Pallial sentence example

pallial
  • f, Gill lamellae (not ctenidia, but organs of the pallial complex, having two kidneys, in some cases two branchiae, and two auricles.
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  • In these there are neither branchia nor osphradium, and the pallial chamber which retains its large open ing serves as a lung.
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  • Upon the surface of the visceral dome, and extending special pallial growths, comparable with those of Pleurophyllidia).
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  • Shell with pointed spire; a short pallial siphon.
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  • Epipodial fila L ments present; one or two pallial tentacles.
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  • Cephalic shield continuous with neck; twelve to fourteen stomachal plates; a posterior pallial filament passing through a notch in shell.
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  • with sinistral spiral; pallial cavity dorsal.
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  • Adult without shell; a sub-epithelial pseudoconch formed by connective tissue; pallial cavity ventral.
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  • Shell not coiled, symmetrical; pallial cavity ventral.
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  • Median pallial nerve of dorsal each side, just below the lobe of mantle.
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  • The pallial line, which is the line of attachment of the mantle parallel to the edge of the shell, is not indented by a sinus at the posterior end.
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  • pac, Pallial cavity.
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  • The pallial cavity, with its organs, is by this torsion moved up the right side of the larva to the dorsal surface, and thus the left organs become right and vice versa.
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  • In some cases each pleural ganglion is connected with the opposite branch of the visceral commissure by anastomosis with the pallial nerve, a condition which is called dialyneury; or there may be a direct connective from the pleural ganglion to the visceral ganglion of the opposite side, which is called zygoneury.
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  • They are termed pallial gills.
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  • (From Gegenbaur, pi, Pallial nerve.
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  • Acmaea, without pallial branchiae, British.
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  • Scurria, with pallial branchiae in a circle beneath the mantle.
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  • No ctenidia but pallial branchiae in a circle between mantle and foot.
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  • Patella, pallial branchiae forming a complete circle, no epipodial tentacles, British.
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  • Neither ctenidia nor pallial branchiae.
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  • Without shell and operculum, but with pallial cavity and ctenidium.
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  • Pectinibranchia.-In this order there is no longer any trace of bilateral symmetry in the circulatory, respiratory and excretory organs, the topographically right half of the pallial complex having completely disappeared, except the right kidney, which is FIG.
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  • In the latter a pallial siphon, a welldeveloped proboscis and an unpaired oesophageal gland are always present, in the former they are usually absent.
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  • Pallial cavity transformed into a lung; pedal centres concentrated; a deep pedal groove.
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  • Mantle with two posterior appendages; ctenidium large and capable of protrusion from pallial cavity.
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  • Shell turriculated and siphonated, thick, each whorl with varices; foot broad and truncated anteriorly; pallial siphon well developed; proboscis present.
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  • Foot with anterior transverse groove; a posterior pallial tentacle; generally burrowing.
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  • Where the modification is carried to its extreme degree, not only the shell but the pallial cavity, ctenidium and visceral hump disappear, and the body acquires a simple elongated form and a secondary external symmetry, as in Pterotrachaea and in Doris, Eolis, and other Nudibranchia.
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  • The pallial cavity is always well developed, and contains the ctenidium, at least in part; ctenidium, except in Lophocercidae, of folded type.
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  • Posteriorly the mantle forms a large pallial lobe FIG.
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  • under the pallial aperture.
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  • Foot without parapodia; no pallial cavity, but always a single ctenidium situated on the right side between mantle and foot.
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  • In both Oncidiidae and Pecten the pallial eyes have probably been developed by the modification of tentacles, such as coexist in an unmodified form with the eyes.
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  • All have an osphradium, except the Auriculidae, which are terrestrial, and it is situated outside the pallial cavity in those forms in which water is not admitted into the lung.
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  • Visceral mass and shell conical; tentacles atrophied; head expanded; genital apertures contiguous; marine animals, with an aquatic pallial cavity containing secondary branchial laminae.
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  • Visceral mass and shell conical; head flattened; pallial cavity aquatic, but without a branchia; genital apertures separated.
