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ovid

ovid

ovid Sentence Examples

  • 7, 2; Ovid, Metam.

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  • 5; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Aeschylus and Sophocles wrote tragedies upon it; Ovid has described it at length in his Metamorphoses.

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  • He afterwards retired to Crete, where he lived the life of a hunter with Artemis; but having threatened to exterminate all living creatures on the island, he was killed by the bite of a scorpion sent by the earth-goddess (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • 4, 2; Ovid, Metam.

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  • 10, 1; Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • 6.7; Ovid, Fasti, i.

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  • He was urged to take up a pleader's profession; but, like Ovid, he found in letters and gallantry a more congenial pursuit.

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  • Amongst these may be mentioned Virgil, the epic poet Ponticus, Bassus (probably the iambic poet of the name), and at a later period Ovid.

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  • There is hardly a page of Ovid which does not show obligations to his poems, while other writers made a more sparing use of his stories.

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  • Ovid thus assigns Propertius his place: successor fuit hic (Tibullus), tibi, Galle: Propertius illi (Tibullo): Quartus ab his serie temporis ipse fui (Tr.

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  • 139 and Servius ad loc.; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • Her chief festivals were the ludi Cereris or Cerealia (more correctly, Cerialia), games held annually from April 12-19 (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • The university of Indianapolis (1896) is a loose association of three really independent institutions - the Indiana Law School (1894), the Indiana Dental College (1879), and Butler University (chartered in 1849 and opened in 1855 as the North-western Christian University, and named Butler University in 1877 in honour of Ovid Butler, a benefactor).

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  • In art Flora was represented as a beautiful maiden, bedecked with flowers (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • In Ovid (Metam.

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  • 19 B.C.), but was no longer alive when Ovid wrote (c. A.D.

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  • Ovid in his Fasti, ii.

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  • The cypress was the tree into which Cyparissus, a beautiful youth beloved by Apollo, was transformed, that he might grieve to all time (Ovid, Met.

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  • I also read Tibullus, Catullus, Propertius, Horace (with Dacier's and Torrentius's notes), Virgil, Ovid's Epistles, with l"leziriac's commentary, the Ars amandi and the Elegies; likewise the Augustus and Tiberius of Suetonius, and a Latin translation of Dion Cassius from the death of Julius Caesar to the death of Augustus.

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  • Erysichthon (" tearer up of the earth "), son of Triopas or Myrmidon, having cut down the trees in a grove sacred to the goddess, was punished by her with terrible hunger (Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Metam.

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  • She was identified with Fauna, and by later syncretism also with Ops and Maiathe latter no doubt because the dedication-day of her temple on the Aventine was 1st May (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • A wellknown Lapith was Caeneus, said to have been originally a girl named Caenis, the favourite of Poseidon, who changed her into a man and made her invulnerable (Ovid, Melon.

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  • A complete translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses (he had published six books with the Heroic Epistles some years previously) followed in 1697.

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  • 4 Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • 1; Ovid, Heroides, xiii.; Philostratus, Heroica, iii.

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  • It is a mosaic from Virgil, Ovid, Lucan and Fortunatus, composed in the manner of Einhard's use of Suetonius, and exhibits a true poetic gift.

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  • 23; Ovid, Metam.

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  • She was acquitted by Agamemnon; but, as Polymestor foretold, she was turned into a dog, and her grave became a mark for ships (Ovid, Metam.

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  • and serving him up to the gods at table, in order to test their powers of observation (Ovid, Metam.

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  • His companions were changed into birds, called Memnonides, which came every year to fight and lament over his grave, which was variously located (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Ovid, Fast.

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  • She receives a crown as a bridal gift, which is placed amongst the stars, while she herself is honoured as a goddess (Ovid, Metam.

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  • In this festival Pales was invoked to grant protection and increase to flocks and herds; the shepherds entreated forgiveness for any unintentional profanation of holy places of which their flocks might have been guilty, and leaped three times across bonfires of hay and straw (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • Even in private houses at Rome, so late as the time of Ovid, the porter was chained.

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  • Both were happy at the result; but forgetting to thank the goddess for the apples, they were led by her to a religious crime, and were transformed into lions by the goddess Cybele (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 59; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • 118), Ovid (Met.

