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osman

osman

osman Sentence Examples

  • In 1813 the ruthless severity of the governor-general, Haji Osman, who obtained the co-operation of the Christians, broke the power of the janissaries; but after Osman had fallen a victim.

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  • When the Sudan War broke out, Baker, hastening with 3 500 men to relieve Tokar, encountered the enemy under Osman Digna at El Teb.

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  • In reward for the brilliant services rendered him by Ertoghrul (the father of Osman) and by Osman himself, Ala-ud-din, the last of the Seljuk sultans, conferred certain provinces in fief upon these two great warriors.

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  • The total credits for the ministry of finance are, then, as follows: Ottoman public debt, £T8,288,394; House of Osman, £T443,880; legislative corps, U181,871; treasury, ET2,989,600; central accounts department, £T17,124; forming an aggregate of £T11,920,869.

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  • Here Ertoghrul died in 1288 at the age of ninety, being succeeded in the leadership of the tribe by his son Osman.

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  • But Osman remained firm in his allegiance, and by repeated victories over the Greeks revived the drooping glories of his suzerain.

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  • His earliest conquest was Karaja Hissar (1295),(1295), where first the name of Osman was substituted for that of the sultan in the weekly prayer.

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  • Osman continued his victorious career against the Greeks, and by his valour and also through allying himself with Keusse Mikhal, lord of Harman Kaya, became master of Ainegeul, Bilejik and Yar Hissar.

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  • that Osman declared his independence, and accordingly the Turkish historian dates the foundation of the Ottoman Empire from this event.

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  • Osman reigned as independent monarch until 1326.

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  • In 1617 the sultan died, and was succeeded by his brother Mustafa; but the latter being declared incompetent to reign, his brother Osman took his place on the throne.

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  • Osman IL, were given up. Peace, however, left the rebellious 1618-1622.

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  • He was succeeded by his brother Osman, whose three years' reign w as marked by no political event of special 1754-1757.

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  • Osman III.

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  • But he arrived too late; Selim had already been killed; the unworthy Mustafa was put to death, and Mahmud, the sole survivor of the house of Osman, became sultan.

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  • With an inexperienced boy on the throne, divided and untrustworthycounsels in :the divan, and the defences of the empire shattered, the house of Osman seemed doomed and the Turkish Empire about to dissolve into its elements.

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  • Abd-ul-Aziz is said to have yielded the more readily as being desirous of bringing about a similar alteration in the succession in Turkey, in favour of his own eldest son, Prince Yussuf Izz-ed-din; public opinion was, however, opposed to so sweeping a change, and the succession to the throne in Turkey still goes to the eldest surviving member of the house of Osman.

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  • Plevna surrendered on the 9th of December 1877 after a heroic struggle under Osman Pasha.

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  • was removed to Salonica on the 28th, and on the 10th of May the new sultan was formally invested with the sword of Osman.

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  • Sultan Veled flourished during the reign of ` Osman I., though he did not reside in the territory under the rule of that prince.

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  • The founder of the Mevlevi dancing dervishes, the poet Mahommed Jelal-ed-Din (Rumi), in 1307, though tempted to assume the inheritance along with the empire of the Seljuk sultan Ala ed-din Kaikobad III., who died without heirs, preferred to pass on the power to Osman, son of Ertogrul, and with his own hands invested Osman and girt him with the sword: this investiture was the legitimate beginning of the Osmanli authority.

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  • In the summer of 1876 he was appointed commander-in-chief of the Servian army, but on entering Turkey was driven back by Osman Pasha, who followed him into Servia, defeating him at Zayechar and Yavor in July, and the campaign in Servia proved disastrous.

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  • An army of 160,000 Turkish veterans led by Sultan Osman in person advanced from Adrianople towards the Polish frontier, but Chodkiewicz crossed the Dnieper in September 1621 and entrenched himself in the fortress of Khotin right in the path of the Ottoman advance.

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  • Here for a whole month the Polish hero held the sultan at bay, till the first fall of autumn snow compelled Osman to withdraw his diminished forces..

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  • des Osman.

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  • Little can be said of this degenerate son of Suleiman, who during the eight years of his reign never girded on the sword of Osman, and preferred the clashing of wine-goblets to the shock of arms, save that with the dissolute tastes of his mother he had not inherited her ferocity.

