Parish sentence example

parish
  • I've got parish calls to make this evening.
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  • The restored church of St Michael, formerly a parish church, but standing on a hill about 2 m.
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  • The present parish church belonged to an abbey founded in 837 by St Bernard, bishop of Vienne.
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  • A stone bridge over the Wye connects the town with the village and parish church of Cwmdauddwr.
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  • In the First Parish Church, the site of which is marked by a monument, the Provincial Congress, after adjournment from Concord, met from April to July 1775; the Massachusetts General Court held its sessions here from 1775 to 1778, and the Boston town meetings were held here during the siege of Boston, when many of the well-known Boston families made their homes in the neighbourhood.
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  • Under the influence of Archbishop Chicheley, who had himself founded two colleges in imitation of Wykeham, and Thomas Bekynton, king's secretary and privy seal, and other Wyke - hamists, Henry VI., on the 11th of October 1440, founded, in imitation of Winchester College, "a college in the parish church of Eton by Windsor not far from our birthplace," called the King's College of the Blessed Mary of Eton by Windsor, as "a sort of first-fruits of his taking the government on himself."
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  • He was ordained minister of New Luce in Galloway in 1660, but had to leave his parish under Middleton's Ejectment Act in 1663.
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  • Of churches the most noteworthy is that of St John the Baptist, the parish church, a Perpendicular building with lofty western tower.
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  • After the Reformation the processions gradually ceased to be ecclesiastical in England, and are now practically secularized into the perambulation of the parish boundaries on or about Ascension Day.
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  • To these parish parliaments delegates are sent from every station.
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  • A well-preserved gateway of red sandstone and portions of two towers of the castle are included in the buildings of the present gaol, and the old parish church of St Peter contains some interesting monuments, amongst them being the altar tomb (of the 6th century) of Sir Rhys ap Thomas, K.G., and his wife, which was removed hither for safety at the Reformation from the desecrated church of the neighbouring Priory of St John.
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  • Liberton (pop. of parish, 7 2 33), a name that recalls the previous existence of a leper's hospital, is prominently situated on the rising ground to the south of Edinburgh, the parish church being a conspicuous landmark.
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  • Fletcher was one of the few parish clergy who understood Wesley and his work, yet he never wrote or said anything inconsistent with his own Anglican position.
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  • To the north-west lies the parish of Terregles, said to be a corruption of Tir-eglwys (terra ecclesia, that is, "Kirk land").
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  • The fire of 1666 destroyed all the documents of the Parish Clerks Company, and in its hall in Silver Street only printed tables from about the year 1700 are to be found.
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  • The Evangelical parish church contains some fine statues by Christian Rauch, and the palace (built 1710-1720), in addition to a valuable library of 30,000 vols., a collection of coins and pictures, among the latter several by Angelica Kauffmann.
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  • The original aim of the institution was to train nurses for hospital work, but its scope was afterwards extended and it trained its members for teaching and parish work as well.
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  • They are anomalies to the English ecclesiastical law, have no parish rights, and can be converted to other than religious purposes, but a clergyman may be licensed to perform duty in such a place of worship. In the early and middle part of the 19th century such proprietary chapels were common, but they have practically ceased to exist.
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  • Among the principal buildings and institutions are several churches, of which the oldest, the parish church of St Mary, was built in 1821 on an early site; court house, public hall, institute and free library.
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  • Gold was discovered here in 1682 by Bartholomeu Bueno, the first European explorer of this region, and the settlement founded by him was called Santa Anna, which is still the name of the parish.
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  • In 1722 he was presented to the rectory of Ludgvan, and in 173 2 he obtained in addition the vicarage of St Just, his native parish.
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  • He was himself a high churchman, and carried things with a high hand in his parish, but was much beloved by his people.
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  • His last days were spent in a cave in the parish of Sorn, near his birthplace, and there he died in 1686, worn out by hardship and privation.
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  • The better residential district of Holborn, which extends northward to Euston Road in the borough of St Pancras, is mainly within the parish of St George, Bloomsbury.
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  • The reputation of the district immediately to the south, embraced in the parish of St Giles in the Fields, was far different.
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  • The present parish church of St Giles in the Fields, between Shaftesbury Avenue and New Oxford Street, dates from 1734, but here was situated a leper's hospital founded by Matilda, wife of Henry I., in i ioi.
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  • Its chapel became the parish church on the suppression of the monasteries.
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  • The church of St Andrew, the parish of which extends into the City, stands near Holborn Viaduct.
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  • The author of The Sacred Order and Offices of Episcopacy or Episcopacy Asserted against the Aerians and Acephali New and Old (1642), could scarcely hope to retain his parish, which was not, however, sequestrated until 1644.
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  • In 1646 he is found in partnership with two other deprived clergymen, keeping a school at Newton Hall, in the parish of Llanvihangel-Aberbythych, Carmarthenshire.
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  • It is his especial duty to inspect the churches within his archdeaconry, to see that the fabrics are kept in repair, and to hold annual visitations of the clergy and churchwardens of each parish, for the purpose of ascertaining that the clergy are in residence, of admitting the newly elected churchwardens into office, and of receiving the presentments of the outgoing churchwardens.
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  • The parish churches of Dronfield, Hathersage (with some notable stained glass), Sandiacre and Tideswell exemplify the Decorated period; the last is a particularly stately and beautiful building, with a lofty and ornate western tower and some good early brasses.
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  • He was licensed to preach by the Haddington presbytery in 1743, and after two years as a probationer was ordained (1745) minister of the parish of Beith.
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  • There are many large slate quarries in this parish, especially at Blaenau Festiniog, the junction of three railways, London & North Western, Great Western and Festiniog, a narrow-gauge line between Portmadoc and Duffws.
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  • The large parish church of St Teilo has a low embattled Perpendicular tower.
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  • A crofter is defined as " a tenant of a holding " - being arable or pasture land, or partly arable and partly pasture land - " from year to year who resides on his holding, the annual rent of which does not exceed £30 in money, and which is situated in a ` crofting parish.'
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  • Mr and Mrs Barnett worked hard for the poor of their parish, opening evening schools for adults, providing them with music and reasonable entertainment, and serving on the board of guardians and on the managing committees of schools.
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  • At the same time the conditions of indoor relief were improved, and the various charities were co-ordinated, by co-operation with the Charity Organization Society and the parish board of guardians.
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  • Large hosiery works employ many of the inhabitants,, and collieries are worked in the parish.
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  • Among the notable public buildings are the old parish church built at the expense of Charles II.
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  • There are also a parish high school and St Hyacinth's Academy (Roman Catholic).
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  • Amongst the principal buildings are the fine Gothic parish church, with a spire 200 ft.
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  • The old burying-ground was the kirkyard of the former parish church, the tower of which still exists, but a modern cemetery has been formed in Sunnyside.
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  • Parish boundaries are laid down with the help of local meresmen appointed by justices at quarter.
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  • St Mary's, the ancient parish church, has an elaborate 14th-century font and some monuments of interest.
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  • This comprises only the chancel and aisles of a building which, if entire, would rank as one of the finest parish churches in England.
