Paracelsus sentence example

paracelsus
  • All these physical theories are blended with a mystical theosophy, of which the most remarkable example is, perhaps, the chemico-astrological speculations of Paracelsus (1493-1541).
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  • He published several pieces bearing on medicine, astrology and alchemy, and attacking the system of Paracelsus.
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  • Paris was the stronghold of conservatism, and Germany was stirred by the teachings of one who must be considered apart from all schools - Paracelsus.
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  • The chief immediate result we can trace is the introduction of certain mineral remedies, especially antimony, the use of which became a kind of badge of the disciples of Paracelsus.
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  • Of the followers of Paracelsus some became mere mystical quacks and impostors.
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  • The medicine of the 17th century was especially distinguished by the rise of sytems; and we must first speak of an eccentric genius who endeavoured to construct a system for himself, as original and opposed to tradition as that of Paracelsus.
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  • Hahnemann (1753-1844) was in conception as revolutionary a reformer of medicine as Paracelsus.
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  • Of the early years of Paracelsus's life hardly anything is known.
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  • Hence came Paracelsus's peculiar mode of study.
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  • The truth of Paracelsus's doctrines was apparently confirmed by his success in curing or mitigating diseases for which the regular physicians could do nothing.
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  • The original editions of Paracelsus's works are getting less and less common; even the English versions are among the rarest of their class.
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  • Over and above the numerous editions, there is a bulky literature of an explanatory and controversial character, for which the world is indebted to Paracelsus's followers and enemies.
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  • The aim of all Paracelsus's writing is to promote the progress of medicine, and he endeavours to put before physicians a grand ideal of their profession.
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  • Paracelsus >>
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  • Besides mystical theology, Boehme was indebted to the writings of Paracelsus.
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  • SYLPH, an imaginary spirit of the air; according to Paracelsus, the first modern writer who uses the word, an air-elemental, coming between material and immaterial beings.
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  • Similarly, the earthelementals or earth-spirits were in Paracelsus's nomenclature, "gnomes" (Gr.
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  • Paracelsus, a 15th-century Swiss alchemist, extolled the rejuvenating value of mud from Austrian moors.
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  • The term "cobalt" is met with in the writings of Paracelsus, Agricola and Basil Valentine, being used to denote substances which, although resembling metallic ores, gave no metal on smelting.
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  • The influence of Nicolas of Cusa and Paracelsus mingled in Valentin Weigel with that of the Deutsche Theologie, Andreas Osiander, Schwenkfeld and Franck.
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  • Similar is the view of Paracelsus and Jerome Cardan, who " suppose a twofold world, existing one in the other; beside or behind the visible is an inner, ideal world, which breaks through in particular spots " (Dorner's System of Christian Doctrine, ill.
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  • The idea of such transmutation probably arose among the Alexandrian Greeks in the early centuries of the Christian era; thence it passed to the Arabs, by whom it was transmitted to western Europe, and its realization was a leading aim of chemical workers down to the time of Paracelsus and even later.
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  • In the earlier part of the 16th century Paracelsus gave a new direction to alchemy by declaring that its true object was not the making of gold but the preparation of medicines, and this union of chemistry with medicine was one characteristic of the iatrochemical school of which he was the precursor.
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  • The former substituted for the salt, sulphur and mercury of Basil Valentine and Paracelsus three earths - the mercurial, the vitreous and the combustible - and he explained combustion as depending on the escape of this last combustible element; while Stahl's conception of phlogiston - not fire itself, but the principle of fire - by virtue of which combustible bodies burned, was a near relative of the mercury of the philosophers, the soul or essence of ordinary mercury.
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  • As early as the 15th century the alchemist Basil Valentine had suggested this application, but the great exponent of this doctrine was Paracelsus, who set up a new definition: " The true use of chemistry is not to make gold but to prepare medicines."
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  • Footnote 1: The more notable chemists of this period were Turquet de Mayerne (1573-1665), a physician of Paris, who rejected the Galenian doctrines and accepted the exaggeratons of Paracelsus; Andreas Libavius (d.
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  • ALKAHEST (a pseudo-Arabic word believed to have been invented by Paracelsus), a liquid, much sought after by the alchemists, having the power of dissolving gold and every other substance, which it was supposed would possess invaluable medicinal qualities.
