Palermo sentence example

palermo
  • CORLEONE (Saracen, Korliun), a town of Sicily, in the province of Palermo, 42 m.
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  • of Palermo by rail and 21 m.
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  • On the 12th of May the dictatorship of Garibaldi was proclaimed at Salemi, on the 15th of May the Neapolitan troops were routed at Calatafimi, on the 25th of May Palermo was taken, and on the 6th of June 20,000 Neapolitan regulars, supported by nine frigates and protected by two forts, were compelled to capitulate.
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  • Once established at Palermo, Garibaldi organized an army to liberate Naples and march upon Rome, a plan opposed by the emissaries of Cavour, who desired the immediate annexation of Sicily to the Italian kingdom.
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  • In 1880 he went to Milan for the inauguration of the Mentana monument, and in 1882 visited Naples and Palermo, but was prevented by illness from being present at the 600th anniversary of the Sicilian Vespers.
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  • There is daily steam communication (often interrupted in bad weather) with Civitavecchia from Golfo degli Aranci (the mail route), and weekly steamers run from Cagliari to Naples, Genoa (via the east coast of the island), Palermo and Tunis, and from Porto Torres to Genoa (calling at Bastia in Corsica and Leghorn) and Leghorn direct.
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  • An Angevin fleet and army, under Robert's son Charles, was defeated at Palermo by Giovanni da Chiaramonte in 1325, and in 1326 and 1327 there were further Angevin raids on the island, until the descent into Italy of the emperor Louis the Bavarian distracted their attention.
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  • Mira, Bibliografia Siciliana (Palermo, 1875); of the contemporary authorities N.
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  • He took part in the agitation for the First Crusade, and started in the duke's company for Palestine, but died on the way, at Palermo (February 1097).
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  • ALESSANDRO CAGLIOSTRO, Count (1743-1795), Italian alchemist and impostor, was born at Palermo on the 8th of June 1 743.
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  • Two days later, the national government occupied, with a strong force of infantry and artillery, the parade ground at Palermo used by the Buenos Aires volunteers for drill purposes.
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  • Palermo >>
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  • Sicily is the chief centre of cultivationthe area occupied by lemon and orange orchards in the province of Palermo alone having increased from ff525 acres in 1854 to 54,340 in 1874.
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  • Extraction is extensively carried on in the provinces of Messina and Palermo.
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  • The most important Italian ports are (in order): Genoa, Naples, Palermo, Leghorn, Messina, Venice, Catania..
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  • There are 21 universitiesBologna, Cagliari, Camerino, Catania, Ferrara,Genoa,Macerata, Messina, Modena, Naples, Padua, Palermo, Parma, Pavia, Perugia, Pisa, Rome, Sassari, Siena, Turin, Urbino, of which Camerino, Ferrara, Perugia and Urbino are not state institutions; university courses are also given at Aquila, Ban and Catanzaro.
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  • Italy has courts of cassation at Rome, Naples, Palermo, Ttirin, Florence, 20 appeal court districts, I62 tribunal districts and 1535 mandamenti, each with its own magistracy (pretura).
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  • Palermo, Sardinian division Cagliari.
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  • The revolt of Masaniello in Naples (1647), followed by rebellions at Palermo and Messina, which placed Sicily for a while in the hands of Louis XIV.
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  • At Palermo the Sicilians struggled hard to establish a republic in place of the odious government of an alien dynasty.
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  • The Bourbon courl sailed away to Palermo, where it remained for eight years under the protection afforded by the British fleet and a British army of occupation.
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  • During eight years (1806-1814) the chief places of the island had been garrisoned by British troops; and the commander of the force which upheld the tottering rule of Ferdinand at Palermo naturally had great authority.
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  • The British government, which awarded a large annual subsidy to the king and queen at Palermo, claimed to have some control over the administration.
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  • Ferdinand at once re-established autocracy in Naples; though the struggle in Sicily did not end until May, when Palermo, after a splendid resistance, capitulated.
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  • On the 11th Garibaldi landed at Marsala, without opposition, defeated the Neapolitan forces at Calatafimi on the 15th, and on the 27th entered Palermo in triumph, where he proclaimed himself, in King Victor Emmanuels name, dictator of Sicily.
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  • an agitation, which in September culminated in an attack on Palermo by 3000 armed insurgents, and in similar outbreaks elsewhere.
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  • The revolt was put down owing to the energy of the mayor of Palermo, Marquis A.