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  • Before taking up residence in his parish he once more went abroad, and made in Rome the acquaintance of the Chevalier Bunsen, who afterwards dedicated to him part of his work, Hippolytus and his Age.
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  • The friends agreed to visit the Castle twice a week and to look after the sick in any parish where the clergyman was willing to accept their help.
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  • The parish of Madeley includes the small towns of Ironbridge and Coalport, with part of Coalbrookedale.
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  • Born on the 18th of February 1718 he was educated at the parish school of St Ninians, and at the grammar school of Stirling, and, after completing his course at Edinburgh University, became master of the grammar school at Annan.
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  • The finest work is said to come from Unst, though each parish has its own speciality.
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  • Holm of Papal, "isle of the priest" (2), belonging to Bressay parish, and Linga, "heather isle" (8), to the parish of Tingwall, lie S.E.
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  • There are parish poorhouses in Dunrossness and Unst, besides the Shetland combination poorhouse at Lerwick.
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  • George Low (1747-1795), the naturalist and historian of Orkney, who made a tour through Shetland in 1774, described a Runic monument which he saw in the churchyard of Crosskirk, in Northmavine parish (Mainland), and several fragments of Norse swords, shield bosses and brooches have been dug up from time to time.
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  • The population of the whole parish (which measures 12,294 acres) was 1466 in 1901.
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  • Natural gas is found in Caddo parish, about 20 m.
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  • In good seasons and exceptional localities the yield may approach a bale per acre, as in Assumption parish, and in the Mississippi valley at the junction of Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas.
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  • The strong, black perique of the delta - cultivated very generally in the lower alluvial region before the Civil War, but now almost exclusively in St James parish - is a famous leaf, grown since early colonial times.
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  • The lumber industry is centred chiefly in Calcasieu parish.
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  • The " parishes " date from 1807; they were based on an earlier Spanish division for religious purposes - whence the names of saints in parish nomenclature.
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  • The leasing or hiring of state convicts is prohibited by the constitution, but parish convicts may be hired or leased for farm and factory work, work on roads and levees, and other public undertakings.
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  • Under Turkish rule the communes chose their own parish priests, but this right is now vested in the government.
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  • The place-name "Gospel Oak," which occurs in London and elsewhere, is a relic of these rogation processions, the gospel of the day being read at the foot of the finest oak the parish boasted.
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  • In addition to their functions as guardians of the poor, the parish members have to investigate crimes and punish misdemeanours, settle litigations and divide inheritances.
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  • The whole area was united as one civil parish in 1903, and the population in 1901 was 16 4,333, of whom only about 8% spoke Welsh.
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  • The parish lies a few miles south-east of Glasgow, and contains High Blantyre (pop. 2521), Blantyre Works (or Low Blantyre), Stonefield and several villages.
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  • In i i i o Hamburg, with Holstein, passed into the hands of Adolph I., count of Schauenburg, and it is with the building of the Neustadt (the present parish .of St Nicholas) by his grandson, Adolph III.
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  • In July 1746 Home was presented to the parish of Athelstaneford, Haddingtonshire, vacant by the death of Robert Blair, the author of The Grave.
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  • From 1767 he resided either at Edinburgh or at a villa which he built at Kilduff near his former parish.
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  • There are three parish churches, St Andrew, St Peter and St Michael, of which the two first are fine old buildings in mixed styles, while St Michael's is modern.
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  • It possesses a beautiful parish church, which contains the tombs of the Potocki family.
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  • The final division took place in the parish or community, among the inhabitants subject to the tax.
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  • When the struggle between the colonies and the mother country began, although he felt much sympathy for the former, his opposition to any form of obstruction to the Stamp Act and other measures, and his denunciation of a resort to force created a breach between him and his parish, and in a fiery farewell discourse preached after the opening of hostilities he declared that no power on earth should prevent him from praying and shouting "God save the King."
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  • Its source is generally held to be at a place known as Thames Head, in the parish of Coates, 3 m.
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  • St Saviour's parish church of Tor-Mohun, or Tormoham, an ancient stone structure, was restored in 1874.
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  • His first ministerial charge was over a small village parish, West Roxbury, a few miles from Boston; here he was ordained as a Unitarian clergyman in June 1837 and here he preached until January 1846.
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  • Among many places of worship may be mentioned the restored parish church of Holy Trinity, which dates from the 12th century and contains some interesting monuments and brasses; and the Perpendicular Hermitage or Tory chapel, with a 15th or 16th century chantry-house.
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  • In the parish of Ardchattan, on the north shore, stands the beautiful ruin of St Modan's Priory, founded in the 13th century for Cistercian monks of the order of Vallis Caulium.
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  • Though it retains some old houses, and the parish church dates from 1639, Elie is, as a whole, quite modern and is one of the most popular resorts in the county on account of its fine golf links and excellent bathing.
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  • The royal burgh of Earlsferry (pop. 317) is situated in the parish of Elie, which it adjoins on the west.
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  • Of these the chief is the parish, once collegiate, church of the 12th and 13th centuries.
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  • The parochia, or parish, an ecclesiastical division, is often used for administrative purposes, but it has no political organization.
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  • The Canongate Tolbooth adjoins the parish church, in the burial-ground of which is the tombstone raised by Burns to the memory of Robert Fergusson, and where Dugald Stewart, Adam Smith and other men of note were buried.
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  • Obviously the churchyards surrounding the older and more important parish churches - such as Greyfriars', St Cuthbert's and the Canongate, contain the greatest number of memorials of the illustrious dead.
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  • Newhaven (population of parish, 7636), so called from the harbour constructed in the reign of James IV., had a shipbuilding yard of some repute in former times.
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  • Still farther west lies the village of Cramond (pop. of parish, 3815), at the mouth of the river Almond, where Roman remains have often been found.
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  • It was the birthplace of several well-known persons, among others of John Law (1671-1729), originator of the Mississippi scheme, Lauriston Castle being situated in the parish.
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  • The parish church contains the tombs of the Forresters, of old the leading family of the district, with full-length sculptured figures, and at the base of Corstorphine Hill - from one point of which (" Rest and be Thankful ") is to be had one of the best views of Edinburgh - are the seats of several well-known families.
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  • Craigmillar, though situated in the parish of Liberton, is really a part of Edinburgh.
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  • The parish church, effectively situated on an eminence by the side of the lake, was the scene of the ministration of the Rev. John Thomson (1778-1840), the landscape painter, who numbered Sir Walter Scott among his elders.
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  • Alexander Carlyle, the famous divine (1 77 2-1805), whose Memorials of his Times still affords fascinating reading, ministered for fifty-five years in the parish church, in the graveyard of which lies David Macbeth Moir (1798-1851), who under the pen-name of " Delta " wrote Mansie Wauch, a masterpiece of Scots humour and pathos.
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  • Lasswade (pop. of parish, 9708), partly in the Pentlands, famous for its oatmeal, was often the summer resort of Edinburgh worthies.
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  • Here Sir Walter Scott lived for six years and De Quincey for nineteen, and William Tennant (1784-1848), author of Anster Fair, was the parish dominie.
