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ovary

ovary

ovary Sentence Examples

  • There is usually no trace of ovary in the male flowers, though by exception one may occasionally be formed.

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  • The seed is enclosed when ripe in the fruit, a development of the ovary as a result of fertilization of the egg-cell.

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  • Ovary in dorsal valve.

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  • The ovary consists of numerous carpels united together and free, or more or less embedded in the top of the flower-stalk.

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  • and Sambucus, more rarely two-lipped as in Lonicera; the sepals and petals are usually five in number and placed above the ovary, the five stamens are attached to the corolla-tube, there are three to five carpels, and the fruit is a berry as in honeysuckle or snowberry (Symphoricarpus), or a stone fruit, with several, usually three, stones, as in Sambucus.

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  • The closed ovary implies a mode of fertilization which is profoundly different, and which was probably correlated with a simultaneous development of insect life.

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  • Only the left ovary becomes functional, with rare individual exceptions.

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  • In addition to these modifications, which are common to nearly all orchids, there are others generally but not so universally met with; among them is the displacement of the flower arising from the twisting of the inferior ovary, in consequence of which the flower is so completely turned round that the "lip," which originates in that part of the flower, conventionally called the posterior or superior part, or that S c ?

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  • The ovary, three-celled at first, but becoming one-celled and one-seeded by abortion, is surmounted by an inconspicuous perianth with six small teeth.

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  • An orchid flower has an inferior ovary like that just s, sl -- --s[  !

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  • As an example of the former it has been shown (Beddard) that a large median sac in Lybiodrilus is at first freely open to the coelom, that it later becomes shut off from the same, that it then acquires an external orifice, and, finally, that it encloses the ovary or ovaries, between which and the exterior a passage is thus effected.

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  • The ovary is three-celled, and lies at the bottom of this tube.

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  • In the succeeding January or February it sends up its leaves, together with the ovary, which perfects its seeds during the summer.

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  • These segments spring apparently from the top of the ovary - the real explanation, however, being that the end of the flower-stalk or "thalamus," as it grows, becomes dilated into a sort of cup or tube enclosing and indeed closely adhering to the ovary, so that the latter organ appears to be beneath the perianth instead of above it as in a lily, an appearance which has given origin to the term "inferior ovary."

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  • These stamens encircle a style which is the upward continuation of the ovary, and which shows at its free end traces of the three originally separate but now blended carpels of which the ovary consists.

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  • The ovary and testes are heaped-up masses of red or yellow cells due to a proliferation of the cells lining the coelom.

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  • In most orchids the only stamen developed to maturity is the posterior one of the three opposite to the lip (anterior before the twisting of the ovary), the other two, as well as all three inner ones, being entirely absent, or present only in the form of rudiments.

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  • The male gametophyte is sometimes represented by a transitory prothallial cell;, the two male cells are carried passively down into the ovary and into the mouth of the ovule by means of the pollen-tube.

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  • Those germs which do not ripen during the season undergo a process of resorption, and in the winter the whole ovary dwindles to often a diminutive size.

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  • This is clearly the same process in essence as that of the formation of a vitellogenous gland from part of the primitive ovary, or of the feeding of an ovarian egg by the absorption of neighbouring potential eggs; but here the period at which the sacrifice of one egg to another takes place is somewhat late.

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  • 13) in the female are paired, each ovary consisting of a variable number of tubes (one in the bristle-tail Campodea and fifteen hundred in a queen termite) in which the eggs are developed.

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  • In the male of Phyllodromia the rudiment of a vestigial ovary becomes separated from the developing testis, indicating perhaps an originally hermaphrodite condition.

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  • In the female the ovary is a large unpaired organ from the anterior end of which arise two oviducts, and connected with the latter are a pair of large so-called copulatory pouches, which perhaps act as receptacula seminis.

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  • The ovary is double, and the oviducts open by a median ventral pore about the middle of the body; in this region there is a second swelling.

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  • p, a thickened line on the walls forming the placenta; c, calyx; d, ovary; s, hooded stigma terminating the short style.

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  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

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  • The plants have a short rhizome and narrow or lanceolate basal leaves; and they are characterized by the ovary being often half-inferior.

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  • The tribe Ophiopogonoideae, with its tendency to an inferior ovary, suggests an affinity with the Amaryllidaceae which resemble Liliaceae in habit and in the horizontal plan of the flower, but have an inferior ovary.

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  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.

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  • The large showy flowers are visited by insects for the honey which is secreted by a ring-like disk below the ovary; large Convolvulus sepium, slightly reduced.

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  • The ovary bears a sessile stigma and is more or less completely two-celled, with two erect ovules in each cell.

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  • (The ovary (a) leads into (bb) the oviduct, which is joined at (g) by the duct of the yolk-glands (h, h, Y).

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  • In the male of Phyllodromia the rudiment of a vestigial ovary becomes separated from the developing testis, indicating perhaps an originally hermaphrodite condition.

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  • The ovary bears a sessile stigma and is more or less completely two-celled, with two erect ovules in each cell.

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  • In C. nigrescens and in some other species a zooid may contain a pair of ovaries, a pair of testes, or an ovary and a testis, although the males, females and hermaj phrodites do not differ from one another in external characters.

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  • The ovule is not enclosed in an ovary, and the usually solitary macrospore becomes filled with a prothallus, in the upper part of which are formed several rudimentary archegonia.

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  • The ANGIOSFERMS, which are much the larger class, derive their name from the fact that the carpel or carpels form a closed chamber, the ovary, in which the ovules are developedassociated with this is the development of a receptive or stigmatic surface on which the pollen grain is deposited.

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  • Within the perianth, and springing from its sides, or apparently from the top of the ovary, are six stamens whose anthers contain pulverulent pollen-grains.

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  • c, The one-celled ovary cut a, The anther, con transversely, having three taining pollen parietal placentas.

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  • A stage exactly comparable to the stage in the leeches, where the ovary is surrounded by a closed sac, has been observed in Eudrilus.

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  • The sole difference is therefore that in Eudrilus the ovarian sac gives rise to a tube which bifurcates, one branch meeting a corresponding branch of the other ovary of the pair, while the second branch reaches the exterior.

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  • The ovary, of two carpels, is seated on a ring-like disk FIG.

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  • The pistil consists of a single carpel with its ovary, style, stigma and solitary ovule or twin ovules.

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  • The pistil, which is above the rest of the members of the flower, consists of two carpels joined at their edges to form the ovary, which becomes two-celled by subsequent ingrowth of a septum from these united edges; a row of ovules springs from each edge.

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  • p. 152.) in regard to the ovary, and by Benham (14) in regard to the testis.

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  • The eggs are fertilized, practically in the ovary, and develop in situ.

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  • terminating the short annual shoot which bears a whorl of four or more leaves below the flower; in this and in some species of the nearly allied genus Trillium (chiefly temperate North America) the flowers have a fetid smell, which together with the dark purple of the ovary and stigmas and frequently also of the stamens and petals, attracts carrion-loving flies, which alight on the stigma and then climb the anthers and become dusted with pollen; the pollen is then carried to the stigmas of another flower.

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  • The ovary is generally two-chambered, with two inverted ovules standing side by side at the inner angle of each chamber.

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  • Each has a small calyx in the form of a shallow rim, sometimes five-lobed or toothed; five petals, which cohere by their tips and form a cap or hood, which is pushed off when the stamens are ripe; and five free stamens, placed opposite the petals and springing from a fleshy ring or disk surrounding the ovary; each bears a twocelled anther.

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  • The female flower consists of a cup-like receptacle, inseparate from the ovary, and bearing at its upper part a bract and two bracteoles.

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  • The one-celled ovary is immersed within the receptacular tube, and is surmounted by a short style with two short ribbon-like stigmatic branches.

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  • C, Epibdella hippoglossi (from Halibut); ms, the two adoral suckers with the mouth (m) between them; ps, ventral sucker; ov, ovary, to testes.

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  • The ovary (a) leads into (bb) the oviduct, which is joined at (g) by the duct of the yolk-glands (h).

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  • (Xioo.) reproductive system; C, Cirrus; H, hooks on the ventral sucker; I, small piece of the intestine to show its connexion with the reproductive organs by the narrow duct that passes from it to the union of the vaginae; M, mouth; 0, ovary; S, oral sucker; SC, sucker; SH, shell-gland; T, Testis; U, uterus; V, vaginal pore; Y, yolkgland.

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  • The ovary (o) and the testis (t) of Ectoprocta are developed on the body-wall, on the stomach, or on the funiculus.

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  • The ovary, of two carpels, is seated on a ring-like disk FIG.

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  • The pistil, which is above the rest of the members of the flower, consists of two carpels joined at their edges to form the ovary, which becomes two-celled by subsequent ingrowth of a septum from these united edges; a row of ovules springs from each edge.

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  • The ovary has many cavities with a large number of ovules attached to its walls, and is surmounted by a flat stigma of many radiating rows as in a poppy.

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  • whitish to 3, Ovary cut lengthwise.

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  • There are three pairs of spermathecae situated in segments III-V, a testis in V and an ovary in VI.

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  • op., Operculum, or ventral lip. ov., Ovary.

