Paris sentence example

paris
  • She had no good memories of Paris and crossed her arms.
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  • This skin, with the skull and antlers, was sent to Paris, where it was described in 1866 by Professor Milne-Edwards.
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  • He emerged from the shadow world in a luxurious penthouse suite in Paris overlooking the Arc de Triomphe.
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  • The great cathedral Notre Dame de Paris, which was begun before your birth, would not be finished by your death.
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  • You have been to Paris and have remained Russian.
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  • My brother knows him, he's dined with him--the present Emperor--more than once in Paris, and tells me he never met a more cunning or subtle diplomatist--you know, a combination of French adroitness and Italian play-acting!
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  • A man who doesn't know Paris is a savage.
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  • "Paris--the capital of the world," Pierre finished his remark for him.
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  • Zhilinski, a Pole brought up in Paris, was rich, and passionately fond of the French, and almost every day of the stay at Tilsit, French officers of the Guard and from French headquarters were dining and lunching with him and Boris.
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  • The two young women chatted endlessly about the latest fashion in Paris and the boys who were attracted to them.
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  • He died at Paris on the 9th of March 1836.
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  • He fled to France, and lived for a time in Paris under the name of Conti.
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  • Michaux, more than thirty years ago, says that the price of wood for fuel in New York and Philadelphia "nearly equals, and sometimes exceeds, that of the best wood in Paris, though this immense capital annually requires more than three hundred thousand cords, and is surrounded to the distance of three hundred miles by cultivated plains."
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  • This generation inclines a little to congratulate itself on being the last of an illustrious line; and in Boston and London and Paris and Rome, thinking of its long descent, it speaks of its progress in art and science and literature with satisfaction.
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  • Paris is Talma, la Duchenois, Potier, the Sorbonne, the boulevards," and noticing that his conclusion was weaker than what had gone before, he added quickly: "There is only one Paris in the world.
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  • Shall the world be confined to one Paris or one Oxford forever?
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  • You have been in Paris recently, I believe?
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  • He felt it awkward to attract everyone's attention and to be considered a lucky man and, with his plain face, to be looked on as a sort of Paris possessed of a Helen.
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  • He died suddenly at Paris on the 1st of September 1864.
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  • Katie pretended to listen as Hannah discussed the Paris fashion show she'd attended and the month in Monte Carlo she'd spend in January to escape the coldest weather.
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  • They reached the trendy teahouse in the wealthy section of DC, Hannah still talking about Paris fashions.
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  • Most of Jackson's clothes, especially his suits, were custom made or straight off the runway from Paris or Milan.
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  • His scientific jubilee was celebrated in Paris in 1901.
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  • A gentleman in Philadelphia has just written to my teacher about a deaf and blind child in Paris, whose parents are Poles.
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  • The head monkey at Paris puts on a traveller's cap, and all the monkeys in America do the same.
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  • The French are our Gods: Paris is our Kingdom of Heaven.
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  • He did not lose sight either of the welfare of his army or of the doings of the enemy, or of the welfare of the people of Russia, or of the direction of affairs in Paris, or of diplomatic considerations concerning the terms of the anticipated peace.
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  • In December they again reached Paris.
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  • He died at Paris on the 27th of September 1660, and was buried in the church of St Lazare.
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  • In 1714 he paid a short visit to Paris and ransacked the libraries.
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  • Over two hundred editions followed, of which perhaps the best is the one published in Paris in 1644.
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  • In 1809 he was at Paris, and, in a remarkable interview, received from Napoleon's own lips an apology for the treatment he had received.
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  • Her father was Maurice Dupin, a retired lieutenant in the army of the republic; her mother, Sophie Delaborde, the daughter of a Paris bird-fancier.
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  • From the free out-door life at Nohant she passed at thirteen to the convent of the English Augustinians at Paris, where for the first two years she never went outside the walls.
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  • Articles written in common soon led to a complete literary partnership, and 1831 there appeared in the Revue de Paris a joint novel entitled Prima Donna and signed Jules Sand.
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  • In a cottage in the environs of Paris called Le Moulin joli, there sat at the same table an old man engraving and an old woman whom he called his meuniere also engraving.
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  • George Sand not only forgave the elopement and hushed up the scandal by a private marriage, but she settled the young couple in Paris and made over to them nearly one-half of her available property.
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  • She was then living in Paris, a few doors from her friend Mme d'Agoult, and the two set up a common salon in the Hotel de France.
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  • Mme Dudevant was granted sole legal rights over the two children and her Paris home was restored to her.
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  • The collected edition of George Sand's works was published in Paris (1862-1883) in 96 volumes, with supplement 109 volumes; The Histoire de Ma Vie appeared in 20 volumes in 1854-1855.
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  • At the end of the eighteenth century there were a couple of dozen men in Paris who began to talk about all men being free and equal.
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  • Bordas-Demoulini Le Cartesianisme (2nd ed., Paris, 1874); J.
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  • He was present at the September massacres and saved several prisoners, and on the 7th of September 1792 was elected one of the deputies from Paris to the convention, where he was one of the promoters of the proclamation of the republic. He suppressed the decoration of the Cross of St Louis, which he called a stain on a man's coat, and demanded the sale of the palace of Versailles.
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  • He retired to Montargis, where he was arrested, and was guillotined in Paris on the 17th of November 1793.
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  • MARCELLIN PIERRE EUGENE BERTHELOT (1827-1907), French chemist and politician, was born at Paris on the 29th of October 1827, being the son of a doctor.
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  • He died suddenly, immediately after the death of his wife, 'on the18th of March 1907, at Paris, and with her was buried in the Pantheon.
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  • CARMAGNOLE (from Carmagnola, the town in Italy), a word first applied to a Piedmontese peasant costume, well known in the south of France, and brought to Paris by the revolutionaries of Marseilles in 1798.
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  • When Paris was mentioned, Mademoiselle Bourienne for her part seized the opportunity of joining in the general current of recollections.
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  • She took the liberty of inquiring whether it was long since Anatole had left Paris and how he had liked that city.
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  • She looked at Natasha's dresses and praised them, as well as a new dress of her own made of "metallic gauze," which she had received from Paris, and advised Natasha to have one like it.
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  • Though it was not clear what the artist meant to express by depicting the so-called King of Rome spiking the earth with a stick, the allegory apparently seemed to Napoleon, as it had done to all who had seen it in Paris, quite clear and very pleasing.
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  • Nicholas was with the Russian army in Paris when the news of his father's death reached him.
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  • The counter movement reaches the starting point of the first movement in the west--Paris--and subsides.
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  • The Allies defeated Napoleon, entered Paris, forced Napoleon to abdicate, and sent him to the island of Elba, not depriving him of the title of Emperor and showing him every respect, though five years before and one year later they all regarded him as an outlaw and a brigand.
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  • Hannah sat and began talking about Paris again to an audience eager to hear her.
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  • He entered the Congregation of the Christian Doctrine, and became tutor to the son of a Paris banker.
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  • Having ordered punch and summoned de Beausset, he began to talk to him about Paris and about some changes he meant to make in the Empress' household, surprising the prefect by his memory of minute details relating to the court.
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  • Paris, the ultimate goal, is reached.
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  • Before leaving, Napoleon showed favor to the emperor, kings, and princes who had deserved it, reprimanded the kings and princes with whom he was dissatisfied, presented pearls and diamonds of his own--that is, which he had taken from other kings--to the Empress of Austria, and having, as his historian tells us, tenderly embraced the Empress Marie Louise--who regarded him as her husband, though he had left another wife in Paris--left her grieved by the parting which she seemed hardly able to bear.
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  • "Sire, all Paris regrets your absence," replied de Beausset as was proper.
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  • "Would not the French ladies leave Paris if the Russians entered it?" asked Pierre.
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  • In 1789 a ferment arises in Paris; it grows, spreads, and is expressed by a movement of peoples from west to east.
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  • Well, what is Paris saying? he asked, suddenly changing his former stern expression for a most cordial tone.
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  • The French government discovered his hiding-place, and he was imprisoned and expelled from Paris.
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  • The words were constantly altered and added to during the Terror and later; thus the well-known lines, "Madame Veto avait promis De faire egorger tout Paris On lui coupa la tete," &c., were added after the execution of Marie Antoinette.
