Trecynon) and Aberaman carved out of the ancient parish, has some twelve Anglican churches, one Roman Catholic church (built in 1866 in Monk Street near the site of a cell attached to Penrhys Abbey) and over fifty Nonconformist chapels.
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  • It consists mainly of a plateau of slight elevation, rarely exceeding zoo ft., and comprises the parishes of Althorpe, Belton, Epworth, Haxey, Luddington, Owston and Crowle; the total area being about 47,000 acres.
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  • The episcopal emoluments arise from the mensal parishes, the incumbency of which is retained by the bishops, from licences and from an annual contribution, varying in amount, paid by the clergy of the diocese.
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  • At the census of 1901 there were 1084 parishes, and the clergy numbered 3711.
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  • Many Irish parishes grew out of primitive monasteries, but other early settlements remained monastic, and were compelled by the popes to adopt the rule of authorized orders, generally that of the Augustinian canons.
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  • All priests were required to register and to remain in their own parishes, and informers were to be rewarded at the expense of the Catholic inhabitants.
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  • The three administrative counties and the county boroughs contain together 761 civil parishes.
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  • The ancient county contains 580 ecclesiastical parishes and districts, wholly or in part.
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  • In 1812 the southern or "Old Parish" of Reading, which was strongly DemocraticRepublican while the other two parishes were strongly Federalist, was set apart and incorporated as the town of South Reading.
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  • Before the process of subinfeudation became prevalent, the most ancient manors were the districts which we call by that name when speaking of the tenants, or "townships" when we regard the inhabitants, or "parishes" as to matters ecclesiastical.
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  • The boundaries of the old ecclesiastical parishes are usually identical with those of the township or townships comprised within its precinct; they are determined by usage, in the absence of charters or records, and are evidenced by perambulations, which formerly took place on the "gang-days" in Rogation week, but are now, where they still survive, for the most part held triennially, the Poor-Law Act of 1844 permitting the parish officers to charge the expense on the poor-rate, "provided the perambulations do not occur more than once in three years."
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  • Many parishes contain more than one township, and this is especially the case in the northern counties, where the separate townships are organized for administrative purposes under an act passed in 1662.
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  • In the southern and midland districts the parishes are for the most part subdivided into hamlets or other local divisions known as "tythings," "boroughs," and the like; the distinction between a parish and a subordinate district lies chiefly in the fact that the latter will be found to have never had a church or a constable to itself.
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  • It may be situated in different counties or hundreds, and in many instances it contains, in addition to its principal district, several outlying portions intermixed with the lands in other parishes.
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  • Under the powers given by the Church Building Acts, and acts for making new parishes, many populous parishes have been subdivided into smaller ecclesiastical parishes.
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  • This district may of itself constitute a poor law union; but in the great majority of cases the unions, or areas under the jurisdiction of boards of guardians according to the Poor-Law Amendment Act of 1834, are made up of aggregated poor-law parishes.
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  • Each of these poor-law parishes may represent the extent of an old ecclesiastical parish, or a township separately rated by custom before the practice was stayed in 1819 or separated from a large parish under the act of 1662, or it may represent a chapelry, tything, borough, ward, quarter or hamlet, or other subdivision of the ancient parish, or, under various acts, an area formed by the merger of an extra-parochial place with an adjoining district by the union of detached portions with adjoining parishes, or by the subdivision of a large parish for the better administration of the relief of the poor.
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  • The civil importance of the poor-law parishes may be dated from the introduction of the poor law by the statute of 43 Elizabeth, which directed overseers of the poor to be appointed in every parish, and made the churchwardens into ex-officio overseers.
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  • It seems probable (though the point is obscure) that the bishops presided at the first formation of the parishes - the parish being a subdivision of the diocese - and at any rate down to the date of the Reformation they exercised the power of creating new parishes within their respective dioceses (Duncan, Parochial Law, p. 4).
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  • After the Reformation the power of altering parishes was assumed by the legislature.
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  • Under this statute the areas of parishes continued to be altered and defined down to 1844, when the act commonly known as Graham's Act was passed (7 & 8 Vict.
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  • This act, which applied to the disjunction and erection of parishes, introduced a simpler form of procedure, and to some extent dispensed with the consent of the heritors, which had been required under the earlier statute.