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  • Ovary.

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  • 4, Ovary.

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  • 1 being the label ps, The superior division or lum, here inferior the labellum, which may by the twisting become inferior by the of the ovary.

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  • twisting of the ovary.

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  • its two pollen-masses in o, The twisted ovary.

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  • e, Ovary.

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  • sperm, spermatheca; sp. o, its external orifice; sp. sac, spermathecal sac; ov, sac containing ovary;.

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  • ov, Ovary.

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  • a, Ovary.

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  • b, pair of bracteoles below the flower; s, sepals; p, petals; st, stamens; o, ovary.

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  • The parts of the flower are in fives in calyx, corolla and stamens, followed by two carpels which unite to form a superior ovary.

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  • The anomalous position of the stamens in front of the petals is explained by the abortion or non-development of an outer row of stamens, indications of which are sometimes seen on the hypogynous disk encircling the ovary.

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  • o, Ovary.

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  • In some Gymnolaemata, polypides which develop an ovary possess a flask-shaped "intertentacular organ," situated between two of the tentacles, and affording a direct passage into the introvert for the eggs or even the spermatozoa developed in the same zooecium.

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  • The flowers are regular, with a perianth springing from above the ovary, tubular below, with spreading segments and a central corona; the six stamens are inserted within the tube.

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  • In the male flowers, which are numerous, the stamens are sixteen in number and arranged in pairs; the female flowers are solitary, with traces of stamens, and a smooth ovary with one ovule in each of the eight cells - the ovary is surmounted by four styles, which are hairy at the base.

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  • At the base of the tube, in both groups, the ovary becomes developed into a fleshy (often edible) fruit, that produced by the Opuntia being known as the prickly pear or Indian fig.

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  • In the female, each ovary consists of a large number of ovarian tubes, in which swollen chambers containing the egg-cells alternate with smaller chambers enclosing nutrient material.

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  • The ovary is threecelled, ripening into a three-celled capsule.

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  • The sexes are not distinct, the sexual organs being represented by a pair of testes and a single ovary, which open together into the posterior end of the alimentary canal.

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  • a, ovary; b, oval stylite (?); c, mouth; d., alimentary canal; e...e, legs.

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  • The cup-shaped flowers have six regular segments in two rows, as many free stamens, and a three-celled ovary with a sessile stigma, which ripens into a leathery many-seeded capsule.

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  • - Rotifera are unisexual, with the sexes dimorphic. The ovary is, as in many Platyhelminthes, duplex; one part, the germary, being an organ for the production by cell multiplication of the germ-cells or eggs.

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  • The whole ovary is unilateral and unpaired in most rotifers; symmetrical in Asplanchnaceae, Philodinaceae and Seisonaceae.

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  • As a rule, the wall of the ovary is continued into a uterine tube opening into the cloaca; but in Philodinaceae this is absent, and the young are free in the body cavity and escape by perforating the cloacal walls.

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  • Germary and ovary paired; oviduct absent; young viviparous.

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  • The left inner gill-plate is also snipped to show the subjacent orifices of the left renal organ x, and of the genital gland (testis or ovary) y.

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  • These forms are hermaphrodite, with an ovary and testis completely separate from each other on each side of the body, each having its own duct and aperture.

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  • When the follicle bursts, as it does in time, the ovum escapes on to the surface of the ovary.

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  • That end of each which lies in front of the ovary is called the fimbriated extremity, and has a number of fringes (fimbriae) hanging from it; one of the largest of these is the ovarian fimbria and is attached to the upper or tubal pole of the ovary.

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  • 6) the Fallopian tube and ovary Parovarium Ligament Fallopian tube I Ovary of ovary Hydatid Fimbriated end of tube Round ligament Broad ligament are pulled out from the uterus; this, as has been explained, is not the position of the ovary in the living body, nor is it of the tube, the outer half of which lies folded on the front and inner surface of the ovary.

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  • Above, there is the Fallopian tube, already described; below and in front is the round ligament; behind, the ovary projects backward, and just above this, when the broad ligament is stretched out as in fig.

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  • The epoophoron or parovarium is a collection of short tubes which radiate from the upper border of the ovary when the broad ligament is pulled out as in fig.

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  • Near the ovary the tubes are closed, but nearer the Fal lopian tube they open into another tube which is nearly at right angles to them, and which runs toward the uterus, though in the human subject is generally lost before reaching that organ.

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  • a, b and c, the isthmus tubae, the ligament of the ovary, and the round ligament of the right side cut short.

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  • Mesonephric cords appear as in the male; they do not enter the ovary, however, but form a transitory network (rete ovarii) in the mesovarium.

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  • The ovary is an organ which in shape and size somewhat resembles a large almond, though its appearance varies considerably in different individuals, and at different times of life.

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  • Its more pointed lower end iš attached to the uterus by the ligament of the ovary, while its anterior border has a short reflection of peritoneum, known as the mesovarium, running forward to the broad ligament of the uterus.

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  • Under the microscope the ovary is seen to be covered by a FIG.

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  • Within these are six stamens, a hairy ovary surmounted by two feathery styles which ripens into the fruit (grain), and which is invested by the husk formed by the persistent glume and pale.

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  • In the majority of Platyelmia the primitive ovary becomes divided into fertile and sterile portions, i.e.

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  • There are five, or sometimes fewer, carpels, which unite to form an ovary with as many chambers, in each of which are one or two, rarely more, pendulous anatropous ovules, attached to the central column in such a way that the micropyle points outwards and the raphe is turned towards the placenta.

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  • A widespread disease known as pocket-plums or bladderplums is due to an ascomycetous fungus, Exoascus pruni, the mycelium of which lives parasitically in the tissues of the host plant, passes into the ovary of the flower and causes the characteristic malformation of the fruit which becomes a deformed, sometimes curved or flattened, wrinkled dry structure, with a hollow occupying the place of the stone; the bladder plums are yellow at first, subsequently dingy red.

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  • b, buccal mass; m, retractor muscles of the buccal mass; ov, ovary; od, oviduct; i, coils of intestines; ao, aorta; c', left auricle; c, ventricle.

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  • The sexes are distinct, and the ovary is frequently greenish in colour, the testis red.

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  • Ovary cut across.

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  • The numerous stamens surround the ovary, which is composed of 4 to 16 carpels and is surmounted by a flat or convex rayed disk bearing the stigmas.

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  • The ovary is incompletely divided into many chambers by the ingrowth of the placentas which bear numerous ovules and form in the fruit a many-seeded short capsule opening by small valves below the upper edge.

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  • The carpel, or aggregate of carpels forming the pistil or gynaeceum, comprises an ovary containing one or more ovules and a receptive surface or stigma; the stigma is sometimes carried up on a style.

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  • When placed on the stigma, under favourable circumstances, the pollen-grain puts forth a pollen-tube which grows down the tissue of the style to the ovary, and makes its way along the placenta, guided by projections or hairs, to the mouth of an ovule.

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  • The ovary contains one or more ovules borne on a placenta, which is generally some part of the ovary-wall.

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  • In Casuarina, Juglans and the order Corylaceae, the pollen-tube does not enter by means of the micropyle, but passing down the ovary wall and through the placenta, enters at the chalazal end of the ovule.

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  • Meanwhile the ovary wall has developed to form the fruit or pericarp, the structure of which is closely associated with the manner of distribution of the seed.

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  • Frequently the influence of fertilization is felt beyond the ovary, and other parts of the flower take part in the formation of the fruit, as the floral receptacle in the apple, strawberry and others.

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  • In Gymnosperms we have seeds, and the carpels may become modified and close around these, as in Pinus, during the process of ripening to form an imitation of a box-like fruit which subsequently opening allows the seeds to escape; but there is never in them the closed ovary investing from the outset the ovules, and ultimately forming the ground-work of the fruit.

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  • The former comprise three classes, which are distinguished by the relative position of the stamens and ovary; the eleven classes of the latter are based on the same set of characters and fall into the larger subdivisions Apetalae, Monopetalae and Polypetalae, characterized respectively by absence, union or freedom of the petals, and a subdivision, Diclines Irregulares, a very unnatural group, including one class only.

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  • Series 2, Disciflorae, takes its name from a development of the floral axis which forms a ring or cushion at the base of the ovary or is broken up into glands; the ovary is superior.

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  • Of the Gamopetalae, series i, Inferae, has an inferior ovary and stamens usually as many as the corolla-lobes.

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  • Series 2, Heteromerae, has generally a superior ovary, stamens as many as the corolla-lobes or more, and more than two carpels.

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  • Series 3, Bicarpellatae, has generally a superior ovary and usually two carpels.

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  • The eight series of Monochlamydeae, containing 36 orders, form groups characterized mainly by differences in the ovary and ovules, and are now recognized as of unequal value.

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  • The petaloid perianth consists of two series, each with three members, which are joined below into a longer or shorter tube, followed by one whorl of three stamens; the inferior ovary is three-celled and contains numerous ovules on an axile placenta; the style is branched and the branches are often petaloid.

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  • b, b', Upper and lower membranous spathe-like bracts; c, Tube of perianth; d, Ovary; e, Style; f, Stigmas.