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  • Among the best-known non-Jewish exponents of the Kabbalah were the Italian count Pico di Mirandola (1463-1494), the renowned Johann Reuchlin (1455-1522), Heinrich Cornelius Agrippa of Nettesheim (3487- '535), Theophrastus Paracelsus (1493-1541), and, later, the Englishman Robert Fludd (1574-1637).
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  • The Kleine Schriften contains valuable criticisms on Paracelsus and Bruno.
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  • Paracelsus and Chemical Medicine.
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  • The first noticeable quality in Paracelsus (c. 1490-1541) is his revolutionary independence of thought, which was supported by his immense personal arrogance.
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  • There is no record of Paracelsus' knowledge of Greek, and as, at least in his student days, the most important works of Greek medicine were very imperfectly known, it is probable he had little first hand acquaintance with Galen or Hippocrates, while his breach with the humanists is the more conspicuous from his lecturing and writing chiefly in his native German.
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  • Having thus made a clean sweep of nearly the whole of the dogmatic medicine, what did Paracelsus put in its place?
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  • To know the nature of man and how to deal with it, the physician should study, not anatomy, which Paracelsus utterly rejected, but all parts of external nature.
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  • Life was a perpetual germinative process controlled by the indwelling spirit or Archeus; and diseases, according to the mystical conception of Paracelsus, were not natural but spiritual.
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  • The actual therapeutical resources of Paracelsus included a large number of metallic preparations, in the introduction of some of which he did good service, and, among vegetable preparations, the tincture of opium, still known by the name he gave it, laudanum.
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  • German historians of medicine attach great importance to the revolt of Paracelsus against the prevailing systems, and trace in his writings anticipations of many scientific truths of later times.
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  • But it should be remembered that all the chemical physicians did not call Paracelsus master.
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  • The most notorious of that school in England, Francis Anthony (1550-1623), never quotes Paracelsus, but relies upon Arnald de Villanova and Raimon Lull.
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  • From this time, however, it is always possible to trace a school of chemical practitioners, who, though condemned by the orthodox Galenists, held their ground, till in the 17th century a successor of Paracelsus arose in the celebrated J.
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  • Well acquainted with the doctrines of Galen, he rejected them as thoroughly as Paracelsus did, and borrowed from the latter some definite ideas as well as his revolutionary spirit.
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  • The archeus of Paracelsus appears again, but with still further complications - the whole body being controlled by the archeus influus, and the organ of the soul and its various parts by the archei insiti, which are subject to the central archeus.
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  • In some theoretical views, and in the use of certain remedies, the school owed something to Van Helmont and Paracelsus, but took in the main an independent position.
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  • One sentence of Locke's, in a letter to William Molyneux, sums up the practical side of Sydenham's teaching: "You cannot imagine how far a little observation carefully made by a man not tied up to the four humours [Galen], or sal, sulphur and mercury [Paracelsus], or to acid and alcali [Sylvius and Willis] which has of late prevailed, will carry a man in the curing of diseases though very stubborn and dangerous; and that with very little and common things, and almost no medicine at all."
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  • AZOTH, the name given by the alchemists to mercury, and by Paracelsus to his universal remedy.
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  • The word zinc (in the form zinken) was first used by Paracelsus, who regarded it as a bastard or semi-metal; but the word was subsequently used for both the metal and its ores.
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  • Other acids became known during the alchemistic period; and the first attempt at a generalized conception of these substances was made by Paracelsus, who supposed them to contain a principle which conferred the properties of sourness and solubility.
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  • Thus Paracelsus and Libavius both used the term to denote a fine powder, the latter speaking of an alcohol derived from antimony.
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  • At the same time Paracelsus uses the word for a volatile liquid; alcool or alcool vini occurs often in his writings, and once he adds "id est vino ardente."
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  • In 1450 Basil Valentine referred to it by the name "wismut," and characterized it as a metal; some years later Paracelsus termed it "wissmat," and, in allusion to its brittle nature, affirmed it to be a "bastard" or "half-metal"; Georgius Agricola used the form "wissmuth," latinized to "bisemutum," and also the term "plumbum cineareum."
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  • Hydrogen appears to have been recognized by Paracelsus in the 16th century; the combustibility of the gas was noticed by Turquet de Mayenne in the 17th century, whilst in 1700 N.
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  • PARACELSUS (c. 1490-1541), the famous German physician of the 16th century, was probably born near Einsiedeln, in the canton Schwyz, in 1490 or 1491 according to some, or 1493 according to others.
