Pancreas sentence example

pancreas
  • The part of the pancreas in digestion also is better understood.
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  • This passes to the pancreas and causes increased secretion from that gland.
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  • A third enzyme, the trypsin of the pancreas, possesses the power of both pepsin and erepsin.
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  • The pancreas has two lobes or branches, a long one passing to the left and reaching the spleen, and a shorter right lobe.
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  • Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, is needed to convert glucose into the energy the body requires.
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  • This group is represented by the erepsin of the pancreas and other organs.
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  • Besides the private practice of his profession, he contributed largely to medical knowledge by the publication of several books, mainly on the anatomy of the pancreas and the abdominal viscera, by papers in the Proceedings of the Royal Society and in professional journals, and by editing for a time the Quarterly Medical Journal.
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  • I have extensive calcifications throughout the pancreas, scarring and atrophy.
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  • Too many refined carbohydrates means your pancreas has to produce excess insulin, causing your blood glucose levels to crash.
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  • The milk protein casein is similar in shape to the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas.
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  • A. The pancreas is a long secreting gland situated at the back of the abdomen, adjacent to the stomach.
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  • This in turn stimulates the liver to produce glucose and the pancreas to produce glucagon and insulin.
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  • Also, he had been in Vietnam and had a hand grenade explode near him, leaving him with shrapnel in his pancreas.
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  • Insulin lispro is closely related to human insulin lispro is closely related to human insulin which is a natural hormone made by the pancreas.
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  • The enzymes come from the pancreas and from cells lining the intestine.
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  • In type 2 diabetes the pancreas does produce insulin but cells become increasingly intolerant to the action of the insulin.
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  • By transplanting a new pancreas into a diabetic patient we also transplant the islets.
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  • Small clusters of cells within the pancreas called islets produce the insulin.
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  • Treatment - Palliative surgery may relieve the biliary obstruction in carcinoma of the head of the pancreas.
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  • Insulin is secreted by the pancreas in response to carbohydrate being eaten.
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  • Sugar stimulates the pancreas to release insulin, which in turn causes extra calcium to be excreted in the urine.
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  • They removed the pancreas from dogs which then developed diabetes.
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  • This is because the CF affects the pancreas, which makes it hard for people with CF to digest food.
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  • The problem is retrieving enough healthy islets from the already quite damaged pancreas.
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  • Several structural and gene expression changes have been shown in many tissues, including pancreas, liver, kidney, muscle and adipose tissue.
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  • Sulfonylurea drug-A medication for type 2 diabetes that causes the pancreas to produce more insulin, and may trigger hypoglycemia in some people.
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  • This condition is due to a deficiency of the enzyme trypsin and other digestive enzymes produced in the pancreas.
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  • Certain tumors in the pancreas, lungs, adrenal glands, thyroid, and intestine can produce GHRH, which in turn triggers production of an abnormal quantity of GH.
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  • When the mother's blood sugar is high, the baby's pancreas makes lots of insulin to help absorb the sugar.
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  • He and Billie are the parents of Chelsea, who donated a pancreas to save his life.
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  • Survivors of outbreaks can exhibit fibrous replacement of the exocrine pancreas.
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  • Below is a photograph of a normal pancreas exposed during surgery of the abdomen.
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  • A few patients have received islet transplants, but the islets work better and for longer when a whole pancreas is transplanted.
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  • Aprotinin is a protease inhibitor normally prepared from bovine pancreas and lung.
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  • The artificial pancreas will measure blood sugar levels on a minute-by-minute basis with a continuous glucose monitor.
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  • Long term herbs for the pancreas will include juniper berries, fenugreek seed, astragalus root and small amounts of licorice rhizome.
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  • The key, he believes, is insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas gland.
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  • These inhibit insulin secretion from the pancreas and stimulate the liver to increase glucose output, bringing a recovery.
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  • They do not increase insulin secretion from the pancreas.
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  • Spiral computed tomography of the pancreas showed a 3 x 2.5 cm mass in the region of the tail of the pancreas.
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  • The hormone insulin, secreted by the pancreas gland within the abdomen, controls this action of cell glucose uptake.
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  • Lord Lister's discoveries brought these new methods to bear with a certainty and a celerity previously undreamed of; and many visceral maladies, such as visceral ulcers, disease of the pancreas, stone of the kidney or gall-bladder, perityphlitis, ovarian dropsy, which in the earlier part of the 19th century were either fatal or crippling, are now taken promptly and safely in hand, and dealt with successfully.
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  • For example, the trypsin of the pancreas (see Nutrition) digests albuminous bodies in neutral or alcoholic solution, and if the whole of that which is secreted in the pancreas for the digestion of meat in the intestine were absorbed unchanged into the circulation, it would digest the body itself and quickly cause death.