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  • f, Ovary.

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  • The superior ovary - half-inferior in Samolus - bears a simple style ending in a capitate entire stigma, and contains a free-central placenta bearing generally a large number of ovules, which are exceptional in the group Gamopetalae in having two integuments.

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  • (P, N, p, n, X I I o.) Samolus, anatropous with the hilum basal - together with the method of dehiscence of the capsule and the relative position of the ovary.

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  • the anthers oblong and converging; the ovary is globose, and has three furrows; the seeds are roundish and black.

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  • The ovary is not visible till nearly midsummer, and is not fully developed before lutumn.

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  • In a few cases two whorls of stamens are present, with three members in each, but generally only three are present; the pistil consists of three or two carpels, united to form an ovary bearing a corresponding number of styles and containing one ovule.

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  • 1, Flower; 2, same flower split open above the ovary; 3, ovary cut across; 1, 2, and 3, about 1/2 nat.

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  • Above the ring of stamens is the ovary itself, upraised on a prolongation of the same stalk which bears the filaments, or sessile.

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  • The stalk supporting the stamens and ovary is called the "gynophore" or the "gynandrophore," and is a characteristic of the order.

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  • The ovary of passionflowers is one-celled with three parietal placentas, and bears at the top three styles, each capped by a large button-like stigma.

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  • The ovary.

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  • The perianth is represented by very rudimentary, small, fleshy scales arising below the ovary, called lodicules; they are elongated FIG.

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  • or truncate, sometimes fringed with hairs, and are in contact with the ovary.

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  • The ovary is small, rounded to elliptical, and one-celled, and contains a single slightly bent ovule sessile on the ventral suture (that is, springing from the back of the ovary); the micropyle points downwards.

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  • The ovary ripens into a usually small ovoid or rounded fruit, which is entirely occupied by the single large seed, from which it is not to be distinguished, the thin pericarp being completely united to its surface.

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  • On the other, posterior, side of the grain is a more or less evident, sometimes punctiform, sometimes elongated or linear mark, the hilum, the place where the ovule was fastened to the wall of the ovary.

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  • yvµvos, naked, nrEp,ua, seed) implies, one characteristic of this group is the absence of an ovary or closed chamber containing the ovules.

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  • In function the perianth may be compared with a unilocular ovary containing a single ovule; the projecting integument, which at the time of pollination secretes a drop of liquid, serves the same purpose as the style and stigma of an angiosperm.

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  • ov, Ovary; cavity, so that primarily the te, testis.

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  • st, Stomodaeum; ov, ovary.

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  • Within these are three stamens surrounding a compressed ovary, with two feathery stigmas.

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  • These several glumes are closely applied one to the other so as to conceal and protect the ovary, D E FIG.

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  • F, Lodicules at base of j, the ovary, surmounted by styles.

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  • The stamens are placed round the base of the ovary, which is rounded or oblong, much smaller than the glumes, covered with down, and surmounted by two short styles, extending into feathery brush-like stigmas.

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  • The ripe fruit or grain, sometimes called the "berry," the matured state of the ovary and its contents, is oblong or ovoid, with a longitudinal furrow on one side.

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  • The ovary adheres firmly to the seed in the interior, so that on examining a longitudinal section of the grain by the microscope the outer layer is seen to consist of epidermal cells, of which the uppermost are prolonged into short hairs to cover the apex of the grain.

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  • Two or three layers of cells inside the epidermis constitute the tissue of the ovary, and overlie somewhat similar layers which form the coats of the seed.

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  • The reproductive organs lie on the left side, near the aboral end, both ovary and testis being present in the same individual in some of the species.

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  • - Ovary of Polygonum Convolvulus in longitudinal section during fertilization.

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  • (X 48.) fs, Stalk-like base of ovary.

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  • The flowers spring from, or are enclosed in, a spathe, and are unisexual and regular, with generally a calyx and corolla, each of three members; the stamens are in whorls of three, the inner whorls are often barren; the two to fifteen carpels form an inferior ovary containing generally numerous ovules on often large, produced, parietal placentas.

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  • Female flowers arranged, two to three together on scale-like structures formed by the union of bracts, in catkins; ovary two-celled; fruit small, flattened, protected between the ripened scales of the catkin.

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  • Ovary two-celled.

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  • Ovary three-celled.

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  • It seems probable that in such cases the spermatozoa make their way from the adherent spermatophore through the body-wall into the body, and so by traversing the tissues reach the ovary.

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  • Spermatozoa are not found in the uterus and oviducts, and it appears probable, as we have said, that they reach the ovary directly by boring through the skin and traversing the body cavity.

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  • 26, o), which is the lower portion enclosing the ovules destined to become seeds, and the stigma (g), a portion of loose cellular tissue, the receptive surface on which the pollen is deposited, which is either sessile on the apex of the ovary, as in the poppy, or is separated from it by a prolonged portion called the style (s) .

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  • 27), Capparidaceae, and some other plants, the ovary is raised upon a distinct stalk termed the gynophore; it is thus separated from the stamens, and is said to be stipitate.

    0
    0
  • - The pistil of Tobacco (Nicotiana Tabacum), consisting of the ovary o, containing ovules, the style s, and the capitate stigma g.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes the twisting of a part makes a change in the position of other parts, as in Orchids, where the twisting of the ovary changes the position of the labellum.

    0
    0
  • - Fruit of Physalis Alkekengi, consisting of the persistent calyx (s), surrounding the berry (fr), derived from the ovary.

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    0
  • The calyx, petals and stamens spring from above the ovary (o) in which two chambers are shown each with a pendulous ovule; d, disc between the stamens and stigmas.

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    0
  • - Flower of Tree waxy lining of the hollow receptacle, Paeony (Paeonia Moutan), as in the rose; or a swelling at the deprived of its corolla, and top of the ovary, as in Umbelliferae, showing the disk in the form in which the disk is said to be of a fleshy expansion (d) ep i gynous.

    0
    0
  • The enlarged torus covering the ovary.

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    0
  • covering the ovary in Nymphaea (Castalia) and Nelumbium may be regarded as a form of disk.

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    0
  • It consists essentially of two parts, a basal portion forming a chamber, the ovary, containing the ovules attached to a part called the placenta, and an upper receptive portion, the stigma, which is either seated on the ovary (sessile), as in the tulip and poppy, or is elevated on a stalk called the style, interposed between the ovary and stigma.

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    0
  • Each carpel has its own ovary, style (when present), and stigma, and may be regarded as formed by a folded leaf, the upper surface of which is turned inwards towards the axis, and the lower outwards, while from its margins are developed one or more ovules.

    0
    0
  • - Pistil of Broom (Cytisus) consisting of ovary o, style s, and stigma t.

    0
    0
  • The pistil is apocarpous, consisting of several distinct carpels, each with ovary, style and stigma.

    0
    0
  • 90), and in this case, when the ovaries form apparently a single body, the organ receives the name of compound ovary; or the union may take place by the ovaries and styles, while the stigmas are disunited; or by the stigmas and the summit of the style only.

    0
    0
  • When the union is incomplete, the number of the parts of a compound pistil may be determined by the number of styles and stigmas; when complete, the external venation, the grooves on the surface, and the internal divisions of the ovary indicate the number.

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    0
  • - Trilocular ovary of the Lily (Lilium), cut transversely.

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    0
  • - Diagrammatic section of a quinquelocular ovary, composed of five carpels, the edges of which are folded inwards, and meet in the centre forming the septa, s.

    0
    0
  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the edges of the carpels, bearing the placentas and ovules o, are not folded inwards.

    0
    0
  • The placentas are parietal, and the ovules appear sessile on the walls of the ovary.

    0
    0
  • The ovary is unilocular.

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    0
  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the septa (s) proceed inwards for a certain length, bearing the placentas and ovules (o).

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    0
  • In this case the ovary is unilocular, and the placentas are parietal.

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    0
  • I, Vertical; 2, horizontal section; c, calyx; d, wall of ovary; o, ovules; p, placenta; s, stigma.

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    0
  • - Diagrammatic section of a compound unilocular ovary, in which there are no indications of partitions.

    0
    0
  • The ovules (o) are attached to a free central placenta, which has no connexion with the walls of the ovary.

    0
    0
  • In Caryophyllaceae, however, while the placenta is free in the centre, there are often traces found at the base of the ovary of the remains of septa, as if rupture had taken place, and, in rare instances, ovules are found on the margins of the carpels.

    0
    0
  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

    0
    0
  • o, Ovary; p, free central placenta; g, ovules; s, styles.

    0
    0
  • - The same cut horizontally, and the halves separated so as to show the interior of the cavity of the ovary o, with the free central placenta p, covered with ovules g.

    0
    0
  • They are often horizontal, as in Cathartocarpus Fistula, where they consist of transverse cellular prolongations from the walls of the ovary, only developed after fertilization, and therefore more properly noticed under fruit.

    0
    0
  • At other times they are vertical, as in Datura, where the ovary, in place of being two-celled, becomes four-celled; in Cruciferae, where the prolongation of the placentas forms a vertical partition; in Astragalus and Thespesia, where the dorsal suture is folded inwards; and in Oxytropis, where the ventral suture is folded inwards.