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  • The main division of parishes in Scotland was into civil and ecclesiastical, or, to speak more accurately, into parishes proper (i.e.
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  • for all purposes, civil and ecclesiastical) and ecclesiastical parishes.
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  • This division is expressed in legal language by the terms, parishes quoad omnia (i.e.
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  • quoad civilia et sacra) and parishes quoad sacra - civilia being such matters as church rates, education, poor law and sanitary purposes, and sacra being such as concern the administration of church ordinances, and fall under the cognizance of the church courts.
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  • - In a number of instances it is difficult to determine the exact areas of such parishes at the present day.
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  • Where there has been a union or disjunction and erection of parishes the evidence of the boundaries is the relative statute, order in council, or decree of commission or of court of teinds.
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  • The parishes proper vary to a great degree both in size and population.
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  • (2) Quoad Sacra Parishes.
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  • (3) Extra-Burghal Parishes.
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  • - For sanitary purposes, highways and some others, certain classes of burghs were made separate areas from the parishes in which they lay.
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  • This fact created a set of incomplete parishes, called extra-burghal.
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  • (4) Burghal, Landward and Burghal-Landward (or Mixed) Parishes.
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  • - This division of parishes depends, as the names imply, upon local character and situation of the parochial districts.
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  • (5) Combined Parishes.
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  • - Under the Poor-Law, Education and Registration Acts power was given to the central authority to combine parishes for purposes of local administration.
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  • The number of councillors for a parish council was fixed at not less than five nor more than thirty - one, the number being determined, in the case of landward parishes, by the county council; in the case of burghal parishes by the town council and, in the case of mixed parishes, by county and town councils jointly.
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  • The term "parish" is not in use as a territorial designation except in Louisiana, the sixty parishes of which correspond to the counties of the other states of the Union.
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  • BEATING THE BOUNDS, an ancient custom still observed in many English parishes.
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  • This clerical side of the parish bounds-beating was one of the religious functions prohibited by the Injunctions of Queen Elizabeth; but it was then ordered that the perambulation should continue to be performed as a quasi-secular function, so that evidence of the boundaries of parishes, &c. might be preserved (Gibson, Codex juris Ecclesiastici Anglicani (1761) pp. 213-214).
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  • Also many paupers were not able-bodied and parishes were not big enough to cope with the problems.
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  • adjoining parishes, the Duchy keeping the remainder.
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  • amalgamations of parishes can be provided on request - select ' Contact ' on the left of this page.
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  • annex f of OPCS 1981 User Guide 53 lists all those parishes which have been subject to subdivision.
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  • are of two " churches without parishes " which I believe are working well.
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  • These two parishes have recently become a united benefice.
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  • benefice of four parishes in Essex, partly farming country, partly commuter belt.
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  • bounded on northeast and east by England, and on the other sides by the parishes of Morebattle and Linton.
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  • churchwardens of the appropriate parishes for further details.
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  • As the baptist congregation is relatively small, John enlisted the help of other parishes and groups in the area.
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  • constituent parishes, with each parish requesting a poll.
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  • curacyn David Yeoman served curacies in the parishes of Caerphilly and Cardiff.
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  • curate in various parishes in Ulster.
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  • The parishes also elect members of the deanery synod for their rural deanery.
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  • The word " deanery " comes originally for the Latin for ten: deaneries originally comprised about ten parishes.
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  • In our own diocese many parishes have been blessed by their Local Ministry Teams.
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  • Consequential changes are made to parishes, local government electoral areas, petty sessional divisions and coroners ' districts.
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  • The countryside in both parishes is flat near the sea, gradually becoming hilly to the north.
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  • index on microfiche, to marriages and christenings in the 900 or so parishes in Scotland.
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  • lambasteurch is sending DVDs to parishes and schools lambasting what it calls the " nonsense " of the book and film.
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  • But Bruno is proceeding with the civil lawsuits seeking to regain control over the parishes.
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  • A copy of the Central Council publicity leaflet will be included in the publicity pack sent out to parishes by The Children's Society.
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  • This is obviously a fairly lively church, thanks to a population much larger than most Suffolk parishes.
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  • What seems clear is that where parishes are smallest, the less evidence there is of a former minster.
