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Owes sentence examples

  • It owes not a little to the attractions of its site.

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  • I'm the one who owes you an apology, not the other way around.

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  • Your mate owes me a debt.

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  • She does feel she owes me.

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  • Wynn owes it to her.

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  • You don't know what you owe... what he owes?

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  • It owes its origin to its mineral waters, which have long been known to the inhabitants of Caucasia.

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  • Callander owes much of its prosperity to the fact that it is the centre from which the Trossachs is usually visited, the route being that described in Scott's Lady of the Lake.

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  • As Graetz says: "To Jeremiah and Mar Samuel Judaism owes the possibility of existence in a foreign country."

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  • Chesterfield (Cestrefeld) owes its present name to the Saxons.

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  • Bartolommeo learned from the younger artist the rules of perspective, in which he was so skilled, while Raphael owes to the frate the improvement in his colouring and handling of drapery, which was noticeable in the works he produced after their meeting.

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  • Lowestoft (Lothu Wistoft, Lowistoft, Loistoft) owes its origin to its fisheries.

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  • The largest granite quarries are near Barre, Washington county, a city which owes its importance to the quarries.

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  • He vigorously restored Roman Catholicism in his diocese, made no difficulty about submitting to the papal jurisdiction which he had forsworn, and in 1555 began the persecution to which he owes his fame.

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  • It owes its name either to its early paper and grist mills (Milton being abbreviated from Milltown) or to Milton Abbey, Dorset, whence members of the Tucker family came, it is supposed, to Milton about 1662.

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  • He was described to Pepys on his acquiring office as "one of a broken sort of people that have not much to lose and therefore will venture all," and as "a beggar having £1Too or £1200 a year, but owes above £10,000."

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  • modern Roman Catholic learning, which owes a great debt to Aristotle through the schoolmen, includes Natural Theology in philosophy, not in theology properly so called.

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  • This custom, which owes its origin to Henry II., meant a loss of revenue to the lords, whose victory in this matter, however, was a step backwards.

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  • "Bony amber" owes its cloudy opacity to minute bubbles in the interior of the resin.

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  • A sandy beach or desert owes its character to the mobility of its constituent sand-grains, which are readily drifted and piled up in the form of dunes.

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  • It is to the marriage of this young knight that the house of Howard owes the tragedy of its greatness.

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  • Eger is an old town, and owes its importance to the bishopric created' by King Stephen in ioio, which was one of the richest in the whole of Hungary.

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  • As a specific for gout colchicum was early employed by the Arabs; and the preparation known as eau medicinale, much resorted to in the 18th century for the cure of gout, owes its therapeutic virtues to colchicum; but general attention was first directed by Sir Everard Home to the use of the drug in gout.

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  • It owes its name (Jity-su, Semiryechie, i.e.

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  • Ford owes his position among English dramatists to the intensity of his passion, in particular scenes and passages where the character, the author and the reader are alike lost in the situation and in the sentiment evoked by it; and this gift is a supreme dramatic gift.

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  • Azurite occurs with malachite in the upper portions of deposits of copper ore, and owes its origin to the alteration of the sulphide or of native copper by water containing carbon dioxide and oxygen.

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  • - To its mineral wealth Nevada owes its existence as a state; but for the richness of its veins of gold and silver ore it would be still little more than an arid waste.

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  • Astarabad owes its origin to Yazid ibn Mohallab, who occupied the province early in the 8th century for Suleiman, the seventh of the Omayyad caliphs (715-717), and was destroyed by Timur (Tamerlane) in 1384.

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  • The town dates from 1780 and owes its rise to the granite quarries at Craignair and elsewhere in the vicinity, from which were derived the supplies used in the construction of the Thames Embankment, the docks at Odessa and Liverpool and other works.

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  • Neoplatonism owes its form to Plato, but its underlying motive is the widespread feeling of self-despair and the longing for divine illumination characteristic of the age in which it appears.

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  • Of all the Asiatic ranges the Himalayan is, geologically, the best known; and the evidence which it affords shows clearly that the folds to which it owes its elevation were produced by an overthrust from the north.

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  • Except that the use of Arabic inscriptions is one of its principal methods of decoration, it owes little to Arabia and much to Byzantium.

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  • Gioja's more important treatise owes much to Genovesi's lectures.

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  • Of the six edicts four were of minor importance, and, I flattered myself, even of his friendship and esteem, I never had that of his correspondence," but there is no doubt that Adam Smith met Turgot in Paris, and it is generally admitted that The Wealth of Nations owes a good deal to Turgot.

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  • The chief town of a district of the same name, it owes its existence to the discovery of gold in the Kaap valley, and dates from 1886.

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  • After Francis I., Fontainebleau owes most to Henry IV., to whom are due the Cour d'Henri IV., the Cour des Princes, with the adjoining Galerie de Diane, and Galerie des Cerfs, used as a library.

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  • But the modern conception of society or the state owes more to biology than philosophy, and actual research has destroyed more frequently than it has justified the assumptions of the older philosophical school.

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  • Like Malthus, Ricardo owes his reputation very largely to the theory associated with his name, though it has long ceased to be stated precisely in the terms he employed.

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  • Parker's consecration was, however, only made legally valid by the plentitude of the royal supremacy; for the Edwardine Ordinal, which was used, had been repealed by Mary and not re-enacted by the parliament of 1559 Parker owes his fame to circumstances rather than to personal qualifications.

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  • To Boer cultivation the valley of the Marico river owes its fertility.

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  • It is usually affirmed that the state of Venice owes its origin to the barbarian invasions of north Italy; that it was founded by refugees from the mainland cities who sought asylum from the Huns in the impregnable shallows and mud banks of the lagoons; and that the year 452, the year when Attila sacked Aquileia, may be taken as the birth-year of Venice.

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  • Paphos owes its ancient fame to the cult of the "Paphian goddess" llacNaFavavaa, or 7) IIacaia, in inscriptions, or simply n 8ea), a nature-worship of the same type as the cults of Phoenician Astarte, maintained by a college of orgiastic ministers, practising sensual excess and self-mutilation.'

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  • The town of Kuttenberg owes its origin to the silver mines, the existence of which can be traced back to the first part of the 13th century.

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  • The city owes its origin to a series of commercial experiments.

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  • The pointed arch owes nothing to the Arabs; it is already used in England in early Norman work.

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  • THE PRIMITIVE METHODIST CHURCH, a community of nonconformists, which owes its origin to the fact that Methodism as founded by the Wesleys tended, after the first generation, to depart from the enthusiasm that had marked its inception and to settle down to the task of self-organization.

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  • One of the men to whom Primitive Methodism owes its existence was Hugh Bourne (1772-1852), a millwright of Stoke-upon-Trent.

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  • This undertaking owes much to the liberality of Sir William P. Hartley, whose name the college, which is a school of the Victoria University, now bears.

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  • This sulphur again was not ordinary sulphur, but some principle derived from it, which constituted the philosopher's stone or elixir - white for silver and yellow or 1 " Some traditionary knowledge might be secreted in the temples and monasteries of Egypt; much useful experience might have been acquired in the practice of arts and manufactures, but the science of chemistry owes its origin and improvement to the industry of the Saracens.

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  • It owes its pre- Lysicrates.

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  • The Jesuit system of education, set forth in the Ratio studiorum, owes nothing to him.

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  • It is also prepared by digesting precipitated mercuric sulphide with an alkaline sulphide fox some hours; it is said that Chinese vermilion owes its superiority to being made in this way.

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  • It owes its importance to the iron mines in the mountain Malmberget 4 z m.

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  • Atlanta owes its origin to the development of pioneer railroads of Georgia.

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  • Organic Chemistry While inorganic chemistry was primarily developed through the study of minerals - a connexion still shown by the French appellation chimie minerale - organic chemistry owes its origin to the investigation of substances occurring in the vegetable and animal organisms. The quest of the alchemists for the philosopher's stone, and the almost general adherence of the iatrochemists to the study of the medicinal characters and preparation of metallic compounds, stultified in some measure the investigation of vegetable and animal products.