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  • In the 12th century three languages were certainly spoken in London; yet London could not call itself the "city of threefold speech," as Palermo did.
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  • The three tongues of Palermo are Greek, Arabic and Latin.
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  • of the Norman kings at Palermo and Monreale and Cefalu and Messina are in style simply Saracenic; they were most likely the work of Saracen builders; they were beyond doubt built after Saracenic models.
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  • Some of the most important deposits of sulphur in the world are worked in Sicily, chiefly in the provinces of Caltanisetta and Girgenti, as at Racalmuto and Cattolica; and to a less extent in the provinces of Catania, Palermo (Lercara) and Trapani (Gibellina).
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  • of Palermo by rail.
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  • From it came the three archaic metopes now in the museum at Palermo, which are of great importance in the history of the development of art, showing Greek sculpture in its infancy.
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  • It is famous for its fine metopes now in the museum at Palermo, belonging to the beginning of the 5th century B.C.
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  • The greater part of the defeated fleet was afterwards burned in the harbour of Palermo, where it had taken refuge, and the French thus secured the undisputed command of the Mediterranean.
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  • The music was begun in the following year, and completed at Palermo on the 13th of January 1882.
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  • Among other important archaeological finds of the past decade are those of several new fragments of the " Palermo Stone " and similar annalistic monuments of the V.
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  • BAGHERIA, a town of the province of Palermo, Sicily, 8 m.
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  • of Palermo.
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  • It contains many villas of the aristocracy of Palermo, the majority of which were erected in the 18th century, but have now fallen into decay.
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  • It was seen in the 10th century, by the Arab traveller Ibn-Haukal, in the neighbourhood of Palermo, where it throve luxuriantly in the pools of the Papireto, a stream to which it lent its name.
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  • The presentation was accompanied by a kind of mathematical performance, in which Leonardo solved several hard problems proposed to him by John of Palermo, an imperial notary, whose name is met with in several documents dated between 1221 and 1240.
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  • - To find a square number which remains a square after the addition and subtraction of 5, put to our mathematician in presence of the emperor by John of Palermo, who, perhaps, was quite enough Leonardo's friend to set him such problems only as he had himself asked for.
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  • The Flos of Leonardo turns on the second question set by John of Palermo, which required the solution of the cubic equation x 3 -{-2x'-}-lox = 20.
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  • On the outbreak of the Sicilian revolution at Palermo (January 12, 1848) he hastened to the island and took an active part in guiding the insurrection.
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  • After the fall of Palermo, Crispi was appointed minister of the interior and of finance in the Sicilian provisional government, but was shortly afterwards obliged to resign on account of the struggle between Garibaldi and the emissaries of Cavour with regard to the question of immediate annexation.
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  • Crispi resigned his seat in parliament, but was re-elected by an overwhelming majority in April 1898 by his Palermo constituents.
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  • and C. Cavallari, Topografia archeologica di Siracusa (Palermo, 1883), or the more handy German translation by B.
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  • Mauceri, Siracusa (Palermo, 1904); J.
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  • Moagada, Palermo, 1883; Canzoniere, ed.
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  • The basilica is still the predominent type, but the influence of the domed churches of Constantinople and the mosques of Palermo is also apparent.
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  • In 1062 their ships returned from Palermo laden with spoil.
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  • In Naples, in Palermo, in all parts of Italy, Switzerland and the south of France, we still find the names of Pisan families who quitted their beloved home at that time.
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  • JUAN FRANCISCO MASDEU (1744-1817), Spanish historian, was born at Palermo on the 4th of October 1744.
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  • Naples had in 1832 Il)Progresso of Carlo Troya, helped by Tommaseo and Centofanti, and Palermo owned the Giornale di statistica (1834), suppressed eight years later.
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  • CEFALU (anc. Cephaloedium), a seaport and episcopal see of the province of Palermo, Sicily, 42 m.
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  • The interior was restored in 1 559, though the pointed arches of the nave, borne by ancient granite columns, are still visible: and the only mosaics preserved are those of the apse and the last bay of the choir: they are remarkably fine specimens of the art of the period (1148) and, though restored in 1859-1862, have suffered much less than those at Palermo and Monreale from the process.
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  • made him a cardinal and archbishop of Palermo.
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  • De Ruyter made his way to Palermo, which was in the hands of the Spaniards.
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  • In 1192 and 1193 he commanded personally and with success against the Apulian barons, but his death at Palermo (20th of February 1194) a few days after that of Roger, his son and joint-king, made Henry's path clear.