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  • minster parishes and on the development of hundreds and Iron Age tribal territories.
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  • natives of the parishes of Crawford and Leadhills.
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  • normalized by the total number of parishes per county.
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  • In most parts of the Church of England parishes which have opted for extended episcopal oversight are very small in number.
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  • Responses to the Reformation seem to have varied, both regionally and between neighboring parishes.
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  • The present parish comprehends the ancient parishes of Longformacus and Ellam, which were united before the year 1750.
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  • The work so far has centered around Milton Abbas and the surrounding parishes, with the overall aim to get people more active.
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  • Minster is an important center serving mainly the rural parishes of the district.
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  • The total number of parishes in the county is 465, exclusive of the new district parishes in the county is 465, exclusive of the new district parishes recently established.
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  • It contains within its borders no less than 83 pre-Reformation catholic parishes, a sign of how the ecclesiastical landscape has changes.
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  • Modern church parishes and civil parishes are listed with their nearest ancient equivalent.
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  • He became parish Surveyor, and when required, measured the land for farmers and laborers in Wrangle and the adjacent parishes.
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  • This will also help identify churches in nearby townships and/or parishes.
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  • parishioners of both parishes.
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  • parochial ministry with two Anglican parishes in the North of England.
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  • portion of these parishes is covered with sand hills.
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  • A copy of the Central Council publicity leaflet will be included in the publicity leaflet will be included in the publicity pack sent out to parishes by The Children's Society.
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  • With the help of their architect, most parishes can make reasonable estimates of what costs the next quinquennial is likely to incur.
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  • He also wants to seek reconciliation with dissenting parishes.
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  • reside inland in tiny hamlets within the island`s 11 parishes.
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  • When it flowed this rivulet was reputed to mark the ancient boundary between the parishes of Cardiff and Llandaf.
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  • shire town ], 137 Parishes & about 6400 Houses.
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  • Parishes, it should also be remembered, often straddled county boundaries.
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  • subdivision of a county, a number of parishes grouped together.
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  • tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for £ 700 per annum.
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  • townships and/or parishes.
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  • Traces of the Roman road were very distinct in 1790 in this and neighboring parishes; and in Sturmer is a large tumulus.
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  • vagrancy passes were issued to permit a pauper to travel across parishes, usually as part of a Removal Order.
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  • vicar of two parishes in Bristol.
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  • He also built the vicarage which can still be seen, with some chimneys modeled on the church towers of his previous parishes.
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  • Nowadays selected parishes have an episcopal visitation and the timing of the events is staggered.
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  • The pope on his side grants the temporal sovereign certain rights, such as that of making or controlling the appointment of dignitaries; engages to proceed in harmony with the government in the creation of dioceses or parishes; and regularizes the situation produced by the usurpation of church property &c. The great advantage of concordats - indeed their principal utility - consists in transforming necessarily unequal unilateral claims into contractual obligations analogous to those which result from an international convention.
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  • Analogous provisions have been made with regard to the territorial divisions within the dioceses; parishes have been recast, and the consent of the two authorities has been required for the establishment of new parishes.
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  • As regards candidates for ecclesiastical offices, the concordats concluded with Catholic nations regularly give the sovereign the right to nominate or present to bishoprics, often also to other inferior benefices, such as canonries, important parishes and abbeys; or at least the choice of the ecclesiastical authority is submitted to the approval of the civil power.
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  • Their parishes were declared vacant, and episcopal clergy appointed to them.
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  • parishes form a consistorial circum- Aven scription, which has a consistorial (Thou council consisting of the council of presbyters of the chief town of the i8861~
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  • (b) The Presbytery has jurisdiction, partly appellate and partly original, over a number of parishes.
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  • bishop, provincial synod, exarch of the diocese, patriarch of Constantinople (obviously the council could not here have been legislating for the entire church); forbidding clerics to be running to Constantinople with complaints, without the consent of their respective bishops; (7) confirming the possession of rural parishes to those who had actually administered them for thirty years, providing for the adjudication of conflicting claims, and guaranteeing the integrity of metropolitan provinces; (8) confirming the third canon of the second ecumenical council, which accorded to Constantinople equal privileges ('oa 7fp€ose7a) with Rome, and the second rank among the patriarchates, and, in addition, granting to Constantinople patriarchal jurisdiction over Pontus, Asia and Thrace.