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  • Following the example of his ancestors Philip cared for education and the general welfare of his land, and the Protestant university of Marburg, founded in 1527, owes to him its origin.

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  • A stone building of the 13th century connects the Schlossberg with the Afraberg, which owes its name to the old convent of St Afra.

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  • The state owes to this ruler the opening up of new railways across the great desert, which was formerly passable only by camels, and the tapping of the valuable coal deposits that occur in the territory.

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  • Hagenau dates from the beginning of the 12th century, and owes its origin to the erection of a hunting lodge by the dukes of Swabia.

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  • arose the second of the great poets of the old Ottoman school, Nef'i of Erzerum, who owes his preeminence to the brilliance of his 1p.sidas.

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  • In the political writings of Reshid and `Akif Pashas we have the first clear note of change; but the man to whom more than to any other the new departure owes its success is Shinasi Effendi, who employed it (1859) for poetry as well as for prose.

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  • According to the usual tradition, which there seems no sufficient reason to reject, the Escorial owes its existence to a vow made by Philip II.

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  • Pop. (1891), 29,296; (igoi), 33373 It owes its popularity to its chalybeate spring and its beautiful situation in a hilly wooded district.

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  • The town owes its rise to the discovery of the medicinal springs by Dudley, Lord North, in 1606.

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  • The Pena de los Enamorados, or "Lovers' Peak," is a conspicuous crag which owes its name to the romantic legend adapted by Robert Southey (1774-1843) in his Laila and Manuel.

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  • Its natural form is the aphorism, and to this and to its epigrammatic brilliance, vigour, and uncompromising revolt against all conventions in science and conduct it owes its persuasiveness.

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  • The principal occupation is the manufacture of the salt obtained from the brine springs or wyches, to which the town probably owes both its name and its origin.

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  • Omars great scientific fame, however, is nearly eclipsed by his still greater poetical renown, which he owes to his rubais or quatrains, a collection of about 500 epigrams. The peculiar form of the rubaiviz.

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  • The place owes its origin to the decision of the government in 1814 to form a naval depot on Milford Haven.

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  • The Sienese school of painting owes its origin to the influence of Byzantine art; but it improved that art, impressed it with a special stamp and was for long independent of all other influences.

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  • Wallis Budge, to whom the present writer owes his information, was shown the stream in which their last christ had been baptized.

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  • In the words of Westermarck: " The facts appear to prove that the feeling of shame, far from being the cause of man's covering his body, is, on the contrary, a result of this custom; and that the covering, if not used as a protection from the climate, owes its origin, at least in a great many cases, to the desire of men and women to make themselves mutually attractive."

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  • Aurillac owes its origin to an abbey founded in the 9th century by St Geraud, and the abbey-church, rebuilt in the 17th century in the Gothic style, is the chief building in the town.

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  • BRAHMA SAMAJ, a religious association in India which owes its origin to (Raja) Ram Mohan Roy, who began teaching and writing in Calcutta soon after 1800.

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  • He gave a printingpress to the Samaj, and established a monthly journal called the Tattwabodhini Patrikd, to which the Bengali language now owes much for its strength and elegance.

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  • Regent's Park, mainly in the borough of Marylebone, owes its preservation to the intention of George III.

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  • The cornmercial product (which is known in Germany as "Kalkstickstof") contains from 14 to 22% of nitrogen, which is liberated as ammonia when the substance is treated with water; to this decomposition it owes its agricultural value.

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  • Saarbrucken owes its name to a bridge which existed in Roman times.

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  • 13) owes its effect entirely to surface colour and lustre.

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  • While the Martello tower owes its reputation and its widespread adoption in Great Britain to a single incident of modern warfare, the round masonry structure entered by a door raised high above the base is to be found in many lands, and is one of the earliest types of masonry fortification.

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  • The older name of Hameln was Hameloa or Hamelowe, and the town owes its origin to an abbey.

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  • It owes its prosperity to its manufacture of linen, woolen goods and paper, especially cigarette paper.

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  • A Spiritus Nucis Juglandis is given as an antispasmodic. It doubtless owes its properties to the alcohol which it contains.

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  • Second in importance is the carbonate, calamine (q.v.) or zinc spar, which at one time was the principal ore; it almost invariably contains the carbonates of cadmium, iron, manganese, magnesium and calcium, and may be contaminated with clay, oxides of iron, galena and calcite; "white calamine" owes its colour to much clay; "red calamine" to admixed iron and manganese oxides.

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  • Airdrie was a market town in 1695, but owes its prosperity to the great coal and iron beds in its vicinity.

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  • It owes much of its importance to the fact that it contains the tomb of Imam Reza's sister Fatmeh, who died there A.D.

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  • in the history of art Vienna owes to its musicians, among whom are counted Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert.

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  • The Campo Santo, lying to the north of the cathedral, owes its origin to Archbishop Ubaldo 1 In Strabo's time it was only 2 m.

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  • Munich owes its architectural magnificence largely to Louis I.

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  • It owes its development to its geographical situation in the north-east angle of the Adriatic Sea at the end of the deeply indented gulf, and to its harbour, which was more accessible to large vessels than that of Venice.

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  • Duff gave much thought and time to the university of Calcutta, which owes its examination system and the prominence given to physical sciences to his influence.

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  • His marriage was one of those of which " magnanimity owes no account to prudence," and it did not turn out prosperously.

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  • Mill, who had been greatly impressed by Comte's philosophic ideas; Mill admits that his own System of Logic owes many valuable J.

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  • west of Tlemcen, owes its foundation to the attempts of the Beni-Marin rulers of Morocco to extend their sovereignty.

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  • The Bethmann Museum owes its celebrity principally to Dannecker's " Ariadne," but it also possesses the original plaster model of Thorwaldsen's " Entrance of Alexander the Great into Babylon."

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  • Japan owes a profound debt of gratitudc to the kangakusha of that time.

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  • It is to him that Japan owes the possession of some of the most stately and most original works in her art, sublime in conception, line and color, and deeply instinct with the religious spirit.

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  • It is to Moronobu that Japan owes the popularization of artistic wood-engravings, for nothing before his series of xylographic albums approached his best work in strength and beauty, and nothing since has surpassed it.

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  • To this combination of modellers in European style and metal-workers of such force as Suzuki and Okazaki, Japan owes various memorial bronzes and effigies which are gradually finding a place in her parks, her museums, her shrines or her private houses.

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  • Japan, on the contrary, owes her ceramic distinction in the main to her faience.

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  • Francis owes the greater measure of his glory to the artists and men of letters who vied in celebrating his praises.

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  • Prussia owes the foundation of its literary periodicals to G.

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  • Spain Spain owes her intellectual emancipation to the monk Benito Feyjoo, who in 1726 produced a volume of dissertations somewhat after the fashion of the Spectator, but on graver subjects, entitled Teatro critico, which was continued down to 1739.

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  • and is famous for its fine scenery, which has gained for it the title of the "Austrian Switzerland"; but it owes its name (literally "salt-exchequer property") and its economic importance to its valuable salt mines.

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  • This slight work of a Macedonian freedman, destitute of national significance and representative in its morality only of the spirit of cosmopolitan individualism, owes its vogue to its easy Latinity and popular subject-matter.

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  • The permanent gain to the service due to his exertions was far more than formal, for it is to him that the general staff owes its tradition of thorough and patient individual effort.

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  • Johannesburg owes its existence to the discovery of gold in the Witwatersrand reefs.

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  • By the Jews 2 the introduction of Targums is ascribed to Ezra; but this tradition, which probably owes its origin to the Talmudic explanation of Neh.

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  • The special characteristic of its theology is in the first part where it owes most to the teaching of Augustine, who in his striving after self-knowledge analysed the mystery of his own triune personality and illustrated it with psychological images, " I exist and I am conscious that I exist, and I love the existence and the consciousness; and all this independently of any external influence."

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  • It owes its value to the decomposition described above, by means of which a powerful antiseptic action is safely and continuously exerted.