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  • Sibilla and the loyal Margarito prepared to defend Palermo, but the citizens admitted the emperor on the 20th of November 1194.
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  • and afterwards archbishop of Palermo.
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  • Until the king came of age in 1171 the government was controlled first by the chancellor Stephen of Perche, cousin of Marguerite (1166-1168), and then by Walter Ophamil, archbishop of Palermo, and Matthew d'Ajello, the vice-chancellor.
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  • Lacking in military enterprise, secluded and pleasure-loving, he seldom emerged from his palace life at Palermo.
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  • TERMINI IMERESE (anc. Thermae Himeraeae), a seaport town of Sicily, in the province of Palermo, 23 m.
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  • Romano, Antichita Termitane (Palermo, 1838); Mauceri, Acropoli Pelasgica nei dintorni di Termini Imerese (Palermo, 1896).
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  • After Palermo had been taken in January 1072 Robert Guiscard, as suzerain, invested Roger as count of Sicily, but retained Palermo, half of Messina and the north-east portion (the Val Demone).
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  • In return for his aid against Bohemund and his rebels the duke surrendered to his uncle in 1085 his share in the castles of Calabria, and in 10 9 1 the half of Palermo.
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  • While he gave full toleration to the Greek Churches, he created new Latin bishoprics at Syracuse and Girgenti and elsewhere, nominating the bishops personally, while he turned the archbishopric of Palermo into a Catholic see.
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  • of Palermo direct (51 1/2 m.
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  • MONREALE (contraction of monte-reale, so called from a palace built here by Roger I.), a town of Sicily, in the province of Palermo, 5 m.
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  • Gravina, Il Duomo di Monreale (Palermo, 1859-1865).
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  • In 1762, at the express desire of the pope, he accepted the bishopric of Sant' Agata dei Goti, a small town in the province of Benevent; though he had previously refused the archbishopric of Palermo.
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  • of Trapani, is now reckoned as a part of the group. They belonged to the Pallavicini family of Genoa until 1874, when they were bought by Signor Florio of Palermo.
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  • It is obvious, however, that William was far inferior in character and energy to his father, and was attached to the semi-Moslem life of his gorgeous palaces of Palermo.
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  • The policy of the minister led to a general conspiracy, and in November 1160 he was murdered in Palermo by Matthew Bonello, leader of the Sicilian nobles.
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  • The Norman adventurers in possession of Palermo and Naples perpetually tended to look for their aggrandizement to the Byzantine Empire.
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  • But they still continued to desire the restoration of the Angevin dynasty in Sicily and to assist the designs of France on Aragon by preaching a crusade against the masters of Barcelona and Palermo.
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  • The removal of the court to Palermo and the sack of the city by the emperor Henry VI.
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  • SERGIUS I., pope from 687 to 701, came of an Antiochene family which had settled at Palermo.
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  • The duke now, in response to an invitation from King Ferdinand IV., visited Palermo where, on the 25th of November 1809 he married Princess Maria Amelia, the king's daughter.
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  • He commanded a volunteer company under Garibaldi in 1859 and 1860, being wounded slightly at Calatafimi and severely at Palermo in the latter year.
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  • John the Baptist were due to Domenico Gagini of Bissone on the Lake of Lugano, who later transferred his activities to Naples and Palermo, and other Lombard masters.
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  • The north coast is generally steep and cliff-bound, and abundantly provided with good harbours, of which that of Palermo is the finest.
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  • Triassic rocks form a discontinuous band along the northern coast, and are especially well developed in the neighbourhood of Palermo.
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  • At Palermo (where continuous observations have been made since 1791) the range of temperature between the mean of 1 A general account of the geology of the island will be found in L.
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  • The archiepiscopal sees (the suffragan sees, if any, being placed after each in brackets) are Catania (Acireale), Messina (Lipari, Nicosia, Patti), Monreale (Caltanissetta, Girgenti), Palermo (Cefalu, Mazara, Trapani), Syracuse (Caltagirone, Noto, Piazza Armerina).
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  • at Palermo, reaches only 21 in.
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  • west of Palermo, running parallel to the northern coast almost as far as Messina, and of which many peaks reach nearly 6000 ft.
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  • The most important Sicilian mineral is undoubtedly sulphur, which is mined principally in the provinces of Caltanissetta and Girgenti, and in minor quantities in those of Palermo and Catania.
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  • There are several glass works at Palermo, a cotton dyeing works at Messina, and a large metal foundry at Palermo.
