Panicles sentence example

panicles
  • cordata has heartshaped lobed leaves, and large panicles of small flesh-coloured flowers.
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  • Rodgersia Pinnata - A distinct plant, whose handsome panicles, 3 to 4 feet high, of rosy-pink flowers, stand out well above the emerald-green, often bronzed, redtinged leaves.
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  • orientalis, with contracted one-sided panicles.
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  • The small greenish flowers are borne on branched panicles; and the male ones are characterized by having a disgusting odour.
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  • in length; the panicles are contracted and dense, and the grains, which are enclosed in husks and.
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  • In Europe it is raised less for bread than for mechanical purposes; the panicles are made into the so-called rice-brooms and into brushes.
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  • japonica, I to 12 ft., better known as Hoteia japonica or Spiraea japonica, thrives in peaty or sandy soil; its glossy tripinnate leaves, and feathery panicles of white flowers early in summer, are very attractive.
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  • cordifolium, 4 ft., has large cordate leaves, and heads of rich orange flowers in cymose panicles in July.
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  • Flowers white in graceful panicles; flourishes in a mixture of sandy peat and loam.
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  • virginica, to I z ft., azure blue, shows flowers in drooping panicles in May and June.
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  • Other distinct kinds are P. campanulatus, 12 ft., pale rose, of bushy habit; P. humilis, 9 in., bright blue; P. speciosus, cyananthus and Jaffrayanus, 2 to 3 ft., all bright blue; P. barbatus, 3 to 4 ft., scarlet, in long terminal panicles; P. Murrayanus, 6 ft., with scarlet flowers and connate leaves; and P. Palmeri, 3 to 4 ft., with large, wide-tubed, rose-coloured flowers.
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  • P. coeruleum (Jacob's Ladder), 2 ft., has elegant pinnate leaves, and long panicles of blue rotate flowers.
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  • Sclarea, 5 to 6 ft., is a very striking plant little more than a biennial, with branched panicles of bluish flowers issuing from rosy-coloured bracts; S.
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  • Vigorous growing plants of great beauty, preferring good, deep, rather moist soil; the flowers small but very abundant, in large corymbose or spicate panicles.
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  • album, 3 to 5 ft., has whitish blossoms in dense panicles, I to 2 ft.
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  • Chaixii, 4 to 5 ft., yellow, in large pyramidal panicles; V.
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  • formosum, 6 ft., golden yellow in dense panicles, are desirable species.
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  • high, and is characterized by its bristly, much branched nodding panicles.
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  • The leaves are large, ovate-oblong in shape, and the flowers, which are arranged in panicles, have a greenish colour and a rather disagreeable odour.
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  • The flowers are in fascicles, appearing before the leaves as in the Norway maple, or in racemes or panicles appearing with, or later than, the leaves as in sycamore.
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  • The spikelets are usually many-flowered and variously arranged in racemes or panicles.
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  • a Spikelets upon distinct pedicels and arranged in panicles or racemes.
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  • long, and panicles of small flowers without petals.
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  • The members of the genus are possessed of the following characters: - Bark often papyraceous; leaves deciduous, compound, alternate and imparipinnate, with leaflets serrate or entire; flowers in racemes or panicles, white, green, yellowish or pink, having a.
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  • hydrangea paniculata ' Unique ' AGM has flowers in large conical panicles that are white, aging to purplish-pink.
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  • Flowers are borne in terminal or axillary panicles, clusters or cymes which are spherical, domed or flattened like a lacecap hydrangea.
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  • The male inflorescence terminates on the uppermost spike branched arranged in a loose panicles.
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  • panicles of white flowers appear, usually followed by slender pods.
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  • This elder has large panicles of ivory flowers tinged with pink in summer, followed by tiny black fruits.
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  • Crambe cordifolia Deciduous clumps of large leaves with tall (4 ') branched panicles of white flowers in summer.
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  • In autumn, creamy white flowers are produced in large panicles, which are often followed by round, black fruit.
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  • Tiarella cordifolia Vigorously spreading, hairy green leaves and dainty panicles or white flowers.
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  • However, peel-off mats will work best with smaller particles, more homogeneous panicles, and at lower concentrations of particles per surface area.
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  • Its fragile, cup shaped white or pale pink flowers are carried in loose panicles on slender stems from spring to early summer.
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  • They are borne in terminal or axillary panicles, clusters, corymbs or cymes, which are often spherical or domed.
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  • Its flower panicles start to appear in midsummer on stems up to 30 inches tall.
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  • Its small white flowers appear in autumn in great panicles.
