Palaeobotany sentence example

palaeobotany
  • In recent years the science of vegetable palaeontology has been given the distinct name of Palaeobotany, so that " palaeontology e' among biologists mainly refers to zoology; but historically the two cannot be disconnected.
    1
    0
  • The results arrived at may be read as a sequel to the article on PALAEOBOTANY.
    0
    0
  • See also, for botany, the article Palaeobotany.
    0
    0
  • In the meantime the foundations of palaeobotany were being laid (1804) by Ernst Friedrich von Schlotheim (1764-1832), (1811) by Kaspar Maria Sternberg (1761-1838) and (1838) by Theophile Brongniart (1801-1876).
    0
    0
  • Palaeobotany >>
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • This was followed by several papers chiefly bearing upon the relation between extinct and existing forms - a line of research which culminated in the publication of the Histoire des vegetaux fossiles, which has earned for him the title of "father of palaeobotany."
    0
    0
  • His activity was by no means confined to palaeobotany, but extended into all branches of botany, more particularly anatomy and phanerogamic taxonomy.
    0
    0
  • These plants, a fuller description of which must be sought in the article Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic, underwent secondary increase in thickness and attained the size of large trees; the aerial stem was more or less branched dichotomously.
    0
    0
  • In the absence of direct evidence from Palaeobotany, and bearing in mind the modifications associated with adaptation to an aquatic life in other plants, the recognition of any more definite affinity for these heterosporous ferns than that indicated above appears to be inadvisable.
    0
    0
  • PALAEOBOTANY.
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • A recently discovered fossil group, the Pteridospermae (see PALAEOBOTANY) have characters intermediate between the Ptendophyta and the more primitive seedplants.
    0
    0
  • The subject of palaeontological botany (see Palaeobotany) has been advanced by the researches of both botanists and geologists.
    0
    0
  • Palaeontology, the study of the fossils found in the various strata of which the earth is composed (see Palaeobotany).
    0
    0
  • (See Palaeobotany.) The subjoined list included the larger standard works on algae, together with a number of papers to which reference is made in this article.
    0
    0
  • Another instance of the production of seeds in an extinct plant which further reduces the importance of this character as a distinguishing feature is afforded by the Palaeozoic genus Lepidocarpon described by Scott in 1901; this lycopodiaceous type possessed an integumented megaspore, to which the designation seed may be legitimately applied (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The division known as the Cycadophyta is represented by a few living genera of limited geographical range and by a large number of extinct types which in the Mesozoic era (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic) played a conspicuous part in the vegetation of the world.
    0
    0
  • The Cordaitales (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic) are represented by extinct forms only, which occupied a prominent position in the Palaeozoic period; these plants exhibit certain features in common with the living Araucarias, and others which invite a comparison with the maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba), the solitary survivor of another class of Gymnosperms, the Ginkgoales (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).
    0
    0
  • Pteridospermae (see Palaeobotany, Palaeozoic).
    0
    0
  • Bennettitales (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).
    0
    0
  • Cordaitales (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • It is interesting that no monstrous cycadean cone has been described in which ovuliferous and staminate appendages are borne on the same axis: in the Bennettitales (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic) flowers were produced bearing on the same axis both androecium and gynoecium.
    0
    0
  • Ginkgo is of special interest on account of its isolated position among existing plants, its restricted geographical distribution, and its great antiquity (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).
    0
    0
  • This is not the place to discuss in detail the past history of Ginkgo (see Palaeobotany: Mesozoic).
    0
    0
  • (See Palaeobotany.) The relation which exists between the two alternating stages or generations, which together constitute the complete life-cycle of all plants higher than the Thallophyta, is perhaps the most natural characteristic of the Pteridophyta.
    0
    0
  • The most important and best known of the extinct Equisetales are, however, the Calamites (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic).
    0
    0
    Advertisement
  • The best known of these ancient Ferns belong to the Botryopterideae; the characters of this group point to its having been the starting-point of several series of existing Ferns (see Palaeobotany: Palaeozoic).
    0
    0