    0
    0
  • The ovary is usually of a more or less spherical or curved form, sometimes smooth and uniform on its surface, at other times hairy and grooved.

    0
    0
  • In some plants, as many Saxifragaceae, a there are intermediate forms, in which the term half-inferior is applied to the ovary, whilst the floral whorls are halfsuperior.

    0
    0
  • In some cases, owing to more rapid growth of the dorsal side of the ovary, the style becomes lateral (fig.

    0
    0
  • In all these cases the style still indicates the organic apex of the ovary, although it may not be the apparent apex.

    0
    0
  • When in a compound pistil the style of each carpel is thus displaced, it appears as if the ovary were depressed in the centre, and the style rising from the depression in the midst of the carpels seems to come from the torus.

    0
    0
  • Each division of the tricarpellary ovary of Jatropha Curcas has a bifurcate or forked style, and the ovary of Emblica officinalis has three styles, each of which is twice forked.

    0
    0
  • Thus in Campanula a five-cleft stigma indicates five carpels; in Bignoniaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Acanthaceae, the two-lobed or bilamellar stigma indicates a bilocular ovary.

    0
    0
  • - Carpel of Lady's-mantle (Alchemilla) with lateral style s; o, ovary, st, stigma.

    0
    0
  • - Pistil of Primrose (Primula) composed of five carpels which are completely united; o, ovary; s, style; st, stigma.

    0
    0
  • - Gynoecium of the Flowerde-Luce (Iris), consisting of an inferior ovary (o) and a style which divides into three petaloid segments (s), each bearing a stigma (st).

    0
    0
  • The ovule is usually contained in an ovary, and all plants in which the ovule is so enclosed are termed angiospermous; but in Coniferae and Cycadaceae it has no proper ovarian covering, and is called naked, these orders being denominated gymnospermous.

    0
    0
  • In Leontice thalictroides (Blue Cohosh), species of Ophiopogon, Peliosanthes and Stateria, the ovary ruptures immediately after flowering, and the ovules are exposed; and in species of Cuphea the placenta ultimately bursts through the ovary and corolla, and becomes erect, bearing the exposed ovules.

    0
    0
  • The position of the ovule relative to the ovary varies.

    0
    0
  • When there is a single ovule, with its axis vertical, it may be attached to the placenta at the base of the ovary (basal placenta), and is then erect, as in Polygonaceae and Compositae; or it may be inserted a little above the base, on a parietal placenta, with its apex upwards, and then is ascending, as in Parietaria.

    0
    0
  • It may hang from an apicilar placenta at the summit of the ovary, its apex being directed downwards, and is inverted or pendulous, as in Hippuris vulgaris; or from a parietal placenta near the summit, and then is suspended, as in Daphne Mezereum, Polygalaceae and Euphorbiaceae.

    0
    0
  • Sometimes a long funicle arises from a basal placenta, reaches the summit of the ovary, and there bending over suspends the ovule, as in Armeria (sea-pink); at other times the hilum appears to be in the middle, and the ovule becomes horizontal.

    0
    0
  • Thus, in the ovary of Leguminous plants (fig.

    0
    0
  • 112), through the conducting tissue of the style when present, and reach the interior of the ovary in angiosperms, and then pass to the micropyle of the ovule, one pollen-tube going to each ovule.

    0
    0
  • The ovary enlarges, and, with the seeds enclosed, constitutes the fruit, frequently incorporated with which are other parts of the flower, as receptacle, calyx, &c. In gymnosperms the pollen-tubes, having penetrated a certain distance down the tissue of the nucellus, are usually arrested in growth for a longer or shorter period, sometimes nearly a year.

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    0
  • The small sinuous segmented body is enclosed, except for one small opening, in an enormous sac-like carapace, between the lamellae of which are protruded from the body the ovary and " liver," both large, bifurcate and ramified.

    0
    0
  • 15, 7) represents an approach to the angiospermous ovary.

    0
    0
  • This has been regarded by some anatomists as a rudimentary ovary.

    0
    0
  • small persistent, 5-dentate calyx, 5 petals, 1 0 stamens, a sessile 3 to 5-chambered ovary, a long style, and a 3-lobed stigma; fruit trigonal or pentagonal; and seed compressed.

    0
    0
  • Table 2: Treatments for other features of polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS feature Available treatment Comments raised androgen (male sex hormone) level.

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    0
  • cyst on the ovary has diminished 75% Thanks so much.

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    0
  • An ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac which develops in an ovary.

    0
    0
  • The ovary contains many primordial follicles, which are mostly found around the edges of the cortex.

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    0
  • In flowering plants, anther s produce pollen which contains male gametes, and the embryo sac within the ovary contains a female gamete.

    0
    0
  • Meanwhile, by the twelfth week, the indifferent gonad begins to develop into an ovary.

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    0
  • Ovulation induction with urinary follicle stimulating hormone versus human menopausal gonadotropin for clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovary syndrome (Cochrane Review ).

    0
    0
  • The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a short-term gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist protocol in polycystic ovary syndrome.

    0
    0
  • Rarely worms invade the abdominal cavity, causing granulomas of the liver, ovary, kidney, spleen, and lung.

    0
    0
  • hamster ovary cells.

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    0
  • hysterectomy with removal of only her right ovary (she had right sided pelvic pain ).

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    0
  • induction of ovulation in obese infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • Pregnancies and deliveries after in vitro maturation culture followed by in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer without stimulation in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • At birth, the ovary contains around 400 000 primordial follicles which contain primary oocytes.

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    0
  • The patient had undergone hysterectomy (hysterectomy) some years before and the left ovary and tube had not been removed.

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    0
  • I have recently had one ovary removed with cancerous cells.

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    0
  • The young, developing ovary and immature fruit often have the highest concentration of all!

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    0
  • There is a condition known a polycystic ovary, which is a hormonal disorder where the cyst fails to produce an egg.

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    0
  • The consultant couldn't see my left ovary on the scan.

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    0
  • The human ovary holds a fixed number of rudimentary eggs - follicles - which form in the fourth month of pregnancy.

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    0
  • ovary syndrome?

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    0
  • ovary cells.

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    0
  • ovary transplant.

    0
    0
  • ovary cancer.

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    0
  • It is made from genetically altered material based on Chinese hamster ovary cells.

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    0
  • ovary often has sows brought to her that have Cystic Ovaries.

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    0
  • ovulation in obese infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • The pollen grains grow down from the stigma to fertilize the ovules in the ovary at the base of the style.

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    0
  • References: The use of metformin to augment the induction of ovulation in obese infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • pollinated by bees, who come to collect a sweet juicy sap stored round the base of the ovary.

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    0
  • polycystic ovary, which is a hormonal disorder where the cyst fails to produce an egg.

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    0
  • polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • HORMONES Q: I have polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS ), which makes losing weight really difficult.

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    0
  • An ovarian cyst is a fluid filled sac which develops in an ovary.

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    0
  • The male flowers have 4 sepals and 4 stamen s, whilst the females have 4 sepals and a 3- style d ovary.

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    0
  • Verity PCOS Verity are a UK support group for women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

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    0
  • teratoma of the ovary has been recommended following the study of relatively small numbers of patients.

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    0
  • tumors of the ovary from 1977-1997.

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    0
  • In C. nigrescens and in some other species a zooid may contain a pair of ovaries, a pair of testes, or an ovary and a testis, although the males, females and hermaj phrodites do not differ from one another in external characters.

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    0
  • op., Operculum, or ventral lip. ov., Ovary.

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    0
  • The ovary consists of numerous carpels united together and free, or more or less embedded in the top of the flower-stalk.

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    0
  • The ovary has many cavities with a large number of ovules attached to its walls, and is surmounted by a flat stigma of many radiating rows as in a poppy.

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    0
  • Beneath the cuticle of these regions are situated the luminous organs, consisting of layers of cells which may be regarded as a specialized portion of the fat-body) Both the male and female fireflies emit light, as well as their larvae and eggs, the egg being luminous even while still in the ovary.

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  • whitish to 3, Ovary cut lengthwise.

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    0
  • The ovary, three-celled at first, but becoming one-celled and one-seeded by abortion, is surmounted by an inconspicuous perianth with six small teeth.

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    0
  • 4, Ovary.

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    0
  • The catkins of the poplars differ from those of the nearly allied willows in the presence of a rudimentary perianth, of obliquely cup-shaped form, within the toothed bracteal scales; the male flowers contain from eight to thirty stamens; the fertile bear a onecelled (nearly divided) ovary, surmounted by the deeply cleft stigmas; the two-valved capsule contains several seeds, each furnished with a long tuft of silky or cotton-like hairs.

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    0
  • The ovule is not enclosed in an ovary, and the usually solitary macrospore becomes filled with a prothallus, in the upper part of which are formed several rudimentary archegonia.

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  • The ANGIOSFERMS, which are much the larger class, derive their name from the fact that the carpel or carpels form a closed chamber, the ovary, in which the ovules are developedassociated with this is the development of a receptive or stigmatic surface on which the pollen grain is deposited.