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  • Promoted to be a lieutenantgeneral, and given the command of the 16th Division, he took part in the investment of Plevna and also in the fight of the 9th of December, when Osman Pasha surrendered, with his army.

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  • He died shortly afterwards and was succeeded by Osman Bey al-Bardisi.

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  • They offered an heroic resistance, but were overpowered, and iiome killed, some made prisoners; among the last was Osman Bey al-BardIsI, who was severely wounded.

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  • On the Red Sea littoral Osman Digria, a slave dealer of Suakin, appointed amir of the Eastern Sudan, raised the local tribes and invested fi3J(er.

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  • Two heavy blows had now been inflicted on the followers of Osman Digna, and the road to Berber could have been opened, as General Graham and Brigadier-General Sir H.

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  • The abrupt disappearance of the British troops encouraged the tribesmen led by Osman Digna, and effectually prevented the ~atangle- formation of a native movement, which might have ment ~-,i been of great value.

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  • I have from first endeavoured to impress on government that I am strong enough to relieve Khartum, and believe in being able to send a force, when returning by way of Berber, to Suakin, to open road and crush Osman Digna.

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  • On the 8th of February Lord Wolseley telegraphed, The sooner you can now deal with Osman Digna the better, and recommended the despatch of Indian troops to Suakin, to co-operate with me in keeping road to Berber open.

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  • Graham was placed in command of this force, with orders to break down the power of Osman Digna and to press the construction of the railway towards Berber.

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  • The withdrawal of the Suakin force began on the 17th of May, and the friendly tribes, deprived of support, were compelled to make terms with Osman Digna, who was soon able to turn his attention to Kassala, which capitulated in August, nearly at the same time as Sennar.

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  • Unfortunately famine compelled the garrison of Kassala to capitulate on the 3oth of July of that year, and Osman Digna hurried there from Tamai to raise a force with which to meet the Abyssinian general, Ras Alula, who was preparing for its relief.

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  • By the end of August Osman Digna had occupied Kufit, in the Barea country, with 10,000 men and entrenched himself.

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  • Over 3ooo dervishes with their principal amirs, except Osman Digna, lay dead on the field, and many more were killed in the pursuit.

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  • Meanwhile Osman Digna, who had fled from Kufit to Kassala, wreaked his vengeance upon the unhappy captives at Kassala.

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  • Kitchener, who was at the time governor of the Red Sea littoral, judiciously arranged a combination of them to overthrow Osman Digna, with the result that his stronghold at Tamai was captured on the 7th of October, 200 of his men killed, and 5o prisoners, 17 guns and a vast store of rifles and ammunition captured.

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  • Then at the end of 1887 Osman Digna again advanced towards Suakin, but his force at Tarol was routed by the Handub.

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  • Kitchener unsuccessfully endeavoured to capture Osman Digna on the 17th of January 1888, but in the attack was himself severely wounded, and was shortly after invalided.

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  • Later in the year Osman Digna collected a large force and besieged Suakin.

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  • In January 1891 Osman Digna showed signs of increased activity, and Colonel (afterwards Sir Charles) Holled Smith, then governor of the Red Sea littoral, attacked Handub successfully on the 27th and occupied it, then seized Trinkitat and Teb, and on the 19th of February fought the decisive action of Afafit, occupied Tokar, and drove Osman Digna back to Temrin with a loss of 700 men, including Baffle of all his chief amirs.

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  • This action proved the final blow ~~afu to the dervish power in the neighborhood of Suakin, for although raiding continued on a small scale, the tribes were growing tired of the khalif as rule and refused to support Osman Digna.

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  • Osman wad Adam (Ganu), amir of Kordofan, was sent by the khalif a to Karamallas assistance.

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  • The Darfurian chiefs then allied themselves with Abu Gemaiza, sheikh of the Masalit Arabs, who had proclaimed himself Khalifa Osman, and was known as the anti-mahdi.

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  • Abu Gemaiza attacked a portion of Osman Adams force, under Abd-elKader, at Kebkebia, 30 m.

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  • from El Fasher, and almost annihilated it on the I 6th of October 1888; and a week later another large force of Osman Adam met with the same fate at the same place.

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  • In the me~ntime the advance to Akasha had already relieved the pressure at Kassala, Osman Digna having withdrawn a considerable force from the investing army and proceeded with it to Suakin.