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  • 1250, this dynasty owes its rise to power.

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  • Even so she owes her natural frontiers in the Scandinavian peninsula to Charles X.

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  • This subject owes its importance in modern chemistry to the fact that the vapour density, when hydrogen is taken as the standard, gives perfectly definite information as to the molecular condition of the compound, since twice the vapour density equals the molecular weight of the compound.

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  • Constance owes its fame, not to the Roman station that existed here, but to the fact that it was a bishop's see from the 6th century (when it was transferred hither from Vindonissa, near Brugg, in the Aargau) till its suppression in 1821, after having been secularized in 1803 and having lost, in 1814-1815, its Swiss portions.

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  • Green mud differs to a greater extent from the blue mud, and owes its characteristic nature and colour to the presence of glauconite, which is formed inside the cases of foraminifera, the spines of echini and the spicules of sponges in a manner not yet understood.

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  • The third process owes its inception to G.

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  • The Luxembourg palace in Paris owes its name to the fact that it: was built on a site belonging to the duke of LuxemburgPiney.

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  • "the bridge") owes its name to the magnificent Roman bridge which spans the Tagus on the north-west.

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  • Weimar owes its importance not to any industrial development, which the grand-dukes discourage within the limits of their Residenz, but to its intimate association with the classical period of German literature, which earned for it the title of the "poets' city" and "the German Athens."

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  • Osaka owes its origin to Rennio Shonin, the eighth head of the Shin-Shu sect, who in1495-1496built, on the site now occupied by the castle, a temple which afterwards became the principal residence of his successors.

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  • Frankfort-on-the-Oder owes its origin and name to a settlement of Franconian merchants here, in the 13th century, on land conquered by the margrave of Brandenburg from the Wends.

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  • Dawlish owes its prosperity to the visitors attracted, in spring and early summer, by the warm climate and excellent bathing.

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  • Though a place of considerable antiquity - being mentioned in 1086 as the meeting-place of insurgents against Knud, the saint - Randers has few remains of old buildings and bears the stamp of a compact, modern manufacturing town that owes its importance to its distilleries, manufactories of gloves, railway carriages, &c. St Marten's church dates from the 14th century, but was frequently altered and enlarged down to 1870.

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  • Hildesheim owes its rise and prosperity to the fact that in 822 it was made the seat of the bishopric which Charlemagne had founded at Elze a few years before.

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  • It owes most of its interest to the peace signed here in July 1807, the preliminaries of which were settled by the emperors Alexander and Napoleon on a raft moored in the Memel.

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  • Barry owes its seaport to the determination of a number of colliery owners to secure an alternative port to Cardiff, with an independent railway to it from the coalfields.

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  • The syrinx or pan pipes owes its double name to ancient Greek tradition, ascribing its invention to Pan in connection with a well-known legend of the Arcadian water-nymph "Syrinx."

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  • Kerbela owes its existence to the fact that IJosain, a son of `Ali, the fourth caliph, was slain here by the soldiers of Yazid, the rival aspirant to the caliphate, on the 10th of October A.D.

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  • This temple owes its preservation to its use as a church of St Barbara, a local martyr, also claimed by the Egyptian Heliopolis.

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  • of the province and owes its importance to the existence there of a diamond mine.

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  • But it is to its position as one of the great ports of call of the East that Colombo owes its great and increasing importance.

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  • Saxony owes its unusual wealth in fruit partly to the care of the elector Augustus I., who is said never to have stirred abroad without fruit seeds for distribution among the peasants and farmers.

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  • The modern village, which was called Monte Fortino until 1870, owes its present name to an unwarrantable identification of the site with the ancient Volscian Artena, destroyed in 404 B.C. Another Artena, which belonged to the district of Caere, and lay between it and Veii, was destroyed in the period of the kings,and its site is quite unknown.

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  • The fortress-abbey to which Mont St Michel owes its fame stands upon the more precipitous side of the islet towards the north and west, the sloping portion towards the east and south being occupied by houses.

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  • This beautiful picture of the Christian life as a realized ideal, and of Christians as "the soul" of the world, owes its inclusion to a double error: first, to the accidental attachment at the end of another fragment (§ II), which opens with the writer's claim to stand forth as a teaclier as being "a disciple of apostles"; and next, to mistaken exegesis of this phrase as implying personal relations with apostles, rather than knowledge of their teaching, written or oral.

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  • England, in particular, owes much to it, for there Florence Nightingale acquired the practical knowledge which enabled her afterwards to turn her remarkable gift of organization to such brilliant account.

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  • The current Siamese characters are derived from the more monumental Cambodian alphabet, which again owes its origin to the alphabet of the inscriptions, an offshoot of the character found on the stone monuments of southern India in the 6th and 8th centuries.

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  • The cultivation of sugar and coffee owes its development mainly to the Dutch; and to them also is due the introduction of tea.

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  • It is similar in size to the brown bear, but its fur is of a soft even texture, and of a shining black colour, to which it owes its commercial value.

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  • Unlike most Irish counties, Antrim owes its principal features to rocks of Mesozoic and Cainozoic age.

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  • Batavia owes its origin to the Dutch governor-general Pieter Both, who in 1610 established a factory at Jacatra (which had been built on the ruins of the old Javanese town of Sunda Calappa), and to his successor, Jan Pieters Coen, who in 1619 founded in its stead the present city, which soon acquired a flourishing trade and increased in importance.

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  • Cleland's Institution of a Young Nobleman (1607) owes much to the Italian humanists.

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  • As Lynn (Lun, Lenne, Bishop's Lynn) owes its origin to the trade which its early settlers carried by the Ouse and its tributaries its history dates from the period of settled occupation by the Saxons.

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  • Palma probably owes, if not its existence, at least its name (symbolized on the Roman coins by a palm branch), to Metellus Balearicus, who in 123 B.C. settled three thousand Roman and Spanish colonists on the island.

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  • The country is essentially agricultural, and owes its political stability to the presence of a large class of peasant proprietors, who number more than two-thirds of the population.

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  • Roman remains are to be seen, but the place owes its celebrity to the megalithic monuments in the vicinity, some of which are among the largest extant.

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  • It is to this that Venice owes its origin, under Byzantine protection, early in the 9th century A.D.

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  • It was formerly famed for the chalybeate springs to which it owes its name, and in 1621 was visited by Charles I.

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  • The pharmacopoeial preparations of this acid are a 2% solution, which is given in doses of from two to six minims, the tinctura chloroformi et morphinae cornposita, which contains a half-minim of this solution in each ten minims, and the aqua laurocerasi, which owes its virtues to the presence of this acid, and is of inconstant strength, besides being superfluous.

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  • trend to crustal deformations which in very early geological time gave a beginning to what later came to be the Appalachian mountain system; but this system had Its climax of deformation so long ago (probably in Permian time) that it has since then been very generally reduced to moderate or low relief, and owes its present altitude either to renewed elevations along the earlier lines or to the survival of the most resistant rocks as residual mountains.

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  • Hence even the father of waters, like so many other rivers in the Northern states, owes many of its features more or less directly to glacial action.

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  • The central section of the plains thus presents a marked contrast to the northern section; for while the northern section owes its smoothness to the removal of local gravels and sands from a formerly uneven surface by the action of degrading rivers and their inflowing tributaries, the southern section owes its smoothness to the deposition of imported gravels and sands upon a previously I uneven surface by the action of aggrading rivers and their outgoing distributaries.

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  • The place was originally called Corsignano and owes its present name to Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini, Pope Pius II.

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  • Monasticism in the West owes its extension and development to Benedict of Nursia (born A.D.

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  • The town owes its origin to a Benedictine abbey, which was founded in the 7th century, and at one time it was a free city of the empire.

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  • The elements of this Christian Latin language may be enumerated as follows: - (i.) it had its origin, not in the literary language of Rome as developed by Cicero, but in the language of the people as we find it in Plautus and Terence; (ii.) it has an African complexion; (iii.) it is strongly influenced by Greek, particularly through the Latin translation of the Septuagint and of the New Testament, besides being sprinkled with a large number of Greek words derived from the Scriptures or from the Greek liturgies; (iv.) it bears the stamp of the Gnostic style and contains also some military expressions; (v.) it owes something to the original creative power of Tertullian.