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  • The male gametophyte is sometimes represented by a transitory prothallial cell;, the two male cells are carried passively down into the ovary and into the mouth of the ovule by means of the pollen-tube.

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    0
  • The seed is enclosed when ripe in the fruit, a development of the ovary as a result of fertilization of the egg-cell.

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    0
  • The closed ovary implies a mode of fertilization which is profoundly different, and which was probably correlated with a simultaneous development of insect life.

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    0
  • Only the left ovary becomes functional, with rare individual exceptions.

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    0
  • Those germs which do not ripen during the season undergo a process of resorption, and in the winter the whole ovary dwindles to often a diminutive size.

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    0
  • The ovary is three-celled, and lies at the bottom of this tube.

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    0
  • In the succeeding January or February it sends up its leaves, together with the ovary, which perfects its seeds during the summer.

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    0
  • These segments spring apparently from the top of the ovary - the real explanation, however, being that the end of the flower-stalk or "thalamus," as it grows, becomes dilated into a sort of cup or tube enclosing and indeed closely adhering to the ovary, so that the latter organ appears to be beneath the perianth instead of above it as in a lily, an appearance which has given origin to the term "inferior ovary."

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  • Within the perianth, and springing from its sides, or apparently from the top of the ovary, are six stamens whose anthers contain pulverulent pollen-grains.

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    0
  • These stamens encircle a style which is the upward continuation of the ovary, and which shows at its free end traces of the three originally separate but now blended carpels of which the ovary consists.

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    0
  • An orchid flower has an inferior ovary like that just s, sl -- --s[  !

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    0
  • 1 being the label ps, The superior division or lum, here inferior the labellum, which may by the twisting become inferior by the of the ovary.

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    0
  • twisting of the ovary.

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    0
  • its two pollen-masses in o, The twisted ovary.

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    0
  • c, The one-celled ovary cut a, The anther, con transversely, having three taining pollen parietal placentas.

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    0
  • In addition to these modifications, which are common to nearly all orchids, there are others generally but not so universally met with; among them is the displacement of the flower arising from the twisting of the inferior ovary, in consequence of which the flower is so completely turned round that the "lip," which originates in that part of the flower, conventionally called the posterior or superior part, or that S c ?

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  • They are attracted to the flower by its colour or its perfume; they seek, collect or feed on its honey, and while so doing they remove the pollen from the anther and convey it to another flower, there to germinate on the stigma when its tubes travel down the style to the ovary where their contents ultimately fuse with the "oosphere" or immature egg, which becomes in consequence fertilized, and forms a seed which afterwards develops into a new plant (see article Angiosperms).

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  • In most orchids the only stamen developed to maturity is the posterior one of the three opposite to the lip (anterior before the twisting of the ovary), the other two, as well as all three inner ones, being entirely absent, or present only in the form of rudiments.

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    0
  • e, Ovary.

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    0
  • As an example of the former it has been shown (Beddard) that a large median sac in Lybiodrilus is at first freely open to the coelom, that it later becomes shut off from the same, that it then acquires an external orifice, and, finally, that it encloses the ovary or ovaries, between which and the exterior a passage is thus effected.

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    0
  • sperm, spermatheca; sp. o, its external orifice; sp. sac, spermathecal sac; ov, sac containing ovary;.

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    0
  • There are three pairs of spermathecae situated in segments III-V, a testis in V and an ovary in VI.

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    0
  • ov, Ovary.

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    0
  • A stage exactly comparable to the stage in the leeches, where the ovary is surrounded by a closed sac, has been observed in Eudrilus.

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    0
  • The sole difference is therefore that in Eudrilus the ovarian sac gives rise to a tube which bifurcates, one branch meeting a corresponding branch of the other ovary of the pair, while the second branch reaches the exterior.

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    0
  • This is clearly the same process in essence as that of the formation of a vitellogenous gland from part of the primitive ovary, or of the feeding of an ovarian egg by the absorption of neighbouring potential eggs; but here the period at which the sacrifice of one egg to another takes place is somewhat late.

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    0
  • a, Ovary.

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    0
  • 13) in the female are paired, each ovary consisting of a variable number of tubes (one in the bristle-tail Campodea and fifteen hundred in a queen termite) in which the eggs are developed.

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    0
  • From each ovary an oviduct (fig.

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    0
  • In the female the ovary is a large unpaired organ from the anterior end of which arise two oviducts, and connected with the latter are a pair of large so-called copulatory pouches, which perhaps act as receptacula seminis.

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    0
  • and Sambucus, more rarely two-lipped as in Lonicera; the sepals and petals are usually five in number and placed above the ovary, the five stamens are attached to the corolla-tube, there are three to five carpels, and the fruit is a berry as in honeysuckle or snowberry (Symphoricarpus), or a stone fruit, with several, usually three, stones, as in Sambucus.

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    0
  • The pistil consists of a single carpel with its ovary, style, stigma and solitary ovule or twin ovules.

    0
    0
  • Ovary in dorsal valve.

    0
    0
  • The ovary and testes are heaped-up masses of red or yellow cells due to a proliferation of the cells lining the coelom.

    0
    0
  • The ovary is double, and the oviducts open by a median ventral pore about the middle of the body; in this region there is a second swelling.

    0
    0
  • The ovary is superior and one-celled, with three parietal placentas and numerous ovules; it bears a single style, which ends in a dilated or hood-like stigma (fig.

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    0
  • p, a thickened line on the walls forming the placenta; c, calyx; d, ovary; s, hooded stigma terminating the short style.

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    0
  • b, pair of bracteoles below the flower; s, sepals; p, petals; st, stamens; o, ovary.

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    0
  • p. 152.) in regard to the ovary, and by Benham (14) in regard to the testis.

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    0
  • The eggs are fertilized, practically in the ovary, and develop in situ.

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    0
  • 5), the perianth which is generally petaloid occupying the two outer whorls, followed by two whorls of stamens, with a superior ovary of three carpels in the centre of the flower; the ovary is generally three-chambered and contains an indefinite number of anatropous ovules on axile placentas (see fig.

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    0
  • evergreen shrub with flattened leaf-like cladodes, native in the southerly portion of England and Wales; the small flowers are unisexual and borne on the face of the cladode; the male contains three stamens, the filaments of which are united to form a short stout column on which are seated the diverging cells of the anthers; in the female the ovary is enveloped by a fleshy staminal tube on which are borne three barren anthers.

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    0
  • terminating the short annual shoot which bears a whorl of four or more leaves below the flower; in this and in some species of the nearly allied genus Trillium (chiefly temperate North America) the flowers have a fetid smell, which together with the dark purple of the ovary and stigmas and frequently also of the stamens and petals, attracts carrion-loving flies, which alight on the stigma and then climb the anthers and become dusted with pollen; the pollen is then carried to the stigmas of another flower.

    0
    0
  • The plants have a short rhizome and narrow or lanceolate basal leaves; and they are characterized by the ovary being often half-inferior.

    0
    0
  • The tribe Ophiopogonoideae, with its tendency to an inferior ovary, suggests an affinity with the Amaryllidaceae which resemble Liliaceae in habit and in the horizontal plan of the flower, but have an inferior ovary.

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    0
  • The tribe Smilacoideae, shrubby climbers with net-veined leaves and small unisexual flowers, bears much the same relationship to the order as a whole as does the order Dioscoreaceae, which have a similar habit, but flowers with am inferior ovary, to the Amaryllidaceae.

    0
    0
  • The parts of the flower are in fives in calyx, corolla and stamens, followed by two carpels which unite to form a superior ovary.

    0
    0
  • The ovary is generally two-chambered, with two inverted ovules standing side by side at the inner angle of each chamber.

    0
    0
  • The large showy flowers are visited by insects for the honey which is secreted by a ring-like disk below the ovary; large Convolvulus sepium, slightly reduced.

    0
    0
  • Each has a small calyx in the form of a shallow rim, sometimes five-lobed or toothed; five petals, which cohere by their tips and form a cap or hood, which is pushed off when the stamens are ripe; and five free stamens, placed opposite the petals and springing from a fleshy ring or disk surrounding the ovary; each bears a twocelled anther.

    0
    0
  • The anomalous position of the stamens in front of the petals is explained by the abortion or non-development of an outer row of stamens, indications of which are sometimes seen on the hypogynous disk encircling the ovary.

    0
    0
  • - A, reproductive system of Amphilina foliacea: a, glandular pit; b, opening of uterus; b', uterus (black); c, yolk-gland and its duct; d, ovary; e, e', opening and duct of vagina; f, spermotheca; g, male genital opening (gonopore); h, penis; i, vas def erens; j, testes; k, shell-gland.

    0
    0
  • (The ovary (a) leads into (bb) the oviduct, which is joined at (g) by the duct of the yolk-glands (h, h, Y).

    0
    0
  • A, a segment of Bothriocephalus latus, showing the generative organs from the ventral surface; ex., excretory vessels; c., cirrus; c.p., cirrus pouch; v.d., vas deferens; v.o., vaginal opening; v., vagina; sh.g., shell-gland; od., oviduct; ov., ovary; y.g., yolk-gland; y.d., its duct; ut., uterus; u.o., uterine opening; the testes are not visible from this side; X 23 (from Sommer and Landois).