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  • To meet Osman Dignas movement LieutenantColonel G.

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  • He occupied Abu Klea wells and Metemma; recalled the amir Ibrahim Khalil, with 4000 men, from the Ghezira; brought to Omdurman thc army of the west under Mahmudsome 10,000 men; entrusted the line of the AtbaraEd Darner, Adarama, Asubri and El Fasherto Osman Digna; constructed defences in the Shabluka gorge; and personally superintended the organization and drill of the forces gathered at Orndurman, and the collection of vast stores of food and supplies of camels for offensive expeditions.

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  • The khalifa, fearing an attack on Olndurman, moved Osman Digna from Adarama to Shendi.

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  • But at the end of February, Mahmud crossed the Nile to Shendi with some 12,000 fighting men, and with Osman Digna advanced along the right bank of the Nile to Ahab, where he struck across the desert to Nakheila, on the Atbara, intending to turn Kitcheners left flank at Berber.

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  • On the 19th of January 1900 Osman Digna, who had been so great a supporter of Mahdism in the Eastern Sudan, and had always shown great discretion in securing the safety of his own person, was surrounded an.d captured at Jebel Warriba, as he was wandering a fugitive among the hills beyond Tokar.

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  • Osman.

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  • He died on the 25th of June 1861, and was succeeded by his brother, Abd-ul-Aziz, as the oldest survivor of the family of Osman.

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  • In the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78 he joined the Russians before Plevna, and being placed in command of the combined Russian and Rumanian forces, forced Osman Pasha to surrender.

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  • wide and now almost silted up. To the north lies an extensive shallow basin, called the lagoon of Osman Aga, originally part of the great harbour but now cut off from it by a narrow sandbank.

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  • Though differing on many points, they agree in thinking (I) that the island of Sphagia is the ancient Sphacteria, Palaeokastro the ancient Coryphasium or Pylos; (2) that in 425 B.C. the lagoon of Osman Aga was navigable and communicated by a navigable channel with the Bay of Navarino; (3) that Thucydides, if the MS. reading is correct, underestimates the length of the island, which he gives as 15 stades instead of 24 (nearly 3 m.), and also the breadth of the southern channel between it and the mainland.

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  • Although he had set his troops in motion too late to relieve Kassala, Ras Alula, his chief general, had succeeded in inflicting a handsome defeat on Osman Digna at Kufit in September 1885.

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  • Sir Mir Osman Ali Khan Hyderabad >>

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  • The British expedition to Suakin was engaged in a series of battles with Osman Digna, the mahdis lieutenant; while General Gordon, after alternate reverses and successes, was isolated at Ofl~ Khartum.

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  • During his reign the Turks under Osman conquered nearly the whole of Bithynia; and to resist them the emperor called in the aid of Roger di Flor, who commanded a body of Spanish adventurers.

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  • The next month, December 1883, saw the surrender' of Slatin in Darfur, whilst in February 1884 Osman Digna, his amir in the Red Sea regions, inflicted a crushing defeat on some 4000 Egyptians at El Teb near Suakin.

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  • Wad Helu and Sherif were stripped of their power and gradually all chiefs and amirs not of the Baggara tribe were got rid of except Osman Digna, whose sphere of operations was on the Red Sea coast.

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  • In January 1900 Osman Digna, a wandering fugitive for months, was captured.

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  • In the November following Hicks Pasha's force of io,000 men was destroyed at Kashgil, and in the same year the mandi's lieutenant, Osman Digna, raised the tribes in the eastern Sudan, and besieged Sinkat and Tokar, near Suakin, routing General Valentine Baker's force of 2500 men at El Teb in February 1884.

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  • flautisto have flutist Gemma Harvey performing a duet with Gil Osman on the piano.

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  • In 1813 the ruthless severity of the governor-general, Haji Osman, who obtained the co-operation of the Christians, broke the power of the janissaries; but after Osman had fallen a victim.

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  • When the Sudan War broke out, Baker, hastening with 3 500 men to relieve Tokar, encountered the enemy under Osman Digna at El Teb.

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  • In reward for the brilliant services rendered him by Ertoghrul (the father of Osman) and by Osman himself, Ala-ud-din, the last of the Seljuk sultans, conferred certain provinces in fief upon these two great warriors.