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  • Paracelsus's name was Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim; for the names Philippus and Aureolus which are sometimes added good authority is wanting, and the epithet Paracelsus, like some similar compounds, was probably one of his own making, and was meant to denote his superiority to Celsus.
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  • Doubtless Paracelsus learned rapidly what was put before him, but he seems at a comparatively early age to have questioned the value of what he was expected to acquire, and to have soon struck out ways for himself.
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  • Trithemius is the reputed author of some obscure tracts on the great elixir, and as there was no other chemistry going Paracelsus would have to devote himself to the reiterated operations so characteristic of the notions of that time.
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  • But the confection of the stone of the philosophers was too remote a possibility to gratify the fiery spirit of a youth like Paracelsus, eager to make what he knew, or could learn, at once available for practical medicine.
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  • And the commentary of his own and succeeding centuries upon these very extreme views is that Paracelsus was no scholar, but an ignorant vagabond.
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  • In this new school discovered by Paracelsus, and since attended with the happiest results by many others, he remained for about ten years.
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  • Paracelsus had burst upon the schools with such novel views and methods, with such irresistible criticism, that all opposition was at first crushed flat.
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  • The growing jealousy and enmity culminated in a dispute with Canon Cornelius von Lichtenfels, who, having called in Paracelsus after other physicians had given up his case, refused to pay the fee he had promised in the event of cure; and, as the judges, to their discredit, sided with the canon, Paracelsus had no alternative but to tell them his opinion of the whole case and of their notions of justice.
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  • The first book by Paracelsus was printed at Augsburg in 1529.
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  • The only drawback is that rather than omit anything which Paracelsus may have composed, he has gone to the opposite extreme and included writings with which it is pretty certain Paracelsus had nothing to do.
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  • The works were originally composed in Swiss-German, a vigorous speech which Paracelsus wielded with unmistakable power.
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  • It is this latter which has been the stumbling-block to many past critics of Paracelsus, and unless its character is remembered it will be the same to others in the future.
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  • Dissatisfied with the Aristotelianism of his time, Paracelsus turned with greater expectation to the Neoplatonism which was reviving.
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  • Paracelsus had seen how bodies were purified and intensified by chemical operations, and he thought if plants and minerals could be made to yield their active principles it would surely be better to employ these than the crude and unprepared originals.
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  • It may be claimed for Paracelsus that he embraced within the idea of chemical action something more than the alchemists did.
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  • See Marx, Zur Wiirdigung des Theophrastus von Hohenheim (Gottingen, 1842); Mook, Theophrastus Paracelsus, eine kritische Studie (Warzburg, 1876); Hartman, Life of P. T.
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  • Paracelsus (London, 1887); Schubert and Sudhoff, Paracelsus-Forschungen (Frankfurt a.M., 1887-1889); Sudhoff, Versuch einer Kritik der Echtheit der Paracelsischen Schriften (Berlin, 1894); Waite, The Hermetic and Alchemical Writings of Paracelsus (London, 1894).
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  • The nature-philosophers of the Renaissance, such as Nicolaus Cusanus, Paracelsus, Cardan and others, curiously blend scientific ideas with speculative notions derived from scholastic theology, from Neoplatonism and even from the Kabbalah.
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  • Reuchlin was no less learned than Pico; Melanchthon no less humane than Ficino; Erasmus no less witty, and far more trenchant, than Petrarch; Ulrich von Hutten no less humorous than Folengo; Paracelsus no less fantastically learned than Cardano.
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  • This blind dualism found its natural consequence in the revolt of the Renaissance thinkers, Bruno and Paracelsus, who asserted the unity of mind and matter in all existence and were the precursors of the more intelligent monism of Leibnitz and the scientific metaphysics of his successors.
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  • So far back as Basil Valentine and Paracelsus, antimonial preparations were in great vogue as medicinal agents, and came to be so much abused that a pro hibition was placed upon their employment by the Paris parlement in 1566.
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  • St Sebastian's, on the right bank, built in1505-1512and restored in 1812, contains the tomb of Paracelsus, who died here.
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  • But in his attempt to draw still closer the realms of faith and knowledge he approaches more nearly to the mysticism of Eckhart, Paracelsus and Boehme.
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  • In the 16th century a man widely known as Paracelsus proclaimed that the sylphs were small aerial beings that lived in a place called Fairyland.
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  • Paracelsus also dubbed the sylphs as the "highest of the elementals, their vehicle is the wind."
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