Paralleled sentence example

paralleled
  • and Papa (earth) can be paralleled in China, India and Greece, and more remotely in Egypt and Babylonia.
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  • This conversion of earthwork into stone in the age of Severus can be paralleled from other parts of the Roman empire.
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  • The cylindrical body of Pterotrachaea is paralleled by the slug-like forms of Euthyneura.
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  • The Rhine has always exercised a peculiar sort of fascination over the German mind, in a measure and in a manner not easily paralleled by the case of any other river.
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  • The tempest descended on the pope and on Rome with a violence which cannot be paralleled, even in the days of Alaric and Genseric, or of the Norman Robert Guiscard.
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  • The separation of sense and understanding is for him unjustifiable, and only paralleled by the extraordinary blunder of severing matter and form.
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  • A special levy on the class of resident aliens (µEToiKtov), probably paralleled by a duty on slaves, was in force.
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  • The thinness of the skin, indeed, can but rarely be paralleled among other Europeans.
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  • It was among the Scandinavian colonists of the British coasts that in the first generations after the colonization of Iceland therefrom a magnificent school of poetry arose, to which we owe works that for power and beauty can be paralleled in no Teutonic language till centuries after their date.
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  • Space does not permit us to recount the equally puerile and barbarous legends of Vishnu, Agni, the loves of Vivasvat in the form of a horse, the adventures of Soma, nor the Vedic amours (paralleled in several savage mythologies) of Pururavas and Urvasi.2 Divine Myths of Greece.
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  • Some suppose that it must be explained as an attempt to avoid absolutism, and is paralleled by the analogous instance of the consuls at Rome.
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  • The experiences of the religious mystic are paralleled with the ecstatic vision in which the philosophical hermit sees a world of pure intelligences, where birth and decease are unknown.
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  • But in the 13th century this feeling began to disappear, and Brandenburg enjoyed an independence and carried out an independent policy in a way that was not paralleled by any other German state.
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  • This pipe, called a penstock, ranged from forty-four inches down to two feet in diameter and paralleled the Uncompahgre River far above its torrent as it coursed down the deep gorge.
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  • The road paralleled the river to their right and far below, which was most often hidden by the pine trees that blanketed the slope.
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  • The descent in meaning from that which is shared alike by several to that which is inferior, vulgar or low, is paralleled by the uses of "common."
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  • Imposing columns and pillars of ice were visible everywhere—massive icicles and mounds, built up from the spraying water tapped from the piping that paralleled the penstock.
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  • echelons of British society can be paralleled to many a film or pop star today.
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  • Crop formation frequency, at least in England, has roughly paralleled sunspot numbers.
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  • picturesque of the coastal resort towns on the French Riviera, paralleled only by Antibes.
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  • Thus it is no coincidence that gold as the standard bearer of capitalist ascendancy in circulation paralleled the real subsumption of labor in production.
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  • yearling sales results paralleled the respect deserved of the Grade One icon.
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  • The holy mountain is no doubt Babylonian, and the plantations of sacred trees, one of which at least has magic virtue, can be paralleled from the monuments (see Eden).
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  • The relationship of Ing to the Inguaeones is paralleled by that of Irmin to the Hermiones (see above).
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  • The story of the action of the council of Trent on the subject of corruption of church music is told elsewhere (see Music and Palestrina); and it has been recently paralleled by a decree of Pope Pius X., which has restored the 16th-century polyphonic Mass to a permanent place in the Roman Catholic Church music.
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  • Baader distinguishes, in a manner which may be paralleled from Boehme, between an immanent or esoteric process of self-production in God, through which He issues from His unrevealed state, and the emanent, exoteric or real process, in which God overcomes and takes up into Himself the eternal "nature" or the principle of selfhood, and appears as a Trinity of persons.
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  • The supernatural coats and the quintessential loaf may be paralleled but cannot be surpassed; and the book is throughout a mine of suggestiveness, as, for example, in the anticipation of Carlyle's clothes philosophy within the compass of a few lines.
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  • Bloom 's day is paralleled to the wanderings of Odysseus in the Homeric epic.
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  • Street Cry 's yearling sales results paralleled the respect deserved of the Grade One icon.
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  • There were enormous economic shifts that paralleled advancements in manufacturing and the creation of a new social class.