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  • All three Paris curves show three peaks, the first and third representing the ordinary forenoon and afternoon maxima.
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  • This three-peaked curve is not wholly pecuiiar to Paris, being seen, for instance, at Lisbon in summer.
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  • So again, in the case of the Paris curves, the absolute value of the diurnal range in summer was much greater for the Eiffel Tower than for the Bureau Central, but the mean voltage was 2150 at the former station and only 134 at the latter.
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  • 7; while at Paris (1873-1893) E.
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  • He was a student at St Andrews, 1489-1494, and thereafter, it is supposed, at Paris.
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  • Paris mushrooms are cultivated in enormous quantities in dark underground cellars at a depth of from 60 to 160 ft.
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  • from Paris, he had signed an act of submission to the papal decision of 1794.
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  • Pottier in La Revue de Paris (Feb.
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  • He was naturalized as a French citizen in 1834, and in the same year became professor of constitutional law in the faculty of law at Paris.
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  • He actively promoted the incorporation of the left bank of the Rhine with France and in 1793 went to Paris to carry on the negotiations.
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  • Domestic sorrows were added to his political troubles and he died suddenly at Paris on the 10th of January 1794.
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  • He then abandoned himself to pleasure; he often visited London, and became an intimate friend of the prince of Wales (afterwards George IV.); he brought to Paris the "anglo-mania," as it was called, and made jockeys as fashionable as they were in England.
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  • He also made himself very popular in Paris by his large gifts to the poor in time of famine, and by throwing open the gardens of the Palais Royal to the people.
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  • Sieyês had drawn up at his request, and was elected in three - by the noblesse of Paris, Villers-Cotterets and Crepy-en-Valois.
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  • He indeed became so disgusted with the false position of a pretender to the crown, into which he was being forced, that he wished to go to America, but, as the comtesse de Buffon would not go with him, he decided to remain in Paris.
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  • In the summer of 1792 he was present for a short time with the army of the north, with his two sons, the duke of Chartres and the duke of Montpensier, but had returned to Paris before the 10th of August.
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  • Peignot, Précis historique de la maison d'Orleans (Paris, 1830); L.
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  • Acad., Paris, 1746).
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  • Lobsters are exported, especially to Paris.
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  • Eckel, Charles le Simple (Paris, 1899).
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  • He was afterwards appointed the prince's envoy at Paris, where he remained till the decree of Napoleon, forbidding all persons born on the left side of the Rhine to serve any other state than France, compelled him to resign his office (IS'I).
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  • Sevestre, Le Concordat de 1801, l'histoire, le texte, la destinee (Paris, 1905).
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  • JEAN ANTOINE LETRONNE (1787-1848), French archaeologist, was born at Paris on the 25th of January 1787.
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  • He died at Paris on the 14th of December 1848.
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  • She was the daughter of Gratien Phlipon, a Paris engraver, who was ambitious, speculative and nearly always poor.
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  • His hostility to the insurrectional commune of Paris, which led him to propose transferring the government to Blois, and his attacks upon Robespierre and his friends rendered him very unpopular.
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  • Although now extremely unpopular, the Rolands remained in Paris, suffering abuse and calumny, especially from Marat.
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  • Madame Roland's Memoires, first printed in 1820, have been edited among others by P. Faugere (Paris, 1864), by C. A.
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  • Dauban (Paris, 1864), by J.
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  • Claretie (Paris, 1884), and by C. Perroud (Paris, 1905).
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  • A large variety of materials have been used in their manufacture by different peoples at different times - painted linen and shavings of stained horn by the Egyptians, gold and silver by the Romans, rice-paper by the Chinese, silkworm cocoons in Italy, the plumage of highly coloured birds in South America, wax, small tinted shells, &c. At the beginning of the 8th century the French, who originally learnt the art from the Italians, made great advances in the accuracy of their reproductions, and towards the end of that century the Paris manufacturers enjoyed a world-wide reputation.
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  • But after the restoration of the grand duke, Montanelli, who was in Paris, was tried and condemned by default; he remained some years in France, where he became a partizan of Napoleon III.
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  • He was in Paris in 1789, and entered into relations with Marat, Camille Desmoulins and Robespierre.
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  • In 1535 he received his cardinal's hat; in1536-1537he was nominated "lieutenant-general" to the king at Paris and in the Ile de France, and was entrusted with the organization of the defence against the imperialists.
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  • See also Ribier, Lettres et memoires d'estat (Paris, 1666); V.
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  • le Glay (Paris, 1839); Maximilians I.
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  • In 1672, having finished his philosophy course, he was given a scholarship at the college of St Michel at Paris by Jean, marquis de Pompadour, lieutenant-general of the Limousin.
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  • At Rennes Descartes found little to interest him; and, after he had visited the maternal estate of which his father now put him in possession, he went to Paris, where he found the Rosicrucians the topic of the hour, and heard himself credited with partnership in their secrets.
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  • The proceeds were invested in such a way at Paris as to bring him in a yearly income of between 6000 and 7000 francs (equal now to more than L500).
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  • For an instant Descartes seems to have concurred in the plan of purchasing a post at Chatellerault, but he gave up the idea, and settled in Paris (June 1625), in the quarter where he had sought seclusion before.
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  • But their importunity made a hermitage in Paris impossible; a graceless friend even surprised the philosopher in bed at eleven in the morning meditating and taking notes.
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  • A meeting at which he was present after his return to Paris decided his vocation.
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  • But when Descartes arrived, he found Paris rent asunder by the civil war of the Fronde.
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  • In 1640 a copy of the work in manuscript was despatched to Paris, and Mersenne was requested to lay it before as many thinkers and scholars as he deemed desirable, with a view to getting their views upon its argument and doctrine.
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  • The place of Mersenne as his Parisian representative was in the main taken by Claude Clerselier (the Frenchtranslator of the Objections and Responses), whom he had become acquainted with in Paris.
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  • of Paris - its learned professors not more than the courtiers and the fair sex, flocked to hear the new doctrines explained, and possibly discuss their value.
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  • In 1671 the archbishop of Paris, by the king's order, summoned the heads of the university to his presence, and enjoined them to take stricter measures against philosophical novelties dangerous to the faith.
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  • In 1705 Cartesianism was still subject to prohibitions from the authorities; but in a project of new statutes, drawn up for the faculty of arts at Paris in 1720, the Method and Meditations of Descartes were placed beside the Organon and the Metaphysics of Aristotle as text-books for philosophical study.
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  • Aime-Martin (1838) and Ouvres morales et philosophiques by AimeMartin with an introduction on life and works by Amedee Prevost (Paris, 1855); CEuvres choisies (1850) by Jules Simon.
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  • P. Mahaffy, Descartes (1902), with an appendix on Descartes's mathematical work by Frederick Purser; Victor de Swarte, Descartes directeur spirituel (Paris, 1904), correspondence with the Princess Palatine; C. J.
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  • Jeannel, Descartes et la princesse palatine (Paris, 1869); Lettres de M.
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  • Renouvier, Manuel de philosophie moderne (Paris, 1842); V.
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  • de la philosophie cartesienne (Paris, 1854), 2 vols., and Hist.
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  • Millet, Descartes, sa vie, ses travaux, ses decouvertes avant 1637 (Paris, 1867), and Hist.
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  • de Descartes depuis 1637 (Paris, 1870); L.
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  • Liard, Descartes (Paris, 1882); A.
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  • Fouillee, Descartes (Paris, 1893); Revue de metaphysique et de morale (July, 1896, Descartes number); Norman Smith, Studies in the Cartesian Philosophy (1902); R.
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  • Paris is served by the Vandalia, and the Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St Louis (New York Central system) railways; the main line and the Cairo division of the latter intersect here, and the city is the transfer point for traffic from the E.
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  • Paris was founded about 1825, was incorporated in 1853, and was re-incorporated in 1873.
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  • Paris, Texas >>
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  • In 1245 Albertus was called to Paris, and there Aquinas followed him, and remained with him for three years, at the end of which he graduated as bachelor of theology.