    0
    0
  • There is usually no trace of ovary in the male flowers, though by exception one may occasionally be formed.

    0
    0
  • The female flower consists of a cup-like receptacle, inseparate from the ovary, and bearing at its upper part a bract and two bracteoles.

    0
    0
  • The one-celled ovary is immersed within the receptacular tube, and is surmounted by a short style with two short ribbon-like stigmatic branches.

    0
    0
  • C, Epibdella hippoglossi (from Halibut); ms, the two adoral suckers with the mouth (m) between them; ps, ventral sucker; ov, ovary, to testes.

    0
    0
  • B, anterior portion more highly magnified (from Marshall and Hurst, after Sommer); cs, cirrus sac; d, ductus ejaculatorius; f, female aperture; o, ovary; od, oviduct; p, penis; s, shell-gland; t, anterior testis; u, uterus; va, vp, vasa deferentia; us, vesicula seminalis; y, yolk-gland; yd, its duct.

    0
    0
  • The ovary (a) leads into (bb) the oviduct, which is joined at (g) by the duct of the yolk-glands (h).

    0
    0
  • (Xioo.) reproductive system; C, Cirrus; H, hooks on the ventral sucker; I, small piece of the intestine to show its connexion with the reproductive organs by the narrow duct that passes from it to the union of the vaginae; M, mouth; 0, ovary; S, oral sucker; SC, sucker; SH, shell-gland; T, Testis; U, uterus; V, vaginal pore; Y, yolkgland.

    0
    0
  • o, Ovary.

    0
    0
  • The ovary (o) and the testis (t) of Ectoprocta are developed on the body-wall, on the stomach, or on the funiculus.

    0
    0
  • In some Gymnolaemata, polypides which develop an ovary possess a flask-shaped "intertentacular organ," situated between two of the tentacles, and affording a direct passage into the introvert for the eggs or even the spermatozoa developed in the same zooecium.

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  • The flowers are regular, with a perianth springing from above the ovary, tubular below, with spreading segments and a central corona; the six stamens are inserted within the tube.

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  • In the male flowers, which are numerous, the stamens are sixteen in number and arranged in pairs; the female flowers are solitary, with traces of stamens, and a smooth ovary with one ovule in each of the eight cells - the ovary is surmounted by four styles, which are hairy at the base.

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  • At the base of the tube, in both groups, the ovary becomes developed into a fleshy (often edible) fruit, that produced by the Opuntia being known as the prickly pear or Indian fig.

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    0
  • In the female, each ovary consists of a large number of ovarian tubes, in which swollen chambers containing the egg-cells alternate with smaller chambers enclosing nutrient material.

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  • The ovary is threecelled, ripening into a three-celled capsule.

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    0
  • The sexes are not distinct, the sexual organs being represented by a pair of testes and a single ovary, which open together into the posterior end of the alimentary canal.

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  • a, ovary; b, oval stylite (?); c, mouth; d., alimentary canal; e...e, legs.

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  • The cup-shaped flowers have six regular segments in two rows, as many free stamens, and a three-celled ovary with a sessile stigma, which ripens into a leathery many-seeded capsule.

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  • - Rotifera are unisexual, with the sexes dimorphic. The ovary is, as in many Platyhelminthes, duplex; one part, the germary, being an organ for the production by cell multiplication of the germ-cells or eggs.

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  • The whole ovary is unilateral and unpaired in most rotifers; symmetrical in Asplanchnaceae, Philodinaceae and Seisonaceae.

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  • As a rule, the wall of the ovary is continued into a uterine tube opening into the cloaca; but in Philodinaceae this is absent, and the young are free in the body cavity and escape by perforating the cloacal walls.

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    0
  • in the failure of previous g, ovary; k, kidney; m, mouth; n, supra morphologists to adapt oesophageal ganglion; nr, nerve ring in the details of developsection.

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    0
  • Germary and ovary paired; oviduct absent; young viviparous.

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  • The left inner gill-plate is also snipped to show the subjacent orifices of the left renal organ x, and of the genital gland (testis or ovary) y.

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  • These forms are hermaphrodite, with an ovary and testis completely separate from each other on each side of the body, each having its own duct and aperture.

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  • When the follicle bursts, as it does in time, the ovum escapes on to the surface of the ovary.

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  • That end of each which lies in front of the ovary is called the fimbriated extremity, and has a number of fringes (fimbriae) hanging from it; one of the largest of these is the ovarian fimbria and is attached to the upper or tubal pole of the ovary.

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  • 6) the Fallopian tube and ovary Parovarium Ligament Fallopian tube I Ovary of ovary Hydatid Fimbriated end of tube Round ligament Broad ligament are pulled out from the uterus; this, as has been explained, is not the position of the ovary in the living body, nor is it of the tube, the outer half of which lies folded on the front and inner surface of the ovary.

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  • Above, there is the Fallopian tube, already described; below and in front is the round ligament; behind, the ovary projects backward, and just above this, when the broad ligament is stretched out as in fig.

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  • The epoophoron or parovarium is a collection of short tubes which radiate from the upper border of the ovary when the broad ligament is pulled out as in fig.

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  • Near the ovary the tubes are closed, but nearer the Fal lopian tube they open into another tube which is nearly at right angles to them, and which runs toward the uterus, though in the human subject is generally lost before reaching that organ.

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  • a, b and c, the isthmus tubae, the ligament of the ovary, and the round ligament of the right side cut short.

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    0
  • Mesonephric cords appear as in the male; they do not enter the ovary, however, but form a transitory network (rete ovarii) in the mesovarium.

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    0
  • The ovary is an organ which in shape and size somewhat resembles a large almond, though its appearance varies considerably in different individuals, and at different times of life.

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  • Its more pointed lower end iš attached to the uterus by the ligament of the ovary, while its anterior border has a short reflection of peritoneum, known as the mesovarium, running forward to the broad ligament of the uterus.

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  • Under the microscope the ovary is seen to be covered by a FIG.

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  • Within these are six stamens, a hairy ovary surmounted by two feathery styles which ripens into the fruit (grain), and which is invested by the husk formed by the persistent glume and pale.

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  • In the majority of Platyelmia the primitive ovary becomes divided into fertile and sterile portions, i.e.

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  • There are five, or sometimes fewer, carpels, which unite to form an ovary with as many chambers, in each of which are one or two, rarely more, pendulous anatropous ovules, attached to the central column in such a way that the micropyle points outwards and the raphe is turned towards the placenta.

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  • A widespread disease known as pocket-plums or bladderplums is due to an ascomycetous fungus, Exoascus pruni, the mycelium of which lives parasitically in the tissues of the host plant, passes into the ovary of the flower and causes the characteristic malformation of the fruit which becomes a deformed, sometimes curved or flattened, wrinkled dry structure, with a hollow occupying the place of the stone; the bladder plums are yellow at first, subsequently dingy red.

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  • b, buccal mass; m, retractor muscles of the buccal mass; ov, ovary; od, oviduct; i, coils of intestines; ao, aorta; c', left auricle; c, ventricle.

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  • The sexes are distinct, and the ovary is frequently greenish in colour, the testis red.

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  • Ovary cut across.

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    0
  • The numerous stamens surround the ovary, which is composed of 4 to 16 carpels and is surmounted by a flat or convex rayed disk bearing the stigmas.

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  • The ovary is incompletely divided into many chambers by the ingrowth of the placentas which bear numerous ovules and form in the fruit a many-seeded short capsule opening by small valves below the upper edge.

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  • The carpel, or aggregate of carpels forming the pistil or gynaeceum, comprises an ovary containing one or more ovules and a receptive surface or stigma; the stigma is sometimes carried up on a style.

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  • When placed on the stigma, under favourable circumstances, the pollen-grain puts forth a pollen-tube which grows down the tissue of the style to the ovary, and makes its way along the placenta, guided by projections or hairs, to the mouth of an ovule.

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    0
  • The ovary contains one or more ovules borne on a placenta, which is generally some part of the ovary-wall.

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  • In Casuarina, Juglans and the order Corylaceae, the pollen-tube does not enter by means of the micropyle, but passing down the ovary wall and through the placenta, enters at the chalazal end of the ovule.

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    0
  • Meanwhile the ovary wall has developed to form the fruit or pericarp, the structure of which is closely associated with the manner of distribution of the seed.

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    0
  • Frequently the influence of fertilization is felt beyond the ovary, and other parts of the flower take part in the formation of the fruit, as the floral receptacle in the apple, strawberry and others.

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  • In Gymnosperms we have seeds, and the carpels may become modified and close around these, as in Pinus, during the process of ripening to form an imitation of a box-like fruit which subsequently opening allows the seeds to escape; but there is never in them the closed ovary investing from the outset the ovules, and ultimately forming the ground-work of the fruit.

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  • The former comprise three classes, which are distinguished by the relative position of the stamens and ovary; the eleven classes of the latter are based on the same set of characters and fall into the larger subdivisions Apetalae, Monopetalae and Polypetalae, characterized respectively by absence, union or freedom of the petals, and a subdivision, Diclines Irregulares, a very unnatural group, including one class only.