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  • There are dry docks both at Palermo and Messina.
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  • They formed a separate system (the Rete Sicula) until in 1906, like the rest of the railways of Italy, they passed into the hands of the state, with the exception of the line round Mount Etna and the line from Palermo to Corleone.
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  • From Messina lines run along the northern coast to Palermo, and along the east coast via Catania to Syracuse: the latter line is prolonged along the south of the island (sometimes approaching, sometimes leaving the coast) via Canicatti as far as Aragona Caldare, Girgenti and Porto Empedocle.
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  • Caterina Xirbi (with a branch to Canicatti) to Roccapalumba (with a branch to Aragona Caldare) and thence northwards to Termini, on the line between Messina and Palermo.
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  • This is the direct route from Catania to Palermo.
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  • From Palermo a line runs southwards to Corleone and S.
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  • The only part of the coast of the island which has no railways is that portion of the south coast between Porto Empedocle and Castelvetrano (Sciacca lies about midway between these two points), where a road already exists, and a railway is projected, and the precipitous north coast between Palermo and Trapani.
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  • A steamer leaves Naples every night for Palermo, and vice versa, the journey (208 m.) being done in I I hours, while the journey by rail (438 m.), including the crossing of the Straits of Messina takes 191 hours; and the weekly steamer from Naples to Messina (216 m.) takes 12 hours, while the journey by rail and ferry boat (292 m.) takes 14 hours.
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  • Palermo, Messina and Catania are the most important harbours, the former being one of the two headquarters (the other, and the main one, is Genoa) of the Navigazione Generale Italiana, and a port of call for the steamers from Italy to New York.
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  • Emigrants to the number of 37,638 left Palermo direct for New York in 1906, and no less than 46,770 in 1905, while others embarked at Messina and Naples.
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  • To undo this mischief Augustus planted Roman colonies at Palermo, Syracuse, Tauromenium, Thermae, Tyndaris and Catana.
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  • Their advance in civilization is shown by their position under the Normans, and above all by their admirable style of architecture '(see' Palermo).
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  • But Palermo was not taken until 1071, and then only by the help of Duke Robert, who kept the prize to himself.
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  • At the taking of Palermo the Greek bishop was restored; but his successors were Latins, and Latin prelates were placed in the bishoprics which Count Roger founded.
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  • He inherited all Sicily, save half Palermo - the other half had been given up - and part of Calabria.
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  • The rest of Palermo was soon granted; the Semitic capital became the abiding head of Sicily.
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  • In 1130 Roger was crowned at Palermo, by authority of the antipope Anacletus, taking the strange title of " king of Sicily and Italy."
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  • By a general outbreak on the death of William the Good, the Saracens, especially those of Palermo, were driven to take shelter in the mountains, where they sank into a wild people, sometimes holding points of the island against all rulers, sometimes taking military service under them.
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  • Frederick - presently to be the renowned emperor Frederick II., Emperor Frederick " Fridericus stupor mundi et immutator mirabilis " - II was crowned at Palermo in 1198; but the child, deprived of both parents, was held to be under the protection of his lord Pope Innocent III.
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  • In 1258, on a false rumour of the death of Conradin, Manfred was himself crowned king of Palermo.
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  • Naples, not Palermo, was the head of the new power; Sicily was again a province.
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  • A gross case of insult offered by a Frenchman to a Sicilian woman led to the massacre at Palermo, and the like scenes followed elsewhere.
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  • In Palermo, once city of threefold speech, a Greek, a Saracen, a Norman who spoke his own tongue must have died with the strangers.
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  • Meanwhile Peter of Aragon was watching and pre the citizens of the great cities, a king would be acceptable; Peter was chosen with little opposition in a parliament at Palermo, and a struggle of twenty-one years began, of which Charles and Peter saw only the first stage.
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  • Beyond the XIIth Dynasty estimates must again be vague rhe spacing of the years on the Palermo stone has given rise to some calculations for the early dynasties.
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  • A few names of the kings of Lower Egypt are preserved in the first line of the Palermo stone, but no annals are attached to them.
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  • In January 1814 he had 14,000 peasants at work on the castle of Argiro Castro, and about 1500 erecting a fort at Porto Palermo, nearly opposite Corfu."
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  • He was crowned in Palermo on the 25th of December 1130.
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  • The king died at Palermo on the 26th of February 1154, and was succeeded by his fourth son William.