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  • - The week is a period of seven days, having no reference whatever to the celestial motions, - a circumstance to which it owes its unalterable uniformity.

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  • It owes its development to the steam-engine and the factory system, and in recent years has shared in the increase of trade owing to the construction of the Manchester Ship Canal, which has added greatly to its prosperity.

    0
    0
  • The town owes its popularity to a firm expanse of sand, good bathing facilities, and a temperate climate.

    0
    0
  • Hango owes its commercial importance to the fact that it is practically the only winter ice-free port in Finland, and is thus of value both to the Finnish and the Russian sea-borne trade.

    0
    0
  • Dresden owes a large part of its fame to its extensive artistic, literary and scientific collections.

    0
    0
  • It owes its brilliancy largely to the protection accorded by Henry II.

    0
    0
  • The Inter-Parliamentary Union, which dates back to 1887, owes its origin to the initiative of the late Sir W.

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    0
  • The Nobel Committee owes its existence to the will of the late Alfred B.

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    0
  • Hooker, who speaks of Jewel as "the worthiest divine that Christendom bath bred for some hundreds of years," was one of the boys whom Jewel prepared in his house for the university; and his Ecclesiastical Polity owes much to Jewel's training.

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  • Saxon architecture owes nearly everything to his initiative, and Bede was one of his pupils.

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  • His exegesis owes its interest to his subjective resources rather than to breadth of learning; his power lay in spiritual vision rather than balanced judgment, and in the vivid apprehension of the factors which make the Christian personality, rather than in constructive doctrinal statement.

    0
    0
  • But the view that the invasion was effected throughout by small bodies of adventurers acting independently of one another, and that each of the various kingdoms owes its origin to a separate enterprise, has little probability in its favour.

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  • The present establishment only dates from 1818, and owes its existence to King Frederick William III.

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  • London Methodism owes more than can be told to the Metropolitan Chapel Building Fund which was founded in 1861.

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    0
  • It owes its chief importance to its position at the southern outlet of the Fakhi defile over these mountains, through which passes the shortest road from Shumla to Constantinople.

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    0
  • It had been written in 1807, and is intrinsically autobiographical; that Adolphe represents Constant himself there is no dispute, but Ellenore probably owes something both to Madame de Charriere and Madame de Stael.

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  • The housewife long persisted in deceiving herself by purchasing filled calicoes, and the movement in favour of purer goods owes a good deal, strangely enough, to the increase in the making-up trade and the consequent inconveniences to workers of sewing machines, whose needles were constantly broken by hard filled calicoes.

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    0
  • Cettigne owes its origin to Ivan the Black, who was forced, towards the end of the 15th century, to withdraw from Zhablia,k, his former capital.

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  • We may conceive, then, that a pigmented animal owes its colour to the power that certain tissues of its body possess to secrete both tyrosinases and chromogenic substances.

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  • Of him Edward Eggleston says: "A strange mixture of rashness, pious zeal, genial manners, hot temper, and harsh bigotry, his extravagances supply the condiment of humour to a very serious history - it is perhaps the principal debt posterity owes him."

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  • It owes its origin to the marquis de la Mina, who, about 1754, did much for the city, and is regularly laid out, the houses being built of brick after a uniform pattern.

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  • Paderborn owes its early development to Charlemagne, who held a diet here in 777 and made it the seat of a bishop a few years later.

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  • The town owes its prosperity to its beautiful situation in a fine valley surrounded by mountains, and possesses a tepid mineral spring, considered efficacious in cases of general debility and for scorbutic and consumptive complaints.

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  • Herford owes its origin to a Benedictine nunnery which is said to have been founded in 832, and was confirmed by the emperor Louis the Pious in 839.

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  • Hersfeld owes its existence to the Benedictine abbey (see below).

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  • The town, the name of which appears in the forms Andefeian, Andieura and Andever, probably owes much of its importance to the neighbourhood of the Roman road from Silchester to Old Sarum.

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  • The double poinsettia, again, owes its so-called double condition merely to the increased number of its scarlet involucral leaves, which are not parts of the flower at all.

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  • Rotterdam probably owes its existence to two castles, which existed in feudal times.

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  • The active principle to which the oil owes its purgative properties has not been isolated.

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  • Thus, while the dukedom belongs to the Agilolfing family, the duke must be chosen by the people and his election confirmed by the Frankish king, to whom he owes fealty.

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  • Its ductility, to which it owes its value, is profoundly affected by the rate of cooling.

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  • Chrome steel, which usually contains about 2% of chromium and o 80 to 2% of carbon, owes its value to combining, when in the " hardened " or suddenly cooled state, intense hardness with a high elastic limit, so that it is neither deformed permanently nor cracked by extremely violent shocks.

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  • Before the igth century Darlington was noted for the manufacture of linen, worsted and flax, but it owes its modern importance to the opening of the railway between Darlington and Stockton on the 27th of September 1825.

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  • Bremen owes its fame almost exclusively to its transmaritime trade, mainly imports.

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  • It owes its sanctity to its being the reputed confluence of three sacred streams - the Ganges, the Jumna and the Saraswati.

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  • In the town and its vicinity are numerous steam saw-mills, besides wood-pulp factories, steelworks, brickworks, engineering shops, breweries and joineries, but Sundsvall owes its chief importance to its export trade in timber (6 to 7 million cub.

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  • The place probably owes its Celtic name of Llan-ym-ddyffri (the church amid the waters) to the proximity of Llandingat church to the streams of the Towy, Bran and Gwydderig.

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  • To the munificence of its citizens the town owes many of its finest public buildings.

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  • ,uovaa"Tucos, living alone, µovos), a system of living which owes its origin to those tendencies of the human soul which are summed up in the terms " asceticism " and " mysticism."

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  • But there is a break in these hills - a gate, as it were, to the great high road between Herat and India; and it is this gate which the fortress of Kandahar so effectually guards, and to which it owes its strategic importance.

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  • Kelsey, 2nd ed., New York and London, 1902; 2nd revised edition of the German original, Pompeii in Leben and Kunst, Leipzig, 1908), the best general account written by the greatest authority on the subject, to which our description owes much, with full references to other sources of information; and, for later excavations, Notizie degli Scavi and Romische Mitteilungen (in the latter, articles by Mau), passim.

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  • He is chiefly indebted to the popular ballads and legends of Armenia, and it is to the use of such materials that the work owes its permanent value.

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  • Universities and Higher Technical Schools.Germany owes its large number of universities, and its widely diffused higher education to its former subdivision into many separate states.

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  • in arms owes its existence to the reforms in the Prussian army that followed Jena.

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  • It owes its origin mainly to the efforts of the statesman Stein, who was responsible for the foundation of the Gesellschaft fr dltere deutsche Geschichtskunde, under the auspices of which the work was begun.

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  • Droysens great Geschichte der preussischen Politile (Berlin, 1855-1886); the Deutsche Reichstagsakten, the first series of which was published at Munich (1867, fol.) and the second at Gotha (1893-1901); and the collection known as the Regesta imperii, which owes its existence to the labors of J.

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  • He owes his distinctive place to the power of concealing his art.

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    0
  • Although he attended the meetings of parliament with great regularity he did not neglect his episcopal duties, and the fabric of the cathedral of Aberdeen owes much to his care.

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  • There is a bronze statue to John Fielden (1784-1849), to whose energy in developing the cotton manufacture the town owes much of its prosperity.

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    0
  • Hoogeveen, situated between these two, owes its origin to the fen reclamation which was begun here in 1625 by Baron van Echten.

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    0
  • The former, as is well known, owes its origin to the action of ice on the mountains of Norway in the Glacial period.

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  • Lennep, which was the residence of the counts of Berg from 1226 to 1300, owes the foundation of its prosperity to an influx of Cologne weavers during the 14th century.

