Paradoxes sentence example

paradoxes
  • The Hebrews shared the paradoxes of Orientals, and religious enthusiasm and ecstasy were prominent features.
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  • Silesius delighted specially in the subtle paradoxes of mysticism.
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  • Like Jean Hardouin he got to believe that a great deal of what is called classical literature was compiled by anonymous authors at a much later date, and he used frequently to startle his colleagues, the Gustavian academicians, by his audacious paradoxes.
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  • It was founded upon a feeling of uneasiness at a growing tendency among Roman Catholic writers not only to treat theology freely, but to corrupt it by paradoxes.
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  • The Paradoxes (Characters of a believing Christian in paradoxes, and seeming contradictions), which was often and justly suspected, has been conclusively proved by Grosart to be the work of another author.
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  • As the leading "aesthete," Oscar Wilde became one of the most prominent personalities of the day; apart from the ridicule he encountered, his affected paradoxes and his witty sayings were quoted on all sides, and in 1882 he went on a lecturing tour in the United States.
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  • Paradoxes in the history of religion and revelation which Paul draws out, and which Marcion's contemporaries passed by as utterly incomprehensible, are here made the foundation of an ethico-dualistic conception of history and of religion.
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  • His next and best-known work, Divine Legation of Moses demonstrated on the Principles of a Religious Deist (2 vols., 1737-1741), preserves his name as the author of the most daring and ingenious of theological paradoxes.
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  • Of his prose works, the Juvenilia appeared in 1633; the Lxxx Sermons in 1640; Biathanatos in 1644; Fifty Sermons in 1649; Essays in Divinity, 1651; his Letters to Several Persons of Honour, 1651; Paradoxes, Problems and Essays, 1652; and Six and Twenty Sermons, 1661.
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  • A sample of De Morgan's bibliographical learning is to be found in his account of Arithmetical Books, from the Invention of Printing (1847), and finally in his [[Budget]] of Paradoxes.
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  • He can hardly be called a " moralist "; and though it is impossible to deny him a considerable share of philosophic penetration, his anti-moral paradoxes have not even apparent coherence.
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  • Of the paradoxes used by Zeno to discredit the belief in plurality and motion, eight survive in the writings of Aristotle and Simplicius.
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  • If tradition has not misrepresented these paradoxes of time, space and motion, there is in Zeno's reasoning an element of fallacy.
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  • Great as was the importance of these paradoxes of plurality and motion in stimulating speculation about space and time, their direct influence upon Greek thought was less considerable than that of another paradox - strangely neglected by historians of philosophy - the paradox of predication.
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  • This book seeks to unravel the riddle of legal paradoxes.
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  • These are not just anomalies or paradoxes about which we can simply shrug our shoulders.
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  • Regis, by removing the paradoxes and adjusting the metaphysics to the popular powers of apprehension, made Cartesianism popular, and reduced it to a regular system.
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  • Of the many paradoxes in the Divine Legation, few are more extravagant than the theory that Virgil, in the sixth book of his Aeneid, intended to allegorize, in the visit of his hero and the Sibyl to the shades, the initiation of Aeneas, as a lawgiver, into the Eleusinian mysteries.
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  • In casting a thin hollow object like a bell, it will be seen that the resultant upward thrust on the mould may be many times greater than the weight of metal; many a curious experiment has been devised to illustrate this property and classed as a hydrostatic paradox (Boyle, Hydrostatical Paradoxes, 1666).
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  • In view of these differences (amounting almost to an antinomy of paradoxes) in interpretation, it is not surprising to find that recent years have witnessed a violent reaction in some quarters against Hegelian influence.
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  • With many paradoxes, with many criticisms which are below contempt, and many indecent displays of personal animosity - especially in his reference to Etienne Dolet, over whose death he gloated with brutal malignity - it yet contains acute criticism, and showed for the first time what such a treatise ought to be, and how it ought to be written.
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  • More sympathetic judgments will divine unquenchable vitality in a faith whose very paradoxes rise up in new power again and again.
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  • Evaded by Augustinianism, it came back now, with some at least of its difficulties and paradoxes, but also with its immense attractive and dynamic power.
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  • Time travel is also a popular theme with resulting paradoxes creating unexpected plot twists.
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  • As with all time travel stories, you are simply going to have to ignore all the inherent paradoxes if you're going to enjoy the movie.
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  • This exquisite familiarity with bird and beast would make us love the memory of Thoreau if his egotism were triply as arrogant, if his often meaningless paradoxes were even more absurd, if his sympathies were even less humanitarian than we know them to have been.
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  • No doubt these airy paradoxes were not always seriously taken; but it is significant that a common Roman proverb identified "philosophizing" (philosophatur) with thinking out some dirty trick.
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  • But, like all the great paradoxes of philosophy, it has its value in directing our attention to a vital, yet much neglected, element of experience.
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  • It was these paradoxes that Kant sought to rebut by a more thoroughgoing criticism of the basis of knowledge the substance of which is summed up in his celebrated Refuta tion of Idealism,' wherein he sought to undermine Hume's scepticism by carrying it one step further and demonstrating that not only is all knowledge of self or object excluded, but the consciousness of any series of impressions and ideas is itself impossible except in relation to some external permanent and universally accepted world of objects.
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  • Nearly two years were passed in Geneva; visiting Italy in 1641, he remained during the winter of that year in Florence, studying the "paradoxes of the great star-gazer" Galileo, who died within a league of the city early in 1642.
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  • Hence, to proceed from psychology to metaphysics is to proceed from the less to the more known; and the paradoxes of psychological have caused those of metaphysical idealism.
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  • In Germany, since the victory of Kant over Wolff, realism has always been in difficulties, which we can appreciate when we reflect that the Germans by preference apply the term " realism " to the paradoxes of Herbart (1776-1841), who, in order to avoid supposed contradictions, supposed that bodies are not substances, but show (Schein), while " reals" are simple substances, each with a simple quality, and all preserving themselves against disturbance by one another, whether physically or psychologically, but not known to be either material or spiritual because we do not know the simple quality in which the nature of the real consists.
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  • Zeno's paradoxes, notably, for example, the puzzle of Achilles and the Tortoise, are still capable of amusing the modern world.
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  • Mandeville's ironical paradoxes are interesting mainly as a criticism of the "amiable" idealism of Shaftesbury, and in comparison with the serious egoistic systems of Hobbes and Helvetius.
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  • Paradoxes of deterrent theory have emerged. 
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