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osiris

osiris

osiris Sentence Examples

  • One incident of the tale of Osiris acquired a deep ethical meaning in connection with the dead.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906).

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  • It is not so much as king of the dead that Osiris here appears, but every deceased Egyptian was regarded as himself an Osiris, as having undergone all the indignities inificted upon the god, but finally triumphant over the powers of death and evil impersonated by Seth.

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  • With this may be compared the festivals of Adonis and Osiris and the myth of Persephone.

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  • All shrines of Osiris were called P-usiri, but the principal city of the name was in the centre of the Delta, capital of the 9th (Busirite) nome of Lower Egypt; another one near Memphis (now Abusir) may have helped the formation of the legend in that quarter.

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  • The more ancient account survived, however, he myth that Osiris, Horus, Seth, Isis and Nephthys (a less who plays but a minor part in the Osiris cycle) were all Iren of the earth-god Keb and the sky-goddess Nut, born on five consecutive days added on at the end of the year (the flied epagomenal days).

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  • This notion became so popular, that beside it all other views of the dead sink into insignificance; it permeates the funerary cult in all its stages, and from the Middle Kingdom onwards the dead man is regularly called the Osiris so-~d-so, just as though he were completely identical with the god.

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  • It is assumed above that the name Serapis (so written in later Greek and in Latin, in earlier Greek Sarapis) is derived from the Egyptian Userhapi - as it were Osiris-Apis - the name of the bull Apis, dead and, like all the blessed dead, assimilated to Osiris,.

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  • It is assumed above that the name Serapis (so written in later Greek and in Latin, in earlier Greek Sarapis) is derived from the Egyptian Userhapi - as it were Osiris-Apis - the name of the bull Apis, dead and, like all the blessed dead, assimilated to Osiris,.

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  • The Osiris cycle of legends seems to belong to these people.

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  • Osiris and Isis are closely connected with Syria and the Lebanon in legend; the Ded or sacred pillar of Osiris is doubtless really a representation of a great cedar with its horizontally outspreading branches; 8 another of the sacred Egyptian trees is obviously a cypress; corn and wine are traditionally associated with Osiris, and it is probable that corn and wine were first domesticated in Syria, and came thence with the gods Osiris and Re (the sun god of Heliopolis) into the Delta.

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  • Plutarch, drawing partly on Theopompus, speaks of his religion in his Isis and Osiris (cc. 46-47).

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  • the Osiris Apis, just as dead men were assimilated to Osiris, the king of the underworld.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Joseph Bingham, Antiquities of the Christian Church, bk.

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  • Busiris is here probably an earlier and less accurate Graecism than Osiris for the name of the Egyptian god Usiri, like Bubastis, Buto, for the goddesses Ubasti and Uto.

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  • On the other hand, Osiris with Isis and Horus was everywhere honoured and popular, and while the artificer Ptah, the god of the great native capital of Egypt, made no appeal to the imagination, the Apis bull, an incarnation of Ptah, threw Ptah himself altogether into the shade in the popular estimation.

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  • Like Aphrodite and Adonis in Syria, Baal and Astarte at Sidon, and Isis and Osiris in Egypt, the Great Mother and Attis formed a duality which symbolized the relations between Mother Earth and her fruitage.

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  • But it was a sign of the times when Serapis and Isis, Osiris and Anubis began to take place among the popular deities in the old Greek lands.

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  • Later generations reconciled these radictions by assuming the existence of two Horuses, one, brother of Osiris, Seth and Isis, being named Haroeris, i.e.

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  • NEPHTHYS, the sister of Osiris and wife of Seth, daughter of Keb and Nut, plays a considerable rfile in the Osiris story.

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  • In a shrine sits Osiris, the ruler and judge of the dead, accompanied by forty-two assessors; and before him stands the balance on which the heart of the deceased man is to be weighed against Truth; Thoth stands behind and registers the result.

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  • In a shrine sits Osiris, the ruler and judge of the dead, accompanied by forty-two assessors; and before him stands the balance on which the heart of the deceased man is to be weighed against Truth; Thoth stands behind and registers the result.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1907), p. 67: " Prophecy of the Hebrew type has not been limited to Israel; it is indeed a phenomenon of almost world-wide occurrence; in many lands and in many ages the wild, whirling words of frenzied men and women have been accepted as the utterances of an in-dwelling deity.