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  • They show similar characteristics to neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas.
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  • The research has shown that whole leaf stevia has a regulatory effect on the pancreas, which can help to stabilize blood sugar levels.
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  • When insulin resistance occurs, the body's cells do not respond normally, and so, the pancreas produces more insulin to compensate for this condition.
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  • When the enzymes are destroyed, the pancreas has to work really hard to crank out digestive enzymes.
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  • You may already know that smoking causes lung cancer, but did you realize it increases your risk for cancer of the mouth, larynx, esophagus, bladder, kidney, pancreas, and stomach?
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  • In both sexes, smoking is linked to cancers of the lung, bladder, pancreas, kidney, larynx, pharynx, and esophagus.
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  • The endocrine system is made up of the thyroid gland, parathyroid gland, pituitary gland, the adrenal glands and part of the pancreas.
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  • It's widely used to cleanse and restore balance to the pancreas, lymph system, and the spleen.
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  • Any type of hard concretion (stone) in the body, but usually found in the gallbladder, pancreas, and kidneys.
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  • Cancer of the kidneys, ovaries, uterus, pancreas, bladder, rectum, and the leukemias and lymphomas are among the 12 major cancers affecting Americans of all ages.
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  • Smoking is also the leading cause of bladder cancer and has been shown to contribute to cancers of the upper respiratory tract, esophagus, larynx, kidney, pancreas, stomach, and possibly breast as well.
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  • Research has shown that cells of the brain, nerves, skeletal muscles, liver, heart, kidneys, ears, eyes, and pancreas seem to be particularly affected because of their high energy requirements.
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  • Its name derives from the fibrous scar tissue that develops in the pancreas, one of the principal organs affected by the disease.
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  • This defect causes the lungs and pancreas to secrete thick mucus, blocking passageways and preventing proper function.
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  • Mucus is a complex mixture of salts, water, sugars, and proteins that cleanses, lubricates, and protects many passageways in the body, including those in the lungs and pancreas.
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  • In the pancreas, clogged passageways prevent secretion of digestive enzymes into the intestine, causing serious impairment of digestion-especially of fat-which may lead to malnutrition.
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  • Other abdominal symptoms are caused by the inability of the pancreas to supply digestive enzymes to the intestine.
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  • While the intestines themselves also provide some digestive enzymes, the pancreas is the major source of enzymes for the digestion of all types of foods, especially fats and proteins.
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  • Scarring of the pancreas slowly destroys those pancreatic cells which produce insulin, producing type I, or insulin-dependent diabetes.
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  • Most of these people do not have the delta-F508 mutation but a different one, which presumably allows at least some of their CFTR proteins to function normally in the pancreas.
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  • Most people with CF need to take pancreatic enzymes to supplement or replace the inadequate secretions of the pancreas.
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  • Insulin is a hormone or chemical produced by cells in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach.
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  • Type 1 diabetes occurs when the beta cells of the pancreas are damaged and stop producing the hormone insulin.
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  • Children who develop type 1 diabetes must eventually take regular insulin injections to keep blood glucose levels under control and do the job of the pancreas.
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  • The pancreas typically produces enough insulin (often too much insulin); however, cells are resistant to the insulin and it may not work as effectively.
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  • Finally, damage caused by diseases of the pancreas (such as pancreatitis), endocrine disorders (e.g., endocrine tumors), and drugs or toxins can also destroy beta cell function.
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  • Transplantation of a healthy pancreas into a patient with type 1 diabetes can eliminate the need for insulin injections; however, this transplant is typically done only if a kidney transplant is performed at the same time.
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  • Although a pancreas transplant is possible, it is not clear if the potential benefits outweigh the risks of the surgery and life-long drug therapy needed to prevent organ rejection, particularly in the case of children.
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  • In this type of treatment, insulin-producing islet cells are harvested from a donor pancreas and injected into the liver of a recipient, where they attach to new blood vessels and (ideally) begin producing insulin.
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  • Glucagon-A hormone produced in the pancreas that changes glycogen, a carbohydrate stored in muscles and the liver, into glucose.
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  • Insulin-A hormone or chemical produced by the pancreas that is needed by cells of the body in order to use glucose (sugar), a major source of energy for the human body.
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  • Insulin is made by the pancreas and facilitates the movement of glucose from the blood and extracellular fluids into the cells.
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  • It is caused by autoantibodies to the islet cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, and persons must be given insulin to control blood glucose and prevent ketosis.
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  • In Menkes disease, which is usually first noticed in infancy, impaired transport of copper from the digestive tract results in low levels of copper in the blood, while copper accumulates in the kidney, pancreas, and skeletal muscle.