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  • The total credits for the ministry of finance are, then, as follows: Ottoman public debt, £T8,288,394; House of Osman, £T443,880; legislative corps, U181,871; treasury, ET2,989,600; central accounts department, £T17,124; forming an aggregate of £T11,920,869.

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  • Here Ertoghrul died in 1288 at the age of ninety, being succeeded in the leadership of the tribe by his son Osman.

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  • But Osman remained firm in his allegiance, and by repeated victories over the Greeks revived the drooping glories of his suzerain.

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  • His earliest conquest was Karaja Hissar (1295),(1295), where first the name of Osman was substituted for that of the sultan in the weekly prayer.

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  • Osman continued his victorious career against the Greeks, and by his valour and also through allying himself with Keusse Mikhal, lord of Harman Kaya, became master of Ainegeul, Bilejik and Yar Hissar.

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  • that Osman declared his independence, and accordingly the Turkish historian dates the foundation of the Ottoman Empire from this event.

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  • Osman reigned as independent monarch until 1326.

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  • In 1617 the sultan died, and was succeeded by his brother Mustafa; but the latter being declared incompetent to reign, his brother Osman took his place on the throne.

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  • Osman IL, were given up. Peace, however, left the rebellious 1618-1622.

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  • Osman marched against Khotin, but failed to capture it, and his unpopularity with the army was increased by rumours that he designed to collect such troops as were loyal to him, under pretence of going on Ahmed I., 1603-1617.

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  • He was succeeded by his brother Osman, whose three years' reign w as marked by no political event of special 1754-1757.

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  • Osman III.

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  • But he arrived too late; Selim had already been killed; the unworthy Mustafa was put to death, and Mahmud, the sole survivor of the house of Osman, became sultan.

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  • With an inexperienced boy on the throne, divided and untrustworthycounsels in :the divan, and the defences of the empire shattered, the house of Osman seemed doomed and the Turkish Empire about to dissolve into its elements.

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  • Abd-ul-Aziz is said to have yielded the more readily as being desirous of bringing about a similar alteration in the succession in Turkey, in favour of his own eldest son, Prince Yussuf Izz-ed-din; public opinion was, however, opposed to so sweeping a change, and the succession to the throne in Turkey still goes to the eldest surviving member of the house of Osman.

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  • Plevna surrendered on the 9th of December 1877 after a heroic struggle under Osman Pasha.

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  • was removed to Salonica on the 28th, and on the 10th of May the new sultan was formally invested with the sword of Osman.

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  • Sultan Veled flourished during the reign of ` Osman I., though he did not reside in the territory under the rule of that prince.

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  • The founder of the Mevlevi dancing dervishes, the poet Mahommed Jelal-ed-Din (Rumi), in 1307, though tempted to assume the inheritance along with the empire of the Seljuk sultan Ala ed-din Kaikobad III., who died without heirs, preferred to pass on the power to Osman, son of Ertogrul, and with his own hands invested Osman and girt him with the sword: this investiture was the legitimate beginning of the Osmanli authority.

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  • But he came too late; the ill-fated reforming sultan had been strangled in the seraglio, and Bairakdar's only resource was to wreak his vengeance on Mustafa and to place on the throne Mahmud II., the sole surviving member of the house of Osman.

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  • In the summer of 1876 he was appointed commander-in-chief of the Servian army, but on entering Turkey was driven back by Osman Pasha, who followed him into Servia, defeating him at Zayechar and Yavor in July, and the campaign in Servia proved disastrous.

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  • An army of 160,000 Turkish veterans led by Sultan Osman in person advanced from Adrianople towards the Polish frontier, but Chodkiewicz crossed the Dnieper in September 1621 and entrenched himself in the fortress of Khotin right in the path of the Ottoman advance.

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  • Here for a whole month the Polish hero held the sultan at bay, till the first fall of autumn snow compelled Osman to withdraw his diminished forces..

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  • Suakin was the headquarters of the Egyptian and British troops operating in the eastern Sudan against the dervishes under Osman Digna (see EGYPT, Military Operations, 1884, seq.).

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  • des Osman.

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  • Little can be said of this degenerate son of Suleiman, who during the eight years of his reign never girded on the sword of Osman, and preferred the clashing of wine-goblets to the shock of arms, save that with the dissolute tastes of his mother he had not inherited her ferocity.