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  • At Palermo Roger drew round him distinguished men of various races, such as the famous Arab geographer Idrisi and the historian Nilus Doxopatrius.
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  • The Capella Palatina, at Palermo, the most wonderful of Roger's churches, with Norman doors, Saracenic arches, Byzantine dome, and roof adorned with Arabic scripts, is perhaps the most striking product of the brilliant and mixed civilization over which the grandson of the Norman Trancred ruled.
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  • The legend is that she was a native of Sicily (probably of Catania, though Palermo also claims her), of noble birth and great beauty.
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  • of Palermo (202 m.
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  • di Marzo (Palermo, 1882).
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  • His court at Palermo had been one of the most brilliant in Europe, and attracted learned men from all over the then known world; his somewhat pagan philosophy was afterwards regarded as marking the beginnings of modern rationalism.
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  • As a result of this victory Charles was soon master of almost the whole kingdom, and he entered Naples, which now became the capital instead of Palermo.
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  • He had induced Peter to make good his somewhat shadowy claims to the crown of Sicily, but while preparations were being made for the expedition, the popular rising known as the Sicilian Vespers, which resulted in the massacre of nearly all the French in the island, broke out at Palermo on Easter Day 1282.
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  • Peter reached Palermo in September, and by the following month had captured Messina, the last French stronghold.
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  • In 1647, during the viceroyalty of the marquis de Los Leres in Sicily, bread riots in Palermo became a veritable revolution, and the people, led by the goldsmith Giovanni d'Alessio, drove the viceroy from the city; but the nobles, fearing for their privileges, took the viceroy's part and turned the people against d'Alessio, who was murdered, and Los Leres returned.
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  • The king, after a somewhat farcical occupation of Rome, which had been evacuated by the French, hurried back to Naples as soon as the French attacked his troops, and although the lazzaroni (the lowest class of the people) were devoted to the dynasty and ready to defend it, he fled with the court to Palermo in a panic on board Nelson's ships.
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  • Meanwhile the court at Palermo sent Cardinal Fabrizio Ruffo, a wealthy and influential prelate, to Calabria, to organize a counter-revolution.
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  • An English squadron approached Naples and occupied the island of Procida, but after a few engagements with the Republican fleet commanded by Caracciolo, an ex-officer in the Bourbon navy, it was recalled to Palermo, as the Franco-Spanish fleet was expected.
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  • On the 8th of July, King Ferdinand arrived from Palermo, and the state trials, conducted in the most arbitrary fashion, resulted in wholesale butchery; hundreds of persons were executed, including some of the best men in the veng g country, such as the philosopher Mario Pagano, the scientist Cirillo, Manthone, the minister of war under the republic, Massa, the defender of Castel dell' Uovo, and Ettore Caraffa, the defender of Pescara, who had been captured by treachery, while thousands of others were immured in horrible dungeons or exiled.
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  • Ferdinand and Maria Carolina fled to Palermo in January 1805; in February 1806 Joseph Bonaparte entered Naples as king.
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  • On the 12th of January 1848 a revolution under the leadership of Ruggiero Settimo broke out at Palermo to the cry of " independence or the 1812 constitution," and by the end of February the whole island, with the exception of Messina, i was in the hands of the revolutionists.
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  • In April he reached Palermo while the fleet appeared in the bay; tumults having broken out within the city, the government surrendered on terms which granted amnesty for all except Settimo and forty-two others.
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  • In 1856 his life was unsuccessfully attempted by a soldier, and the same year Baron Bentivegna organized a revolt near Palermo, which was quickly suppressed.
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  • The authorities at Palermo, learning of a projected rising, attacked the convent of La Gangia, the headquarters of the rebels, and killed most of the inmates; but in the meanwhile Garibaldi, whose hesitation had been overcome, embarked on the 5th of May 1860, at Quarto, near Genoa, with l000 picked followers on board two steamers, and sailed for Sicily.
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  • He continued his march towards Palermo, where the bulk of the 30,000 Bourbon troops were concentrated, gathering numerous followers on the way.
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  • Monreale road, and entering Palermo from Misilmeri received an enthusiastic welcome.
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  • In July further reinforcements of volunteers under Cosenz and Medici, assisted by Cavour, arrived at Palermo with a good supply of arms furnished by subscription in northern Italy.
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  • Pagano, Istoria del regno di Napoli (Naples and Palermo, 1832, &c.); J.
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  • [[Rudini, Antonio Starabba, Marquis Di]] (1839-1908), Italian statesman, was born at Palermo on the 6th of April 1839.