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  • It owes its development from a mere pit village very largely to the enterprise of Sir Charles Mark Palmer.

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  • It was granted municipal rights in 1900, having grown with astonishing rapidity from 13 inhabitants in 1868 to 13,355 in 1 9 This growth it owes to the construction of a large harbour in 1868-1888.

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  • The town owes its existence to the construction of the Knottingley canal in 1826 by the Aire and Calder Navigation Company, after which, in 1829, Goole was made a bonding port.

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  • In India too the sultan owes something perhaps to his spiritual title.

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  • William was a pioneer in astronomical research and perhaps owes his most lasting fame to his discoveries in this branch of study.

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  • It owes its modern prosperity to the nearness of the valuable Puertollano coal-field, 3 m.

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  • Magdeburg, which was in existence as a small trading settlement at the beginning of the 9th century, owes its early prosperity chiefly to the emperor Otto the Great, who established a convent here about 937.

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  • is Tremadoc (which owes its name, Town of Madocks - as does Portmadoc - to Mr W.

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  • The town owes its importance entirely to being the headquarters of the maharaja of Burdwan, the premier nobleman of lower Bengal, whose rent-roll is upwards of £300,000.

    0
    0
  • Prior Hepburn founded a new college, that of St Leonard's, in the university of St Andrews, and Scotland owes only one university, that of Edinburgh, to the learned enthusiasm of her reformed sons.

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  • It owes its value to the benzoic acid which it contains.

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    0
  • His commentary on Don Quixote owes something to John Bowle, and is disfigured by a patronizing, carping spirit; nevertheless it is the most valuable work of its kind, and is still unsuperseded.

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  • Budapest owes its great commercial importance to its situation on the Danube, on which the greater part of its trade is carried.

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  • The town owes its existence as a manufacturing centre to the tsar Alexander I.

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  • To him Munich owes her finest art collections and most remarkable buildings.

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  • To him Munich owes the acquisition of the famous Rhenish collection of the Boisseree brothers.

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  • The western margin of the valley is possibly defined by another fault which has not yet been detected; but in any case it is clear that the great depression owes its extraordinary depth to faulting.

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  • It is chiefly to architecture that metal-work owes its permanent artistic improvement.

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  • In 1873 he was appointed keeper of the Royal Library, Berlin, which, like the Berlin Museum, owes much to his care.

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  • In the centre is a monument to Jose Marti (1853-1895), "the apostle of independence," and in an adjoining square is the city's fine monument to the Cuban engineer Francisco de Albear, to whom she owes her water system.

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  • He owes his position to the good-will of his fellows, receives no remuneration, and resigns as soon as he loses the confidence of the people.

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  • Unlike coffee-planting the enterprise owes its origin to the initiation of government, and has never attracted the attention of the natives.

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  • 3) owes its high degree of achromatism.

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  • Lobito, a little north of Benguella, is a town which dates from 1905 and owes its existence to the bay of the same name having been chosen as the sea terminus of a railway to the far interior.

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  • A mere village in the beginning of the 19th century, it rapidly increased from 1850 onwards, and, according to the censusof 1906, possessed 22,845 inhabitants, mainly engaged in the coal mines and ironsmelting works, to which it owes its development.

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    0
  • Luneburg owes its importance chiefly to the gypsum and lime quarries of the Kalkberg, which afford the materials for its cement works, and to the productive salt-spring at its base which has been known and used since the 10th century.

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  • The city is in a rich farming country, which produces Indian corn, oats and wheat; and is in the Indiana natural gas region, to which fact it owes its rapid growth as a manufacturing centre.

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  • The Atlantic coast owes its oblique N.E.

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  • trend to crustal deformations which in very early geological time gave a beginning to what later came to be the Appalachian mountain system; but this system had its climax of deformation so long ago (probably in Permian time) that it has since then been very generally reduced to moderate or low relief, and owes its present altitude either to renewed elevations along the earlier lines or to the survival of the most resistant rocks as residual mountains.

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  • 5 Leibnitz probably owes to him the thought of a calculus of symbols, and the conception of demonstration as essentially a chain of definitions.

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  • It is to Lotze, however, that he owes most in the characteristic feature of his logic, viz., the systematic development of the types of judgment, and inference from less adequate to more adequate forms. His fundamental continuity with Bradley may be illustrated by his definition of inference.

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    0
  • Portsmouth (Portsmue, Portesmuth) owes its origin to the retreat of the sea from Porchester, and its importance to its favourable position for a naval station.

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    0
  • To this fact it owes its immunity from the forest fires which wreak frightful havoc among the surrounding forests.

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    0
  • The town owes its existence to the Bolivian trade from La Paz and Oruro, and is the residence of a number of foreign merchants.

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  • Christianity, regarded objectively as one of the great religions of the world, owes its rise to Jesus of Nazareth, in ancient Galilee.

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  • Fulda owes its existence to its famous abbey.

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  • Asia Minor owes the peculiar interest of its history to its geographical position.

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  • It is somewhat larger than a fox, of a uniform reddish brown colour above, and whitish beneath, with two white spots above each of the eyes, and a tuft of long black hair at the tip of the ears; to these it owes its name, which is derived from Turkish words signifying "black-ear."

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  • The revocation of the edict of Nantes owes quite as much to the dream of political absolutism, inherited from Richelieu, as to religious bigotry.

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  • owes the modern ideal of political liberty to that spirit of stubborn resistance which broke the power of Spain.

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  • The soil is a peculiar clay-schist, on or alternating with granite, and it is to the peculiar conditions of climate and soil that port owes its remarkable qualities of colour, body and high flavour.

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  • owes its celebrity to the medieval fortifications of remarkable completeness with which it is surrounded.

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  • Erlangen owes the foundation of its prosperity chiefly to the French Protestant refugees who settled here on the revocation of the edict of Nantes and introduced various manufactures.

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    0
  • The town is entirely modern, and owes its progress to the water-power supplied by the Ericht for linen and jute factories.

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  • Colorado is pre-eminently a mineral region, and to this fact it owes its colonization.

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  • Mark's, Venice, 10th century, owes much of its refined beauty to niello patterns in the borders.

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  • To the existence of an Old-World myth New Mexico owes its early exploration by the Spaniards.

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  • The town owes much of its prosperity to its coal mines, which employ a large proportion of the inhabitants and supply the factory furnaces.

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  • Their interest was to show that the gospel precept of universal benevolence, which owes nothing to civil enactment, was both agreeable to nature and conducive to happiness.

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  • To this the true answer seems to be that Bacon owes his position not only to the general spirit of his philosophy, but to the manner in which he worked into a con- (1860); Liebig, Ober Francis Bacon von Verulam, &c. (1863).

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  • The island owes its importance, therefore, mainly to its copious supply of a few raw materials, notably copper and timber.

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  • This reputation he owes partly to the vast fertility of his pen - according to the historian Sozomen he was credited with having written altogether 3,000,000 lines - partly to the elegance of his style and a certain measure of poetic inspiration, more perhaps to the strength and consistency of his personal character, and his ardour in defence of the creed formulated at Nicaea.

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  • Owing to its position at the junction of several routes, Kerkuk has a brisk transit trade in hides, Persian silks and cottons, colouring materials, fruit and timber; but it owes its principal importance to its petroleum and naphtha springs.

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  • The present writer owes something to Goblet d'Alviella, Hibbert Lectures (Lond.

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  • The Indian National Congress (see 14.417), which held its first session at Bombay in 1885, owes its existence to his exertions.

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  • It owes its origin almost entirely to the cotton printing and bleaching works of the vicinity, for which there is an abundant supply of excellent water, and contains one of the largest of the Turkey-red dyeing establishments in the Vale of Leven.

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  • His countrymen indeed have always believed that to Knox more than to any other man Scotland owes her political and religious individuality.

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  • Of these the chief are Poole's Hole, a vast stalactite cave, about half a mile distant; Diamond Hill, which owes its name to the quartz crystals which are not uncommon in its rocks; and Chee Tor, a remarkable cliff, on the banks of the Wye, 300 ft.