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  • Promoted to be a lieutenantgeneral, and given the command of the 16th Division, he took part in the investment of Plevna and also in the fight of the 9th of December, when Osman Pasha surrendered, with his army.

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  • He died shortly afterwards and was succeeded by Osman Bey al-Bardisi.

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  • They offered an heroic resistance, but were overpowered, and iiome killed, some made prisoners; among the last was Osman Bey al-BardIsI, who was severely wounded.

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  • On the Red Sea littoral Osman Digria, a slave dealer of Suakin, appointed amir of the Eastern Sudan, raised the local tribes and invested fi3J(er.

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  • Two heavy blows had now been inflicted on the followers of Osman Digna, and the road to Berber could have been opened, as General Graham and Brigadier-General Sir H.

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  • The abrupt disappearance of the British troops encouraged the tribesmen led by Osman Digna, and effectually prevented the ~atangle- formation of a native movement, which might have ment ~-,i been of great value.

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  • I have from first endeavoured to impress on government that I am strong enough to relieve Khartum, and believe in being able to send a force, when returning by way of Berber, to Suakin, to open road and crush Osman Digna.

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  • On the 8th of February Lord Wolseley telegraphed, The sooner you can now deal with Osman Digna the better, and recommended the despatch of Indian troops to Suakin, to co-operate with me in keeping road to Berber open.

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    0
  • Graham was placed in command of this force, with orders to break down the power of Osman Digna and to press the construction of the railway towards Berber.

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  • The withdrawal of the Suakin force began on the 17th of May, and the friendly tribes, deprived of support, were compelled to make terms with Osman Digna, who was soon able to turn his attention to Kassala, which capitulated in August, nearly at the same time as Sennar.

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  • Unfortunately famine compelled the garrison of Kassala to capitulate on the 3oth of July of that year, and Osman Digna hurried there from Tamai to raise a force with which to meet the Abyssinian general, Ras Alula, who was preparing for its relief.

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  • By the end of August Osman Digna had occupied Kufit, in the Barea country, with 10,000 men and entrenched himself.

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  • Over 3ooo dervishes with their principal amirs, except Osman Digna, lay dead on the field, and many more were killed in the pursuit.

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  • Meanwhile Osman Digna, who had fled from Kufit to Kassala, wreaked his vengeance upon the unhappy captives at Kassala.

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  • Kitchener, who was at the time governor of the Red Sea littoral, judiciously arranged a combination of them to overthrow Osman Digna, with the result that his stronghold at Tamai was captured on the 7th of October, 200 of his men killed, and 5o prisoners, 17 guns and a vast store of rifles and ammunition captured.

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  • Then at the end of 1887 Osman Digna again advanced towards Suakin, but his force at Tarol was routed by the Handub.

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  • Kitchener unsuccessfully endeavoured to capture Osman Digna on the 17th of January 1888, but in the attack was himself severely wounded, and was shortly after invalided.

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  • Later in the year Osman Digna collected a large force and besieged Suakin.

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  • In January 1891 Osman Digna showed signs of increased activity, and Colonel (afterwards Sir Charles) Holled Smith, then governor of the Red Sea littoral, attacked Handub successfully on the 27th and occupied it, then seized Trinkitat and Teb, and on the 19th of February fought the decisive action of Afafit, occupied Tokar, and drove Osman Digna back to Temrin with a loss of 700 men, including Baffle of all his chief amirs.

    0
    0
  • This action proved the final blow ~~afu to the dervish power in the neighborhood of Suakin, for although raiding continued on a small scale, the tribes were growing tired of the khalif as rule and refused to support Osman Digna.

    0
    0
  • Osman wad Adam (Ganu), amir of Kordofan, was sent by the khalif a to Karamallas assistance.

    0
    0
  • The Darfurian chiefs then allied themselves with Abu Gemaiza, sheikh of the Masalit Arabs, who had proclaimed himself Khalifa Osman, and was known as the anti-mahdi.

    0
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  • Abu Gemaiza attacked a portion of Osman Adams force, under Abd-elKader, at Kebkebia, 30 m.

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  • from El Fasher, and almost annihilated it on the I 6th of October 1888; and a week later another large force of Osman Adam met with the same fate at the same place.