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  • _ Ovid, Metam.

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  • Neckam also wrote Corrogationes Promethei, a scriptural commentary prefaced by a treatise on grammatical criticism; a translation of Aesop into Latin elegiacs (six fables from this version, as given in a Paris MS., are printed in Robert's Fables inedites); commentaries, still unprinted, on portions of Aristotle, Martianus Capella and Ovid's Metamorphoses, and other works.

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  • There is a touching epistle (Medea to Jason) in the Heroides of Ovid.

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  • 65) became very prevalent, not only in religious ceremonials, but also on various state occasions, such as in triumphs (Ovid, Trist.

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  • 64-67, 70, 82; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • 540 B.C.), partly from its copper mines (Ovid, Met.

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  • Ovid also mentions its sheep (Met.

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  • The extracts from Cicero and Ovid, Origen and St John, Chrysostom, Augustine and Jerome are but specimens of a useful custom which reaches its culminating paint in book xxviii., which is devoted entirely to the writings of St Bernard.

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  • AGONALIA, in ancient Rome, festivals celebrated on the 9th of January, 17th of March, 21st of May, and 11th of December in each year in honour of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, 319-332).

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  • He wrote a Theseis, referred to in a letter from his intimate friend Ovid (Ex Ponto, iv.

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  • Three elegies were formerly attributed to Pedo by Scaliger; two on the death of Maecenas (In Obitum Maecenatis and De Verbis Maecenatis moribundi), and one addressed to Livia to console her for the death of her son Drusus (Consolatio ad Liviam de Morte Drusi or Epicedion Drusi, usually printed with Ovid's works); but it is now generally agreed that they are not by Pedo.

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  • and no trace of the poem before the publication of the editio princeps of Ovid in 1471.

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  • He anticipated Ovid in recalling the stories of Greek mythology to a second poetical life.

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  • The greatest masters of this kind of poetry are the elegiac poets of the Augustan age - Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid.

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  • Propertius is a less accomplished artist and a less equably pleasing writer than either Tibullus or Ovid, but he shows more power of dealing gravely with a great or tragic situation than either of them, and his diction and rhythm give frequent proof of a concentrated force of conception and a corresponding movement of imaginative feeling which remind us of Lucretius.

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  • The most facile and brilliant of the elegiac poets and the least serious in tone and spirit is P. Ovidius Naso or Ovid (43 B.C. - A.D.

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  • In Ovid we have both.

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  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

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  • Virgil in a supreme degree, and Horace, Propertius and Ovid in a less degree, had expressed in their poetry the romance of the past.

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  • Ovid.

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  • Although there are some works of this so-called Silver Age of considerable and one at least of supreme interest, from the insight they afford into the experience of a century of organized despotism and its effect on the spiritual life of the ancient world, it cannot be doubted that the steady literary decline which characterized the last centuries of paganism was beginning before the death of Ovid and Livy.

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  • The vigorous vitality which gives interest to the personality of Catullus, Propertius and Ovid no longer characterizes their successors.

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  • 569; Ovid, Metaan.

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  • 60; Ovid, Ars.

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  • 171; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Calymnus (pop. about 7000) was once covered by forests - (Ovid, A.A.

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  • Ovid (Herotides, 5) gives a pathetic description of Oenone's grief when she found herself deserted.

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  • PYRAMUS AND THISBE, the hero and heroine of a Babylonian love-story told by Ovid (Metam.

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  • The spring mentioned by Ovid (Ars Amat.

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  • 57; Ovid, Met.

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  • It is highly spoken of by Ovid (Am.

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  • 31; and Ovid, Metam.

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  • He was the husband of Chloris, the goddess of flowers, by whom he had a son, Carpus, the god of fruit (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • 454-527 Ovid, Metam.

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  • 395; Ovid, Metam.

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  • According to a later tradition, he was the son of Hera (Juno) alone, who became pregnant by touching a certain flower (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • But the authors whom he quotes most frequently are Virgil, and, next to him, Terence, Cicero, Plautus; then Lucan, Horace, Juvenal, Sallust, Statius, Ovid, Livy and Persius.

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  • His five great pagan poets are Homer, Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Lucan; Statius he regards as a " Christian " converted by Virgil's Fourth Eclogue.