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  • Series 2, Disciflorae, takes its name from a development of the floral axis which forms a ring or cushion at the base of the ovary or is broken up into glands; the ovary is superior.

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  • Of the Gamopetalae, series i, Inferae, has an inferior ovary and stamens usually as many as the corolla-lobes.

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    0
  • Series 2, Heteromerae, has generally a superior ovary, stamens as many as the corolla-lobes or more, and more than two carpels.

    0
    0
  • Series 3, Bicarpellatae, has generally a superior ovary and usually two carpels.

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    0
  • The eight series of Monochlamydeae, containing 36 orders, form groups characterized mainly by differences in the ovary and ovules, and are now recognized as of unequal value.

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  • The petaloid perianth consists of two series, each with three members, which are joined below into a longer or shorter tube, followed by one whorl of three stamens; the inferior ovary is three-celled and contains numerous ovules on an axile placenta; the style is branched and the branches are often petaloid.

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  • b, b', Upper and lower membranous spathe-like bracts; c, Tube of perianth; d, Ovary; e, Style; f, Stigmas.

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    0
  • f, Ovary.

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  • The superior ovary - half-inferior in Samolus - bears a simple style ending in a capitate entire stigma, and contains a free-central placenta bearing generally a large number of ovules, which are exceptional in the group Gamopetalae in having two integuments.

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  • (P, N, p, n, X I I o.) Samolus, anatropous with the hilum basal - together with the method of dehiscence of the capsule and the relative position of the ovary.

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  • the anthers oblong and converging; the ovary is globose, and has three furrows; the seeds are roundish and black.

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  • The ovary is not visible till nearly midsummer, and is not fully developed before lutumn.

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  • In a few cases two whorls of stamens are present, with three members in each, but generally only three are present; the pistil consists of three or two carpels, united to form an ovary bearing a corresponding number of styles and containing one ovule.

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  • 1, Flower; 2, same flower split open above the ovary; 3, ovary cut across; 1, 2, and 3, about 1/2 nat.

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  • Above the ring of stamens is the ovary itself, upraised on a prolongation of the same stalk which bears the filaments, or sessile.

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    0
  • The stalk supporting the stamens and ovary is called the "gynophore" or the "gynandrophore," and is a characteristic of the order.

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    0
  • The ovary of passionflowers is one-celled with three parietal placentas, and bears at the top three styles, each capped by a large button-like stigma.

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  • The ovary.

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    0
  • The perianth is represented by very rudimentary, small, fleshy scales arising below the ovary, called lodicules; they are elongated FIG.

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  • or truncate, sometimes fringed with hairs, and are in contact with the ovary.

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  • The ovary is small, rounded to elliptical, and one-celled, and contains a single slightly bent ovule sessile on the ventral suture (that is, springing from the back of the ovary); the micropyle points downwards.

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    0
  • The ovary ripens into a usually small ovoid or rounded fruit, which is entirely occupied by the single large seed, from which it is not to be distinguished, the thin pericarp being completely united to its surface.

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  • On the other, posterior, side of the grain is a more or less evident, sometimes punctiform, sometimes elongated or linear mark, the hilum, the place where the ovule was fastened to the wall of the ovary.

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  • yvµvos, naked, nrEp,ua, seed) implies, one characteristic of this group is the absence of an ovary or closed chamber containing the ovules.

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  • In function the perianth may be compared with a unilocular ovary containing a single ovule; the projecting integument, which at the time of pollination secretes a drop of liquid, serves the same purpose as the style and stigma of an angiosperm.

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  • ov, Ovary; cavity, so that primarily the te, testis.

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  • st, Stomodaeum; ov, ovary.

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  • Within these are three stamens surrounding a compressed ovary, with two feathery stigmas.

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  • These several glumes are closely applied one to the other so as to conceal and protect the ovary, D E FIG.

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  • F, Lodicules at base of j, the ovary, surmounted by styles.

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  • The stamens are placed round the base of the ovary, which is rounded or oblong, much smaller than the glumes, covered with down, and surmounted by two short styles, extending into feathery brush-like stigmas.

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  • The ripe fruit or grain, sometimes called the "berry," the matured state of the ovary and its contents, is oblong or ovoid, with a longitudinal furrow on one side.

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  • The ovary adheres firmly to the seed in the interior, so that on examining a longitudinal section of the grain by the microscope the outer layer is seen to consist of epidermal cells, of which the uppermost are prolonged into short hairs to cover the apex of the grain.

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  • Two or three layers of cells inside the epidermis constitute the tissue of the ovary, and overlie somewhat similar layers which form the coats of the seed.

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  • The reproductive organs lie on the left side, near the aboral end, both ovary and testis being present in the same individual in some of the species.

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  • - Ovary of Polygonum Convolvulus in longitudinal section during fertilization.

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  • (X 48.) fs, Stalk-like base of ovary.

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  • The flowers spring from, or are enclosed in, a spathe, and are unisexual and regular, with generally a calyx and corolla, each of three members; the stamens are in whorls of three, the inner whorls are often barren; the two to fifteen carpels form an inferior ovary containing generally numerous ovules on often large, produced, parietal placentas.

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  • The female flowers are solitary and are raised to the surface on a long, spiral stalk; the ovary bears three broad styles, on which some of the large, sticky pollen-grains from the floating male flowers get deposited (fig.

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  • Female flowers arranged, two to three together on scale-like structures formed by the union of bracts, in catkins; ovary two-celled; fruit small, flattened, protected between the ripened scales of the catkin.

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  • Ovary two-celled.

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  • Ovary three-celled.

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  • It seems probable that in such cases the spermatozoa make their way from the adherent spermatophore through the body-wall into the body, and so by traversing the tissues reach the ovary.

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  • Spermatozoa are not found in the uterus and oviducts, and it appears probable, as we have said, that they reach the ovary directly by boring through the skin and traversing the body cavity.

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  • The parts distinguished in the pistil are the ovary (fig.

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  • 26, o), which is the lower portion enclosing the ovules destined to become seeds, and the stigma (g), a portion of loose cellular tissue, the receptive surface on which the pollen is deposited, which is either sessile on the apex of the ovary, as in the poppy, or is separated from it by a prolonged portion called the style (s) .

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  • 27), Capparidaceae, and some other plants, the ovary is raised upon a distinct stalk termed the gynophore; it is thus separated from the stamens, and is said to be stipitate.

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  • - The pistil of Tobacco (Nicotiana Tabacum), consisting of the ovary o, containing ovules, the style s, and the capitate stigma g.

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  • by the carpels, so that the outer members of the flower spring from the edge of the receptacle which is immediately above the ovary (epigynous), hence the term epigyny (fig.

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  • Sometimes the twisting of a part makes a change in the position of other parts, as in Orchids, where the twisting of the ovary changes the position of the labellum.

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  • - Fruit of Physalis Alkekengi, consisting of the persistent calyx (s), surrounding the berry (fr), derived from the ovary.

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  • The calyx, petals and stamens spring from above the ovary (o) in which two chambers are shown each with a pendulous ovule; d, disc between the stamens and stigmas.

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  • - Flower of Tree waxy lining of the hollow receptacle, Paeony (Paeonia Moutan), as in the rose; or a swelling at the deprived of its corolla, and top of the ovary, as in Umbelliferae, showing the disk in the form in which the disk is said to be of a fleshy expansion (d) ep i gynous.

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  • The enlarged torus covering the ovary.

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  • covering the ovary in Nymphaea (Castalia) and Nelumbium may be regarded as a form of disk.

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  • It consists essentially of two parts, a basal portion forming a chamber, the ovary, containing the ovules attached to a part called the placenta, and an upper receptive portion, the stigma, which is either seated on the ovary (sessile), as in the tulip and poppy, or is elevated on a stalk called the style, interposed between the ovary and stigma.

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  • Each carpel has its own ovary, style (when present), and stigma, and may be regarded as formed by a folded leaf, the upper surface of which is turned inwards towards the axis, and the lower outwards, while from its margins are developed one or more ovules.

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  • - Pistil of Broom (Cytisus) consisting of ovary o, style s, and stigma t.

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  • The pistil is apocarpous, consisting of several distinct carpels, each with ovary, style and stigma.

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  • 90), and in this case, when the ovaries form apparently a single body, the organ receives the name of compound ovary; or the union may take place by the ovaries and styles, while the stigmas are disunited; or by the stigmas and the summit of the style only.

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  • When the union is incomplete, the number of the parts of a compound pistil may be determined by the number of styles and stigmas; when complete, the external venation, the grooves on the surface, and the internal divisions of the ovary indicate the number.

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  • - Pistil of Pea along the whole margin of the ovary after fertilization of the as far as the base of the style (fig.

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  • - Trilocular ovary of the Lily (Lilium), cut transversely.

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  • - Diagrammatic section of a quinquelocular ovary, composed of five carpels, the edges of which are folded inwards, and meet in the centre forming the septa, s.

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  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the edges of the carpels, bearing the placentas and ovules o, are not folded inwards.

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  • The placentas are parietal, and the ovules appear sessile on the walls of the ovary.

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  • The ovary is unilocular.