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  • In the me~ntime the advance to Akasha had already relieved the pressure at Kassala, Osman Digna having withdrawn a considerable force from the investing army and proceeded with it to Suakin.

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    0
  • To meet Osman Dignas movement LieutenantColonel G.

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  • He occupied Abu Klea wells and Metemma; recalled the amir Ibrahim Khalil, with 4000 men, from the Ghezira; brought to Omdurman thc army of the west under Mahmudsome 10,000 men; entrusted the line of the AtbaraEd Darner, Adarama, Asubri and El Fasherto Osman Digna; constructed defences in the Shabluka gorge; and personally superintended the organization and drill of the forces gathered at Orndurman, and the collection of vast stores of food and supplies of camels for offensive expeditions.

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    0
  • The khalifa, fearing an attack on Olndurman, moved Osman Digna from Adarama to Shendi.

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  • But at the end of February, Mahmud crossed the Nile to Shendi with some 12,000 fighting men, and with Osman Digna advanced along the right bank of the Nile to Ahab, where he struck across the desert to Nakheila, on the Atbara, intending to turn Kitcheners left flank at Berber.

    0
    0
  • On the 19th of January 1900 Osman Digna, who had been so great a supporter of Mahdism in the Eastern Sudan, and had always shown great discretion in securing the safety of his own person, was surrounded an.d captured at Jebel Warriba, as he was wandering a fugitive among the hills beyond Tokar.

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  • He died on the 25th of June 1861, and was succeeded by his brother, Abd-ul-Aziz, as the oldest survivor of the family of Osman.

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  • The lower town was rebuilt, and in the 17th and 18th centuries became a chief seat of the great Dere Bey family of Kara Osman Oglu (see Manisa), which did not resign it to direct Ottoman control until about 1825.

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  • In the Russo-Turkish War of 1877-78 he joined the Russians before Plevna, and being placed in command of the combined Russian and Rumanian forces, forced Osman Pasha to surrender.

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  • wide and now almost silted up. To the north lies an extensive shallow basin, called the lagoon of Osman Aga, originally part of the great harbour but now cut off from it by a narrow sandbank.

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    0
  • Though differing on many points, they agree in thinking (I) that the island of Sphagia is the ancient Sphacteria, Palaeokastro the ancient Coryphasium or Pylos; (2) that in 425 B.C. the lagoon of Osman Aga was navigable and communicated by a navigable channel with the Bay of Navarino; (3) that Thucydides, if the MS. reading is correct, underestimates the length of the island, which he gives as 15 stades instead of 24 (nearly 3 m.), and also the breadth of the southern channel between it and the mainland.

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  • Although he had set his troops in motion too late to relieve Kassala, Ras Alula, his chief general, had succeeded in inflicting a handsome defeat on Osman Digna at Kufit in September 1885.

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  • Sir Mir Osman Ali Khan Hyderabad >>

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  • The British expedition to Suakin was engaged in a series of battles with Osman Digna, the mahdis lieutenant; while General Gordon, after alternate reverses and successes, was isolated at Ofl~ Khartum.

    0
    0
  • During his reign the Turks under Osman conquered nearly the whole of Bithynia; and to resist them the emperor called in the aid of Roger di Flor, who commanded a body of Spanish adventurers.

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  • The next month, December 1883, saw the surrender' of Slatin in Darfur, whilst in February 1884 Osman Digna, his amir in the Red Sea regions, inflicted a crushing defeat on some 4000 Egyptians at El Teb near Suakin.

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    0
  • Wad Helu and Sherif were stripped of their power and gradually all chiefs and amirs not of the Baggara tribe were got rid of except Osman Digna, whose sphere of operations was on the Red Sea coast.

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  • In January 1900 Osman Digna, a wandering fugitive for months, was captured.

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  • The representative of the Capitan Pasha, who governed that eyalet, was, however, less influential in the city than the head of the Kara Osman Oglu's of Manisa (see Manisa).

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  • In the November following Hicks Pasha's force of io,000 men was destroyed at Kashgil, and in the same year the mandi's lieutenant, Osman Digna, raised the tribes in the eastern Sudan, and besieged Sinkat and Tokar, near Suakin, routing General Valentine Baker's force of 2500 men at El Teb in February 1884.

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