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  • This embraced portions of South Leith parish (landward) and of Duddingston parish, including the village of Restalrig and the ground lying on both sides of the main road from Edinburgh to Portobello; and also part of Cramond parish, in which is contained the village and harbour of Granton.
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  • Under the protection of the hill-fort, a native settlement was established on the ridge running down to the valley at the foot of Salisbury Crags, and another hamlet, according to William Maitland (1693-1757), the earliest historian of Edinburgh, was founded in the area at the northwestern base of the rock, a district that afterwards became the parish of St Cuthbert, the oldest in the city.
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  • The parish church of St Giles is believed to have been erected in the reign of Alexander I., about 1110, and the huge Norman keep of the castle, built by his younger brother, David I., continued to be known as David's Tower till its destruction in the siege of 1572.
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  • The legal point in the dispute (which Campbell afterwards made the subject of a separate pamphlet) was whether the churchwardens of the parish, in the absence of the vestry, had any means of enforcing a rate except the antiquated interdict or ecclesiastical censure.
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  • He studied theology at Orleans, was ordained priest in 1824 and placed in charge of the parish of Puiseaux, in the diocese of Orleans.
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  • The parish church (1769) has some columns of an earlier building, interesting brasses and strong embattled tower.
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  • Beyond the railway station stands the obelisk to the memory of Ewen Maclachlan (1775-1822), the Gaelic poet, who was born in the parish.
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  • Next to the poor rate came that for highways, and other special rates have been authorized from time to time, as for police, education, public lighting, cemeteries, libraries, sanitary purposes, &c. To distinguish the rate the name of the precepting authority is frequently added or the purpose for which it is levied specified, as county rate, watch rate, &c. The valuation list of a parish is the basis on which the poor rate is levied.
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  • This valuation list contains the gross estimated' rental and rateable value of all rateable property in the parish.
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  • The rateable value of the parish being known, so much on each pound of the rateable value as will equal the amount required to be raised is levied, and is known as the "rate."
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  • It is in the parish of Llandanwg (pop. in 1901, 931).
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  • It is still surrounded in part by the ruins of its ancient walls, but, with the exception of the parish church of St John (15th century), there are no buildings worthy of special notice.
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  • On this cliff also stands the parish church of St Mary and St Eanswith, a cruciform building of much interest, with central tower.
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  • Out of the civil parish, which has an area of 10,785 acres and had in 1 9 01 a population of 854, there was formed in 1907 the urban district, comprising 1611 acres, and with an estimated population at the date of formation of 812.
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  • The ancient parish of Llangammarch consists of the townships of Penbuallt and Treflis, the wells being in the former, which comprises 11,152 acres and had in 1901 a population of only 433.
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  • John Penry, the Puritan martyr, was born at Cefn-brith in this parish.
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  • Charles Wesley's wife, Sarah Gwynne, was of Garth, an old residence just outside the parish.
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  • The chief historical interest of the town centres round the socalled "Fishguard Invasion" of 1797, in which year on the 2 2nd of February three French men-of-war with troops on board, under the command of General Tate, an Irish-American adventurer, appeared off Carreg Gwastad Point in the adjoining parish of Llanwnda.
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  • A magnificent Gothic parish church was destroyed by fire and gunpowder in 1790 to make way for a building of little merit in Italian style.
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  • It was formerly in the ancient parish of Eglwysilan, but from that and Bedwas (Mon.) an ecclesiastical parish was formed in 1850, while the whole of the parishes of Eglwysilan and Llanfabon, with a total acreage of 14,426, were in 1893 constituted into an urban district; its population in 1901 was 15,385, of which 4343 were in the "town" ward.
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  • The parish church of St Mary is Perpendicular, with a fine carved roof of the 17th century.
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  • Conant (1868); The Life That Now is (1871); The Simple Truth (1877); Talks to Young Men: With Asides to Young Women (1888); Things New and Old (1893); Father Taylor (1906); and A History of the Town and Parish of Ilkley (with Horsefall Turner, 1886).
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  • On Sunday morning the iith of October, just after his return, whilst on a visit to Mr Gladstone, he died in Hawarden parish church of heart failure.
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  • On the 30th of May the priests were once more sent for - to wit, his nephew, the abbe Mignot, the abbe Gaultier, who had officiated on the former occasion, and the parish priest, the cure of St Sulpice.
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  • In the parish of Lochrutton, a few miles south-west of Maxwelltown, there is a good example of a stone circle, the "Seven Grey Sisters," and an old peel-tower in the Mains of Hills.
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  • Dr Thomas Brown, the metaphysician (1778-1820), was a native of the parish (Kirkmabreck) in which Creetown lies.
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  • Its principal buildings are the fine Renaissance parish church and the fortress-like 17th-century town hall.
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  • The chapel was used as the parish church of St Mary-le-Strand (1564-1717) and constituted a Chapel Royal in 1773; but there are no remains of the rest of the foundation.
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  • Greater London (in the sense in which that name might then have been applied) was governed by the inhabitants of each parish in vestry assembled, save that in some instances parishes had elected select vestries under the provisions of the Vestries Act 1831.
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  • Under that act a vestry elected by the ratepayers of the parish was established for each parish in the metropolis outside the City.
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  • The boundaries of these divisions do not in any way correspond with each other, or with the police divisions, or with the borough or parish boundaries.
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  • The act of 1899 swept away all these distinctions, and constituted the new borough councils in every case the overseers for every parish within their respective boroughs, except that the town clerk of each borough performs the duties of overseers with respect to the registration of electors.'
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  • The parish church of which we have the most authentic notice before the Conquest is St Helen's, Bishopsgate.
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  • The Greyfriars, Minorites or Franciscans, first settled in Cornhill, and in 1224 John Ewin made over to them an estate situated in the ward of Farringdon Within and in the parish of St Nicholas in the Shambles, where their friary was built.
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  • Besides the four chief orders of friars there were the Crutched Friars in the parish of St Olave, Hart Street (about 1298), and the Friars of the Sac first outside Aldersgate (about 1257) and afterwards in the Old Jewry.
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  • He states that the City contained 120 parish churches and 40,000 inhabitants.
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  • The Company of Parish Clerks is named in an ordinance of 1581 (of which there is a copy in the Record Office) as the body responsible for the bills, and their duties were then said to be " according to the Order in that behalf heretofore provided."
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  • At common law the parish is required to maintain all highways within its bounds; but by special custom the obligation may attach to a particular township or district, and in certain cases the owner of land is bound by the conditions of his holding to keep a highway in repair.
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  • The leading principle of the Highway Act 1835 is to place the highways under the direction of parish surveyors, and to provide for the necessary expenses by a rate levied on the occupiers of land.
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  • The expenses of highway management in each district (or parish), together with a proportion of the general expenses of the act, are levied by the trustees by an assessment on the lands and heritages within the district (or parish).
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  • It is, however, a Roman Catholic archbishopric. The Protestant cathedral is also the parish church, and was to a great extent rebuilt c. 1861 from plans by Sir Thomas Deane.