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  • The Latin poets to be studied include Virgil, Lucan, Statius, Ovid's Metamorphoses, and (with certain limitations) Horace, Juvenal and Persius, as well as Plautus, Terence and the tragedies of Seneca; the prose authors recommended are Cicero, Livy and Sallust.

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  • Among the Latin authors studied were Virgil and Lucan, with selections from Horace, Ovid and Juvenal, besides Cicero and Quintilian, Sallust and Curtius, Caesar and Livy.

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  • At the grammar school of Stratford-on-Avon, about 1671-1677, Shakespeare presumably studied Terence, Horace, Ovid and the Bucolics of Baptista Mantuanus (1502).

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  • In the early plays he quotes Ovid and Seneca.

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  • 10; Ovid, Metam.

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  • 63; Ovid, Am.

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  • 3, 22; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Ovid, Fasti, vi.

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  • Among his lost works may be mentioned: Aetolica, a prose history of Aetolia; Heteroeumena, a mythological epic, used by Ovid in the Metamorphoses and epitomized by Antoninus Liberalis; Georgica and Melissourgica, of which considerable fragments are preserved, said to have been imitated by Virgil (Quintilian x.

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  • 16), imitated by Ovid, and frequently quoted by Pliny and other writers.

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  • Vollgraff, Nikander and Ovid (Groningen, 1909 foil.).

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  • The ghosts had to be driven out of the house, and Ovid (Fasti,

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  • The chief towns of Upper Moesia were: Singidunum (Belgrade), Viminacium (sometimes called municipium Aelium; Kostolatz), Bononia (Widdin), Ratiaria (Artcher): of Lower Moesia; Oescus (colonia Ulpia, Gigen), Novae (near Sistova, the chief seat of Theodoric), Nicopolis ad Istrum (Nikup), really on the Iatrus or Yantra, Odessus (Varna), Tomi (Kustendje), to which the poet Ovid was banished.

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  • The metamorphoses of Scylla and of Picus, king of the Ausonians, by Circe, are narrated in Ovid (Metamorphoses, xiv.).

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  • A statue of Ovid stands in the main square of Constantza.

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  • 12; Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • This story is told by Ovid (Metam.

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  • Akontios), in Greek legend, a beautiful youth of the island of Ceos, the hero of a love-story told byCallimachus in a poem now lost, which forms the subject of two of Ovid's Heroides (xx., xxi.).

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  • In Ovid (Fasti, iv.

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  • They were introduced into Rome from lower Italy by way of Etruria, and held in secret, attended by women only, on three days in the year in the grove of Simila (Stimula, Semele; Ovid, Fasti, vi.

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  • 15; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Moving westward across Scythia, and hence called Metanastae, they were on the lower Danube by the time of Ovid, and about A.D.

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  • The fact of his being addressed by Ovid in one of the epistles Ex Ponto shows that he was alive long after Aemilius Macer.

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  • See Ovid, Tristia, iv.

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  • p. 541; for Macer Iliacus see Ovid, Ex Ponto, ii.

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  • ACASTUS, in Greek legend, the son of Pelias, king of Iolcus in Thessaly (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Amphion married Niobe, and killed himself after the loss of his wife and children (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 39), and, on the S., towards Laurentum at the 6th mile, where sacrifice to Terminus was made (Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • Later, he was represented as a king of that district, rich in flocks and herds, and owner of the garden of the Hesperides, who was turned into a rocky mountain when Perseus, to punish him for his inhospitality, showed him the Gorgon's head (Ovid, Metam.

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  • He was buried or mysteriously disappeared on one of the islands in the Adriatic called after him Diomedeae, his sorrowing companions being changed into birds by the gods out of compassion (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Among the Romans, Ovid (Amor.

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  • See the Homeric hymn to Demeter, 153,474; Ovid, 1l?etam.

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  • 1-5; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Ovid expresses the grounds of that esteem when he characterizes him as "Ingenio maximus, arte rudis."

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  • 290 (Sulmo, esp. Ovid, e.g.

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  • Two festivals called Faunalia were celebrated in honour of Faunus, one on the 13th of February in his temple on the island in the Tiber, the other in the country on the 5th of December (Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • 23; Ovid, Fasti, vi.

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  • 2.3; Ovid, Metam.

