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ostracoda

ostracoda Sentence Examples

  • Orders: Ostracoda, Phyllopoda and Trilobitae.

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  • Orders: Branchiopoda (Sub-orders: Phyllopoda, Cladocera, Branchiura), Ostracoda, Copepoda.

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  • This zoological term, as now restricted, includes the Branchiopoda, Ostracoda and Copepoda.

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  • The Ostracoda have the body enclosed in a bivalve shell-covering, and normally unsegmented.

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  • Ostracoda.

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  • (e) Cytherellidae, which, unlike the Ostracoda in general, have the hinder part of the body segmented, at least ten segments being distinguishable in the female.

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  • The range in time of the Ostracoda is so extended that, in G.

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  • The " brush-formed " organs of the Podocopa are medially placed, and, in spite of their sometimes forward situation, Miller believes among other possibilities that they and the penis in the Cypridinidae may be alike remnants of a third pair of legs, not homologous with the penis of other Ostracoda (Podocopa included).

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  • Brady and Norman, in their Monograph of the Ostracoda of the North Atlantic and North-Western Europe (1889), give a bibliography of 125 titles, and in the second part (1896) they give 55 more.

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  • They do not refer to Latreille, 1802, with whom the term Ostracoda originates.

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  • 6) and in the Ostracoda.

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  • They may, however, be natatory as in many Ostracoda and Copepoda, or prehensile, as in some Copepoda.

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  • In many Entomostraca (Phyllopoda, Cladocera, Ostracoda, Copepoda) they are important, and sometimes the only, organs of locomotion.

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  • They are frequently organs of attachment in parasitic Copepoda, and they may be completely pediform in the Ostracoda.

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  • A somewhat similar structure is found also in some Ostracoda.

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  • In a few Ostracoda, by a rare exception, the masticatory process is reduced or suppressed, and the palp alone remains, forming a pediform appendage used in locomotion as well as in the prehension of food.

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  • In many of the smaller Entomostraca (Copepoda and most Ostracoda) no special gills are present, and respiration is carried on by the general surface of the body and limbs.

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  • In the Cirripedia, however, they are vascular processes from the inner surface of the mantle or shell-fold, and in some Ostracoda they are outgrowths from the sides of the body.

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  • In a few Entomostraca (some Phyllopoda and Ostracoda) the chitinous lining of the fore-gut develops spines and hairs which help to triturate and strain the food, and among the Ostracods there is occasionally (Bairdia) a more elaborate armature of toothed plates moved by muscles.

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  • In certain Copepoda and Ostracoda glands of the same type produce a phosphorescent substance, and others, in certain Amphipoda and Branchiura, are believed to have a poisonous function.

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  • - Many Crustacea belonging to very different groups (Ostracoda, Copepoda, Schizopoda, Decapoda) possess the power of emitting light.

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  • In the Ostracoda and Copepoda the phosphorescence, as already mentioned, is due to glands which produce a luminous secretion, and this is the case also in certain members of the Schizopoda and Decapoda.

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  • Parthenogenesis is prevalent in the Branchiopoda and Ostracoda, often in more or less definite seasonal alternation with sexual reproduction.

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  • These may be formed by the modification of almost any of the appendages, often the antennules or antennae or some of the thoracic limbs, or even the mandibular palps (some Ostracoda).

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  • The eggs are retained between the valves of the shell in some Phyllopoda and in the Cladocera and Ostracoda, and they lie in the mantle cavity in the Cirripedia.

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  • A nauplius larva differing only in details from the typical form just described is found in the majority of the Phyllopoda, Copepoda and Cirripedia, and in a more modified form, in some Ostracoda.

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  • The Phyllopoda, Ostracoda and Cirripedia (Thyrostraca) are represented in Cambrian or Silurian rocks by forms which seem to have resembled closely those now existing, so that palaeontology can have little light to throw on the mode of origin of these groups.

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  • Cypridea tuberculata, Sby.; (Ostracoda); Weald, Sussex.

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  • The Ostracoda might have been derived from the same stock were it not that they retain the mandibular palp which all the Phyllopods have lost.

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  • Orders Ostracoda.

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  • Fowler, who inclines to favour a close relationship between the Thyrostraca and Ostracoda.

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  • Orders: Ostracoda, Phyllopoda and Trilobitae.