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  • In some deeds relating to the parish of Chiddingfold, in Surrey, of a date not later than 1230, a grant is recorded of twenty acres of land to Lawrence " vitrearius," and in another deed, of about 1280, the " ovenhusveld " is mentioned as a boundary.
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  • They can be traced by cullet heaps and broken-down furnaces, and by their names, often mutilated, recorded in parish registers.
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  • From 1703 till his death, on the 21st of March 1734, he was parish minister at Eastwood, near Glasgow.
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  • He was licensed as a preacher by the presbytery of Dunkeld, and soon afterwards ordained by that of Dundee as minister of the parish of Tealing (1719), where his effective preaching soon secured a large congregation.
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  • In some cases a parish priest is also appointed to a chaplaincy, but in so far as he is a chaplain he has no parochial duties.
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  • The Roman Catholic chaplains are classed as parish priests, curates and assistants, and are subject to an army Vicar Apostolic. In war, at an army headquarters there are a "field-rabbi," a "military imam," an evangelical minister, as well as the Roman Catholic hierarchy.
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  • There is a stately parish church, while above the little town is the oldest Capuchin convent in Switzerland (1581).
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  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Thomas (restored 1874), the church of St David (r866), a Roman Catholic church, and Baptist, Calvinistic, Methodist, Congregational and Wesleyan chapels; the intermediate and technical schools (1895), Davies's endowed (elementary) school (1789), the Gwyn Hall (1888), the town hall, with corn exchange in the basement storey, and the market-house.
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  • The parish church of St Martin's is a handsome edifice rebuilt in 1873.
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  • The choir is used as the parish church.
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  • The parish of New Monkland, in which Airdrie lies, was formed (with Old Monkland)in 1640 out of the ancient barony of Monkland, so named from the fact that it was part of the lands granted by Malcolm IV.
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  • It has a cathedral, St Michael's, which also serves as a parish church.
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  • In the old parish church was traditionally Owen's pew; his knife, fork and dagger, are at the neighbouring Rig (Rhig); his palace, 3 m.
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  • From 1796 to 1800 he was sub-editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, in succession to his elder brother, JAMES THOMSON (1768-1855), who filled that position in 1795-1796, and who in 1805 was ordained to the parish of Eccles, Berwickshire; and the chemical and mineralogical articles which he contributed to the supplement to the third edition formed the basis of his System of Chemistry, the first edition of which was published in 1802 and the seventh in 1831.
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  • There are two interesting old burying-grounds: one on Grove Street, near the Cambridge line, first used in 1642, contains a monument to John Coolidge, killed during the British retreat from Concord and Lexington on the 19th of April 1775; the other is near the centre of the village about the former site of the First Parish Church.
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  • John Hodgson (1779-1845), the historian of Northumberland, in a short memoir published in 1831, held that he was born in 1685, at Pinkie House, in the parish of Inveresk, Midlothian, and that his father was a Northumberland Nonconformist, who had migrated to Scotland, but returned to England soon after the Revolution of 1688.
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  • No member of the executive branch of the government (president, cabinet minister, prefect, sub-prefect, or governor) can be elected to either chamber, nor can any judge or " fiscal " of the supreme court, nor any member of the ecclesiastical hierarchy from his diocese, province or parish, nor any judge or " fiscal " of superior and first-instance courts from their judicial districts, nor any military officer from the district where he holds a military appointment at the time of election.
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  • The parish church of Au, in the Early Gothic style, contains gigantic stained-glass windows and some excellent wood-carving; and the church of St John in Haidhausen is another fine Gothic structure.
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  • By the colonial authorities Natick was considered as a " plantation " until the establishment of the church; in 1762 the parish (erected in 1745) became a district, and in 1781 this was incorporated as a town.
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  • After short assistant pastorates at St Andrew's, Glasgow, and Bonhill, Dumbartonshire, he obtained a settled charge as minister of the important parish of St George's, Edinburgh.
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  • The vicar of the parish gave him instruction and procured his entrance in 1563 as an exhibitioner to Balliol College, Oxford.
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  • He made his last speech in the House of Commons on the 1st of March 1894, acquiescing in some amendments introduced by the Lords into the Parish Councils Bill; and on the 3rd of March he placed his resignation in the queen's hands.
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  • Sir James Lumsden, a soldier of fortune under Gustavus Adolphus, who distinguished himself in the Thirty Years' War, was born in the parish of Kilrenny about 1598.
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  • Archibald Constable (1774-1827), Sir Walter Scott's publisher, was born in the parish of Carnbee, about 3 m.
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  • The parish church of Santa Maria has some good pictures and wood carvings.
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  • The principal buildings are the parish church of St Andrew (dating from the time of Henry I., modernized in 1710, rebuilt with the exception of the tower in 1805, and again rebuilt in 1878), and the handsome Gothic mechanics' institute and technical school (1870).
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  • He was buried in the Swedish church in Princes Square, in the parish of St George's-in-theEast, and on the 7th of April 1908 his remains were removed at the request of the Swedish government to Stockholm.
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  • He returned to Augsburg in 1720, but became parish minister of Kaufbeuren in 1723.
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  • It has an evangelical and four Roman Catholic churches, among the latter the handsome parish church dating from the 15th century, and various educational establishments.
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  • It possesses no notable buildings, save a modern parish church, a prefecture, also modern, and a building wherein are housed the town library and a picture gallery, with some fair works of art.
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  • They were both buried in the parish church at Battersea, where a monument with medallions and inscriptions composed by Bolingbroke was erected to their memory.
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  • On the 18th of March 1838 he became parish minister at Loudoun, Ayrshire.
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  • On the secession of 1843 he was offered many different parishes, and having finally settled at Dalkeith, devoted himself to parish work and to questions affecting the Church as a whole.
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  • By far his best work was the spontaneous and delightful Reminiscences of a Highland Parish (1867).
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  • His Glasgow church was named after him the "Macleod Parish Church," and the "Macleod Missionary Institute" was erected by the Barony church in Glasgow.
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  • In the vicinity is St Mary's (Anglican) parish hall (1905-1907), the first portion of a large building planned to take the place of "Old" St Mary's Church, the "mother" church of the Rand, built in 1887.
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  • The principal buildings are the Roman Catholic church, which is the pro-cathedral of the diocese of Killaloe; the parish church formed out of the ruins of the Franciscan Abbey, founded in 1240 by Donough Carbrac O'Brien; a school on the foundation of Erasmus Smith, and various county buildings.
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  • The parish church of St John the Baptist, with its fine tower and spire, was built about the close of the 14th century, and, though largely restored, has a beautiful chancel, Lady chapel and baptistery.
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  • Caravaca is dominated by the medieval castle of Santa Cruz, and contains several convents and a fine parish church, with a miraculous cross celebrated for its healing power, in honour of which a yearly festival is held on the 3rd of May.
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  • In January 1841 Shuttleworth, bishop of Chichester, appointed him archdeacon, whereupon he began a personal visitation of each parish within his district, completing the task in 1843.
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  • Pop. of parish, which includes East Sheen (1901), 7774.