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  • That the Romans had borrowed some things in the art of hunting from the Gauls may be inferred from the name canis gallicus (Spanish galgo) for a greyhound, which is to be met with both in Ovid and Martial; also in the words (canis) vertragus and segusius, both of Celtic origin.'

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  • This is all we know for certain about the goddess and her cult; but the name naturally suggested myth-making, and Anna became a figure in stories which may be read in Ovid (l.c.) and in Silius Italicus (8.50 foil.).

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  • The coarse myth told by Ovid, in which Anna plays a trick on Mars when in love with Minerva, is probably an old Italian folk-tale, poetically applied to the persons of these deities when they became partially anthropomorphized under Greek influence.

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  • Subsequently Areas, when hunting, chanced to pursue his mother Callisto, who had been transformed into a bear, as far as the temple of Lycaean Zeus; to prevent the crime of matricide Zeus transported them both to the heavens (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 254; Ovid, Metam.

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  • By the command of the god he bathed in the river Pactolus, which henceforth became auriferous (Ovid, Metam.

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  • A lover of music, he invented the shepherd's pipe, said to have been made from the reed into which the nymph Syrinx was transformed when fleeing from his embraces (Ovid, Metam.

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  • They were said to have been the playmates of Persephone, and, after her rape by Pluto, to have sought for her in vain over the whole earth (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Cretan coins represent the infant Zeus being suckled by the goat; other Greek coins exhibit him suspended from its teats or carried in the arms of a nymph (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • Ovid (Metam.

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  • By throwing a stone among them Cadmus caused them to fall upon each other till only five survived, who assisted him to build the Cadmeia or citadel of Thebes and became the founders of the noblest families of that city (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 535) and Ovid (Her.

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  • 8; Ovid, Metam.

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  • pp. 287-293), from which it is difficult to see how ancient critics could have regarded him as the master of Ovid or Catullus.

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  • 21; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Examples of the work in this direction of Ovid, Claudian, Ausonius and other late Latin poets have been preserved, but it is particularly those of Horace which have given this character to the epistles in verse which form so very characteristic a section of French poetry.

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  • His "Eloisa to Abelard" (1717) is carefully modelled on the form of Ovid's "Heroides," while in his Moral Essays he adopts the Horatian formula for the epistle.

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  • The later Roman conception (Ovid, Metam.

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  • The Greeks and Romans, not understanding the meaning of this attitude, made him the god of silence (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 269, " Non qui tempore Caesaris secundi Aeterno coluit Tomos reatu I Nec qui consimili deinde casu I Ad vulgi tenuem strepentis auram I Irati fuit histrionis exul," lines which by the exact parallel drawn between Ovid's fate and Juvenal's imply the belief that Juvenal died in exile.

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  • The shade of Achilles afterwards appeared to the returning Greeks in the Thracian Chersonese and demanded the sacrifice of Polyxena, who was put to death by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, on his father's grave (Ovid, Metam.

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  • According to the story told by Ovid (Metam.

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  • 4; Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • See Euripides, Bacchae, passim; Ovid, Metam.

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  • 4, 3; Ovid, Metam.

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  • He assisted the expedition in various ways (Athenaeus, loc. cit.; see also Ovid, Metam.

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  • Like Ovid and many other poets, Petrarch felt no inclination for his father's profession.

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  • According to Ovid (Metam.

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  • Her temple at Rome, dedicated by Appius Claudius Caecus (296 B.C.) during a battle with the Samnites and Etruscans (Ovid, Fasti vi.

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  • That he possessed considerable literary abilities, and that these were carefully trained, we gather, both from the speeches which Tacitus puts into his mouth, and from the reputation he left as an orator, as attested by Suetonius and Ovid, and from the extant fragments of his works.

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  • At the wedding a quarrel took place between the rivals, and Phineus was turned to stone by the sight of the Gorgon's head (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 64; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Arachne hanged herself in despair; but the goddess out of pity loosened the rope, which became a cobweb, while Arachne herself was changed into a spider (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Hence we find Neapolis variously styled - by Horace otiosa Neapolis, by Martial docta Parthenope, by Ovid in otia natam Parthenopen.