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  • OSIRIS, one of the principal gods of the ancient Egyptians.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed.), pp. 428-435.

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  • Neith, the goddess of Sais, was identified with Athena, and Osiris was worshipped there in a great festival.

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  • Anubis was believed to have been the embalmer of Osiris: the mummy of Osiris, or of the deceased, on a bier, tended by this god, is a very common subject on funerary tablets of the late periods.

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  • In those days Anubis was considered to be son of Osiris by Nephthys; earlier perhaps he was son of Re, the sun-god.

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  • The name Busiris in this legend may have been caught up merely at random by the early Greeks, or they may have vaguely connected their legend with the Egyptian myth of the slaying of Osiris (as king of Egypt) by his mighty brother Seth, who was in certain aspects a patron of foreigners.

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  • The combination of Osiris and the Apis bull which was found in the dead Apis was thus a most politic choice in naming the new divinity, whose figure represented a god of the underworld wearing an emblem of fruitfulness.

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  • They comprise fragments of the native historian Manetho, the descriptions of Egypt in Herodotus and Diodorus, the geographical accounts of Strabo and Ptolemy, the treatise of Plutarch on Isis and Osiris and other monographs or scattered notices of less importance.

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  • For the story of Isis and Osiris we have indeed the late treatise ascribed to Plutarch, and a few fragments of other myths may be culled from earlier native sources.

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  • (d) Among the later religious books one or two deserve a special mention, such as The Overthrowing of Apophis, the serpent enemy of the sun-god; The Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys over their murdered brother Osiris; The Book of Breathings, a favorite book among the later Theban priests.

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  • Isis, the faithful wife of Osiris, set forth in search of her 1 husbands body, and after long and adventure-fraught derings, succeeded in recovering it and bringing it back ~gypt.

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  • But Isis collected the fragments, and wherever one was id, buried it with due honor; or, according to a different iunt, she joined the limbs together by virtue of her magical ers, and the slain Osiris, thus resurrected, henceforth reigned :ing of the dead in the nether world.

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  • Of Osiris we can only state that he was originally local god of Busiris, whatever further characteristics he iitively possessed being quite obscure.

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  • Isis was perhaps the 1 goddess of Buto, a town not far distant from Busiris; geographical proximity would suffice to explain her conon with Osiris in the tale.

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  • They again gave birth to Keb and Nut, from whom ieir turn sprang Osiris and Seth, Isis and Nephthys.

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  • It is apparently through the funeral that Osiris so early took a firm hold on the imagination of people; for at a very ancient date he was identified with y dead king, and it needed but a slight extension of this idea iakehim into a king of the dead.

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  • In later times the moral ct of his tale was doubtless the main cause of its continued alarity; Osiris was named Onnophris, the good Being excellence, and Seth was contrasted with him as the author the root of all evil.

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  • His fusion with Horus and Etom has already been noted; further we find an Ammon-Re, a Sobk-Re, a Khnum-Re; and Month, Onouris, Show and Osiris are all described as possessing the attributes of the sun.

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  • So too in Abydos, his later home, Osiris was identified with Khante-Amentiu (Khentamenti, Khentamenthes), the chief of those who are in the West, a name that was given to a vaguely-conceived but widely-venerated divinity ruler of the dead.

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  • Plutarch in his treatise on Isis and Osiris well exemplifies this standpoint: for him every god and every rite is symbolic of some natural or moral truth.

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  • She sided with Isis and aided her to bring Osiris back to life.

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  • Sometimes, as in the case of the feast of Osiris in Abydos, a veritable drama would be enacted, in which the whole history of the god, his sufferings and final triumph were represented in mimic form.

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  • It was a veritable drama that was here enacted, and recalled in its incidents the story of Osiris, the divine proto type of all successive generations of the Egyptian dead.

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  • It was related how Seth had brought an accusation against Osiris in the great judgment hail of Heliopolis, and how the latter, helped by the skilful speaker Thoth, had emerged from the ordeal acquitted and triumphant.

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  • The Egyptian name was A bdu, " the hill of the symbol or reliquary," in which the sacred head of Osiris was preserved.