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  • The leaves are larger and smoother than those of other tall-growing kinds, whilst the panicles of flowers are sometimes a foot long.
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  • It is remarkable for its large leaves, the centre leaflet sometimes exceeding a foot in length, and for its long panicles of small white flowers.
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  • The flowers appear in panicles at the ends of the shoots, and in this case every growth is bearing its feathery head of blossoms, so that they arch out in a singularly graceful manner.
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  • C. Mariscus is a vigorous native fen plant, 2 to 6 feet high, in flower crowned with dense, close chestnut-colored panicles, sometimes 3 feet in length, the leaves glaucous, rigid, and often 4 feet long.
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  • C. chrysanthus, a little plant like a small Houseleek, about 4 inches high, with white or creamy-yellow flowers in short panicles.
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  • It is an evergreen with small leaves, and bears a profusion of large panicles of small white flowers.
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  • The brownish-violet flower panicles have at first erect branches, but as the flowers open these branches curve over gracefully and resemble a Prince of Wales Feather.
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  • It is both distinct and choice, and of high fruit ornament in autumn, when the pretty panicles of coralred and black fruits are colored.
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  • Gypsophila - Plants of the Stitchwort family, the larger kinds usually very elegant, and bearing myriads of tiny white blossoms on slender spreading panicles.
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  • It grows in spreading masses, and from midsummer to September has loose graceful panicles of small white or pink flowers on slender stems.
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  • Its panicles give a charm to the finest bouquets.
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  • A. c. vivipara, with its panicles of graceful viviparous awns, resembles a miniature Pampas Grass.
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  • The flowers are small and whitish, in panicles, the berries about the size of peas, of a fine red.
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  • Meconopsis Paniculata - A beautiful Himalayan plant with much-cut foliage and panicles of bright yellow flowers, which come true from the seed ripened sparingly in fine seasons.
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  • Love Grass (Eragrostis) - Grasses, some of which are worth cultivating for their elegant feathery panicles.
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  • They are borne in long terminal panicles, sometimes 9 inches long and 6 inches through, and are fragrant.
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  • It forms a fairly large tree, not unlike a Walnut, and the panicles of small white flowers are said to be 18 inches long and very decorative.
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  • The panicles of pale blue flowers are borne on long foot-stalks from the sides of the young shoots.
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  • Plume Poppy (Bocconia) - B. cordata is a handsome and vigorous perennial of the Poppy order, growing in erect tufts 5 to over 8 feet high, with numerous flowers in very large panicles.
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  • In the flowering season they bear airy, purplish or violet-tinged panicles, rising to twice the height of the tufts.
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  • Rodgersia Aesculifolia - A strong-growing species with erect panicles of pinky-white, fragrant flowers, on stems 3 to 4 feet high.
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  • This produces panicles of creamy-white flowers.
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  • Above the handsome five-parted leaves, and rising to 4 feet or so high, the tall panicles of creamy-white flowers produce an effect not unlike that of a giant Meadow Sweet.
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  • Rodgersia Sambucifolia - With large pinnate, deep-bronze leaves, and panicles of creamy-white flowers in July.
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  • The small white blossoms, borne profusely in large terminal drooping panicles, last until the frosts.
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  • The effect of the numerous flowering shoots and the grey foliage is good, and the plant is worth a place in the choicest garden for its graceful habit and long season of beauty, and the value of its slender panicles for cutting.
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  • The pure white fragrant flowers open in June and July on pendulous panicles, 6 to 9 inches long, that hang in a row beneath the branches, one from each joint.
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  • It bears panicles of white, bell-shaped flowers in the summer, at which time it is quite a feature at Tresco.
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  • The flowers, in large terminal and axillary panicles, are white and fragrant, and at their best in September.
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  • Its glaucous foliage and elegant panicles of purple flowers are welcome along the margins of shallow ponds or streams, and it is hardy in sheltered places.
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  • A. Plantago is rather stately in habit, having tall panicles of pretty pink flowers.
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  • The flowers, deliciously fragrant and of a pale dingy lilac, are gathered in short panicles upon stems of 4 to 12 inches.
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  • A. annua is a graceful plant with tall stems 5 or 6 feet high, the foliage fine, and the flowers not showy in elegant panicles.
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  • Native to both China and Japan, Peegee hydrangea are hardy in Zones 3 to 8 and produce elongated white flower panicles that appear in late summer.
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  • Its elongated cream flower panicles burst into bloom in early summer and persist through fall in most parts of the country.
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  • The loose panicles of male flowers, and the short spikes of female flowers, arise from the axils of the upper leaves.
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