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  • Of the Roman processions, the most prominent was that of the Triumph, which had its origin in the return of the victorious army headed by the general, who proceeded in great pomp from the Campus to the Capitol to offer sacrifice, accompanied by the army, captives, spoils, the chief magistrate, priests bearing the images of the gods, amidst strewing of flowers, burning of incense and the like (Ovid, Trist.

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  • There are many variations in the later forms of the story (notably in Ovid, Metam.

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  • According to another view, he was the god of good counsel, who was said to have " advised " Romulus to carry off the Sabine women (Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • Ovid >>

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  • 4; Ovid, Fasti, i.

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  • Ovid (Met.

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  • Like others who have gone through the conventional course of instruction, he kept a place in his memory for the various charms of Virgil and Horace, of Tacitus and Ovid; but the master whose page by night and by day he turned with devout hand, was the copious, energetic, flexible, diversified and brilliant genius of the declamations for Archias the poet and for Milo, against Catiline and against Antony, the author of the disputations at Tusculum and the orations against Verres.

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  • According to others, the Dioscuri had carried off the daughters of Leucippus, who had been betrothed to the Apharetidae (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • 47; Ovid, Metam.

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  • In the country feast of the vintage, held at the time of the gathering of the grapes, and the city festival of March 17th called Liberalia (Ovid, Fasti, 111.

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  • There was a spring dedicated to Mercury between his temple and the Porta Capena; every shopman drew water from this spring on the 15th of May, and sprinkled it with a laurel twig over his head and over his goods, at the same time entreating Mercury to remove from his head and his goods the guilt of all his deceits (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • The only reference to him in any ancient writer is incidental (Ovid, Ex Ponto, iv.

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  • About the same time (1457-1501) there appeared in Ragusa the poet Menchetich, who wrote nearly four hundred love-songs and elegies, taking Ovid as his model, and George Drzhich (1460-1510), author of many erotic poems and of a drama.

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  • The subjects of most of his dramas were taken from Latin and Italian poets (Atalanta after Ovid, Lavinia after Virgil, Armida after Tasso); but at least in two dramas, Pavlimir and Tsaptislava, he displayed some originality, taking his themes from Servian national history.

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  • 1087; Ovid, Metam.

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  • See Ovid, Metam.

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  • The school grew in numbers, and Barnes occupied all his spare time in assiduous study, reading during these years authors so diverse in character as Herodotus, Sallust, Ovid, Petrarch, Buffon and Burns.

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  • She was beloved by Apollo, and when pursued by him was changed by her mother Gaea into a laurel tree sacred to the god (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Homer, Odyssey, ix.; Ovid, Metam.

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  • In spite of the Etruscan domination, the Faliscans preserved many traces of their Italic origin, such as the worship of the deities Juno Quiritis (Ovid, Fasti, vi.

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  • Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • 12, 13; Ovid, Metam.

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  • This is the account of his death given in the Ajax of Sophocles (Pindar, Nemea, 7; Ovid, Met.

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  • Ovid, Am.

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  • 14.15; Euripides, Ion; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Theseus, who happened to be present, assisted Peirithous, and the Centaurs were driven off (Plutarch, Theseus, 30; Ovid, Metam.

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  • At a later time the festival extended over five days, the last four being chiefly occupied with gladiatorial shows - because Minerva was the goddess of war (Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • 30; Ovid, Fasti, vi.

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  • 28; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Ovid, Fasti i.

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  • What are the limits on Ovid's boldness in using Latin and deploying the elegiac couplet?

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  • His blood, gushing forth from beneath, was metamorphosed by Galatea into the river bearing his name (now Fiume di Jaci), which was celebrated for the coldness of its waters (Ovid, 750; Silius Italicus, Punica, xiv.

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  • 4, 2; Ovid, Metam.

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  • 10, 1; Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • Burmann edited the following classical authors: - Phaedrus (1698); Horace (1699); Valerius Flaccus (1702); Petronius Arbiter (1709); Velleius Paterculus (1719); Quintilian (1720); Justin (1722); Ovid (1727); Poetae Latini minores (1731); Suetonius (1736); Lucan (1740).

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  • 761 and Servius, ad loc.; Ovid, Fasti, iii.

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  • 6.7; Ovid, Fasti, i.