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  • Before he left Paris he had thrown himself with ardour into the controversy raging between the university and the Friar-Preachers respecting the liberty of teaching, resisting both by speeches and pamphlets the authorities of the university; and when the dispute was referred to the pope, the youthful Aquinas was chosen to defend his order, which he did with such success as to overcome the arguments of Guillaume de St Amour, the champion of the university, and one of the most celebrated men of the day.
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  • In 1257, along with his friend Bonaventura, he was created doctor of theology, and began to give courses of lectures upon this subject in Paris, and also in Rome and other towns in Italy.
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  • In 1271 he was again in Paris, lecturing to the students, managing the affairs of the church and consulted by the king, Louis VIII., his kinsman, on affairs of state.
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  • Touron, La Vie de St Thomas d'Aquin, avec un exposé de sa doctrine et de ses ouvrages (Paris, 1737); Karl Werner, Der Heilige Thomas von Aquino (1858); and R.
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  • Desmousseaux de Giure (Paris, 1888); M.
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  • See 011e Laprune, Etienne Vacherot (Paris, 1898).
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  • Waliszewski, Ivan le terrible (Paris, 1904); R.
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  • (Stuttgart, 1845); C. Texier, Asie Mineure (Paris, 1862); C. Texier and R.
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  • When John Evelyn was in Paris in 1644 he saw it played in the gardens of the Luxembourg Palace.
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  • She was brought up in Paris by Ferriol's sister-in-law with her own sons, MM.
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  • She died in Paris on the 13th of March 1733.
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  • Didot (Paris, 1846), and by H.
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  • The best modern work on the subject is by the comtesse Catherine de Flavigny, entitled Sainte Brigitte de Suede, sa vie, ses revelations et son oeuvre (Paris, 1892), which contains an exhaustive bibliogr,aphy.
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  • 1834 Montal's tuning-fork, Paris opera.
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  • II., Paris opera.
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  • 1826 Paris Diapason Normal.
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  • 1834 Paris Diapason Normal.
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  • 1859 Paris opera 1836 Scheibler, Stuttgart, proposed standard (440 at 69° F.).
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  • Having obtained letters for the king, he left Paris on the 31st of July 1589, and reached St Cloud, the headquarters of Henry, who was besieging Paris.
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  • This deed, however, was viewed with far different feelings in Paris and by the partisans of the League, the murderer being regarded as a martyr and extolled by Pope Sixtus V., while even his canonization was discussed.
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  • (Paris, 1904).
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  • A.) Fleche (French for "arrow"), the term generally used in French architecture for a spire, but more especially employed to designate the timber spire covered with lead, which was erected over the intersection of the roofs over nave and transepts; sometimes these were small and unimportant, but in cathedrals they were occasionally of large dimensions, as in the fleche of Notre-Dame, Paris, where it is nearly ioo ft.
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  • On the death of his uncle, however, he left it, owing to the strictness of its rules, and went to Paris, where he devoted himself to writing poetry.
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  • der bayerischen Academie (1867); and Carra de Vaux, Avicenne (Paris, 1900).
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  • Pouqueville, Voyage de la Grece (Paris, 1820); W.
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  • Hecquard, Histoire et description de la Haute Albanie ou Guegarie (Paris, undated); S.
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  • His works were collected by Cardinal Cajetan, and were published in four volumes at Rome (1606-1615), and then at Paris in 1642, at Venice in 1743, and there are other editions.
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  • She was educated with great strictness in the convent of the Carmelites in the Rue St Jacques at Paris.
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  • It was during the first Fronde that she lived at the Hotel de Ville and took the city of Paris as god-mother for the child born to her there.
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  • She chiefly lived in Normandy till 1663, when her husband died, and she came to Paris.
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  • / ait and John Lydgates Bearbeitungen von Boccaccios De Casibus, Munich, 1885) has thrown much doubt on this statement as regards Italy, but Lydgate knew France and visited Paris in an official capacity in 1426.
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  • Although there is no direct evidence of the fact, there can be no doubt that he left St Andrews to complete his education abroad, and that he probably studied at the university of Paris, and visited Italy and Germany.
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  • The work in question, which is rare, was printed at Paris, and has the date 1636 on the title-page, but the royal privilege which secured it to the author is dated in October 1635, and it may have been written several years earlier.
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  • Having studied at Ingolstadt, Vienna, Cracow and Paris, he returned to Ingolstadt in 1507, and in 1509 was appointed tutor to Louis and Ernest, the two younger sons of Albert the Wise, the late duke of BavariaMunich.
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  • (Paris, 1884); PaulyWissowa, Realencyclopddie, IV.
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  • A small company had been accustomed to meet in the lodging of the sieur de la Ferriere in Paris near the Pre-auxCleres.
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  • Some doctrinal differences having arisen in the church at Poitiers, Antoine de Chandieu, First minister at Paris, went to compose them, and, as the General .
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  • in Paris the following year (1559).
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  • Their ecclesiastical polity came much more from Paris than from Geneva."2 To trace the history of Presbyterianism in France for the next thirty years would be to write the history of France itself during that period.
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  • In 1848 an assembly representative of the eglises consistoriales met at Paris.
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  • He was educated at Zurich and at Saumur (where he graduated), studied theology at Orleans under Claude Pajon, at Paris under Jean Claude and at Geneva under Louis Tronchin, and was ordained to the ministry in his native place in 1683.
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  • After being professor of philosophy at several provincial universities, he received the degree of doctor, and came to Paris in 1858 as master of conferences at the Ecole Normale.
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  • In 1861 he became inspector of the Academy of Paris, in 1864 professor of philosophy to the Faculty of Letters, and in 1874 a member of the French Academy.
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  • He died in Paris on the 13th of July 1887.
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  • i.; Diehl, Justinien (Paris, 1901).
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  • Having studied medicine at Paris, Lucas took the degree of M.D.
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  • Thurman was a member of the Electoral Commission of 1877, and was one of the American delegates to the international monetary conference at Paris in 1881.
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  • Chevalier, Mission Chari-Lac Tchad 1902-1904 (Paris; 1908); E.
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  • Lenfant, La Grande Route du Tchad (Paris, 1905); H.
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  • Zeballos, Description Amena de la Republica Argentina (3 vols., Buenos Aires, 1881); Anuario de la Direcion General de Estadistica 1898 (Buenos Aires, 1899); Charles Wiener, La Republique Argentine (Paris, 1899); Segundo Censo Republica Argentina (3 vols., Buenos Aires, 1898); Handbook of the Argentine Republic (Bureau of the American Republics, Washington, 1892-1903).
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  • Paris --~---
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  • The Seine descends from the Langres plateau, flows northwest down to Mry, turns to the west, resumes its north-westerly direction at Montereau, passes through Paris and Rouen and discharges itself into the Channel between Le Havre and Honfleur.
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  • Its affluents are, on the right, the Aube; the Marne, which joins the Seine at Charenton near Paris; the Oise, which has its source in Belgium and is enlarged by the Aisne; and the Epte; on the left the Yonne, the Loing, the Essonne, the Eure and the RUle.
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  • of rain annually (Paris about 23 in.), as also does the Mediterranean coast west of Marseilles.
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  • Within the northern circle of the 8 lie the Mesozoic and Tertiary beds of the Paris basin, dipping inwards; within the southern circle lie the ancient rocks of the Central Plateau, from which the later beds dip outwards.
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  • Towards the end of the period, however, during the deposition of the Portlandian beds, the sea again retreated, and in the early part of the Cretaceous period was limited (in France) to the catchment basins of the Sane and Rhnein the Paris basin the contemporaneous deposits were chiefly estuarine and were confined to the northern and eastern rim.
    0
    0
  • During the Tertiary period arms of the sea spread into France in the Paris basin from the north, in the basins of the Loire and the Garonne from the west, and in the Rhne area from the south.
    0
    0
  • de Lapparent, Trait de gologie (Paris, 1906).
    0
    0
  • Paris - - 2,294,108 2,481,223 2,711,931
    0
    0
  • PARIs.
    0
    0
  • The greatest number of Jews is to be found at Paris, Lyons and Bordeaux, while the departments of the centre and of the south along the range of the Cvennes, where Calvinism flourishes, are the principal Protestant localities, Nimes being the most important centre.