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  • Lynn to seat 3000 worshippers, occupying the site of the old St Anne's parish church, part of the fabric of which the new building incorporates.
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  • The township of Dodbrooke, included within the civil parish, adjoins Kingsbridge on the northeast.
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  • When Kingsbridge became a separate parish is not certainly known, but it was before 1414 when the church was rebuilt and consecrated to St Edmund.
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  • The provincial and parish roads, kept up by the local government, are excellent.
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  • Bowden, to the south of the hills, was the birthplace of the poets Thomas Aird (1802-1876) and James Thomson, and its parish church contains the burial-place of the dukes of Roxburghe.
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  • Among other subjects were the improvement of the parish schools, of pauper administration, and of several of the corrupt forms of legal procedure which then prevailed.
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  • Kennedy retired from office in 1854, but continued to take keen interest in political affairs, and up to his death in 1879 took a great part in both county and parish business.
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  • The old parish church of St Ulrich is a good example of the Transition style of the 13th century, and contains a valuable antiquarian collection.
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  • The building was used as the parish church till 1815, when it fell into disrepair, but it was restored between 1871 and 1876.
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  • The chancel, nave and two side chapels exist, and it still serves as the parish church.
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  • It was in connexion with this parish that the ecclesiastical dispute arose which led to the disruption in the Church of Scotland in 1843.
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  • The church of St Mary, the ancient parish church of East Bourne, is a fine transitional Norman building; and there are numerous modern churches and chapels.
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  • In 1910 the corporation promoted a bill in parliament to add the Hampden Park district in the parish of Willingdon to the borough and to make Eastbourne, with this extension, a county borough.
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  • This variety forms a passage to the species glaucodote, (Co,Fe)AsS, which is found as well-developed orthorhombic crystals in copper ore at Hakansboda in Ramberg parish, Vestmanland, Sweden.
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  • The district originally formed part of the parish of Kilmalcolm, the nucleus of the town being the village of Newark attached to the barony of that name.
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  • In 1695 it was erected into a separate parish under the name of New Port Glasgow.
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  • The parish church is ancient, and above it are the ruins of the medieval castle of Resti.
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  • To this end a copy of the whole English Bible was to be set up in each parish church where the people could read it.
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  • A royal visitation, beginning in 1547, discovered, however, such a degree of ignorance and illiteracy among the parish clergy that it became clear that preaching could only be gradually given its due place in the services of the Church.
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  • In this parish was formerly situated the famous Benedictine convent of Oostbroek, founded in the beginning of the 12th century.
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  • There are blast furnaces in the neighbouring parish of Asfordby for the smelting of the abundant supply of iron ore in the district.
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  • It has three entrances on the Plaza, and over its main gateway hangs the " liberty bell " of Mexico, first rung by the humble parish priest Hidalgo, on the night of the 16th of September 1810, to call the people of Dolores to arms, and now rung at midnight on each recurring anniversary by the president himself.
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  • Lancelot was sent to the Cooper's free school, Ratcliff, in the parish of Stepney, and then to the Merchant Taylors' school under Richard Mulcaster.
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  • Of the churches the Stadtkirche (parish church), of which Herder became pastor in 1776, is a Gothic building dating from about 1400, but much altered in detail under "classical" influences.
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  • The cruciform parish church of St Marcelliana stands on a high cliff, west of the castle.
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  • Tintagel (Tintajol, Dundagel) is a parish a portion of which appears in the Domesday Survey as Bossiney (Botcinnu).
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  • In the parish of Tintagel is the hamlet of Bossiney which under the name of Tintagel received a charter (undated) from Richard king of the Romans, granting freedom to the borough and to the burgesses freedom from pontage and stallage throughout Cornwall, a market on Wednesdays and a three days' fair at Michaelmas.
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  • In 1563 a second Book of Homilies was submitted along with the 39 Articles to convocation; it was issued the same year under the title The second Tome of Homilies of such matters as were promised and instituted in the former part of Homilies, set out by the authority of the Queen's Majesty, and to be read in every Parish Church agreeably.
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  • His uncle, Bartholomew Zwingli, afterwards dekan or superintendent of Wesen, had been elected parish priest of Wildhaus.
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  • In the same year he was elected parish priest of Glarus, in spite of the pope's nomination of Heinrich Goldli, an influential pluralist of Zurich, whom Zwingli found it necessary to buy off at an expense of more than a hundred gulden.
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  • The parish church of St Mary is Early English and Perpendicular, with a small octagonal tower, but has been largely restored in modern times.
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  • Its only notable building is the Early English parish church of St Michael and All Angels.
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  • The church of St Michael, founded by Bishop Bernward early in the 11th century and restored after injury by fire in 1186, contains a unique painted ceiling of the 12th century, the sarcophagus and monument of Bishop Bernward, and a bronze font; it is now a Protestant parish church, but the crypt is used by the Roman Catholics.
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  • Sweden led the way, by making compulsory the parish record of births, deaths and marriages, kept by the clergy, and extending it to include the whole of the domiciled population of the parish.
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  • A supplementary statement of births, deaths and marriages for each parish was required from the clergy, who transmitted it to parliament through the bishops and primates successively.
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  • The parish statement of births, deaths and marriages was sent up by the clergy for the last time.
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  • The notion of obtaining a periodical record of population and its movement, dissociated from fiscal or other liabilities, originated, as stated above, in Sweden, where, in 1686, the birth and death registers, till then kept voluntarily by the parish clergy, were made compulsory and general, the results for each year being communicated to a central office.
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  • The example of Sweden was followed in the next year by Finland, and twenty years later, by Norway, where the parish register was an existing institution, as in the neighbouring state.
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  • In Austria, a census was taken in 1754 by the parish clergy, concurrently with the civil authorities and the military commandants.
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  • Wagner, writing of the censuses of Sweden, said to have been taken in the 18th century, uses these words, "Since 1749 careful parish registers have been kept by the clergy and have in general the value of censuses."
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  • Besides the small old parish churches of MerthyrDovan and Cadoxton, and the rebuilt parish church of Barry, there are four modern churches (in one of which Welsh services are held).
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  • On his return to Scotland in 1732 he settled as a practitioner in the parish of Shotts, Lanarkshire, and in1734-1736studied medicine at Edinburgh, where he was one of the founders of the Royal Medical Society.
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  • One city, one church (` parish ' in the ancient sense) with its bishop," was the rule.'
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  • This act of ordaining ministers, probably after the Genevan order - which they certainly used from May 1568 - and their excommunication of certain deserters from their " church " (so Grindal), clearly mark the fact that this body of some 200 persons had now deliberately taken up a position outside the national church, as being themselves a " church " in a truer sense than any parish church, inasmuch as they conformed to the primitive pattern.
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  • But his claim for " independent " churches no longer denies that true Christianity exists within parish assemblies.
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  • During the Protectorate, with its practical establishment of Presbyterians, Independents and Baptists, the position of Congregationalism was really anomalous, in so far as any of its pastors became parish ministers,' and so received " public mainfenance " and were expected to administer the sacraments to all and sundry.