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  • We learn from Ovid that Propertius was his senior, but also his friend and companion; and that he was third in the sequence of elegiac poets, following Gallus, who was born in 69 B.C., and Tibullus, and immediately preceding Ovid himself, who was born in 43 B.C. We shall not then be far wrong in supposing that he was born about 50 B.C. His early life was full of misfortune.

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  • He was urged to take up a pleader's profession; but, like Ovid, he found in letters and gallantry a more congenial pursuit.

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  • Amongst these may be mentioned Virgil, the epic poet Ponticus, Bassus (probably the iambic poet of the name), and at a later period Ovid.

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  • There is hardly a page of Ovid which does not show obligations to his poems, while other writers made a more sparing use of his stories.

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  • Ovid thus assigns Propertius his place: successor fuit hic (Tibullus), tibi, Galle: Propertius illi (Tibullo): Quartus ab his serie temporis ipse fui (Tr.

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  • For Ovid's friendship with Propertius see below-iv.

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  • 139 and Servius ad loc.; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • The story of Orpheus, as was to be expected of a legend told both by Ovid and Boetius, retained its popularity throughout the middle ages and was transformed into the likeness of a northern fairy tale.

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  • Her chief festivals were the ludi Cereris or Cerealia (more correctly, Cerialia), games held annually from April 12-19 (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • The university of Indianapolis (1896) is a loose association of three really independent institutions - the Indiana Law School (1894), the Indiana Dental College (1879), and Butler University (chartered in 1849 and opened in 1855 as the North-western Christian University, and named Butler University in 1877 in honour of Ovid Butler, a benefactor).

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  • In art Flora was represented as a beautiful maiden, bedecked with flowers (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • The island having been depopulated by a pestilence, Zeus changed the ants upon it into human beings (Ovid, Met.

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  • In Ovid (Metam.

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  • 19 B.C.), but was no longer alive when Ovid wrote (c. A.D.

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  • Ovid in his Fasti, ii.

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  • The cypress was the tree into which Cyparissus, a beautiful youth beloved by Apollo, was transformed, that he might grieve to all time (Ovid, Met.

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  • I also read Tibullus, Catullus, Propertius, Horace (with Dacier's and Torrentius's notes), Virgil, Ovid's Epistles, with l"leziriac's commentary, the Ars amandi and the Elegies; likewise the Augustus and Tiberius of Suetonius, and a Latin translation of Dion Cassius from the death of Julius Caesar to the death of Augustus.

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  • Erysichthon (" tearer up of the earth "), son of Triopas or Myrmidon, having cut down the trees in a grove sacred to the goddess, was punished by her with terrible hunger (Callimachus, Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Metam.

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  • She was identified with Fauna, and by later syncretism also with Ops and Maiathe latter no doubt because the dedication-day of her temple on the Aventine was 1st May (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • A wellknown Lapith was Caeneus, said to have been originally a girl named Caenis, the favourite of Poseidon, who changed her into a man and made her invulnerable (Ovid, Melon.

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  • 7, 2; Ovid, Metam.

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  • A complete translation of Ovid's Metamorphoses (he had published six books with the Heroic Epistles some years previously) followed in 1697.

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  • 4 Hymn to Demeter; Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • 1; Ovid, Heroides, xiii.; Philostratus, Heroica, iii.

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  • It is a mosaic from Virgil, Ovid, Lucan and Fortunatus, composed in the manner of Einhard's use of Suetonius, and exhibits a true poetic gift.

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  • 23; Ovid, Metam.

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  • She was acquitted by Agamemnon; but, as Polymestor foretold, she was turned into a dog, and her grave became a mark for ships (Ovid, Metam.

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  • and serving him up to the gods at table, in order to test their powers of observation (Ovid, Metam.

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  • His companions were changed into birds, called Memnonides, which came every year to fight and lament over his grave, which was variously located (Ovid, Metam.

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  • Ovid, Fast.

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  • She receives a crown as a bridal gift, which is placed amongst the stars, while she herself is honoured as a goddess (Ovid, Metam.

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  • In this festival Pales was invoked to grant protection and increase to flocks and herds; the shepherds entreated forgiveness for any unintentional profanation of holy places of which their flocks might have been guilty, and leaped three times across bonfires of hay and straw (Ovid, Fasti, iv.

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  • Even in private houses at Rome, so late as the time of Ovid, the porter was chained.