    0
    0
  • Considerable sprinklings of Protestants are also to be found in the two Charentes, in Dauphin, in Paris and in Franche-Comt.
    0
    0
  • At the head of the whole organization is a General Synod, sitting at Paris.
    0
    0
  • Its consistories are grouped into two special synods, one at Paris and one at Montbliard (for the department of Doubs and Haute-Sane and the territory of Belfort, where the churches of this denomination are principally situated).
    0
    0
  • The Jewish parishes, called synagogues, are grouped into departmental consistories (Paris, Bordeaux, Nancy, Marseilles, Bayonne, Lille, Vesoul, Besancon and three in Algeria).
    0
    0
  • At Paris is the central consistory, controlled by the government and presided over by the supreme grand rabbi.
    0
    0
  • Market-gardenin is an important industry in the regions round Paris, Amiens an Angers, as it is round Toulouse, Montauban,Avignon and in southern France generally.
    0
    0
  • The market-gardeners of Paris and its vicinity have a high reputation for skill in the forcing of early vegetables under glass.
    0
    0
  • The cider apple, which ranks first in importance, is produced in those districts where cider is the habitual drink, that is to say, ___________________________________ chiefly in the region north-west of a line drawn from Paris to the Cattle.
    0
    0
  • tered by a director-general, who has his headquarters at Paris, assisted by three administrators who are charged with the working of the forests, Nord and Pas-de- 3 Valei questions of rights and law, finance Calais..
    0
    0
  • The department of Seine, comprising Paris and its suburbs, which has the largest manufacturing population, is largely occupied with the manufacture of dress, millinery and articles of luxury (perfumery, &c.), but it plays the leading part in almost every great branch of industry with the exception of Average Production (Thousands of Basins.
    0
    0
  • Stone-quarrying is specially active in the departments round Paris, Seine-et-Oise employing more persons in this occupation than any other department.
    0
    0
  • The environs of Creil (Oise) and Chteau-Landon (Seine-et-Marne) are noted for their freestone (pierre de taille), which is also abundant at Euville and Lrouville in Meuse; the production of plaster is particularly important in the environs of Paris, of kaolin of fine quality at Yrieix (1-Jaute-Vienne), of hydraulic lime in Ardche (Le Teil), of lime phosphates in the department of Somme, of marble in the departments of HauteGaronne (St Beat), Hautes-Pyrnes (Campan, Sarrancolin), Isre and Pas-de-Calais, and of cement in Pas-de-Calais (vicinity of Boulogne) and Isre (Grenoble).
    0
    0
  • The production of lace and guipure, occupying 112,000 persons, is carried on mainly in the towns and villages of Haute-Loire and in Vosges (Mirecourt), Rhne (Lyons), Pas-de-Calais (Calais) and Paris.
    0
    0
  • The cole des Fonts et Chausses at Paris is maintained by the government for the training of the engineers for the construction and upkeep of roads and bridges.
    0
    0
  • The canal and river system attains its greatest utility in the north, northeast and north-centre of the country; traffic is thickest along the Seine below Paris; along the rivers and small canals of the rich departments of Nord and Pas-de-Calais and along the Oise and the canal of St Quentin whereby they communicate with Paris; along the canal from the Marne to the Rhine and the succession of waterways which unite it with the Oise; along the Canal de lEst (departments of Meuse and Ardennes); and along the waterways uniting Paris with the Sane at Chalon (Seine, Canal du Loing, Canal de Briare, Lateral canal of the Loire and Canal du Centre) and along the Sane between Chalon and Lyons.
    0
    0
  • Railways.The first important line in France, from Paris to Rouen, was constructed through the instrumentality of Sir Edward Blount (1809-1905), an English banker in Paris, who was afterwards for thirty years chairman of the Ouest railway.
    0
    0
  • 1842 laid the foundation of the plan under which the railways have since been developed, and mapped out nine main lines, running from Paris to the frontiers and from the Mediterranean to the Rhine and to the Atlantic coast.
    0
    0
  • By the 1859 conventions the state railway system obtained an entry into Paris by means of running powers over the Ouest from Chartres, and its position was further improved by the exchange of certain lines with the Orleans company.
    0
    0
  • Its main lines run from Paris to Calais, via Creil, Amiens and Boulogne, from Paris to Lille, via Creil and Arras, and from Paris to Maubeuge via Creil, Tergnier and St Quentin.
    0
    0
  • The Ouest-Etat, a combination of the West and state systems. The former traversed Normandy in every directionand connected Paris with thetowns of Brittany.
    0
    0
  • Its chief lines ran from Paris:to Le Havre via Mantes and Rouen, to Dieppe via Rouen, to Cherbourg, to Granyule and to Brest.
    0
    0
  • The Est, running from Paris via Chlons and Nancy to Avricourt (for Strassburg), via Troyes and Langres to Belfort and on via Basel to the Saint Gotthard, and via Reims and Mezires to Longwy.
    0
    0
  • The Orleans, running from Paris to Orleans, and thence serving Bordeaux via Tours, Poitiers and Angoulflme, Nantes via Tours and Angers, and Montauban and Toulouse via Vierzon and Limoges.
    0
    0
  • The Paris-Lyon-MditerranCe, connecting Paris with Marseilles via Moret, Laroche, Dijon, Macon and Lyons, and with NImes via Moret, Nevers and Clermont-Ferrand.
    0
    0
  • Paris 42~8 Dieppe.
    0
    0
  • SAVOIE hambry SEINE Paris .
    0
    0
  • PARIS - - Seine, Aube, Eure-et-Loir, Marne, Seine-et-Marne, Seine-et-Oise, Yonne.
    0
    0
  • The organization of the Paris police, which is typical of that in other large towns, may be outlined briefly.
    0
    0
  • In Paris the municipal police are divided among the twenty arrondissements, which the uniform police patrol.
    0
    0
  • There were, however, but few prisons in France adapted for the cellular system, and the process of reconstruction has been slow, In 1898 the old Paris prisons of Grande-Roquette, Saint-Plagie and Mazas were demolished, and to replace them a large prison with 1500 cells was erected at Fresnes-ls-Rungis.
    0
    0
  • In each department an official collector (Trsorier payeur genral) receives the taxes and public revenue collected therein and accounts for them to the central authority in Paris.
    0
    0
  • The administrative staff includes, for the purpose of computing the individual quotas of the direct taxes, a director assisted by contrleurs in each department and subordinate to a central authority in Paris, the direction gnrale des contributions directes.
    0
    0
  • In addition to these corps there are eight permanent cavalry divisions with headquarters at Paris, Lunyule, Meaux, Sedan, Reims, Lyons, Melun and Dole.
    0
    0
  • Paris Garde Rpublicaine,administrative and medical units.
    0
    0
  • The colonial army corps, headquarters at Paris, has three divisions, at Paris, Toulon and Brest.
    0
    0
  • In war the latter would probably remain at the ministry of war in Paris, and the generalissimo would have his own chief of staff.
    0
    0
  • Behind all this huge development of fixed defences lie the central fortresses of Paris and Lyons.
    0
    0
  • At Paris there is a more advanced school (Ecole superieure de la Marine) for the supplementary training of officers.
    0
    0
  • Commercial and technical instruction is given in various institutions comprising national establishments such as the icoles nalionales professionnelles of Armentires, Vierzon, Voiron and Nantes for the education of working men; the more advanced coles darts et mtiers of Chlons, Angers, Aix, Lille and Cluny; and the Central School of Arts and Manufactures at Paris; schools depending on the communes and state in combination, e.g.
    0
    0
  • the school of watch-making at Paris.
    0
    0
  • At Paris the cole Suprieure des Mines and the cole des Fonts et Chausses are controlled by the minister of public, works, the cole des Beaux-Arts, the cole des Arts Dcoratifs and the Conservatoire National de Musique et de Dclamation by the unr,ler-secretary for fine arts.
    0
    0
  • Examples of such bodies are the Society for Elementary Instruction the Polytechnic Association, the Philotechnic Association and the French Union of the Young at Paris; the Philomathic Society of Bordeaux; the Popular Education Society at Havre; the Rhone Society of Pro-, fessional Instruction at Lyons; the Industrial Society of Amiens and others.