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  • The parish church, rebuilt in 1808, contains a tablet to Charles James Fox, who resided at St Anne's Hill in the vicinity, and another to Lawrence Tomson, a translator of the New Testament in the 17th century.
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  • Traces of the wall of Antoninus which ran through the parish may still be made out, especially near Inveravon.
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  • They resembled the monks in so far as they lived in community and took religious vows; but their state of life remained essentially clerical, and as clerics their duty was to undertake the pastoral care and serve the parish churches in their patronage.
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  • Owing to infirm health he came to England, and after several changes settled, in 1823, in the parish of Brixham.
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  • He exerted himself greatly in building up his diocese, attempting to make an annual visit to every parish.
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  • In his twenty-sixth year, believing himself to be a divinely-commissioned prophet, he began to preach in his native parish and afterwards throughout Norway, calling people to repentance and attacking rationalism.
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  • It was necessary to make them large, because in the early Church it was customary for the bishop to baptize all the catechumens in his diocese (and so baptisteries are commonly found attached to the cathedral and not to the parish churches), and also because the rite was performed only thrice in the year.
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  • It is bordered by old houses, among which is one built by Bertrand du Guesclin in 1366, and contains a parish church of the 15th century.
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  • Frequent references to the parish church of Stoke are found during the 14th and 15th centuries.
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  • His father was rector of the parish: his grandfather and great-grandfather were merchants in the City of London, where their descendants for a long while continued to be influential people; his mother belonged to the family of Roundell, which had been settled for four centuries in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
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  • In September 1872 Gladstone again offered him the great seal, which Lord Hatherley had resigned; in the same year he took up his residence in his newly erected house at Blackmoor, in the parish of Selborne, in the county of Hampshire, from which he took his new title as a peer.
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  • The church of St Botolph is a superb Decorated building, one of the largest and finest parish churches in the kingdom.
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  • In Church Street is the ancient parish church of St Mary, largely restored, but still bearing the stamp of antiquity; opposite to it stands a new church in Decorated style by Sir Gilbert Scott.
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  • Besides the parish church of St Mary Magdalene, a fine and massive Perpendicular building with an ancient pulpit of carved stone, there are a guildhall and market house.
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  • It has received the sanction of Convocation, and the Lambeth Conference in 1897 declared that it "recognized with thankfulness the revival of the office of deaconess," though at the same time it protested against the indiscriminate use of the title and laid it down emphatically that the name must be restricted to those who had been definitely set apart by the bishop for the position and were working under the direct supervision and control of the ecclesiastical authority in the parish.
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  • In the principal towns and villages there are parish councils, and in some provinces county councils have been established.
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  • The fields and places of entertainment in Islington were favourite places of resort for the citizens of London in the 17th century and later; the modern Ball's Pond Road recalls the sport of duck-hunting practised here and on other ponds in the parish, and the popularity of the place was increased by the discovery of chalybeate wells.
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  • In England a translation of them made in 1548 was ordered to be placed in all parish churches beside the Bible.
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  • This enlargement of the bishop's parish and multiplication of the chuches under his care led to a change in the functions of the presbyterate.
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  • They were only representatives of the bishop, and the churches over which they were set were all a part of his parish, so that the Cyprianic principle, that the bishop is necessary to the very being of the Church, held good of diocesan as well as of congregational episcopacy.
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  • Local civil government is carried on by popularly elected parish, district, urban and municipal councils.
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  • It is well built, and boasts of a fine old Gothic parish church, dating from the 14th and 15th centuries, opposite which a statue was erected in 1889 to the memory of the famous Minnesinger, Walther von der Vogelweide, who, according to some accounts, was born (c. 1170) at a farm above Waidbruck, to the north of Botzen.
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  • The lower portion of the massive tower of the parish church (Protestant) dates from the rlth century or even earlier.
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  • The parish church is 1 m.
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  • But each parish elects its own council for parochial affairs, which has a legal status and deals with such matters as the ecclesiastical assessments.
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  • Delegates from these parish councils form the Landessynode.
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  • In Alsace-Lorraine about half of those entitled to vote appear at the polls; but in other districts of Germany very little interest is shown in the elections to the parish councils.
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  • Each parish is legally entitled to levy ecclesiastical assessments for defined purposes.
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  • Appointments to benefices are in the hands of the state (sometimes with consent of parishes), of private patrons and of local parish councils.
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  • Customs vary in different states; thus in Schleswig-Holstein the state nominates but the parish elects; in Alsace-Lorraine the directorium or supreme consistory appoints, but the appointment must be confirmed by the viceroy; in Baden the state offers the parish a selection from six names and then appoints the one chosen.
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  • The parish church of St Mary, Hornsey, retains its Perpendicular tower (c. 1500) and a number of interesting monuments.
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  • Farringford House in the parish was for some time the home of Alfred, Lord Tennyson, who is commemorated by a tablet in All Saints' church and by a great cross on the high downs above the town.
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  • The parish church was begun by Wallenstein after the model of the pilgrims' church of Santiago de Compostela in Spain, but not completed till 1655.
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  • There was thus a considerable number of earnest people dispersed throughout the country waiting for the rousing of the parish clergy.
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  • Even in articulo mortis he refused to receive the sacraments from the parish priest at the cost of submission, but the last offices were performed by his friend Professor Friedrich.
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  • Ramsgate (Ramesgate) was originally a small but comparatively prosperous place united until 1827 to the parish of St Lawrence.
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  • The parish church of All Saints was for the most part rebuilt in the latter half of the 18th century; the portions still preserved of the original structure are mainly Early English.
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  • At Kirklees, in the parish, are remains of a Cistercian convent of the 12th century, in an extensive park, where tradition relates that Robin Hood died and was buried.
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  • In the colonial era Maryland had an interesting list of governmental subdivisions - the manor, the hundred, the parish, the county, and the city - but the two last are about all that remain and even these are in considerable measure subject to the special local acts of the General Assembly.
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  • The parish church of All Saints, occupying the site of a building dating from Anglo-Saxon times, was erected in the reign of Edward IV., and is among the best specimens of Perpendicular in the north of England.
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  • The living of St Gabriel he exchanged for that of St Martin, Ironmonger Lane; and, as rector of that parish, he in 1648 subscribed the Remonstrance against putting Charles I.
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  • From the first he managed to combine his solicitor's work with politics, becoming secretary of the South Carnarvonshire Anti-tithe League; and his local reputation was made by a successful fight, carried to the High Court, in defence of the right of Nonconformists to burial in the parish churchyard.
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  • In 1672 he was ordained priest, and remained till 1681 as under-chaplain at Nesne, a little parish near his birthplace; for eight years more he was resident chaplain at Nesne; and at last in 1689 he received the living of Alstahoug, the most important in the north of Norway.
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  • The public buildings include St Margaret's (1862) and St Winifred's (1883), the parish churches of Mountain Ash and Penrhiwceiber respectively; old and new town halls (1864 and 1904), cottage hospital (1896), and a library institute and public hall erected in 1899, at a cost of £8000, by the workmen of Nixon's Navigation collieries.