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  • dissepi:ments extend to the centre or axis, the ovary is divided into cavities or cells, and it may be bilocular, trilocular (fig.

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  • When the carpels in a syncarpous pistil do not fold inwards so that the placentas appear as projections on the walls of the ovary, then the ovary is unilocular (fig.

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  • - Diagrammatic section of a five-carpellary ovary, in which the septa (s) proceed inwards for a certain length, bearing the placentas and ovules (o).

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  • In this case the ovary is unilocular, and the placentas are parietal.

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  • I, Vertical; 2, horizontal section; c, calyx; d, wall of ovary; o, ovules; p, placenta; s, stigma.

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  • - Diagrammatic section of a compound unilocular ovary, in which there are no indications of partitions.

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  • The ovules (o) are attached to a free central placenta, which has no connexion with the walls of the ovary.

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  • Cases occur, however, in which the placentas are not connected with the walls of the ovary, and form what is called a free central placenta (fig.

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  • In Caryophyllaceae, however, while the placenta is free in the centre, there are often traces found at the base of the ovary of the remains of septa, as if rupture had taken place, and, in rare instances, ovules are found on the margins of the carpels.

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  • But in Primulaceae no vestiges of septa or marginal ovules can be perceived at any period of growth; the placenta is always free, and rises in the centre of the ovary.

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  • o, Ovary; p, free central placenta; g, ovules; s, styles.

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  • - The same cut horizontally, and the halves separated so as to show the interior of the cavity of the ovary o, with the free central placenta p, covered with ovules g.

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  • They are often horizontal, as in Cathartocarpus Fistula, where they consist of transverse cellular prolongations from the walls of the ovary, only developed after fertilization, and therefore more properly noticed under fruit.

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  • At other times they are vertical, as in Datura, where the ovary, in place of being two-celled, becomes four-celled; in Cruciferae, where the prolongation of the placentas forms a vertical partition; in Astragalus and Thespesia, where the dorsal suture is folded inwards; and in Oxytropis, where the ventral suture is folded inwards.

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    0
  • The ovary is usually of a more or less spherical or curved form, sometimes smooth and uniform on its surface, at other times hairy and grooved.

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    0
  • When the ovary is situated on the centre of the receptacle, free from the other whorls, so that its base is above the insertion of the stamens, it is termed superior, as in Lychnis, Primula (fig.

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    0
  • When the margin of the receptacle is prolonged upwards, carrying with it the floral envelopes and stamina' leaves, the basal portion of the ovary being formed by the receptacle, and the carpellary leaves alone closing in the apex, the ovary is inferior, as in pomegranate, aralia (fig.

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  • In some plants, as many Saxifragaceae, a there are intermediate forms, in which the term half-inferior is applied to the ovary, whilst the floral whorls are halfsuperior.

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  • In some cases, owing to more rapid growth of the dorsal side of the ovary, the style becomes lateral (fig.

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  • In all these cases the style still indicates the organic apex of the ovary, although it may not be the apparent apex.

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  • When in a compound pistil the style of each carpel is thus displaced, it appears as if the ovary were depressed in the centre, and the style rising from the depression in the midst of the carpels seems to come from the torus.

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  • Each division of the tricarpellary ovary of Jatropha Curcas has a bifurcate or forked style, and the ovary of Emblica officinalis has three styles, each of which is twice forked.

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  • Thus in Campanula a five-cleft stigma indicates five carpels; in Bignoniaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Acanthaceae, the two-lobed or bilamellar stigma indicates a bilocular ovary.

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  • - Carpel of Lady's-mantle (Alchemilla) with lateral style s; o, ovary, st, stigma.

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    0
  • - Pistil of Primrose (Primula) composed of five carpels which are completely united; o, ovary; s, style; st, stigma.

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    0
  • - Gynoecium of the Flowerde-Luce (Iris), consisting of an inferior ovary (o) and a style which divides into three petaloid segments (s), each bearing a stigma (st).

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    0
  • The ovule is usually contained in an ovary, and all plants in which the ovule is so enclosed are termed angiospermous; but in Coniferae and Cycadaceae it has no proper ovarian covering, and is called naked, these orders being denominated gymnospermous.

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  • In Leontice thalictroides (Blue Cohosh), species of Ophiopogon, Peliosanthes and Stateria, the ovary ruptures immediately after flowering, and the ovules are exposed; and in species of Cuphea the placenta ultimately bursts through the ovary and corolla, and becomes erect, bearing the exposed ovules.

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  • The position of the ovule relative to the ovary varies.

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  • When there is a single ovule, with its axis vertical, it may be attached to the placenta at the base of the ovary (basal placenta), and is then erect, as in Polygonaceae and Compositae; or it may be inserted a little above the base, on a parietal placenta, with its apex upwards, and then is ascending, as in Parietaria.

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    0
  • It may hang from an apicilar placenta at the summit of the ovary, its apex being directed downwards, and is inverted or pendulous, as in Hippuris vulgaris; or from a parietal placenta near the summit, and then is suspended, as in Daphne Mezereum, Polygalaceae and Euphorbiaceae.

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  • Sometimes a long funicle arises from a basal placenta, reaches the summit of the ovary, and there bending over suspends the ovule, as in Armeria (sea-pink); at other times the hilum appears to be in the middle, and the ovule becomes horizontal.

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    0
  • Thus, in the ovary of Leguminous plants (fig.

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  • 112), through the conducting tissue of the style when present, and reach the interior of the ovary in angiosperms, and then pass to the micropyle of the ovule, one pollen-tube going to each ovule.

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  • Sometimes the micropyle lies close to the base of the style, and then the pollentube enters it at once, but frequently it has to pass some distance into the ovary, being guided in its direction by various contrivances, as hairs, grooves, &c. In gymnosperms the pollen-grain resting on the apex of the nucellus sends out its pollen-tubes, which at once penetrate the nucellus (fig.

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  • The ovary enlarges, and, with the seeds enclosed, constitutes the fruit, frequently incorporated with which are other parts of the flower, as receptacle, calyx, &c. In gymnosperms the pollen-tubes, having penetrated a certain distance down the tissue of the nucellus, are usually arrested in growth for a longer or shorter period, sometimes nearly a year.

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  • The small sinuous segmented body is enclosed, except for one small opening, in an enormous sac-like carapace, between the lamellae of which are protruded from the body the ovary and " liver," both large, bifurcate and ramified.

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    0
  • 15, 7) represents an approach to the angiospermous ovary.

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  • This has been regarded by some anatomists as a rudimentary ovary.

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  • small persistent, 5-dentate calyx, 5 petals, 1 0 stamens, a sessile 3 to 5-chambered ovary, a long style, and a 3-lobed stigma; fruit trigonal or pentagonal; and seed compressed.

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    0
  • The male flowers have 4 sepals and 4 stamen s, whilst the females have 4 sepals and a 3- style d ovary.

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    0
  • AB - Laparoscopic treatment of benign cystic teratoma of the ovary has been recommended following the study of relatively small numbers of patients.

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  • METHODS: We reviewed records of women who had malignant germ cell tumors of the ovary from 1977-1997.

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  • The cyst can disrupt cycles until it grows large enough to burst the ovary.

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  • However, a large cyst on her ovary could produce similar symptoms, and is often mistaken for a pregnancy.

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  • Sternbergia Fischeriana - Nearly allied, is hardy, and has the habit of S. lutea, from which it differs chiefly in flowering in spring instead of autumn, and by its stalked ovary and capsule.

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    0
  • In purpureo-coerulea the ovary and base of the segments are rosy-purple, gradually merging into blue, which becomes intense towards the tips, harmonising with the black and gold-banded anthers.

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  • Progesterone-The hormone produced by the ovary after ovulation that prepares the uterine lining for a fertilized egg.

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    0
  • Progesterone-The hormone produced by the ovary after ovulation that prepares the uterine lining for a fertilized egg.

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  • Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-A pituitary hormone that in females stimulates the ovary to mature egg capsules (follicles) and in males stimulates sperm production.

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  • Most of these are cancers of the lymphoid tissues (leukemias and lymphomas), but one fifth of the cancers occur in the stomach, brain, ovary, skin, liver, larynx, parotid gland, and breast.

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  • After an egg is released from the ovary during ovulation, fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) normally occurs in the fallopian tubes.

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  • Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are also likely to suffer from oligomenorrhea.

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  • J., et al. "Formation and Early Development of Follicles in the Polycystic Ovary."

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  • Gonadotrophin-Hormones that stimulate the ovary and testicles.

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  • Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-A pituitary hormone that in females stimulates the ovary to mature egg capsules (follicles) and in males stimulates sperm production.

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    0
  • For pregnancy to occur, an egg must become mature inside a woman's ovary, be released, and travel to the fallopian tube.

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  • After an egg is released from the ovary during ovulation, fertilization (the union of sperm and egg) normally occurs in the fallopian tubes.

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  • An AFP level greater than 20 ng/mL may be associated with tumors of the ovary or testes.

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  • Under normal circumstances, one egg is released approximately once a month from a woman's ovary during a process called ovulation.

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  • The egg makes its way into a fallopian tube, a structure that guides the egg away from the ovary toward the uterus.

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