    0
    0
  • BIBL100RAPHY.P. Joanne, Diciionnalre gographique et administrative de la France (8 vols., Paris, 1890-1905); C. Brossard, La France et ses colonies (6 vols., Paris, 1900-1906); 0.
    0
    0
  • Reclus, Le Plus Beau Royaume sous le ciel (Paris, 1899); Vidal de La Blache, La France.
    0
    0
  • ArdouinDumazet, Voyage en France (Paris, 1894); H.
    0
    0
  • Havard, La France artistique et monumentale (6 vols, Paris, 1892-1895); A.
    0
    0
  • Block, Dictionnaire de ladministration franfaise, the articles in which contain full bibliographies (2 vols., Paris, 1905); E.
    0
    0
  • Levasseur, La France et ses colonies (i Vols., Paris, 1890); M.
    0
    0
  • Mairey, La France et s2s colonies au debut du XX~ sIcle, which has numerous biblio.graphies (Paris, 1909); J.
    0
    0
  • de St Genis, La Fropriiti rurale en France (Paris, 1902); H.
    0
    0
  • Petit (2 vols., Paris, 1902).
    0
    0
  • The 2nd earl was ambassador to Vienna and then to Paris; he was secretary of state for the southern.
    0
    0
  • French's best-known work is "Death Staying the Hand of the Sculptor," a memorial for the tomb of the sculptor Martin Milmore, in the Forest Hills cemetery, Boston; this received a medal of honour at Paris, in 1900.
    0
    0
  • On the death of the usurper Rudolph (Raoul), Ralph of Burgundy, Hugh the Great, count of Paris, and the other nobles between whom France was divided, chose Louis for their king, and the lad was brought over from England and consecrated at Laon on the 19th of June 936.
    0
    0
  • Lauer, La Regne de Louis IV d'Outre-Mer (Paris, 1900); and A.
    0
    0
  • JEAN FRANCOIS BOISSONADE DE FONTARABIE (1774-1857), French classical scholar, was born at Paris on the 12th of August 1774.
    0
    0
  • In 1809 he was appointed deputy professor of Greek at the faculty of letters at Paris, and titular professor in 1813 on the death of P. H.
    0
    0
  • He died at Paris on the 21st of June 1828.
    0
    0
  • Garnier, Le Temple de Jupiter Panhellenien a Egine (Paris, 1884); Ad.
    0
    0
  • He was afterwards promoted in the Academy to the place of Maupertuis, and went to reside in Paris.
    0
    0
  • Biologiques (Paris, 1899); B.
    0
    0
  • (Paris, 1791).
    0
    0
  • The statutes of the club were also published in Paris.
    0
    0
  • The very fine torso of Athena in the Ecole des Beaux Arts at Paris, which has unfortunately lost its head, may perhaps best serve to help our imagination in reconstructing a Pheidian original.
    0
    0
  • He was created a peer of France in 1458, and made governor of Paris during the war of the League of the Public Weal (1465).
    0
    0
  • Its congeners even then lived in England, as is proved by the fact that their relics have been found in the Stonesfield oolitic rocks, the deposition of which is separated from that which gave rise to the Paris Tertiary strata by an abyss of past time which we cannot venture to express even in thousands of years.
    0
    0
  • JACQUES ROUSSEAU (1630-1693), French painter, a member of a Huguenot family, was born at Paris in 1630.
    0
    0
  • On his return to Paris he soon became distinguished as a painter, and was employed by Louis XIV.
    0
    0
  • "HENRI LOUIS BERGSON (1859-), French philosopher, was born in Paris Oct.
    0
    0
  • of Paris and immediately outside the fortifications.
    0
    0
  • For the neighbouring Bois de Boulogne see Paris.
    0
    0
  • in Paris.
    0
    0
  • In 1879 a congress assembled in the rooms of the Geographical Society at Paris, under the presidency of Admiral de la Ronciere le Noury, and voted in favour of the making of the Panama Canal.
    0
    0
  • Then Bem escaped to Paris, where he supported himself by teaching mathematics.
    0
    0
  • These were removed to Paris, and when Napoleon was crowned emperor a century and a half later he chose Childeric's bees for the decoration of his coronation mantle.
    0
    0
  • It was founded upon original sources, in order to consult which the author resided for a considerable time in Paris.
    0
    0
  • Lives by Gurlitt (Hamburg, 1805); Young (2 vols., London, 1860); Bonnet (Paris, 1862).
    0
    0
  • After a brief embassy to the emperor in the spring of 1538, Bonner superseded Gardiner at Paris, and began his mission by sending Cromwell a long list of accusations against his predecessor (ib.
    0
    0
  • He seems, however, to have pleased his patron, Cromwell, and perhaps Henry, by his energy in seeing the king's "Great" Bible in English through the press in Paris.
    0
    0
  • He was already king's chaplain; his appointment at Paris had been accompanied by promotion to the see of Hereford, and before he returned to take possession he was translated to the bishopric of London (October 1539) Hitherto Bonner had been known as a somewhat coarse and unscrupulous tool of Cromwell,a sort of ecclesiastical Wriothesley.
    0
    0
  • Duchesne, Origines du Culte Chretien (Paris, 1898).
    0
    0
  • Into the mould left by the saint's body liquid plaster of Paris was run, and a perfect model obtained, showing the features of the youth, the cords which bound him, and even the texture of his clothing.
    0
    0
  • The journey between Algiers and Paris, from which it is distant 1031 miles, is accomplished in about forty-five hours.
    0
    0
  • AGATHON JEAN FRANCOIS FAIN (1778-1837), French historian, was born in Paris on the 11th of January 1778.
    0
    0
  • Fain was a member of the council of state and deputy from Montargis from 1834 until his death, which occurred in Paris on the 16th of September 1837.
    0
    0
  • These naval victories were followed by a further military alliance with France against Spain, termed the treaty of Paris (the 23rd of March 1657).
    0
    0
  • des chroniques nationales (Paris, 1824-1828).
    0
    0
  • In February 17 9 6 he arrived in Paris and had interviews with De La Croix and L.
    0
    0
  • But the Dutch fleet was detained in the Texel for many weeks by unfavourable weather, and before it eventually put to sea in October, only to be crushed by Duncan in the battle of Camperdown, Tone had returned to Paris; and Hoche, the chief hope of the United Irishmen, was dead.
    0
    0
  • His journals, which were written for his family and intimate friends, give a singularly interesting and vivid picture of life in Paris in the time of the directory.
    0
    0
  • In 1266 he was attached to the Faculty of Arts in the University of Paris at the time when there was a great conflict between the four "nations."
    0
    0
  • Siger retired from Paris to Liege.
    0
    0
  • Paris, "Siger de Brabant" in La Poesie du moyen age (1895); and an article in the Revue de Paris (Sept.
    0
    0
  • Lejean, Voyage en Abyssinie (Paris, 1872); Achille Raffray, Afrique orientale; Abyssinie (Paris, 1876); P. H.
    0
    0
  • The edition of Sirmond (Paris, 1642) was afterwards completed by Garnier (1684), who has also written dissertations on the author's works.
    0
    0
  • At Dijon his compositions attracted the attention of an inspector, who had him placed (1814) in the normal school, Paris.
    0
    0
  • He died in Paris on the 4th of February 1842.
    0
    0
  • 1888), Berlin, and Paris.
    0
    0
  • (Paris, 1841-1887).
    0
    0
  • Pigeonneau, Le Cycle de la croisade et de la famille de Bouillon (Paris, 1877); H.
    0
    0
  • By 1669 they were playing in Paris at the Theatre du Marais, her first appearance there being as Venus in Boyer's Fete de Venus.
    0
    0
  • Her brother, the actor Nicolas Desmares (c. 1650-1714), began as a member of a subsidized company at Copenhagen, but by her influence he came to Paris and was received in 1685 sans debut - the first time such an honour had been accorded - at the Comedie Frangaise, where he became famous for peasant parts.
    0
    0
  • ANTOINE JOSEPH SANTERRE (1752-1809), French revolutionist, was born in Paris on the 16th of March 1752.
    0
    0
  • In May 1793 he was temporarily replaced as commander of the National Guard in Paris, so that he might take command of a force which he had organized to operate in La Vendee.