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  • Mineptah (Merenptah) added a great Hypogeum of Osiris to the temple of Seti.

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  • The worship here of Osiris in his various forms begins in the XIIth dynasty and becomes more important in later times, so that at last the whole place was considered as sacred to him (Abydos, ii.

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  • Plutarch in his treatise on Isis and Osiris well exemplifies this standpoint: for him every god and every rite is symbolic of some natural or moral truth.

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  • It was a veritable drama that was here enacted, and recalled in its incidents the story of Osiris, the divine proto type of all successive generations of the Egyptian dead.

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  • 126, 127, 133; Plato, Cratylus, 402 A and Theaetetus, 152 E; Plutarch, Isis and Osiris, 45, 48; Arist.

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  • 357), the ark with the corpse of Osiris was cast ashore at Byblus, and there found by Isis.

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  • In the scene of the weighing of the soul before Osiris, dating from the New-kingdom onwards, Anubis attends to the balance while Thoth registers the result.

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  • At first the luxury of mummification was reserved for the king, who was identified with Osiris and was buried with an abundance of ritual and magic words.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906).

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  • The 6 See Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris, 44 seq.

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  • Later, as the god of ploughing, he is confounded with Osiris, and on a vase-painting at St Petersburg he is represented leaving Egypt in his dragon-drawn chariot on his journey round the world.

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  • In the royal line there are almost certain instances of the marriage of a brother with an heiress-sister in Pharaonic times: this was perhaps helped by the analogy of Osiris and Isis: in the Ptolemaic dynasty it was an established custom, and one of the stories of Khamois, written in the Ptolemaic age, assumes its frequency at a very remote date.

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  • Later, as the god of ploughing, he is confounded with Osiris, and on a vase-painting at St Petersburg he is represented leaving Egypt in his dragon-drawn chariot on his journey round the world.

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  • Budge, who believes it to be a representation of the vertebrae of Osiris, which would be a holy relic); (9) Ilethitische Studien, I., II., Berlin, (1916-9); (10) Contenau, Trente Tablettes Cappadociennes (1919); S.

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  • On the roof of the temple, reached by two staircases, are a pavilion and several chambers dedicated to the worship of Osiris.

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  • The Aegyptus sive de providentia is an allegory in which the good Osiris and the evil Typhon, who represent Aurelian and the Goth Gainas (ministers under Arcadius), strive for mastery; and the question of the divine permission of evil is handled.

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  • Less widespread was the cult of the Mnevis, also consecrated to Osiris.

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  • Various esoterical explanations were given of the myth, and the name not found as a king was recognized as that of the tomb of Osiris.

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  • A Greek statue was therefore chosen as the idol, and it was proclaimed as the anthropomorphic equivalent of a much revered and highly popular Egyptian beast-divinity, the dead Apis, assimilated to Osiris.

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  • Weismann, Lady Verney) have shown by experimenting upon birds that this suggestion is correct; and Guy Marshall found that baboons which are afraid of snakes are also afraid of the snake-like larva of the South African Chaerocampa osiris.

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  • The relationships had now to be readjusted, the most popular view recognized Horus as the son and iger of Osiris.

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  • This nether his -ld was known as the Duat (Dat, Ti), and through it passed in t sun on his journey during the hours of night; here too, as nim sy thought, dwelt the dead and their king Osiris.

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  • Still the Egyptians themselves seem to have been somewhat at a loss to account for the great veneration that they paid to Osiris.

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  • The words that accompanied the manual gestures are, in the rituals that have come down to us, wholly dominated by the myth of Osiris:

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  • it is often hard to discern much connection between the acts and the formulae recited, but the main thought is clearly that the priest represents Horus, the pious son of the dead divinity Osiris.

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  • ,of which only shreds have reached us related how Seth had torn the eye of Horus from him, though not before he himself had suffered a still more serious mutilation; and by some rnea1~s, we know not how, the restoration of the eye was instrumental in bringing about, the vindication of Osiris.

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  • the part of the Egyptians that they should desire to place their tombs near the traditional burying-place of Osiris.

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  • in the ceremonies of Osiris.

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  • At other times the gods are threatened with privations or even destruction if they refuse to aid the magician: the Egyptians seem to have found little impiety in such a use of the divine name, though to us it would seem the utmost degree of ptofanity when, for instance, a magician declares that ifhis spell prove ineffective, he will cast fire into Mendes and burn up Osiris.