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  • Navigable waters are said to penetrate all but four of the parishes of the state, their total length approximating 3800 m.
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  • The Acadians (see § History below) to-day are settled mainly in St Mary, Acadia and Vermilion parishes; lesser numbers are in Avoyelles and St Landry; and some are scattered in various other parishes.
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  • It is often forgotten that "extreme" ritual is no longer an "innovation" in the English Church; it has become the norm in a large number of parishes, and whole generations of Church people have grown up to whom it is the only familiar type of Christian worship. To attempt to "enforce the law" (whatever the law may be) would, therefore, seriously wound the consciences of a large number of people who are quite unconscious of having broken it.
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  • Salaries and similar expenses incurred by the board are charged on a district fund to which the several parishes contribute; but each parish remains separately responsible for the expenses of maintaining its own highways.
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  • He diagnosed this evil as being due to the absence of personal influence, spiritual oversight, and the want of parochial organizations which had not kept pace in the city, as they had done in rural parishes, with the growing population.
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  • Restrictions had also been imposed on the transfer of patronage of churches built under the Church Building Acts and New Parishes Acts, and on that of benefices in the gift of the lord chancellor, and sold by him in order to augment others; but agreements may be made as to the patronage of such churches in favour of persons who have contributed to their building or enlargement without being void for simony.
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  • The Commissioners of Supply, originally appointed to apportion and collect the national revenue and afterwards entrusted with the regulation of the land tax, the control of the county police, the raising of the militia, and the levying of rates for county expenditure, were practically superseded by the county councils, which are also the local authority under the Contagious Diseases (Animals) and the Public Health Acts in all parishes (burghs and police burghs excepted), perform the administrative duties formerly entrusted to the justices of the peace, and may also enforce the Rivers Pollution Act each within its own jurisdiction.
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  • 1779), who is still affectionately remembered in Wales as the donor of " Madam Bevan's Charity," Griffith Jones was enabled to extend his scheme of educating the people throughout South Wales, where numerous " circulating charity schools," as they were called, were set up in many parishes with the approval of their incumbents.
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  • Its Welsh form is confined to the sea-coast parishes, and on the Norfolk coast the creature is supposed to be amphibious, coming out of the sea by night and travelling about the lonely lanes.
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  • The system had an office, Overseer of the Poor, in each of 1,500 parishes.
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  • Others reside inland in tiny hamlets within the island`s 11 parishes.
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  • Monmouth the shire town ], 137 Parishes & about 6400 Houses.
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  • Hundred - a subdivision of a county, a number of parishes grouped together.
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  • They do not deal with parishes where tithe rentcharge was never created, nor do they necessarily cover the whole liability in a parish.
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  • The tithes of the two parishes were commuted in 1837 for £ 700 per annum.
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  • In 1555 parishes were made liable for upkeep of roads passing through them.
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  • Vagrancy Passes were issued to permit a pauper to travel across parishes, usually as part of a Removal Order.
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  • Paul Roberts is vicar of two parishes in Bristol.
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  • He also built the Vicarage which can still be seen, with some chimneys modeled on the church towers of his previous parishes.
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  • Today, "Acadiana", or Cajun country is made of twenty-two parishes (counties) in southern Louisiana.
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  • You may find birth, marriage, wills, baptism and death records from parishes in the United Kingdom and other countries as well, dating back to the church's founding.
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  • For three years he was actively employed in removing from their parishes those ministers whom he regarded as incompetent.
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  • It was felt to be a political necessity that he should return, and in 1541, somewhat reluctantly, he returned on his own terms. These were the recognition of the Church's spiritual independence, the division of the town into parishes, and the appointment (by the municipal authority) of a consistory or council of elders in each parish for the exercise of discipline.
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  • At the Restoration, in which they heartily co-operated, there were in Ulster seventy ministers in fixed charges, with nearly eighty parishes or congregations containing one hundred thousand persons.
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  • The Jewish parishes, called synagogues, are grouped into departmental consistories (Paris, Bordeaux, Nancy, Marseilles, Bayonne, Lille, Vesoul, Besancon and three in Algeria).
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