Ostentation sentence example

ostentation
  • His library of 70,000 volumes was one of his forms of ostentation, and so was his gallery of pictures.
    59
    17
  • He had been accused of vanity and ostentation in his office, but his reputation for ability and integrity as a judge was high even with his enemies.
    26
    24
  • They are also bought up by native chiefs at high prices for purposes of ostentation.
    4
    2
  • Hahn is one of those French composers such as Charpentier and Fauré who value clarity and good taste in preference to vulgar ostentation.
    3
    2
  • A man of great courage and energy, chaste and generous, Bek was remarkable for his haughtiness and ostentation.
    3
    2
    Advertisement
  • The king and his courtiers joined in the processions in the garb of penitents, and scourged themselves with ostentation.
    3
    3
  • " I find that even those that have sought knowledge for itself, and not for benefit or ostentation, or any practical enablement in the course of their life, have nevertheless propounded to themselves a wrong mark, namely, satisfaction (which men call Truth) and not operation."
    11
    11
  • He abhorred a vain ostentation of wit in handling sacred truths, so venerable and grave, and of eternal consequence.
    2
    2
  • Everything was made subservient to ostentation, even wounds, which were often subsequently enlarged for the purpose of boasting a broader scar.
    2
    2
  • His greed and ostentation were equalled by his incapacity, and he behaved with characteristic insolence to the foreign ambassadors, from whom he extorted large bribes.
    2
    2
    Advertisement
  • Her own life was by choice, and as far as her position would admit, one of almost austere simplicity and homeliness; and her subjects were proud of a royalty which involved none of the mischiefs of caprice or ostentation, but set an example alike of motherly sympathy and of queenly dignity.
    2
    2
  • " I am not conscious," says he, " of having ever bought a book from a motive of ostentation; every volume, before it was deposited on the shelf, was either read or sufficiently examined "; he also mentions that he soon adopted the tolerating maxim of the elder Pliny, that no book is ever so bad as to be absolutely good for nothing.
    19
    21
  • At the most important crisis of his life in 1783, he almost made an ostentation of disorder and of indifference not only to appearances, but even to decency.
    13
    15
  • But he had that quality which Aristotle places high among the virtues - the noble mean of Magnificence, standing midway between the two extremes of vulgar ostentation and narrow pettiness.
    8
    10
  • Of all the mixed motives that went to the evolution of church architecture in the middle ages, this rivalry in ostentation was probably the most fertile in the creation of new forms. A volume might be written on the economic effects of this locking up of vast capital in unproductive buildings.
    9
    14
    Advertisement
  • In viewing William's character as a whole one is struck by its entire absence of ostentation, a circumstance which reveals his mind and policy more clearly than would otherwise be the case.
    7
    13
  • This prelate was related to the English king, Edward II., and after a life spent in strife and ostentation, he died on the 24th of September 1333.
    4
    11
  • As a writer he was apt to be turgid and prolix, and there was a somewhat un-English element of ostentation in his manner.
    3
    11
  • When at length he found his memory failing and his mental powers declining, he gave up, without ostentation or complaint, whatever parts of his work he could no longer carry on according to his own standard of efficiency.
    5
    15
  • Against these may be set the vices of pride, ostentation, love of bloodshed, contempt of inferiors, and loose manners.
    10
    22
    Advertisement