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  • At the back were large chambers connected with the Osiris worship (Caulfield, Temple of the Kings); and probably from these led out the great Hypogeum for the celebration of the Osiris mysteries, built by Mineptah (Murray, Osireion).

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  • Forty-two was the number of divine assessors at the judgment of the dead before Osiris, and was the standard number of the nomes or counties in Egypt.

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  • Excavation has brought to light figurines of the Egyptian Osiris, Isis, Ptah, Anubis and especially Bes.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Allis and Osiris (London, 1907), pp. 12 sqq., 401.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion (1907); A.

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  • In the Pyramid texts Thoth is already closely associated with the Osiris myth, having aided the god by his science and knowledge of magic, and demonstrated the justice of his claims in the contest with Set.

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  • Ser- the golden apples of the Hesperides, and the Egyptian pents' gods Kneph and Osiris, and the Indian Krishna and wealth and Indra.

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  • In Egypt and in Greece the introduction of wine was ascribed to gods; in Greece to Dionysus; in Egypt to Osiris.

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  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

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  • 8 In Egypt, Osiris, Isis and Horus proved an influential type.

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  • So in the famous scene of the weighing of the soul, which first appears pictorially under the New Empire, she introduces the deceased before the forty-two assessors of the heavenly judge, Osiris, and presides over the scale in which his actions and life are weighed.

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  • The great judgment of Osiris formulates with the utmost precision the alliance between morals and religion.

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  • Reinach, Cultes, mythes et religions (2 vols., Paris, 1905-6); Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); Ed.

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  • In Egypt, Harpa-khruti, Horus the child, was one of the forms of Horus, the sun-god, the child of Osiris.

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  • holy merriment," and were celebrating the festival of Osiris.

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  • The story is in many respects similar to that of Osiris.

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  • (2nd ed.), p. 115, and Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); L.

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  • the same set of ideas in more detail, are Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906) and Lectures on the Early History of the Kingship (1905).

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  • The baser Greek myths of the wanderings, amours and adventures of the gods, myths ignored by Homer, are parallel to the adventures of the Alcheringa people, and the fable of the mutilation of Osiris and the search for the lost organ by Isis, actually occurs among the Alcheringa tales of Messrs Spencer and Gillen.

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  • His graves are shown in many places, like those of Osiris, which, says Plutarch, abounded in Egypt.

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  • Or we may take the opposite view, and regard the story of Osiris and his war with Seth (who shut him up in a box and mutilated him) as a dualistic myth, originally on the level of the battle betweenaGaunab andTsui-Goab, or between Tagar and Suqe.

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  • He also somewhat obscurely identifies himself with Osiris.

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  • We thus find Osiris very near the beginning of what is known about Egyptian religion.

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  • Herodotus constantly alludes to the most famous Egyptian myth,that of Osiris, and he recognizes the analogies between the Osirian myth and mysteries and those of Dionysus.

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  • Osiris, Horus, Typhon (Seth), Isis and Nephthys were the children of Seb (whom the Greeks identified with Cronus); the myths of their birth were peculiarly savage and obscene.

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  • Osiris introduced civilization into Egypt, and then wandered over the world, making men acquainted with agriculture and the arts, as Pund-jel in his humbler way did in Australia.

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  • He had a beautiful carved chest made which exactly fitted Osiris, and at an entertainment offered to give it to any one who could lie down in it.

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  • As soon as Osiris tried, Typhon had the box nailed up, and threw it into the Tanaite branch of the Nile.

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  • He mangled the body of Osiris (as so many gods of all races were mangled), and tossed the fragments about.

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  • Wherever Isis found a portion of Osiris she buried it; hence Egypt was as rich in graves of Osiris as Namaqualand in graves of Heitsi Eibib.

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  • Afterwards Osiris returned from the shades, and (in the form of a wolf) urged his son Horus to revenge him on Typhon.

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  • Plutarch remarked the fact that the Greek myths of Cronus, of Dionysus, of Apollo and the Python, and of Demeter, " all the things that are shrouded in mystic ceremonies and are presented in rites," " do not fall short in absurdity of the legends about Osiris and Typhon."