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  • His father, James Chalmers, was a grandson of George Chalmers of Pittensear, a small estate in the parish of Lhanbryde, now St Andrews-Lhanbryde, in the same county, possessed by the main line of the family from about the beginning of the 17th to the middle of the 18th century.
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  • The urban district (formed in 1893) is conterminous with the civil parish of Newton Nottage, which, in addition to Porthcawl proper, built on the sea-front, comprises the ancient village of Nottage, 1 m.
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  • Blackmore in his tale The Maid of Sker (1872), based on a legend associated with Sker House, a fine Elizabethan building in the adjoining parish of Sker, which was formerly extra-parochial.
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  • The parish church (dedicated to St John the Baptist) has a pre-Reformation stone altar and an ancient carved stone pulpit, said to be the only relic of an earlier church now covered by the sea.
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  • These are places of worship supplementary to a parish church, and may be either "chapels of ease," to ease or relieve the mother-church and serve those parishioners who may live far away, "parochial chapels," the "churches" of ancient divisions of a very large and widely scattered parish, or "district chapels," those of a district of a parish divided under the various church building acts.
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  • Prato is said to be first mentioned by name in 1107, but the cathedral appears as early as 1048 as the parish church of Borgo Cornio or Santo Stefano.
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  • After his death his wife until 1871 was head of a similar community at Germantown in Webster parish.
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  • Bernard Gilpin, "the Apostle of the North," was rector of this parish from 1556 to 1583, and the founder of the grammar school.
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  • Chalmers then opened mathematical classes on his own account which attracted many students; at the same time he delivered a course of lectures on chemistry, and ministered to his parish at Kilmany.
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  • His parish contained about 1 1,000 persons, and of these about one-third were unconnected with any church.
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  • The town council consented to build one new church, attaching to it a parish of 10,000 persons, mostly weavers, labourers and factory workers, and this church was offered to Dr Chalmers that he might have a fair opportunity of testing his system.
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  • In September 1819 he became minister of the church and parish of St John, where of 2000 families more than Boo had no connexion with any Christian church.
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  • The parish was divided into 25 districts embracing from 60 to loo families, over each of which an elder and a deacon were placed, the former taking oversight of their spiritual, the latter of their physical needs.
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  • The Jesuit has no home: the whole world is his parish.
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  • The younger Teniers lived and died at a farm outside Vilvorde, and is buried in the parish church of Dry Toren.
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  • It is an old town still partly surrounded by medieval walls, and its most noteworthy buildings are the Roman Catholic parish church (12th and 13th centuries); the Carmelite church (1318), the former castle, now used for administrative offices; the Evangelical church (1851, enlarged in 1887); and the former Benedictine monastery of the Marienberg, founded 1123 and since 1839 a hydropathic establishment, crowning a hill Too ft.
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  • Hidalgo, a parish priest, and Allende, a captain of cavalry, with forces consisting largely of Indians, captured a stronghold at Guanajato and even threatened the capital; but the revolutionists were defeated in 181r at Calderon, and the leaders executed.
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  • The Version has been publicly read in parish churches both in London and in the country.
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  • A representative must have been an inhabitant of the state for at least two years next preceding his election, and must be an inhabitant of the town, parish or ward he is chosen to represent; a senator must be at least thirty years of age, must have been an inhabitant of the state for at least seven years next preceding his election, and must be an inhabitant of the district by which he is chosen.
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  • Its new parish (Evangelical) church (1897) is built at the foot of the 11 th-century castle which belonged to the margraves of Baden, and was destroyed by the French during the wars of Louis XV.
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  • The choir of the old Gothic church of 1398 (restored at the end of the 19th century) forms a portion of the parish church.
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  • The parish of Bothwell contains several flourishing towns and villages, all owing their prosperity to the abundance of coal, iron and oilshale.
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  • The parish church of St Peter is Perpendicular, dating from 1485, and occupies the site of a Norman church.
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  • The poet Paul Gerhardt (1607-1676) was pastor here and is buried in the parish church.
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  • The ecclesiastical parish of Brecon consists of the two civil parishes of St John the Evangelist and St Mary, both on the left bank of the Usk, while St David's ih Llanfaes is on the other side of the river, and was wholly outside the town walls.
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  • Having decided to enter the Episcopal Church, Strachan was ordained on the 22nd of May 1803, and was immediately afterwards appointed to the parish of Cornwall.
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  • Schandau has an Evangelical parish church, a hydropathic establishment and a school of river navigation.
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  • The mines of argentiferous lead, belonging to Greenwich Hospital, London, were formerly of great value, and it was in order that royalties on the Alston lead mines and on those elsewhere in the county might be jointly collected that the parish was first included within the borders of Cumberland, in the 18th century.
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  • As many as 119 lead mines were worked in the parish in 1768, but the supply of metal has been almost exhausted.
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  • Worthy of mention also are the parish church, a Late Gothic building, finished in 1520, and restored in 1875, which possesses an altar piece by Tintoretto; the Augustinian church, appropriated to the service of the university since 1827; the small Leech Kirche, an interesting building in Early Gothic style, dating from the 13th century, and the Herz Jesu-Kirche, a building in Early Gothic style, finished in 1891, with a tower 360 ft.
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  • As an order of regular clergy, holding a middle position between monks and secular canons, almost resembling a community of parish priests living under rule, they adopted naves of great length to accommodate large congregations.
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  • In the East greater emphasis was laid on the anointing with oil, which had long been an adjunct of the laying on of hands: the oil was consecrated by the bishop, and the child anointed or "sealed" with it by the parish priest, and this was reckoned as its confirmation.
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  • And to this day in the Eastern Church the infant is baptized, anointed and communicated by the parish priest in the course of a single service; and thus the bishop and the laying on of hands have disappeared from the ordinary service of confirmation.
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  • Practically, the preparation of candidates for confirmation is the most important and exacting duty of the Anglican parish priest, as the administration of the rite is the most arduous of a bishop's tasks; and after a long period of slovenly neglect these duties are now generally discharged with great care: classes are formed and instruction is given for several weeks before the coming of the bishop to lay on hands "after the example of the Holy Apostles" (prayer in the Confirmation Service).
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  • There were also three submanors, one given by the first Aubrey de Vere early in the 12th century to the Abbot of Abingdon, whence the present parish church is called St Mary Abbots; while in another, Knotting Barnes, the origin of the name Notting Hill is found.
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  • Famous houses no longer standing were Campden House, in the district north-west of the parish church, formerly known as the Gravel Pits; and Gore House, on the site of the present Albert Hall, the residence of William Wilberforce, and later of the countess of Blessington.
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  • The parish church of St Mary Abbots, High Street, occupies an ancient site, but was built from the designs of Sir Gilbert Scott in 1869.
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  • He was educated at the parish school, after which he was for a time a herd boy.
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  • Resident householders of a parish are those primarily eligible as churchwardens, but non-resident householders who are habitually occupiers are also eligible, while there are a few classes of persons who are either ineligible or exempted.
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  • In general, churchwardens are appointed in Easter week, usually Easter Monday or Easter Tuesday, but in new parishes the first appointment must be within twenty-one days after the consecration of the church, or two calendar months after the formation of the parish, subsequent appointments taking place at the usual time for the appointment of parish officers.