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  • In 18 J9 he joined the revolutionary committee which paved the way for Garibaldi's triumphs in the following year; then after spending a short time at Turin as attache to the Italian foreign office he was elected mayor of Palermo.
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  • The prestige thus acquired led to his appointment as prefect of Palermo, and while occupying that position he put down brigandage throughout the province; in 1868 he was prefect of Naples.
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  • He became professor of experimental physics, first at Palermo and then at Rome, and was appointed to a similar situation at Turin in 1748.
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  • The principal church contains some sculpttires by the Gagini of Palermo.
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  • Palermo e.
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  • regno di Sicilia (1 575- 1 57 6, 4to, Palermo, 1 57 6 - 1 577); A.
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  • In the neighbourhood of Palermo, Muscat and Malvoisie wines of very fair quality are made.
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  • Caietanus, Vitae sanctorum Siculorum (Palermo, 1657); G.
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  • A church dedicated Divo Josaphat in Palermo is probably not the only one of its kind.
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  • of Palermo direct and 841 m.
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  • of Palermo, and in the townships of Geraci, Castelbuono, and other places in the district of Cefalu, 50 to 70 m.
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  • CARINI, a town in the province of Palermo, Sicily, 13 m.
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  • de Kerbedz, "Sophie de Kowalevski," Benidiconti del circolo mathematico di Palermo (1891); the obituary notice by G.
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  • di Palermo, 1869, and C. Riedel, Ber., 1883, 16, p. 1609.
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  • Driven from Naples in 1798, the Neapolitan royal family fled to Palermo, and the years from 1800 to 1802 were spent by Marie Amelie with her mother at the Austrian court.
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  • In 1806 they were again in flight before the armies of Massena, and it was during the second residence of her father's court at Palermo that she met the exiled Louis Philippe, then duke of Orleans, whom she married in November 1809.
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  • The famous Accademia Pontaniana, founded by Antonio Becardella (surnamed Panormita owing to his origin from Palermo) and J.
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  • Various translations of parts of it exist, the earliest being a Latin rendering of the section relating to the Arabian conquests in Sicily, by Dobelius, Arabic professor at Palermo, in 1610 (preserved in Muratori's Rerum Italicarum Scriptores, vol.
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  • Ferdinand with his usual precipitation fled to Palermo (23rd of January 1806), followed soon after by his wife and son, and on the 14th of February the French again entered Naples.
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  • Bianco, La Sicilia durante l'occupazione Inglese (Palermo, 1902), which contains many new documents of importance; Freiherr A.
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  • He became professor in the faculty of medicine in Paris in 1863, and in the same year professor of chemistry at Palermo, where he delivered his lectures in Italian.
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  • PALERMO (Greek, Ilavopyos; Latin, Panhormus, Panormus), a city of Sicily, capital of a province of the same name, in the kingdom of Italy, and the see of an archbishop. Pop. (1906), town 264,036, commune 323,747.
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  • of the island, on a small bay looking E., the coast forming the chord of a semicircle of mountains which hem in the campagna of Palermo, called the Conca d'Oro.
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  • Palermo has been commonly thought to be an original Phoenician settlement of unknown date (though its true Phoenician name is unknown), but Holm (Archivio storio siciliano, 1880, iv.
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  • During the Norman reigns Palermo was the main centre of Sicilian history, especially during the disturbances in the reign of William the Bad (1154-1166).
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  • entered Palermo in 1194, and it was the chief scene of his cruelties.
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  • After his death Palermo was for a moment a commonwealth.
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  • In the next year, when the greater part of Sicily revolted on behalf of Conradin, Palermo was one of the few towns which was held for Charles; but the famous Vespers of 1282 put an end to the Angevin dominion.
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  • From that time Palermo shared in the many changes of the Sicilian kingdom.
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  • The last kings crowned at Palermo were Victor Amadeus of Savoy, in 1713, and Charles III.
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  • The loss of Naples by the Bourbons in 1798, and again in 1806, made Palermo once more the seat of a separate Sicilian kingdom.
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  • The city rose against Bourbon rule in 1820 and in 1848.1860 came the final deliverance, at the hands of Garibaldi; but with it came also the yet fuller loss of the position of Palermo as the capital of a kingdom of Sicily.
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  • There are not many early remains in Palermo.
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  • It is the only church in Palermo with a bell-tower, itself crowned with a cupola.