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  • Visceral mass and shell sinistral; inferior pallial lobe very prominent, and transformed into a branchia.
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  • Shell conical, not spiral; inferior pallial lobe transformed into a branchia.
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  • h, Anterior (pallial) adductor muscle of the shells.
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  • t, Pallial tentacles.
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  • u, The thickened muscular pallial margin which adheres to the shell and forms the pallial line of the left side.
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  • When the edges of the mantle ventral to the inhalant orifice are united, an anterior aperture is left for the protrusion of the foot, and thus there are three pallial apertures altogether, and species in this condition are called " Tripora."
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  • i [i]) is called the umbonal area; the great anterior muscular surface h is that of the anterior adductor muscle, the posterior similar surface i is that of the posterior adductor muscle; the long line of attachment u is the simple " pallial muscle," - a thickened ridge which is seen to run parallel to the margin of the mantle-skirt in this Lamellibranch.
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  • Such a subdivision of the pallial chamber, and direction of the currents set up within it do not exist in a number of Lamellibranchs which have the gill-lamellae comparatively free (Mytilus, Arca, Trigonia, &c.), and it is in these forms that FIG.17.
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  • - Pallial Eye of Spondylus.
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  • In the Arcidae the pallial eyes are compound or faceted somewhat like those of Arthropods.
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  • In Yoldia and Nucula proxima the ova are set free in the water and the test-larvae are free-swimming, but in Nucula delphinodonta the female forms a thin-walled egg-case of mucus attached to the posterior end of the shell and in communication with the pallial chamber; in this case the eggs develop and the test-larva is enclosed.
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  • Arcidae.-Borders of the mantle bear compound pallial eyes.
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  • Cyprinidae.-Mantle open in front, with two pallial sutures; external gill-plates smaller than the internal.
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  • Cyrenidae.-Two siphons, more or less united, with papillose orifices; pallial line Inj 6 r 6.
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  • Cycladidae.-One siphon or two free siphons with simple orifices; pallial line simple; hermaphrodite, embryos incubated in external gill-plate; freshwater, Cyclas; British.
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  • pallial suture and no siphons; freshwater; larva a glochidium.
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  • Mutelidae.-Differs from Unionidae in having two pallial sutures; freshwater.
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  • Mantle not extensively closed; two pallial sutures and two well developed siphons.
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  • Dimyarian; pallial line with a deep sinus.
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  • Two pallial sutures, siphons somewhat elongated and partially or wholly united.
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  • Veneridae.-Foot well developed; pallial sinus shallow or absent.
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  • Petricolidae.-Boring forms with a reduced foot; shell elongated, with deep pallial sinus.
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  • Glaucomyidae.-Siphons very long and united; foot small; shell thin, with deep pallial sinus; fresh or brackish water.
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  • Two pallial sutures.
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  • geniculated; pallial line without sinus; two adductors, Cardium; British.
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  • Asymmetrical, inequivalve, fixed, with extensive pallial sutures; no siphons.
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  • Shell thick, without pallial sinus.
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  • Shell gaping, with a pallial sinus.
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  • - Shell sub-trigonal, inequivalve; pallial sinus shallow; siphons short, united, completely retractile; foot large, pointed, often byssiferous.
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  • - Mantle extensively closed; a fourth pallial aperture behind the foot; siphons long and united; shell elongated, a spoon-shaped projection for the ligament on each valve.
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  • Shell with a pallial sinus; dorsal region protected by accessory plates.
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  • - Shell very inequivalve, solid, with a pallial sinus; siphons short; foot small.
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  • - A fourth pallial aperture present; pedal aperture small; siphons very short and separate; shell fixed by the right valve, irregular.
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  • The shell extends to the edge of the mantle-fold, and the cavity between the mantle and the side of the body is the pallial chamber.
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  • Thus in the primitive mollusc the mantle-cavity contains a symmetrical group of structures at the posterior end of the body, and this group of structures is called the pallial complex.
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  • The ramifications of the arteries convey the blood to all parts of the body, and it finally reaches the venous sinuses, the chief of which are the pedal, the pallial and the median-ventral.