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  • The goth music movement closely paralleled the early 1980s post-punk movement, and many artists of the time, such as The Cure, Depeche Mode and The Birthday Party, straddled both similar genres.
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  • Imposing columns and pillars of ice were visible everywhere—massive icicles and mounds, built up from the spraying water tapped from the piping that paralleled the penstock.
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  • The terrace closest to the land, known as the continental shelf, has an average depth of 600 ft., and connects Australia, New Guinea, and Tasmania in one unbroken sweep. Compared with other continents, the Australian continental shelf is extremely narrow, and there are points on the eastern coast where the land plunges down to oceanic depths with an abruptness rarely paralleled.
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  • Labrusca, reappears in Japan), and others; an assemblage, as long ago pointed out by Asa Gray, which can only be paralleled in the Chino-japanese region, another centre of preservation of Miocene types.
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  • The shaft-graves in the Mycenae circle are also a late type, paralleled in the later Cnossian cemetery.
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  • They afford an example - paralleled in other classes of the animal kingdom - of an order which, though specialized in some respects, retains many primitive characters, and has won its way to dominance rather by perfection of behaviour, and specially by the development of family life and helpful socialism, than by excessive elaboration of structure.
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  • paralleled by Guillaume d'Orange's service to Louis the Pious.
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  • In this story the names make sense in Iranian, the tribes are not again mentioned except when this passage is copied, the objects are hardly such as would be held sacred by nomads, the form of ordeal is to be paralleled in Iranian legends, and the people say themselves that they are not really Scythae.
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  • The Scythian pantheon is not distinctive, and can be paralleled among the Tatars and among the Iranians.
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  • In the 16th century we find faith cures recorded of Luther and other reformers, in the next century of the Baptists, Quakers and other Puritan sects, and in the 18th century the faith healing of the Methodists in this country was paralleled by Pietism in Germany, which drew into its ranks so distinguished a man of science as Stahl (1660-1734) In the 19th century Prince Hohenlohe-WaldenburgSchillingsfiirst, canon of Grosswardein, was a famous healer on the continent; the Mormons and Irvingites were prominent among English-speaking peoples; in the last quarter of the 19th century faith healing became popular in London, and Bethshan homes were opened in 1881, and since then it has found many adherents in England.
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  • The other large river valleys are far less useful as highways, though each is paralleled by one or more railways.
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  • This, too, is certain; the fight for precedence at Arthur's board may be paralleled by accounts of precisely similar quarrels in early Irish literature, e.g.
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  • Probably the 129 and 224 systems coexisted in the country; but on the whole it seems more likely that 129 or rather 258 grains was the Hebrew shekel before the Ptolemaic times -- especially as the 100 shekels to the mina is paralleled by the following Persian system (Hultsch) --
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  • Its adhesive foot is paralleled by a cup-shaped ciliated depression, possibly nervous, found in all the larvae cited, except some Echinoderms, and which in Asterids and Crinoids actually serves as an organ of attachment.
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  • The very point is paralleled in the Acts of Thomas, ch.
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  • Among the Guanches of the Canary Islands, however, the Egyptian methods of emptying the body and padding he skin were closely paralleled.
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  • Even if we grant that the Latin symbols were inverted or set at an angle (a proceeding which is paralleled by the treatment of the Phoenician signs in Greek hands), so that represents Latin V, M Latin E, I' Latin 11, and J.
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  • This old-world wisdom of the Hindus, a thousand years before our era, is worthily to be paralleled from the Manichaeism of about the year 400.
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  • The Cirripedia present some examples of sexual relationships which are only paralleled, in the animal kingdom, among the para sitic Myzostomida.
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  • This national movement of the 15th century was not paralleled in France or England, where the classical humanities reigned.
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  • France had not paralleled the activity of Maximilian's Renaissance historians.
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  • Many Graptolite zones, showing a constant uniformity of succession, paralleled in this respect only by the longer known Ammonite zones of the Jurassic, have been distinguished in Britain and northern Europe, each marked by a characteristic species.
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  • The ceremony of turning to the west three times with renunciation of the Evil One, then to the east, is exactly paralleled in a rite of purification by water common among the Malays and described by Skeat in his book on Malay magic. If the Malay rite is not derived through Nlahommedanism from Christianity, it is a remarkable example of how similar psychological conditions can produce almost identical rites.
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