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  • Both were happy at the result; but forgetting to thank the goddess for the apples, they were led by her to a religious crime, and were transformed into lions by the goddess Cybele (Ovid, Metam.

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  • 59; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • 5; Ovid, Metam.

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  • Aeschylus and Sophocles wrote tragedies upon it; Ovid has described it at length in his Metamorphoses.

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  • He afterwards retired to Crete, where he lived the life of a hunter with Artemis; but having threatened to exterminate all living creatures on the island, he was killed by the bite of a scorpion sent by the earth-goddess (Ovid, Fasti, v.

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  • 118), Ovid (Met.

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  • _ Ovid, Metam.

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  • Neckam also wrote Corrogationes Promethei, a scriptural commentary prefaced by a treatise on grammatical criticism; a translation of Aesop into Latin elegiacs (six fables from this version, as given in a Paris MS., are printed in Robert's Fables inedites); commentaries, still unprinted, on portions of Aristotle, Martianus Capella and Ovid's Metamorphoses, and other works.

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  • There is a touching epistle (Medea to Jason) in the Heroides of Ovid.

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  • Among the Romans the use of religious fumigations long preceded the introduction of foreign substances for the purpose (see, for example, Ovid, Fast.

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  • 65) became very prevalent, not only in religious ceremonials, but also on various state occasions, such as in triumphs (Ovid, Trist.

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  • 64-67, 70, 82; Ovid, Fasti, ii.

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  • 540 B.C.), partly from its copper mines (Ovid, Met.

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  • Ovid also mentions its sheep (Met.

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  • The extracts from Cicero and Ovid, Origen and St John, Chrysostom, Augustine and Jerome are but specimens of a useful custom which reaches its culminating paint in book xxviii., which is devoted entirely to the writings of St Bernard.

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  • AGONALIA, in ancient Rome, festivals celebrated on the 9th of January, 17th of March, 21st of May, and 11th of December in each year in honour of various divinities (Ovid, Fasti, 319-332).

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  • He wrote a Theseis, referred to in a letter from his intimate friend Ovid (Ex Ponto, iv.

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  • Three elegies were formerly attributed to Pedo by Scaliger; two on the death of Maecenas (In Obitum Maecenatis and De Verbis Maecenatis moribundi), and one addressed to Livia to console her for the death of her son Drusus (Consolatio ad Liviam de Morte Drusi or Epicedion Drusi, usually printed with Ovid's works); but it is now generally agreed that they are not by Pedo.

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  • and no trace of the poem before the publication of the editio princeps of Ovid in 1471.

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  • He anticipated Ovid in recalling the stories of Greek mythology to a second poetical life.

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  • The greatest masters of this kind of poetry are the elegiac poets of the Augustan age - Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid.

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  • Propertius is a less accomplished artist and a less equably pleasing writer than either Tibullus or Ovid, but he shows more power of dealing gravely with a great or tragic situation than either of them, and his diction and rhythm give frequent proof of a concentrated force of conception and a corresponding movement of imaginative feeling which remind us of Lucretius.

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  • The most facile and brilliant of the elegiac poets and the least serious in tone and spirit is P. Ovidius Naso or Ovid (43 B.C. - A.D.

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  • In Ovid we have both.

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  • As Virgil marks the point of maturest excellence in poetic diction and rhythm, Ovid marks that of the greatest facility.

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  • Virgil in a supreme degree, and Horace, Propertius and Ovid in a less degree, had expressed in their poetry the romance of the past.

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  • Although there are some works of this so-called Silver Age of considerable and one at least of supreme interest, from the insight they afford into the experience of a century of organized despotism and its effect on the spiritual life of the ancient world, it cannot be doubted that the steady literary decline which characterized the last centuries of paganism was beginning before the death of Ovid and Livy.

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  • The vigorous vitality which gives interest to the personality of Catullus, Propertius and Ovid no longer characterizes their successors.

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  • To the women is committed the worship of the "blazing hearth," Vesta, the natural centre of the family life, and it is noticeable that even to Ovid (Fast.

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  • 569; Ovid, Metaan.

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  • With Horace and Tibullus he was on intimate terms, and Ovid expresses his gratitude to him as the first to notice and encourage his work.

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  • 60; Ovid, Ars.

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