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  • Khnum is said to have reconstructed the limbs of the dismembered Osiris.

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  • The dog, like Osiris, Dionysus, Purusha and other gods, was torn to pieces by giants; the fragments became many of the things in the world (Bancroft i.

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  • according to Egede, who settled the Danish colony in Greenland, regarded the stars " very nonsensically," as " so many of their ancestors "; the Egyptian priests showed Plutarch the stars that had been Isis and Osiris.

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  • Later she commonly wore the horns of a cow, and the cow was sacred to her; it is doubtful, however, whether she had any animal representation in early times, nor had she possession of any considerable locality until a late period, when Philae, Behbet and other large temples were dedicated to her worship. Yet she was of great importance in mythology, religion and magic, appearing constantly in the very ancient Pyramid texts as the devoted sister-wife of Osiris and mother of Horus.

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  • Much Egyptian magic turns on the healing or protection of Horus by Isis, and it is chiefly from magical texts that the myth of Isis and Osiris as given by Plutarch can be illustrated.

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  • With her sister Nephthys, Isis is frequently represented as watching the body of Osiris or mourning his death.

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  • Isis was identified with Demeter by Herodotus, and described as the goddess who was held to be the greatest by the Egyptians; he states that she and Osiris, unlike other deities, were worshipped throughout the land.

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  • The Isiac mysteries were a representation of the chief events in the myth of Isis and Osiris - the murder of Osiris, the lamentations of Isis and her wanderings, followed by the triumph of Horus over Seth and the resurrection of the slain god - accompanied by music and an exposition of the inner meaning of the spectacle.

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  • Osiris is usually shown as a crowned king, holding a crook and a flail.

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  • It has been finely incised into the bandages of Osiris.

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  • In Egyptian mythology, Seth causes the death of his brother Osiris, the first king of Egypt.

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  • sceptrethe king or Osiris, the king of the dead could carry this scepter.

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  • I used tripwire for several years, and since have used Samhain and Osiris.

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  • But Osiris was a dead god who ruled the underworld.

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  • Osiris, like Orpheus, is torn in pieces, and his head floats down every year from Egypt to Byblus; the body of Attis, the Phrygian counterpart of Adonis, like that of Orpheus, does not suffer decay.

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  • 87 sqq.), in the myths of Osiris and many others (see, at length, A.

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  • 126, 127, 133; Plato, Cratylus, 402 A and Theaetetus, 152 E; Plutarch, Isis and Osiris, 45, 48; Arist.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1907), p. 67: " Prophecy of the Hebrew type has not been limited to Israel; it is indeed a phenomenon of almost world-wide occurrence; in many lands and in many ages the wild, whirling words of frenzied men and women have been accepted as the utterances of an in-dwelling deity.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906).

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  • With this may be compared the festivals of Adonis and Osiris and the myth of Persephone.

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  • The Osiris cycle of legends seems to belong to these people.

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  • Osiris and Isis are closely connected with Syria and the Lebanon in legend; the Ded or sacred pillar of Osiris is doubtless really a representation of a great cedar with its horizontally outspreading branches; 8 another of the sacred Egyptian trees is obviously a cypress; corn and wine are traditionally associated with Osiris, and it is probable that corn and wine were first domesticated in Syria, and came thence with the gods Osiris and Re (the sun god of Heliopolis) into the Delta.

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  • Budge, who believes it to be a representation of the vertebrae of Osiris, which would be a holy relic); (9) Ilethitische Studien, I., II., Berlin, (1916-9); (10) Contenau, Trente Tablettes Cappadociennes (1919); S.

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  • Plutarch, drawing partly on Theopompus, speaks of his religion in his Isis and Osiris (cc. 46-47).

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  • OSIRIS, one of the principal gods of the ancient Egyptians.

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  • But the appendage of the official was shorter than that of the king, and the gods had a distinctive shape for themselves; if it appears upon the dead it is because they in their death had become identified with the god Osiris (Erman, 59, 225 sq.).

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed.), pp. 428-435.

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  • Neith, the goddess of Sais, was identified with Athena, and Osiris was worshipped there in a great festival.

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  • 357), the ark with the corpse of Osiris was cast ashore at Byblus, and there found by Isis.