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  • The national debt was practically nil until c. 1855, and the debt contracted thereafter owes its existence almost wholly to railway construction.

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  • This Personal Philosophy owes its development to K.

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  • The former owes its existence very largely to the war with Peru, the civil war of 1891, and the financial troubles of 1898.

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  • Montfoort owes its origin to a castle built by the bishop of Rhenen in 1170, which was frequently besieged in the 14th and 15th centuries.

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  • The industry owes its importance to the attention given to oyster cultivation.

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  • above the sea, owes its existence to the valuable diamond mine discovered here in 1870.

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  • And the best proofs alike of its power and its justice would be to obtain for the Uitlanders in the Transvaal a fair share in the government of the country which owes everything to their exertions.

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  • This fruitful conception of man's ethical nature as an organic unity Butler owes directly to Shaftesbury and indirectly to Aristotle; it is the strength and clearness with which he has grasped it that gives peculiar value to his system.

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  • POTATO (Solanum tuberosum), a well-known plant which owes its value to the peculiar habit of developing underground slender leafless shoots or branches which differ in character and office from the true roots, and gradually swelling at the free end produce the tubers (potatoes) which are the common vegetable food.

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  • Cochineal owes its tinctorial power to the presence of a substance termed cochinealin or carminic acid, C17H18010, which may be prepared from the aqueous decoction of cochineal.

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  • 121), yet he really owes more to the " Stoica dogmata," then prevalent, than he is aware of.

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  • The Menina e moga of Bernardim Ribeiro, a tender pastoral story inspired by saudade for his lady-love, probably moved Montemor or Montemayor (q.v.) to write his Diana, and may some fifty years later have suggested the Lusitania transformada to Fernao Alvares do Oriente, who, however, like Ribeiro, owes some debt to Sannazaro's Arcadia.

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  • Special mention must be made of the two citizens to whom San Francisco, as it is to-day, owes so much, viz.

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  • Agra, like Delhi, owes much of its importance in both historical and modern times to the commercial and strategical advantages of its position.

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  • BARLAAM AND JOSAPHAT, one of the most popular and widely disseminated of medieval religious romances, which owes its importance and interest to the fact that it is a Christianized version of the story of Gautama Siddharta, the Buddha, with which it agrees not only in broad outline but in essential details.

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  • The debt which science owes to Plateau is not diminished by the fact that, while investigating these beautiful phenomena, he never himself saw them, having lost his sight in about 1840.

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  • - Swansea owes its commercial prosperity to its great natural advantages as a harbour and its situation within the South Wales coal basin, for the anthracite portion of which it is the natural port of shipment.

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  • Similarly nascent methane may reduce iron salts, and the black mud in which these bacteria often occur owes its colour to the FeS formed.

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  • It was founded by Donnell O'Brien, king of Thomond (1168-1194); and owes its foundation and name to the presentation to his family of a portion of the true Cross, which attracted numerous pilgrims. The shrine of this relic is in the Ursuline convent at Blackrock, Co.

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  • A mile to the west is the Gillies' Hill, now finely wooded, over which the Scots' camp - followers appeared to complete the discomfiture of the English, to which event it owes its name.

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  • These have an importance which we shall consider further on; but Joinville owes his place in general estimation only to his history of his crusading experiences and of the subsequent fate of St Louis.

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  • His dynasty is known as that of the slave kings, and it is to them that old Delhi owes its grandest remains, among them Kutb Mosque and the Kutb Minar.

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  • It is as an historian that he is best known, and to his History of the Christian Church he owes his fame and his familiar title "The Father of Church History."

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    0
  • Southwold (Sudwold, Suwold, Suthwaud) owes its origin and prosperity to its herring fisheries, which were considerable in 1086, while the importance of its harbour increased with the decay of Dunwich.

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  • Both streams run from west to east across the plain of Damascus, which owes to them much of its fertility, and lose themselves in marshes, or lakes, as they are called, on the borders of the great Arabian desert.

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  • The town owes its origin to the development during the first half of the 19th century of ironworks at the upper ends of the valleys that converge in its neighbourhood, its site being previously known as Waun Helygen (Willow-tree Common).

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  • Calcutta owes its commercial prosperity to the fact that it is situated near the mouth of the two great river systems of the Ganges and Brahmaputra.

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  • Spalato has a striking sea-front, in which the leading feature is the ruined façade of the great palace of Diocletian, to which the city owes its origin.

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  • Since 1881 colonies of Hebrews have been established in the southern part of the state, among them being Alliance (1881), Rosenhayn (2882), Carmel (1883), and, most noted of all, Woodbine, which owes its origin to the liberality of Baron de Hirsch, and contains the Baron de Hirsch Agricultural and Industrial School.

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  • Sargent, in his Forest Flora of Japan, says, "Japan owes much of the beauty of its groves and gardens to the Cryptomeria.

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  • Vigo owes its importance to its deep and spacious harbour, and to its fisheries.

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  • London gained its paramount importance from its favourable geographical position in respect of the rest of England on the one hand and the Continent on the other, and the populous district of the " home counties " owes its existence to that importance; whereas other populous districts have generally grown up at the point where some source of natural wealth, as coal or iron, lay to hand.

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  • To the warmth and moisture brought by this means the coastal region owes its high equable temperature, its heavy rainfall (80-110 in.) and its superb vegetation.

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  • The place, which was formerly called Rehme, owes its development to the discovery in 1830 of its five famous salt springs, which are heavily charged with carbonic acid gas.

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  • Amboise owes its celebrity to the imposing ch�au which overlooks the Loire from the rocky eminence above the town.

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  • The valley owes its fertility to two rivers, the Naryn and the Karadarya, which unite within its confines, near Namangan, to form the Syr-darya or Jaxartes.

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  • - The soil is exceedingly fertile, as is evident from the fact that Egypt owes practically all its fertility to the sediment carried into the Nile by its Abyssinian tributaries.

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  • It owes its rise to prosperity to the tolerance it meted out to the Jews, who found here an asylum from the oppression under which they suffered in Nuremberg.

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  • The Talmud owes much to this rabbi.

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  • He took a great interest in colonial missions, especially among the American Indians, and it is to his exertions that the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel owes its existence.

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  • The Royal School for Oriental Languages owes its existence to Matteo Ripa,who in 1732 established a school for Chinese missionaries.

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  • Monstrous cones are fairly common; these in some instances lend support to the axillary-bud theory, and it has been said that this theory owes its existence to evidence furnished by abnormal cones.

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    0
  • Haverfordwest owes its origin to the advent of the Flemings, who were permitted by Henry I.

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  • took steps to raise it in importance, but the school owes its present eminence to Queen Elizabeth, who is commemorated as the foundress at a Latin commemoration service held periodically in the Abbey, where, moreover, the daily school service is held.

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  • Pirmasens owes its name to a St Pirmin, who is said to have preached Christianity here in the 8th century.

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  • Ascension was originally destitute of vegetation save on the summit of Green Mountain, which owes its verdure to the mists which frequently enshroud it, but the lower hills have been planted with grasses and shrubs.

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  • Tradition says that the straw-plait industry owes its introduction to James I., who transferred to Luton the colony of Lorraine plaiters whom Mary queen of Scots had settled in Scotland.

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  • In Rumanian it rests on an older Greek-Slavonic text, and owes its great popularity to the wise and witty proverbs it contains.

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  • Thibaut was the most popular of all the 13th century songwriters, and his work is marked by a grace and sweetness which he owes perhaps in part to his association with the troubadours of the south.

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  • The history of Scotland from 1436 to 1561 owes much, in its earlier chapters, to the accounts of Hector Boece and John Major, though no small portion of the topographical matter is first-hand.

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  • The colony has not only a large trade in its own commodities, but owes much of its commerce to the transit of goods to and from the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Rhodesia.

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  • The town is of considerable antiquity, but owes its development to the refugees who flocked from the villages plundered by the Turks in the 15th century.

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  • To this influence the Hejaz owes what little of law and order it enjoys.