    0
    0
  • He then gave in his resignation as general, and returned to commerce; but his brewery was ruined, and after many vicissitudes of fortune he died in poverty in Paris on the 6th of February 1809.
    0
    0
  • Carro, Santerre general de la republique francaise (Paris, 1847), compiled from Santerre's MS. notes; P. Robiquet, Le Personnel municipal de Paris pendant la Revolution (Paris, 1890); C. L.
    0
    0
  • Chassin, La Vendee et la Chouannerie (Paris, 1892 seq.); "L'Etat des services de Santerre dresse par lui-meme," in the third volume of Souvenirs et memoires (1899), published by Paul Bonnefon.
    0
    0
  • The important T Lents of 1617 and 1618 at Grenoble were a prelude to a still more important apostolate in Paris, "the theatre of the world," as St Vincent de Paul calls it.
    0
    0
  • 1853) Le Reveil du sentiment religieux en France au X Vil e siecle, by Strowski (Paris, 1898); Four Essays on S.
    0
    0
  • of Paris.
    0
    0
  • - Contracts in general; Oppert and Menant, Documents juridiques de l'Assyrie et de la Chaldee (Paris, 1877); J.
    0
    0
  • of the Textes Elamites-Semitiques of the Memoires de la delegation en Perse (Paris, 1902); H.
    0
    0
  • (Paris, 1745); P. J.
    0
    0
  • Daru, Histoire de la republique de Venise (Paris, 1853); A.
    0
    0
  • Baschet, Histoire de la chancellerie secrete a Venise (Paris, 1870).
    0
    0
  • Since the early days of international telegraphy, conferences of representatives of government telegraph departments and companies have been held from time to time (Paris 1865, Vienna 1868, Rome 1871 and 1878, St Petersburg 1875, London 1879, Berlin 1885,1885, Paris 1891, Buda Pesth 1896, London 1903).
    0
    0
  • Broca, La Telegraphie sans fils (Paris, 1899); A.
    0
    0
  • Picard, were published in 1897 at Paris.
    0
    0
  • On the 26th of August 1854 there appeared in L'Illustration (Paris) an interesting article by Charles Bourseul on the electric transmission of speech.
    0
    0
  • 232, 28th September 1854; Du Moncel, Expose des Applications de l'Electricite (Paris), ii.
    0
    0
  • The Anglo-French telephone service, which was opened between London and Paris in April 1891, was extended to the principal towns in England and France on the 11th of April 1904.
    0
    0
  • There are now four circuits between London and Paris, one between London and Lille, and two between Londofi and Brussels, the last carrying an increasing amount of traffic. Experiments have been made in telephonic communication between London and Rome by way of Paris.
    0
    0
  • A later and improved edition was produced in Paris, 1858, in 14 vols.
    0
    0
  • Ceillier's other work, Apologie de la morale des peres de l'eglise (Paris, 1718), also won some celebrity.
    0
    0
  • Montegut died in Paris on the 11th of December 1895.
    0
    0
  • International communication between Rome and Paris, and Italy and Switzerland also exists.
    0
    0
  • After being depressed between 5885 and 1894, the prices in Italy and abroad reached, in 1899, on the Rome Stock Exchange, the average 01 100.83 and of 94.8 on the Paris Bourse.
    0
    0
  • By the end of 1901 the price of Italian stock on the Paris Bourse had, however, risen to par or thereabouts.
    0
    0
  • The directcrs of Paris, not content with overrunning and plundering Switzerland, had outraged German sentiment in many ways.
    0
    0
  • One and all they underwent the influences emanating Character from Paris; and in respe& to civil administration, of Napo- law, judicial procedure, education and public works, Ieon~s they all experienced great benefits, the results of which rule, never wholly disappeared.
    0
    0
  • On the 16th of April 1814 Eugene, on hearing of Napoleons overthrow at Paris, signed an armistice at Mantua by which he was enabled to send away the French troops beyond the Alps and entrust himself to the consideration of the allies.
    0
    0
  • The arrangements made by the allies in accordance with the treaty of Paris (June I 2, 1814) and the Final Act of the congress of Vienna (June 9, 1815), imposed on Italy boundaries which, roughly speaking, corresponded to those of the pre-Napoleonic era.
    0
    0
  • The lonian Islands, formerly belonging to Venice, were, by a treaty signed at Paris on the 5th of November 1815, placed under the protection of Great Britain.
    0
    0
  • The July revolution in Paris and the declaraRoil,; tion of the new king, Louis Philippe, that France, as 1830.
    0
    0
  • In Modena Duke Francis, ambitious of enlarging his territories, coquetted with the Carbonari of Paris, and opened indirect negotiations with Menotti, the revolutionary leader in his state, believing that he might assist him in his plans.
    0
    0
  • The Piedmontese troops distinguished themselves in the field, gaining the sympathies of the French and English; and at the subsequent congress of Paris (1856), where Cavour himself was Sardinian representative, the Italian question was discussed, and the intolerable oppression of the Italian peoples by Austria and the despots ventilated.
    0
    0
  • The decline of Mazzinis influence was accompanied by the rise of a new movement in favor of Italian unity under Victor Emmanuel, inspired by the Milanese marquis Giorgio New Pallavicini, who had spent 14 years in the Spielberg, Unio~lsi and by Manin, living in exile in Paris, both of them moveex-republicans who had become monarchists.
    0
    0
  • The attempt failed and its author was caught and executed, but while t appeared at first to destroy Napoleons Italian sympathies and led to a sharp interchange of notes between Paris and Turin, the emperor was really impressed by the attempt and by Orsinis letter from prison exhorting him to intervene in Italy.
    0
    0
  • In August Marco Minghetti succeeded in forming a military league and a customs union between Tuscany, Romagna and the duchies, and in procuring the adoption of the Piedmontese codes; and envoys were sent to Paris to mollify Napoleon.
    0
    0
  • Zanichellis Scritti del Conte di Cavour (Bologna, 1892) are very important, and so are Prince Metternichs 7ff moires (7 vols., Paris, f881).
    0
    0
  • On the occasion of the Metrical Congress, which met in Paris in 1872, he, however, successfully protested against the recognition of the Vatican delegate, Father Secchi, as a representative of a state, and obtained from Count de Rmusat, French foreign minister, a formal declaration that the presence of Father Secchi on that occasion could not constitute a diplomatic precedent.
    0
    0
  • Depretis recalled Nigra from Paris and replaced him by General Cialdini, whose ardent plea for Italian intervention in favor of France in 1870, and whose comradeship with Marshal Macmahon in 1859, would, it was supposed, render him persona gratissima to the French government.
    0
    0
  • Incensed by the elevation to the rank of embassies of the Italian legation in Paris and the French legation to the Quirinal, and by the introduction of the Italian bill against clerical abuses, the French Clerical party not only attacked Italy and her representative, General Cialdini, in the Chamber of Deputies, but promoted a monster petition against the Italian bill.
    0
    0
  • Nor did nascent irritation in France prevent the conclusion of the Franco-Italian commercial treaty, which was signed at Paris on the 3rd of November.
    0
    0
  • Depretis made some opposition, hut finally acquiesced, and the treaty of triple alliance was signed on the 20th of May 1882, five days after the promulgation of the Franco-Italian commercial treaty in Paris.
    0
    0
  • The attitude of several of his colleagues was more equivocal, but though they coquetted with French financiers in the hope of obtaining the support of the Paris Bourse for Italian securities, the precipitate renewal of the alliance destroyed all probability of a close understanding with France.
    0
    0
  • Bonnal de Ganges, La Chute dune rpublique tVenise] (Paris, 1885); D.
    0
    0
  • Dufourcq, Le Rgime, jacobin en Jtatie,1796-1799(Paris, 1900); A.
    0
    0
  • Guinets Ri.volulions dIlalie (Paris, 1857), and J.
    0
    0
  • of the fortifications of Paris by the railway from Paris to Mantes.
    0
    0
  • This event has such an important bearing on the issue of Magna Carta that it is not inappropriate to quote the actual words used by Matthew Paris in describing the incident.
    0
    0
  • The twenty-five barons were duly appointed, their names being given by Matthew Paris.