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  • Orders: Branchiopoda (Sub-orders: Phyllopoda, Cladocera, Branchiura), Ostracoda, Copepoda.

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  • This zoological term, as now restricted, includes the Branchiopoda, Ostracoda and Copepoda.

    0
    0
  • The Ostracoda have the body enclosed in a bivalve shell-covering, and normally unsegmented.

    0
    0
  • (e) Cytherellidae, which, unlike the Ostracoda in general, have the hinder part of the body segmented, at least ten segments being distinguishable in the female.

    0
    0
  • The range in time of the Ostracoda is so extended that, in G.

    0
    0
  • The " brush-formed " organs of the Podocopa are medially placed, and, in spite of their sometimes forward situation, Miller believes among other possibilities that they and the penis in the Cypridinidae may be alike remnants of a third pair of legs, not homologous with the penis of other Ostracoda (Podocopa included).

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    0
  • Brady and Norman, in their Monograph of the Ostracoda of the North Atlantic and North-Western Europe (1889), give a bibliography of 125 titles, and in the second part (1896) they give 55 more.

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    0
  • They do not refer to Latreille, 1802, with whom the term Ostracoda originates.

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    0
  • 6) and in the Ostracoda.

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    0
  • They may, however, be natatory as in many Ostracoda and Copepoda, or prehensile, as in some Copepoda.

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    0
  • In many Entomostraca (Phyllopoda, Cladocera, Ostracoda, Copepoda) they are important, and sometimes the only, organs of locomotion.

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    0
  • They are frequently organs of attachment in parasitic Copepoda, and they may be completely pediform in the Ostracoda.

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    0
  • A somewhat similar structure is found also in some Ostracoda.

    0
    0
  • In a few Ostracoda, by a rare exception, the masticatory process is reduced or suppressed, and the palp alone remains, forming a pediform appendage used in locomotion as well as in the prehension of food.

    0
    0
  • In many of the smaller Entomostraca (Copepoda and most Ostracoda) no special gills are present, and respiration is carried on by the general surface of the body and limbs.

    0
    0
  • In the Cirripedia, however, they are vascular processes from the inner surface of the mantle or shell-fold, and in some Ostracoda they are outgrowths from the sides of the body.

    0
    0
  • In a few Entomostraca (some Phyllopoda and Ostracoda) the chitinous lining of the fore-gut develops spines and hairs which help to triturate and strain the food, and among the Ostracods there is occasionally (Bairdia) a more elaborate armature of toothed plates moved by muscles.

    0
    0
  • In certain Copepoda and Ostracoda glands of the same type produce a phosphorescent substance, and others, in certain Amphipoda and Branchiura, are believed to have a poisonous function.

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    0
  • - Many Crustacea belonging to very different groups (Ostracoda, Copepoda, Schizopoda, Decapoda) possess the power of emitting light.

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    0
  • In the Ostracoda and Copepoda the phosphorescence, as already mentioned, is due to glands which produce a luminous secretion, and this is the case also in certain members of the Schizopoda and Decapoda.

    0
    0
  • Parthenogenesis is prevalent in the Branchiopoda and Ostracoda, often in more or less definite seasonal alternation with sexual reproduction.

    0
    0
  • These may be formed by the modification of almost any of the appendages, often the antennules or antennae or some of the thoracic limbs, or even the mandibular palps (some Ostracoda).

    0
    0
  • The eggs are retained between the valves of the shell in some Phyllopoda and in the Cladocera and Ostracoda, and they lie in the mantle cavity in the Cirripedia.

    0
    0
  • A nauplius larva differing only in details from the typical form just described is found in the majority of the Phyllopoda, Copepoda and Cirripedia, and in a more modified form, in some Ostracoda.

    0
    0
  • The Phyllopoda, Ostracoda and Cirripedia (Thyrostraca) are represented in Cambrian or Silurian rocks by forms which seem to have resembled closely those now existing, so that palaeontology can have little light to throw on the mode of origin of these groups.

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  • Cypridea tuberculata, Sby.; (Ostracoda); Weald, Sussex.

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    0
  • The Ostracoda might have been derived from the same stock were it not that they retain the mandibular palp which all the Phyllopods have lost.

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  • Orders Ostracoda.

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  • Fowler, who inclines to favour a close relationship between the Thyrostraca and Ostracoda.

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