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  • A considerable area is still covered with forest, to which the region owes its name of Deli Orman ("the wild wood"); there are extensive tracts of pasturage, but cattle-rearing declined in 1880-1910.

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  • It owes its commercial value to the beauty of its hard red calcareous axis which in life is covered by a cortex in which the proximal moieties of the zooids are imbedded.

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  • product of the normal or sexual mode of propagation in the group, but owes its origin to a peculiar type of budding or non-sexual reproduction, in which, as temporary resting or protecting structures, the vesicular bodies may have had a share.

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  • The town owes its origin to a Dominican monastery founded in 1244 by Walter de Burgh.

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  • To this monument and the one in honour of Washington, Baltimore owes the name " The Monumental City," frequently applied to it.

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  • The institution owes its origin to a bequest left by John McDonogh.

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  • The Oxford Down is a modern breed which owes its origin to crossing between Cotswolds and Hampshire Downs and Southdowns.

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  • The Hampshire Down is another breed which owes much of its improved character to an infusion of Southdown blood.

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  • To the enlightened views of the ministries of Guizot and Thiers under the citizen-king, and to the zeal and ability of Cousin in the work of organization, France owes what is best in her system of primary education, - a national interest which had been neglected under the Revolution, the Empire and the Restoration (see Exposé, p. 17).

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  • Port Jervis was laid out in 1826, soon after work began on the Delaware && Hudson Canal; it owes its origin to that waterway (now abandoned), and was named in honour of John Bloomfield Jervis (1795-1885), the engineer who constructed the canal, who, in 1836, was in charge of the construction of the Croton Aqueduct, and wrote Railway Proper"), (18J9) and The Construction and Management of Railways (1861).

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  • Maha-vira was not an originator; he merely carried on, with but slight changes, a system which existed before his time, and which probably owes its most distinguishing features to a teacher named Parswa, who ranks in the succession of Jinas as the predecessor of Maha-vira.

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  • The town owes its prosperity chiefly to its linen trade, introduced in 1733, which gives employment to the greater part of the inhabitants.

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  • In his certificate of 1166 Robert tells the king that, although he owes the service of five knights for Berkeley, Roger of Berkeley still holds certain lands of the honour for which he does no service to Robert.

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  • From the number of urns, coins and other antiquities found near Hanau it would appear that it owes its origin to a Roman settlement.

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  • Expelled from Prussia in 1865, he settled at Leipzig, and it is primarily to his activity in Saxony among the newly-formed unions of workers that the modern social democrat party owes its origin.

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  • The place owes its popularity as a resort to Lord George Hill (d.

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  • It has thus come about that astrophysics owes its recent development, and its recognition as a distinct branch of astronomical science, to the combination of the processes involved in the three arts of spectroscopy, photography and photometry.

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  • His money-getting was but part of his statesmanship, and for his statesmanship his country owes him not a little gratitude.

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  • Leipzig owes its origin to a Slav settlement between the Elster and the Pleisse, which was in existence before the year 1000, and its name to the Slav word lipa, a lime tree.

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  • If we try beginning with myths of the origin of the world, we frequently find that it owes its origin to the activity of preexistent supernatural beings.

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  • It is no exaggeration to assert that the modern world owes its power to understand the Talmud to Rashi.

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  • His paper, however, the Point du Jour, according to Aulard, owes its reputation not so much to its own qualities as to the fact that the painter David, in his famous picture of the "Oath in the Tennis Court," has represented Barere kneeling in the corner and writing a report of the proceedings as though for posterity.

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  • That the writer owes no slavish adherence to any philosophical system is plain from his independent treatment of the affections.

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  • His great spiritual successor, Augustine, whose conversion was helped by Ambrose's sermons, owes more to him than to any writer except Paul.

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  • Gebhard was a drunken and licentious man, who owes his prominence rather to his surroundings than to his abilities.

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  • It owes much of its beauty to a well-wooded range of mountains traversing the island from N.

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  • The Shire horse owes its happily-chosen name to Arthur Young's remarks, in the description of his agricultural tours during the closing years of the 18th century, concerning the large Old English Black Horse, " the produce principally of the Shire counties in the heart of England."

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  • The town is modern and owes its prosperity to the ironworks and collieries in its immediate vicinity.

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  • Richard owes his surname to the fact that Henry II.

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  • It is situated on the Crow's Nest branch of the Canadian Pacific railway, at the junction of Coal Creek with the Elk river, and owes its importance to the extensive coal mines in its vicinity.

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  • To the quantity of solid matter suspended in its water the Dead Sea owes, beside its saltness, its buoyancy and its poisonous properties.

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  • It is to the value and variety of his matter, to his critical insight, breadth of view and wide research, and not least to the surpassing importance and interest of the period with which he deals, that Polybius owes his place among the writers of history.

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  • It owes its existence to the desire of the Sudan administration to find a harbour more suitable than Suakin for the commerce of the country.

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  • Though traditionally a site of great sanctity, Rangoon owes its first importance to its rebuilding in 1753 by Alompra, the founder of the Burmese monarchy, who gave it the present name of Yan Kon, "the end of the war."

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  • Esseg owes its origin to its fortress, which existed as early as the time of the Romans under the name of Mursia; though the present structure dates only from 1720.

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  • The Hercules Farnese of Naples, though signed by Glycon of Athens, and a later and exaggerated transcript, owes something, including the motive of rest after Jabour, to Lysippus.

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  • Sigismondo (1417-1468) is the personage to whom Rimini owes its renown during the Renaissance, of which indeed he was one of the strangest and most original representatives.

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  • In either case, she owes my predecessor for the knowledge he gave her.

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  • The deal will also absolve her of some $ 25 million in debts the estate currently owes.

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  • adversarial litigation counsel or solicitor owes no duty to the lay client's adversary.

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  • Virtually every major building, scholarship and facility in the College owes something to a legacy benefaction.

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  • The amount borrowed will be combined with the amount the borrower still owes on his first mortgage.

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  • History's enduring fascination owes much to the necessary centrality of people in historical study.

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  • However, Ghosts actually owes a much bigger debt to his brilliant retelling of Rio Bravo, Assault on Precinct Thirteen.

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  • In the event that a customer owes Portland any monies, any SLA offered by Portland Communications Ltd becomes discretionary.

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  • galleria in Houston and punched into he owes his quot we had.

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  • incalculable debt that each owes to the other was shown to the world.

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  • The final band for the evening is Midair 91 whoâs guitarist looks like a former lodger of mine who owes me money.

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  • We realize how much our perception of the Other owes to our own narcissism, our inversion of ourselves into the other.

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  • owes a duty of good faith to the insured.

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  • owes on a mortgage after losing the former council house he was buying before his illness.

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  • owes much to its unity.

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  • Patronage politics are dominated by who knows who, who owes who, and how much they owe.

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  • Susie agrees to become a prostitute to help Donna pay back the money she owes Des for drugs.

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  • They've gone psychedelic - this owes more to Radiohead and Sgt Pepper's than to dance music.

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  • The younger generation, tho, doesn't realize how much it owes to American and British folk revivalists of the 1950s and 1960s.

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  • The new K1200 r roadster is a muscle bike that owes its allegiance to nothing that has gone before.

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  • second-degree black goes double action he owes his.

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  • vet second-degree black goes double action he owes his.

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  • We were all quite stingy, apart from Jonathan Fullarton, who owes the museum £ 100.

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  • It owes a debt to European pre-war surrealism: its literary influences include the work of Franz Kafka.

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  • The dominant process is baroclinic instability which owes its existence to strong meridional temperature gradients.

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  • wipesus uses the picture of wiping out a monetary debt that someone owes us.

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  • On the r4th of October 190r his eightieth birthday was celebrated in Berlin amid a brilliant gathering of men of science, part of the ceremonies taking place in the new Pathological Museum, near the Charite, which owes its existence mainly to his energy and powers of organization.