    0
    0
  • Brissot received a good education and entered the office of a lawyer at Paris.
    0
    0
  • The plan was unsuccessful, and soon after his return to Paris Brissot was lodged in the Bastille on the charge of having published a work against the government.
    0
    0
  • On this second visit he became acquainted with some of the leading Abolitionists, and founded later in Paris a Societe des Amis des Noirs, of which he was president during 1790 and 1791.
    0
    0
  • Famous for his speeches at the Jacobin club, he was elected a member of the municipality of Paris, then of the Legislative Assembly, and later of the National Convention.
    0
    0
  • de Montrol (Paris, 1830); Helena Williams, Souvenirs de la Revolution francaise (Paris, 1827); F.
    0
    0
  • Aulard, Les Portraits litteraires a la fin du X VIII" siecle, pendant la Revolution (Paris, 1883).
    0
    0
  • He studied medicine in London, Paris and Leiden, receiving his M.D.
    0
    0
  • Paris, cxl.
    0
    0
  • For a century, from Maximian to Maximus (286-388), it was (except under Julian, who preferred to reside in Paris) the administrative centre from which Gaul, Britain and Spain were ruled, so that the poet Ausonius could describe it as the second metropolis of the empire, or "Rome beyond the Alps."
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  • Paris.
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  • (Stuttgart, 1881); and P. Villari's Machiavelli (London 1892); also C. Yriarte, Cesar Borgia (Paris, 1889), an admirable piece of writing; Schubert-Soldern, Die Borgia and ihre Zeit (Dresden, 1902), which contains the latest discoveries on the subject; and E.
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  • It was the Paris building that gave rise to the generic use of the term for a building where a nation's illustrious dead rest.
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  • The Pantheon in Paris was the church built in the classical style by Soufflot; it was begun in 1764 and consecrated to the patroness of the city, Sainte Genevieve.
    0
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  • eccl., Paris, 1765, titt.
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  • eccl., Paris, 1765, s.v.
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    0
  • Durand de Maillane, Dictionnaire du droit canonique (1761); Dictionnaire ecclesiastique et canonique, par une societ y de religieux (Paris, 1765); Z.
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  • (Paris, 1844); R.
    0
    0
  • Gaudry, Traite de la legislation des cultes (Paris, 1854); W.
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  • The aye-aye was discovered by Pierre Sonnerat in 1780, the specimen brought to Paris by that traveller being the only one known until 1860.
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  • He died in Paris on the 21st of June 1857.
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  • Like most great teachers he published a text-book, and his Traite de Chimie elementaire, theorique et pratique (4 vols., Paris, 1813-16), which served as a standard for a quarter of a century, perhaps did even more for the advance of chemistry than his numerous original discoveries.
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  • FRANCOIS DE BAR (1538-1606), French scholar, was born at Seizencourt, near St Quentin, and having studied at the university of Paris entered the order of St Benedict.
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  • Lelong, Bibliotheque historique de la France (Paris, 1768-1778); C. C. A.
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  • (Paris, 1849-1885).
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  • Wren was an enthusiastic admirer of Bernini's designs, and visited Paris in 1665 in order to see him and his proposed scheme for the rebuilding of the Louvre.
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  • army corps; its court of appeal is in Paris.
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  • (Paris).
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  • Paris, 1889-1891).
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  • lxxvi.; Henneguy, Leons sur lacellule, morphologic et reproduction (Paris, 1896); 0.
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  • by P. de Tchihatchef (Paris, 1875); Engler, Versuch esner Entwicklungsgeschichte der Pflanzenwelt (Leipzig, 1879-1882); Oscar Drude, Manuel de giographie botanique, transi.
    0
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  • Poirault (Paris, 1897); A.
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  • The Hippodrome in Paris somewhat resembles the Roman amphitheatre, being open in the centre to the sky, with seats round on rising levels.
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  • geography, but, following the model of Strabo, described the world according to its different political divisions, and entered with great zest into the question of the productions ' Bunbury's History of Ancient Geography (2 vols., London, 1879), Muller's Geographi Graeci minores (2 vols., Paris, 1855, 1861) and Berger's Geschichte der wissenschaftlichen Erdkunde der Griechen (4 vols., Leipzig, 1887-1893) are standard authorities on the Greek geographers.
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  • The change which took place during the 19th century in the substance and style of geography may be well seen by comparing the eight volumes of Malte-Brun's Geographic universelle (Paris, 1812-1829) with the twenty-one volumes of Reclus's Geographic universelle (Paris, 1876-1895).
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  • A commission left Paris in 1735, consisting of Charles Marie de la Condamine, Pierre Bouguer, Louis Godin and Joseph de Jussieu the naturalist.
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  • The first of the existing geographical societies was that of Paris, founded in 1825 under the title Of La Societe de Geographie.
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  • (Paris, 1890), vol.
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  • (Paris, 1897, 1900), and into English by Dr Hertha Sollas as The Face of the Earth, vols.
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  • s Elie de Beaumont, Notice sur les systemes de montagnes (3 vols., Paris, 1852).
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  • (Paris, 1900), vol.
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    0
  • de Lapparent, Lecons de geographie physique (2nd ed., Paris, 1898), and W.
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  • de Lapparent, Traite de geologie (4th ed., Paris, 1900).
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  • Having passed some time in the court circle, Sunderland was successively ambassador at Madrid, at Paris and at Cologne; in 1678 he was again ambassador at Paris.
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  • Esprit Flechier, bishop of Nimes, in this Histoire du cardinal Jimenes (Paris, 1693), says that Torquemada made her promise that when she became queen she would make it her principal business to chastise and destroy heretics.
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  • He joined Mary at Paris in September, and in 156 1 was sent by her as a commissioner to summon the parliament; in February he arrived in Edinburgh and was chosen a privy councillor on the 6th of September.
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  • He resigned this post in 1820, upon the death of his wife, to whom he was fondly attached, and, though making some efforts to connect himself with journalism, spent the years immediately succeeding in idleness, residing for the most part in Paris.
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  • 113), or by Paris in the temple of the Thymbraean Apollo together with Achilles (Dares Phrygius 34).
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  • These were removed by Napoleon to Paris, but restored to their original positions after the peace of 1815.
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    0
  • Milne-Edwards, Recherches anatomiques et paliontologiques pour servir a l'histoire des oiseaux fossiles de la France (Paris, 1867-1868), torn.
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    0
  • Serres, Anatomie comparee du cerveau (Paris, 1824, 4 pls.); L.
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  • (Paris, xlii., 1856, pp. 937-94 1); M.
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    0
  • (Paris, 1875); A.
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    0
  • C. Sappey, Recherches sur l'appareil respiratoire des oiseaux (Paris, 1847); W.
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    0
  • Ac. Soc., Paris, xiv., 1856; E.
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  • Gallinaceous birds, storkand crane-like waders, rails, birds of prey, cormorants, &c. Especially numerous bones have been found in the Paris basin, chiefly described by G.
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    0
  • Milne-Edwards, Recherches anatomiques et paleontologiques pour servir d l'histoire des oiseaux fossiles de la France (Paris, 1867-1868); F.
    0
    0
  • Trouessart, La Geographie zoologique (Paris, 1890).
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  • (Paris, 1875-1884), are enumerated 238 species as belonging to the island, of which 129 are peculiar to it, and among those are no fewer than 35 peculiar genera.
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  • ALEXANDRE THEODORE VICTOR, COMTE DE LAMETH (1760-1829), French soldier and politician, was born in Paris on the 20th of October 1760.
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  • He died in Paris on the 18th of March 1829.
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  • He was the author of an important History of the Constituent Assembly (Paris, 2 vols., 1828-1829).
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  • Aulard, Les Orateurs de l'Assemble'e Constituante (Paris, 1905); also M.
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  • de l'histoire de Paris (vol.
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  • Rufus King's son, John Alsop King (1788-1867), was educated at Harrow and in Paris, served in the war of 1812 as a lieutenant of a cavalry company, and was a member of the New York Assembly in1819-1821and of the New York Senate in 1823.
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  • The Copley medal was conferred upon him in 1823, and the Lalande prize in 1817 by the Paris Academy, of which he was a corresponding member.