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  • In the scene of the weighing of the soul before Osiris, dating from the New-kingdom onwards, Anubis attends to the balance while Thoth registers the result.

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  • Anubis was believed to have been the embalmer of Osiris: the mummy of Osiris, or of the deceased, on a bier, tended by this god, is a very common subject on funerary tablets of the late periods.

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  • In those days Anubis was considered to be son of Osiris by Nephthys; earlier perhaps he was son of Re, the sun-god.

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  • On the roof of the temple, reached by two staircases, are a pavilion and several chambers dedicated to the worship of Osiris.

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  • The Aegyptus sive de providentia is an allegory in which the good Osiris and the evil Typhon, who represent Aurelian and the Goth Gainas (ministers under Arcadius), strive for mastery; and the question of the divine permission of evil is handled.

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  • the Osiris Apis, just as dead men were assimilated to Osiris, the king of the underworld.

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  • This Osorapis was identified with Serapis, and may well be really identical with him (see Serapis): and Greek writers make the Apis an incarnation of Osiris, ignoring the connexion with Ptah.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Joseph Bingham, Antiquities of the Christian Church, bk.

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  • Less widespread was the cult of the Mnevis, also consecrated to Osiris.

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  • Various esoterical explanations were given of the myth, and the name not found as a king was recognized as that of the tomb of Osiris.

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  • Busiris is here probably an earlier and less accurate Graecism than Osiris for the name of the Egyptian god Usiri, like Bubastis, Buto, for the goddesses Ubasti and Uto.

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  • All shrines of Osiris were called P-usiri, but the principal city of the name was in the centre of the Delta, capital of the 9th (Busirite) nome of Lower Egypt; another one near Memphis (now Abusir) may have helped the formation of the legend in that quarter.

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  • The name Busiris in this legend may have been caught up merely at random by the early Greeks, or they may have vaguely connected their legend with the Egyptian myth of the slaying of Osiris (as king of Egypt) by his mighty brother Seth, who was in certain aspects a patron of foreigners.

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  • A Greek statue was therefore chosen as the idol, and it was proclaimed as the anthropomorphic equivalent of a much revered and highly popular Egyptian beast-divinity, the dead Apis, assimilated to Osiris.

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  • On the other hand, Osiris with Isis and Horus was everywhere honoured and popular, and while the artificer Ptah, the god of the great native capital of Egypt, made no appeal to the imagination, the Apis bull, an incarnation of Ptah, threw Ptah himself altogether into the shade in the popular estimation.

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  • The combination of Osiris and the Apis bull which was found in the dead Apis was thus a most politic choice in naming the new divinity, whose figure represented a god of the underworld wearing an emblem of fruitfulness.

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  • At first the luxury of mummification was reserved for the king, who was identified with Osiris and was buried with an abundance of ritual and magic words.

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  • Like Aphrodite and Adonis in Syria, Baal and Astarte at Sidon, and Isis and Osiris in Egypt, the Great Mother and Attis formed a duality which symbolized the relations between Mother Earth and her fruitage.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906).

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  • The 6 See Frazer, Adonis, Attis, Osiris, 44 seq.

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  • Weismann, Lady Verney) have shown by experimenting upon birds that this suggestion is correct; and Guy Marshall found that baboons which are afraid of snakes are also afraid of the snake-like larva of the South African Chaerocampa osiris.

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  • But it was a sign of the times when Serapis and Isis, Osiris and Anubis began to take place among the popular deities in the old Greek lands.

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  • They comprise fragments of the native historian Manetho, the descriptions of Egypt in Herodotus and Diodorus, the geographical accounts of Strabo and Ptolemy, the treatise of Plutarch on Isis and Osiris and other monographs or scattered notices of less importance.

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  • In the royal line there are almost certain instances of the marriage of a brother with an heiress-sister in Pharaonic times: this was perhaps helped by the analogy of Osiris and Isis: in the Ptolemaic dynasty it was an established custom, and one of the stories of Khamois, written in the Ptolemaic age, assumes its frequency at a very remote date.

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  • For the story of Isis and Osiris we have indeed the late treatise ascribed to Plutarch, and a few fragments of other myths may be culled from earlier native sources.

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  • (d) Among the later religious books one or two deserve a special mention, such as The Overthrowing of Apophis, the serpent enemy of the sun-god; The Lamentations of Isis and Nephthys over their murdered brother Osiris; The Book of Breathings, a favorite book among the later Theban priests.