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  • Most of these buildings are witnesses in different ways to the peculiar position of Palermo in the 12th century as the "city of the threefold tongue," Greek, Arabic, and Latin.
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  • For in Palermo under the Norman kings Christians of both rites, Mahommedans and Jews were all allowed to flourish after their several fashions.
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  • The greatest example of this is the neighbouring metropolitan church of Monreale; more closely connected with Palermo is the church of San Spirito, outside the city on the south side, the scene of the Vespers.
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  • Domestic and civil buildings from the 12th century to the 15th abound in Palermo, and they present several types of genuine national art, quite unlike anything in Italy.
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  • The museum of Palermo, the richest in the island, has been transferred from the university to the former monastery of the Filippini.
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  • Almost the only classical antiquities from Palermo itself are Latin inscriptions of the imperial period, and two large coloured mosaics with figures found in the Piazza Vittoria in front of the royal palace in 1869: in 1906 excavations in the same square led to the discovery of a large private house, apparently of the 2nd or 3rd century A.D., to which these mosaics no doubt belonged.
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  • Of greater local interest are the medieval and Renaissance sculptures from Palermo itself, a large picture gallery, and an extensive collection of Sicilian majolica, &c.
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  • In the immediate neighbourhood of the city are the oldest church in or near Palermo, the Lepers' church, founded by the first conqueror or deliverer, Count Roger, and the bridge over the forsaken stream of the Oreto, built in King Roger's day by the admiral George.
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  • On the other side, towards Pellegrino, is the new harbour of Palermo,.
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  • The steamship traffic at Palermo in 1906 amounted to 2035 vessels, with a total tonnage of 2,403,851 tons.
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  • Palermo is one of the two headquarters (the other being Genoa) of the Navigazione Generale Italiana, the chief Italian steamship company.
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  • Finding most of its valuable rates hypothecated to the meeting of old debts, the municipality of Palermo has embarked upon municipal ownership and trading in various directions.
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  • The plain of Palermo is very fertile, and well watered by springs and streams, of the latter of which the Oreto is the chief.
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  • It also contains many villas of the wealthy inhabitants of Palermo, among the most beautiful of which is La Favorita, at the foot of Monte Pellegrino on the west, belonging to the Crown.
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  • Besides works dealing with Sicily generally, the established local work on Palermo is Descrizione di Palermo antico, by Salvatore Morso (2nd ed., Palermo, 1827).
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  • Modern research and criticism have been applied in Die mittelrilterliche Kunst in Palermo, by Anton Springer (Bonn, 1869); Historische Topographie von Panormus, by Julius Schubring (Lubeck, 1870); Studii di stories palermitana, by Adolf Holm (Palermo, 1880).
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  • See also "The Normans in Palermo," in the third series of Historical Essays, by E.
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  • The description of Palermo in the second volume of Gselfel's guide-book, Unter-Italien and Sicilien (Leipzig), leaves nothing to wish for.
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  • A few fragments of undoubtedly Roman pottery and some Roman coins have been found there, but the cisterns and the ruins of houses are probably of later date (P. Calcara, Descrizione dell' Isola di Linosa, Palermo, 1851, 29).
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  • Invading Sicily with Roger, the brothers captured Messina (T06r) and Palermo (1072).
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  • On the 1st of January 1801 Giuseppe Piazzi (1746-1826) discovered Ceres, at Palermo, while Giuseppe engaged in collecting materials for his star-catalogues.
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  • His son, Ernest Augustus, the 3rd earl (1797-1861), wrote Extracts from Journals kept during the Revolutions at Rome and Palermo.
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  • At Tamatave (east coast) the mean annual temperature is given as 76.5°, while at the capital it is about 66°; the temperature of Antananarivo resembles that of Naples or Palermo.'
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  • A residence of some years at Rome, devoted to painting and the study of the antiquities and galleries of the Eternal City, was followed by a visit to Naples and Sicily, and by the publication, at Palermo, of his first work, a poem of no merit.
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  • In June 1833 he left Palermo for Marseilles in an orange boat, which was becalmed in the Strait of Bonifacio, and here he wrote the verses, "Lead, kindly Light," which later became popular as a hymn.
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  • Born at Jesi near Ancona on the 26th of December 1194, he was baptized by the name of Frederick Roger, chosen German king at Frankfort in 1196, and after his father's death crowned king of Sicily at Palermo on the 17th of May 1198.
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  • He retired to southern Italy, and after a short illness died at Fiorentino on the 13th of December 1250, after having been loosed from the ban by the archbishop of Palermo.