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  • There is more than one meaning of Paris discussed in the 1911 Encyclopedia.
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  • LEON VICTOR BOURGEOIS AUGUSTE (1851-), French statesman, was born at Paris on the 21st of May 1851, and was educated for the law.
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  • After holding a subordinate office (1876) in the department of public works, he became successively prefect of the Tarn (1882) and the Haute-Garonne (1885), and then returned to Paris to enter the ministry of the interior.
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  • French hackney-coaches received the name of fiacre from the Hotel St Fiacre, in the rue St Martin, Paris, where one Sauvage, who was the first to provide cabs for hire, kept his vehicles.
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  • Like Paris and other Trojans, he had an Oriental name, Darius.
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  • The Academy of Inscriptions of Paris appointed him one of its members, and from the grandduke of Baden he received the dignity of privy councillor.
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  • In 1661 he came to Paris, and in 1666 was arrested along with I.
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  • He later made yearly visits to Paris.
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  • Joncieres, Victorin (1839-1903), French composer, was born in Paris on the 12th of April 1839.
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  • He first devoted his attention to painting, but afterwards took up the serious study of music. He entered the Paris Conservatoire, but did not remain there long, because he had espoused too warmly the cause of Wagner against his professor.
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  • One of his first acts after entering on the duties of his office was to cause the parlement of Paris to register the edict of Romorantin, of which he is sometimes, but erroneously, said to have been the author.
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  • Dufey (5 vols., Paris, 1824-1825).
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  • Villemain, Vie du Chancelier de l'Hopital (Paris, 1874); R.
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  • See also Desjardins, Geographie historique et administrative de la Gaule romaine (Paris, 18 77); Fustel de Coulanges, Histoire des institutions politiques de l'ancienne France (Paris, 1877); for Caesar's campaigns, article CAESAR, JULIUS, and works quoted; for coins, art.
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  • He studied law for three years in South Carolina, and then spent two years abroad, studying French and Italian in Paris and jurisprudence at Edinburgh.
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  • In March 1814 he was one of the band of students who, on the heights of Montmartre and Saint-Chaumont, attempted resistance to the armies of the allies then engaged in the investment of Paris.
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  • In 1821 he entered a banking-house newly established at St Petersburg, but returned two years later to Paris, where he was appointed cashier to the Caisse Hypothecaire.
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  • The headquarters in Paris were removed from the modest rooms in the Rue Taranne, and established in large halls near the Boulevard Italien.
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  • He now retired to his estate at Menilmontant, near Paris, where with forty disciples, all of them men, he continued to carry out his socialistic views.
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  • in 1845 he was appointed a director of the Paris & Lyons railway.
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    0
  • Weill, L'Ecole Saint-Simonienne, son histoire, son influence, jusqu' a nos jours (Paris, 1896).
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  • See C. Madrolle, Tonkin du sud: Hanoi (Paris, 1907).
    0
    0
  • de France (Paris, 1901), i.
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    0
  • 838-1220, &c. (Paris, 1619).
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    0
  • Delarc, Les Normands en Italie, 859-1073 (Paris, 1883); J.
    0
    0
  • Chalandon, La Dominion normande en Italie et Sicile, zoog-1194 (Paris, 1907); F.
    0
    0
  • 69 of the Bibliotheque de l'Ecole des Chartes (Paris, 1908).
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  • Gorchakov's defence of Sevastopol, and final retreat to the northern part of the town, which he continued to defend till peace was signed in Paris, were conducted with skill and energy.
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  • At the same time, although he attended the Paris conference of 1856, he purposely abstained from affixing his signature to the treaty of peace after that of Count Orlov, Russia's chief representative.
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  • In return for Russia's service in preventing the aid of Austria from being given to France, Gorchakov looked to Bismarck for diplomatic support in the Eastern Question, and he received an instalment of the expected support when he successfully denounced the Black Sea clauses of the treaty of Paris.
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  • Gorchakov hoped to utilize the complications in such a way as to recover, without war, the portion of Bessarabia ceded by the treaty of Paris, but he soon lost control of events, and the Slavophil agitation produced the Russo-Turkish campaign of 1877-7 8.
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  • A still wilder tale spoke of Hugh Capet as the son of a butcher of Paris.
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    0
  • Luchaire, Manuel des institutions francaises (Paris, 1892), and P. Guilhiermoz, Essai sur l'origine de la noblesse en France au moyen age (1902); for their later status and privileges, A.
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    0
  • Stevenson (Oxford, 1904) Vitae duorum Offarum (in works of Matthew Paris, ed.
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  • (Paris, 1847).
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  • Mullach, Fragmenta philosophorum Graecorum (Paris, 1867), ii.
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    0
  • He was Turkish delegate at the Paris conference of 1856; was charged with a mission to Syria in 1860; grand vizier in 1860 and 1861, and also minister of war.
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  • Even in the nominalistic epoch we have Raymond of Sabunde's Natural Theology (according to the article in Herzog-Hauck, not the title of the oldest Paris MS., but found in later MSS.
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  • JEAN LE ROND D ALEMBERT' (1717-1783), French mathematician and philosopher, was born at Paris in November 1717.
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  • He was a foundling, having been exposed near the church of St Jean le Rond, Paris, where he was discovered on the 17th of November.
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  • Alembert's fame spread rapidly throughout Europe and procured for him more than one opportunity of quitting the comparative retirement in which he lived in Paris for more lucrative and prominent positions.
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  • He died at Paris on the 29th of October 1783.
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  • His literary and philosophical works were collected and edited by Bastien (Paris, 1805, 18 vols.
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  • A better edition by Bossange was published at Paris in 1821 (5 vols.
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  • Pallain, La Mission de Talleyrand a Londres en 1792 (Paris, 1889).
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  • of France met with it in Provence, and attempted to acclimatize it at Paris, where he formed bands divided into various orders, each distinguished by a different colour.
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  • The king's encouragement seemed at first to point to a successful revival of flagellation; but the practice disappeared along with the other forms of devotion that had sprung up at the time of the league, and Henry III.'s successor suppressed the Paris brotherhood.
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    0
  • Fabre's Souvenirs Entomologiques (Paris, 1879-1891); D.
    0
    0
  • Strauss-Durkheim, Anatomie comparee des animaux articulees (Paris, 1828).
    0
    0
  • Beauregard (Les Insectes vesicants, Paris, 1890); and A.
    0
    0
  • Geoffroy (Insectes qui se trouvent aux environs de Paris, Paris, 1762); A.
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    0
  • Olivier (Coleopteres, Paris, 1789-1808); W.
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    0
  • Chapuis (Genera des Coleopteres, io vols., Paris, 1854-1874); J.
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    0
  • and Leopold von Toskana, ihr Briefwechsel (2 vols., 1872); Briefe der Kaiserin Maria Theresa an ihre Kinder and Freunde (4 vols., 1881); Marie Antoinette: Correspondance secrete entre Marie-Therese et le comte de Mercy-Argenteau (3 vols., Paris, 1875), in collaboration with Auguste Geffroy; Graf Philipp Cobenzl and seine Memoiren (1885); Correspondance secrete du comte de Mercy-Argenteau avec l'empereur Joseph II.
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    0
  • Guiraud in the Bibliotheque des ecoles francaises d'Athenes et de Rome (Paris, 1892-1898).
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  • When his master, William Varron, removed to Paris in 1301, Duns Scotus was appointed to succeed him as professor of philosophy, and his lectures attracted an immense number of students.
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  • Probably in 1304 he went to Paris, in 1307 he received his doctor's degree from the university, and in the same year was appointed regent of the theological school.
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    0
  • Complete works, edited by Luke Wadding (13 vols., Lyons, 1639) and at Paris (26 vols., 1891-1895).
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    0
  • Graec. (Paris, 1860); A.
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    0
  • Paris).
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    0
  • AItoff, Peuples et langages de la Russie (Paris, 1906), based on the report of the Russian Census Committee of 1897.
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    0
  • Kovalevsky, Russian Political Institutions (Chicago, 1902), Modern Customs and Ancient Laws of Russia (London, 1891), Le Regime economique de la Russie (Paris, 1898), and Die produktiven Krcifte Russlands (Paris, 1896); A.
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