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  • Medical science further owes to him the classification of new growths on a natural histological basis, the elucidation of leucaemia, glioma and lardaceous tumours, and detailed investigations into many diseases - tuberculosis, pyaemia, diphtheria, leprosy, typhus, &c. Among the books he published on pathological and medical subjects may be mentioned Vorlesungen fiber Pathologic, the first volume of which was the Cellular-pathologic (1858), and the remaining three Die Krankhaften Geschwiilste (1863-67); Handbuch der speziellen Pathologic and Therapie (3 vols., 1854-62), in collaboration with other German surgeons; Gesammelte Abhandlungen zur wissenschaftlichen Medizin (1856); Vier Reden fiber Leben and Kranksein (1862); Untersuchungen fiber die Entwicklung des Schlidelgrundes (1857); Lehre von den Trichinen (1865); Ueber den Hunger-typhus (1868); and Gesammelte Abhandlungen aus dem Gebiete der afentlichen Medizin and der Seuchenlehre (1879).

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  • What most impressed the German world was its beauty and lucidity of style - features to which Mendelssohn still owes his popularity as a writer.

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  • In consequence of the imprisonment of his father in 922, his mother Odgiva (Eadgyfu), sister of the English king lEthelstan, fled to England with the young Louis - a circumstance to which he owes his surname.

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  • In any case, since the Eastern origin of the Etruscans is now generally admitted, we may temporarily, at least, accept the conclusion that hepatoscopy as a method of divination owes its survival in advanced forms of culture to the elaborate system devised in the course of centuries by the Babylonian priests, and to the influence, direct and indirect, exerted by this system in the ancient world.

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  • He was a terse, able and lucid speaker, master of wit and sarcasm, and a fearless critic. He gave liberally to Cooper Union, of which he was trustee and secretary, and which owes much of its success to him; was a trustee of Columbia University from 1901 until his death, chairman of the board of trustees of Barnard College, and was one of the original trustees, first chairman of the board of trustees, and a member of the executive committee of the Carnegie Institution.

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  • Rhayader, built close to the Falls of the Wye (whence its name), owes its early importance to the castle erected here by Prince Rhys ap Griffith of South Wales, c. 1178, in order to check the English advance up the Wye Valley.

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  • Where it is possible to make legitimate and unambiguous comparisons, the ethical and spiritual superiority of Old Testament thought has been convincingly demonstrated, and to the re-shaping and re-writing of the older history and the older traditions the Old Testament owes its permanent value.

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  • The spider owes its name Argyroneta or the silver swimmer to its silvery appearance as it swims about under water enveloped in air, and its power to retain an envelope of air on its sternum and abdomen depends upon the circumstance that these areas are beset with hairs which prevent the water reaching the integument; but the air retained by these hairs can be released when the spider wishes to fill its subaqueous home with that element.

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  • Roman law owes much to Hadrian, who instructed Salvius Julianus to draw up an edictum perpetuum, to a great extent the basis of Justinian's Corpus juris (see M.

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  • The De Vita Contemplativa thus owes its place next to the Quod Omnis Probus Liber, a place which it already occupied in the copy of Philo's works possessed by Eusebius (H.E.

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  • The Attic drama of the period produced many great masterpieces, and the scientific thought of Europe in the departments of logic; ethics, rhetoric and history mainly owes its origin to a new movement of Greek thought which was largely fostered by the patronage of Pericles himself.

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  • Carnac has a handsome church in the Renaissance style of Brittany, but it owes its celebrity to the stone monuments in its vicinity, which are among the most extensive and interesting of their kind (see Stone Monuments).

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  • Abeokuta (a word meaning "under the rocks"), dating from 1825, owes its origin to the incessant inroads of the slavehunters from Dahomey and Ibadan, which compelled the village populations scattered over the open country to take refuge in this rocky stronghold against the common enemy.

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  • Its introduction and six chapters present with rare lucidity the earliest conceptions of the Kingdom of Heaven, the Son of God, the Church, Christian dogma and Catholic worship; and together form a severely critico-historical yet strongly Catholic answer to Harnack's still largely pietistic Wesen des Christentums. It develops throughout the principles that "what is essential in Jesus' Gospel is what occupies the first and largest place in His authentic teaching, the ideas for which He fought and died, and not only that idea which we may consider to be still a living force to-day"; that "it is supremely arbitrary to decree that Christianity must be essentially what the Gospel did not borrow from Judaism, as though what the Gospel owes to Judaism were necessarily of secondary worth"; that "whether we trust or distrust tradition, we know Christ only by means of, athwart and within the Christian tradition"; that "the essence of Christianity resides in the fulness and totality of its life"; and that "the adaptation of the Gospel to the changing conditions of humanity is to-day a more pressing need than ever."

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  • Be that as it may, the deacon was long considered to be the " servant of the widows and the poor " (Jerome, Ep. 146), and the archdeacon, who first appears towards the end of the 4th century, owes the greatness of his position to the fact that he was the chief administrator of church funds (see Archdeacon).

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  • Topography London as a whole owes nothing in appearance to the natural configuration of its site.

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  • It owes this conservation to its Poet prosody.

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  • Targums On The Pentateuch (t) The so-called Targum of Onkelos admittedly owes its name to a mistaken reference in the Babylonian Talmud."

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  • The second Jerusalem Targum, or the so-called pseudo-Jonathan, admittedly owes its ascription to Jonathan ben Uzziel to the incorrect solution of the abbreviated form by which it was fre quently cited, viz.

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  • The institute owes much to its first president, Henry Morton (1836-1902), a distinguished scientist, whose aim was "to offer a course of instruction in which theory and practice were carefully balanced and thoroughly combined," and who gave to the institute sums aggregating $175,000 (see Morton Memorial, History of Stevens Institute, ed.

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  • The Atlantic coast owes its oblique N.E.S.W.

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  • Vathy (Ba®iu="deep"), the chief town and port of the island, lies at the northern foot of Mount Stephanos, its whitewashed houses stretching for about a mile round the deep bay in the Gulf of Molo, to which it owes its name.

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  • This usefulness iron owes in part, indeed, to its abundance, through which it has led us in the last few thousands of years to adapt our ways to its; but still in chief part first to the single qualities in which it very weak; conducting heat and electricity easily, and again offering great resistance to their passage; here welding readily, there incapable of welding; here very infusible, there melting with relative ease.

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  • Gum benzoin, which contains from 12 to 20% of benzoic acid, is used in medicine as the essential constituent of benzoated lard, Adeps benzoatus, which owes its antiseptic properties to benzoic acid; and in friar's balsam, Tinctura benzoini composita, which is an ancient and valuable medicament, still largely used for inhalation in cases of laryngitis, bronchitis and other inflammatory or actually septic conditions of the respiratory tract.

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  • He was a man of barbaric aesthetic tastes, and Acre owes some of its public buildings to him: but he was also capricious and tyrannical, and well lived up to his surname.

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  • Its place in literary history - by no fneans an unimportant one - it owes to Hans Sachs and the other meistersanger.

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  • AnwarI (died between ii89 and 1191; 585 and 587 A.H.), who in early life had pursued scientific studies in the madrasa of Ttt~, and who ranked among the foremost astronomers of his time, owes his renown as much to the inexhaustible store of poetical similes and epitheta ornantia which he showered upon Sinjar and other royal and princely personages, as to his cutting sarcasms, which he was careful to direct, not against individuals but against whole classes of society and the cruel wrong worked by an inexorable fatethus disregarding the example 01 Firdousi, whose attack upon Sultan Mahmd for having cheated him out of the reward for his epopee is the oldest and most finished specimen of personal satire.

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  • The only other types that merit notice are: (1) the Mozarabic Breviary, once in use throughout all Spain, but now confined to a single foundation at Toledo; it is remarkable for the number and length of its hymns, and for the fact that the majority of its collects are addressed to God the Son; (2) the Ambrosian, now confined to Milan, where it owes its retention to the attachment of the clergy and people to their traditionary rites, which they derive from St Ambrose (see Liturgy).

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  • Spalato has a striking sea-front, in which the leading feature is the ruined façade of the great palace of Diocletian, to which the city owes its origin.

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