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  • The pallial cords are united to one another posteriorly, dorsal to the rectum.
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  • the pallial eyes of Pecten and other Lamellibranchs, and of Chitons.
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  • pa.n, Pallial nerve.
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  • g, Gill, in the pallial cavity.
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  • The ventral surface forms a flat creeping "foot," and between mantle and foot is a pallial groove in which there is on each side a series of gills.
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  • - Pallial eye and aesthetes of Acanthopleura spiniger (Moseley).
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  • These papillae form pallial sense-organs, I containing nerve-end bulbs, covered by a dome of cuticle, and innervated from the pallial nervecords.
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  • The series of gills may extend the whole length of the body in the pallial groove, or may be confined to the posterior end.
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  • Cl, Cloacal or pallial chamber of Neomeniae and Chaetoderma.
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  • A simple gonaduct on each side arises from the gonad near its posterior end and passes first forwards, then backwards, and lastly outwards to the external opening in the pallial groove, anterior to the renal aperture.
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  • The venous blood is conducted from the tissues to a large sinus on either side above the pallial groove, and from this sinus passes to the gills by an afferent vessel in each gill on the internal or pedal margin of the axis.
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  • The oxygenated blood is carried from each gill by an efferent vessel on the external or pallial side of the axis to another longitudinal vessel which leads to the auricle on each side.
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  • The eggs may be laid separately invested by a chitinous envelope, or as in Ischnochiton magdalenensis they may form strings containing nearly 200,000 eggs, or the ova may be retained in the pallial groove and undergo development there, as in Chiton polii and Hemiarthrum setulosum.
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  • The body chamber (reduced pallial chamber, conis worm-like and cylindritaining the concealed_pair of ctenidia) cal, the posterior half a to the right.
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  • Heart and blood-vessels are entirely absent; the blood is contained in sinuses which have no distinct walls or endothelial lining, and the principal of which are the perianal, the pedal, the visceral and the pallial.
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  • In the larva a nautiloid shell is developed which is coiled exogastrically, that is, dorsally, and the pallial cavity is posterior or ventral (fig.
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  • No ctenidium, pallial cavity transformed into a lung; aperture of shell circular; terrestrial.
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  • Shell with numerous tuberculated whorls; aperture canaliculated anteriorly; short pallial siphon.
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  • In the most primitive condition the genital duct is single throughout its length and has a single external aperture; it is therefore said to be monaulic. The hermaphrodite aperture is on the right side near the opening of the pallial cavity, and a ciliated groove conducts the spermatozoa to the penis, which is situated more anteriorly.
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  • Shell ovoid, with short spire, wide aperture and folded columella; inferior pallial lobe thick; visceral commissure still twisted.
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  • Shell thin, dextral, with prominent spire and oval aperture; no inferior pallial lobe.
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  • Visceral mass and shell sinistrally coiled; shell thin, with narrow aperture; no inferior pallial lobe.
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  • places it has sunk into the con Passing from the middle line outwards they are - (i.) the median pallial nerve to the middle of the dorsal mantle; (ii.) numerous small nerves - the circum-oesophageal commissures - which pass round the oesophagus to the chief arm-nerve or supra-oesophageal ganglion; (iii.) the under arm-nerve to the lophophore and its muscles; (iv.) the lateral pallial nerve to the sides of the dorsal mantle.
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  • aa, ae, af, ag, ah, ak, al, am, an, ap, aq, ar, as, at, au, av, aw, ax, ay, az, bb, In Anodonta these pallial tentacles are confined to a small area surrounding the inferior siphonal notch (fig.
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  • In siphonate forms the pallial muscle is not simple, but is indented posteriorly by a sinus formed by the muscles which retract the siphons.
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  • There are two pairs of longitudinal cords, a pedal pair situated ventrally and united beneath the intestine by numerous commissures, and a pallial pair situated laterally and continuous with one another above the rectum (fig.
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  • Pallial and pedal on each side are closer together than in the other groups, and posteriorly they unite into a supra-rectal cord provided with a median ganglionic enlargement (fig.
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