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  • of Palermo direct and 83 m.
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  • Condemned to death, but reprieved through the intervention of the British minister, he remained a prisoner at Naples and at Favignana until 1860, when he joined Garibaldi at Palermo.
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  • Columba, in Archeologia di Leontinoi (Palermo, 1891), reprinted from Archivio Storico Siciliano, xi.; P. Orsi in Romische Mitteilungen (1900), 61 seq.
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  • He spent eight years in Egypt, being appointed consul in 1845; in 1848 he was made consul at Palermo, and in 1851 he accompanied the marquis, who had been appointed ambassador at Constantinople, as first secretary.
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  • Some 35 miles from Palermo in Sicily, 90 minutes by fast hydrofoil, lies the island of Ustica.
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  • Palermo became a city of a hundred mosques; Rome remained sacrosanct.
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  • Cavour, however, obliged the expedition to sail for Palermo.
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  • On the 29th of June 1862 he landed at Palermo and gathered an army under the banner "Roma o morte."
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  • The mean annual rainfall for Sassari for1871-1900was 24.45 in., the average number of days on which rain fell being 109, of which 37 were in winter and only 8 in summer - the latter equal with Palermo, but lower than any other station in Italy.
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  • In vain the pope tried to bribe him with promises and dignities; he was determined to stand by his subjects, and was crowned king by the nobles at Palermo in 1296.
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  • At Palermo Queen Maria Carolina continued to make vehement but futile efforts for the overthrow of King Joseph.
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  • La Farina was accordingly sent to Palermo to urge the immediate annexation of Sicily to Piedmont.
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  • di Palermo, vol.
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  • The chief towns in each of these provinces, with their communal populations in 1901, are as follow: Caltanissetta (43,023), Castrogiovanni (26,081), Piazza Armerina (24,119), Terranova (22,019), San Cataldo (18,090); Catania (146,504), Caltagirone (44,527), Acireale (35,203), Giarre (26,194), Patera) (22,857), Leonforte (21,236), Bronte (20,166), Vizzini (18,013), Agira (17,634), Nicosia (15,811),(15,811), Grammichele (15,017); Girgenti (24,872), Canicatti (24,687), Sciacca 4 (24,6 5), Licata (22,993), Favara (20,403); Messina (147,106), Racalmuto (16,028), Palma (14,384), Barcellona (24,133), Milazzo (16,214), Mistretta (14,041); Palermo (305,716), Partinico (23,668), Monreale (23,556), Termini Imerese (20,633), Bagheria (18,329), Corleone (16,350), Cefalu (14,518); Syracuse (31,807),(31,807), Modica (49,951), Ragusa (32,453), Vittoria (32,219), Comiso (25,837), Noto (22,284), Lentini (17,100), Avola (16,301), Scicli (16,220), Palazzolo Acreide (15,106) Trapani (61,448), Marsala (57,824), Alcamo (51,798), Monte S.
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  • These were unable to withstand the Greek settlers, and the Phoenicians of Sicily withdrew step by step to form three considerable towns in the north-west corner bf the island near to the Elymi, on whose alliance they relied, and at the shortest distance by sea from Carthage - Motya, Solous or Soluntum, and Panormus (see Palermo).
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  • At Palermo the capitulation secured to the Saracens the full enjoyment of their own laws; Girgenti was long mainly Saracen; in Val di Noto the Saracens kept towns and castles of their own.
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  • Since that year, however, there has been a steady flow of discoveries in prehistoric and early historic cemeteries, and, partly in consequence of this, monuments already known, such as the annals of the Palermo stone, have been made articulate for the beginnings of history in Egypt.
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  • Bianco,, La Sicilia durante l'occupazione Inglese (Palermo, 1902); and for: 40,000 Bourbon troops between Salerno and Avellino fell back panic-stricken, and on the 7th Garibaldi entered Naples alone, although the city was still full of soldiers, and was received with delirious enthusiasm.
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  • At Tamatave (east coast) the mean annual temperature is given as 76.5°, while at the capital it is about 66°; the temperature of Antananarivo resembles that of Naples or Palermo.'
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  • Palermo 27 What name is given to the pupa of a butterfly?
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  • Birkenstock Palermo Sandal: This very attractive, caramel-colored sandal is available for $76.67.
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  • The two become close friends and seem to have much more in common, at least personality wise, then Port and Olivia Palermo.
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  • Olivia Palermo - Whitney's coworker at DVF and stereotypical New York socialite.
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