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  • The parish church, in the Greek style, was built in 1828.
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  • William Cobbett was born in the parish (1766), and is buried in the churchyard of St Andrew's.
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  • The parish church stands near the spire of the ancient church where, according to tradition, the treaty was made in 1297 with Edward I., by which Sir John Menteith undertook to betray Wallace to the English.
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  • Oak Farm in the parish of Monk's Coppenhall, and takes its name from the original stations having been placed in the township of Crewe, in which the seat of Lord Crewe is situated.
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  • The parish church of St Martin contains several monuments and an ancient stone altar bearing a Latin inscription.
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  • Camborne was the scene of the scientific labours of Richard Trevithick (1771-1833), the engineer, born in the neighbouring parish of Illogan, and of William Bickford, the inventor of the safety-fuse, a native of Camborne.
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  • The centre of revolutionary ideas was St John's Parish, settled by New Englanders (chiefly from Dorchester, Massachusetts).
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  • It has a stately modern parish church (attached to a Gothic choir), a small but very ancient chapel of the abbots of St Gall (whose summer residence was this village), and two Capuchin convents (one for men, founded in 1588, and one for women, founded in 1613).
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  • The parish church is a Gothic edifice of the 14th century, with fine cloisters; and the Lusric château, once belonging to the family of Rosenberg, and now to Prince Schwarzenberg, dating from the 15th century, is reputed to contain the most extensive and valuable archives in Bohemia.
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  • In Holy Trinity church Hull possesses one of the largest English parish churches, having an extreme length of 272 ft.
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  • William Mason the poet (1725-1797) was the son of a rector of the parish.
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  • Ogley Hay, the parish of which partly covers Brownhills, is a large adjoining village; there are also Great Wyrley and Norton-under-Cannock or Norton Canes to the N.W.
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  • It possesses a town hall, a grammar school (1576), and a Martyr's Memorial HallThe most noteworthy building, however, is the parish church, restored in 1863, which contains a curious old fresco and several interesting brasses, and has a Norman tower.
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  • In 1581 episcopacy was abolished as a result of the report of a commission on which Craig had sat; he also assisted at the composition of the Second Book of Discipline and the National Covenant of 1580, and in 1581 compiled "Ane Shorte and Generale Confession" called the "King's Confession," which was imposed on all parish ministers and graduates and became the basis of the Covenant of 1638.
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  • The original text and arrangements were probably made by the monks of Ettal, a monastery a little higher up the valley; but they were carefully remodelled by the parish priest at the beginning of the present century, when the Oberammergau play obtained exemption from the general suppression of such performances by the Bavarian government.
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  • The music was composed by Rochus Dedler, schoolmaster of the parish in 1814.
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  • One of the most important steps taken at the Reformation was the compilation and provision of a comprehensive service book for general and compulsory use in public worship in all cathedral and parish churches throughout the Church of England.
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  • The number of books required for the performance of divine service in pre-Reformation days was very large; the most important being the Missal for the service of Holy Communion or the Mass; the Breviary for the daily service or performance of the divine office; the Manual for the minor sacramental offices usually performed by the parish priest; and the Pontifical, containing such services as were exclusively reserved for performance by the bishop. Many of the contents of these larger volumes were published in separate volumes known by a great variety - over one hundred - different names.
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  • Being a strenuous opponent of the Church of Rome, and "Whitehall lying within that parish, he stood as in the front of the battle all King James's reign."
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  • Learning his letters first from the parish priest, he was sent at an early age to the claustral school at Evesham and thence, in his eighteenth year, to Gloucester Hall, Oxford, as a Benedictine student.
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  • After twentyfour years of suffering for his conscience he died in prison and was buried in an unknown grave in the parish church at Wisbeach on the 16th of October 1584.
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  • The coastmen were expert smugglers and wreckers, the agriculturists were ignorant and drunken, the parish clergy were slothful, in many cases intemperate, and largely given to fox-hunting.
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  • Only :n a parish or two was there any approach to religious ministry.
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  • At that conference the work had spread from Ring's Ash in Devon to Morrah, a lonely and desolate parish in west Cornwall.
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  • Although his exceptional method of address seems to have gained him the qualified approval of certain dignitaries of the church, the prospect of his obtaining a settled charge seemed as remote as ever, and he was meditating a missionary tour in Persia when his departure was arrested by steps taken by Dr Chalmers, which, after considerable delay, resulted, in October 1819, in Irving being appointed his assistant and missionary in St John's parish, Glasgow.
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  • In 1540 Leland, without sufficient reason, credits Athelstan with the bestowal of such privileges as it then enjoyed, and describes it as a parish full of fishermen and Irishmen.
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  • Boxmoor, within the parish, is a considerable township of modern growth.
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  • In 1886 he removed to Edinburgh, where he became minister of St Bernard's Parish Church.
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  • The New River flows through the parish, and Sir Hugh Myddleton, its projector, was for some time resident here.
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  • The parish is of great extent (12,653 acres).
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  • It possesses a parish church, occupying the site of one reputed to have been built by Charlemagne about 805, an interesting town hall and several schools.
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  • It contains a handsome parish church dedicated to St Martin, a town hall and a castle (Wildeck), built by the Emperor Henry I.
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  • On this occasion a stone altar, consisting of a flat slab resting upon three other upright slabs, was presented to the parish, and was set up in the church at the east wall of the chancel.
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  • The parish church of St John (1747) has several monuments of eminent persons.
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  • The parish church of St Mary is a fine Decorated building, containing monuments of the L'Estrange family, whose mansion, Hunstanton Hall, is a picturesque Tudor building of brick in a well-wooded park.
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  • O'Keeffe, parish priest of Callan, on account of two sentences of ecclesiastical censure pronounced by the cardinal as papal delegate.
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  • It possesses a castle, with natural history and antiquarian collections, and a parish church (restored 1891), with the mausoleum (1892) of the reigning princes.
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  • Among the public buildings are the parish church, the tower of which, standing on a commanding eminence, is a conspicuous landmark.
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  • As late as about 1300 a traveller hostile to the Armenians reported to the pope that he had witnessed baptisms without any trinitarian invocation in as many as three hundred parish churches.
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  • The parish priests, or white clergy, are so still, except some of the Latinizing ones.
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  • From 1745 onwards he seems to have travelled over the greater portion of Cornwall and Devon in search of these minerals, and he finally located them in the parish of St Stephen's near to St Austell.
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  • It possesses a fine parish church, built by Maria Theresa and renovated in 1877-1880, and the Imperial Villa is surrounded by a magnificent park.
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  • The parish church, in which Luther often preached, was built in the 14th century, but has been much altered since Luther's time.
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  • Tavistock was governed from before the Conquest by a portreeve, who in the 14th century was assisted by a select council of burgesses, styled in 1660 "the Masters of the Toune and Parish of Tavistock."
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  • The ancient parish church of St Mary Magdalen retains Norman work in the chancel, which terminates in an eastern apse.
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  • The parish church dates from 1818, but there are remains of an earlier building adjoining it.
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