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  • The stomach, gallbladder, and pancreas each empty their contents into the duodenum in anticipation of digestion.
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  • Obstruction prevents the normal passage of stomach contents into the duodenum and keeps the gallbladder and pancreas from draining their secretions.
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  • Inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) may also accompany duodenal atresia.
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  • An echocardiogram and chest x rays may be done to evaluate the infant for any other possible abnormalities, including cardiac defects and abnormal development of the pancreas, which is often associated with duodenal obstruction.
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  • Glucagon is a hormone manufactured by the pancreas that triggers the release of blood glucose by the liver.
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  • The pancreas releases glucagon, insulin, and some of the enzymes which aid digestion.
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  • Normally, the pancreas makes insulin, and the insulin signals the muscles to absorb glucose.
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  • Sometimes, the pancreas isn't able to keep up and glucose builds up in the blood.
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  • The condition is often associated with the development of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (Type 1 DM) or juvenile onset diabetes.Diabetes causes elevated blood sugar levels in your blood due to deficient insulin production within your pancreas.
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  • The small intestine produces secretin, a hormone that stimulates the pancreas to produce digestive enzymes which aid in normal digestion.
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  • When your body detects glucose in the bloodstream, it signals the pancreas to produce insulin to regulate the blood glucose levels.
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  • As weight is gained, the body becomes insulin resistant placing a much greater demand on the pancreas to produce insulin.
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  • Alcohol does not only have an impact on blood pressure but also the liver and the pancreas.
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  • When you eat carbohydrates and sugars, your blood glucose rises and your pancreas releases insulin.
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  • In his book, Good Calories, Bad Calories, author Gary Taubes explains that when you limit carbohydrates, your blood glucose levels remain steady and there is no need for your pancreas to release insulin.
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  • According to Taubes, carbohydrate intake causes a spike in blood sugar, which in turn forces your pancreas to release insulin.
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  • When you eat foods containing sugars, your blood glucose levels rise and your pancreas releases insulin to help control this response.
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  • The bird's liver receives nearly all the blood from the stomach, gut, pancreas and spleen, as well as from the left liver itself, into the right hepatic lobe, by a right and left portal vein.
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  • These are sometimes erroneously spoken of as the "roots" of cancer, and in the case of cancer of the stomach they may fix it to the pancreas, the liver, the bowels or the spine.
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  • When the pancreas is excised in an animal, or when it is destroyed in man by disease, grape-sugar appears in the urine.
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  • The transplantation of a piece of living pancreas into the tissues of an animal, thus rendered artificially diabetic, is said to restore it to health.
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  • Nor must we forget the unfolding of a new chapter of disease, in the nosology of the pancreas.
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  • There is much uncertainty as to the influence of atropine on the secretions of the stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas and kidneys, and it is not possible to make any definite statement, save that in all probability the activities of the nerves innervating the glandcells in these organs are reduced, though they are certainly not arrested, as in the other cases.
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  • The surgery may involve measures to improve drainage of the pancreatic duct, partial or complete removal of the pancreas.
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  • Another vaccine targets a hormone called gastrin, which is normally made by the pancreas.
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  • Endocrinologist-A physician who specializes in treating patients who have diseases of the thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal glands, and/or the pancreas.
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  • Tumors of the pancreas, known as gastrinomas, are also common in MEN 1.
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  • Children with MEN1 rarely develop tumors of the pancreas until they reach adulthood.
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  • The whole of the secretion here is poured into the blood and not at all on to a mucous surface, and herein the thyroid gland differs largely from such glands as the pancreas or peptic and intestinal glands.
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  • But it seems now probable that all glands which have what may be termed an external secretion like the pancreas, stomach, intestine, skin and kidneys have also an internal secretion, so that while they are pouring out one secretion from the ducts into the intestine or external air, they are also pouring into the lymphatics, and thus into the blood, an internal secretion.
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  • In true diabetes, which probably originates in the central nervous system, or in disease of the pancreas, as well as in the glycosuria common in gouty patients, sugar in every form should be entirely forbidden, and starchy food restricted to within narrow limits.
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  • The secretion of trypsin by the pancreas may therefore be looked upon as the formation of a toxin.
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  • We do not know at present if any corresponding anti-toxin or antitrypsin, as we may term it, is returned into the lymphatics or blood from the gland, but the pancreas, which in addition to secreting trypsin secretes a diastatic ferment forming sugar from starch, pours this into the intestine and secretes at the same time a glycolytic ferment which breaks up sugar, and this latter passes into the blood by way of the lymphatics.
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  • It is probable that the pancreas in its turn also secretes something which activates a ferment in the muscles.
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