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  • Isis, the faithful wife of Osiris, set forth in search of her 1 husbands body, and after long and adventure-fraught derings, succeeded in recovering it and bringing it back ~gypt.

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  • But Isis collected the fragments, and wherever one was id, buried it with due honor; or, according to a different iunt, she joined the limbs together by virtue of her magical ers, and the slain Osiris, thus resurrected, henceforth reigned :ing of the dead in the nether world.

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  • Of Osiris we can only state that he was originally local god of Busiris, whatever further characteristics he iitively possessed being quite obscure.

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  • Isis was perhaps the 1 goddess of Buto, a town not far distant from Busiris; geographical proximity would suffice to explain her conon with Osiris in the tale.

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  • The relationships had now to be readjusted, the most popular view recognized Horus as the son and iger of Osiris.

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  • The more ancient account survived, however, he myth that Osiris, Horus, Seth, Isis and Nephthys (a less who plays but a minor part in the Osiris cycle) were all Iren of the earth-god Keb and the sky-goddess Nut, born on five consecutive days added on at the end of the year (the flied epagomenal days).

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  • Later generations reconciled these radictions by assuming the existence of two Horuses, one, brother of Osiris, Seth and Isis, being named Haroeris, i.e.

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  • This nether his -ld was known as the Duat (Dat, Ti), and through it passed in t sun on his journey during the hours of night; here too, as nim sy thought, dwelt the dead and their king Osiris.

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  • They again gave birth to Keb and Nut, from whom ieir turn sprang Osiris and Seth, Isis and Nephthys.

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  • It is apparently through the funeral that Osiris so early took a firm hold on the imagination of people; for at a very ancient date he was identified with y dead king, and it needed but a slight extension of this idea iakehim into a king of the dead.

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  • In later times the moral ct of his tale was doubtless the main cause of its continued alarity; Osiris was named Onnophris, the good Being excellence, and Seth was contrasted with him as the author the root of all evil.

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  • Still the Egyptians themselves seem to have been somewhat at a loss to account for the great veneration that they paid to Osiris.

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  • His fusion with Horus and Etom has already been noted; further we find an Ammon-Re, a Sobk-Re, a Khnum-Re; and Month, Onouris, Show and Osiris are all described as possessing the attributes of the sun.

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  • Ptah was early assimilated to the sepulchral gods Sokaris and Osiris.

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  • So too in Abydos, his later home, Osiris was identified with Khante-Amentiu (Khentamenti, Khentamenthes), the chief of those who are in the West, a name that was given to a vaguely-conceived but widely-venerated divinity ruler of the dead.

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  • NEPHTHYS, the sister of Osiris and wife of Seth, daughter of Keb and Nut, plays a considerable rfile in the Osiris story.

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  • She sided with Isis and aided her to bring Osiris back to life.

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  • The words that accompanied the manual gestures are, in the rituals that have come down to us, wholly dominated by the myth of Osiris:

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  • it is often hard to discern much connection between the acts and the formulae recited, but the main thought is clearly that the priest represents Horus, the pious son of the dead divinity Osiris.

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  • ,of which only shreds have reached us related how Seth had torn the eye of Horus from him, though not before he himself had suffered a still more serious mutilation; and by some rnea1~s, we know not how, the restoration of the eye was instrumental in bringing about, the vindication of Osiris.

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  • Sometimes, as in the case of the feast of Osiris in Abydos, a veritable drama would be enacted, in which the whole history of the god, his sufferings and final triumph were represented in mimic form.

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  • The gods had their ha and bai, and the forms attributed to the latter are surprising; thus we read that the soul of the sky Nun is Re, that of Osiris the Goat of Mendes, the souls of Sobk are crocodiles, and those of all the gods are makes; similarly the soul of Ptah was thought to dwell in the Apis bull, so that each successive Apis was during its lifetime the reincarnation of the god.

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  • It is not so much as king of the dead that Osiris here appears, but every deceased Egyptian was regarded as himself an Osiris, as having undergone all the indignities inificted upon the god, but finally triumphant over the powers of death and evil impersonated by Seth.

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  • This notion became so popular, that beside it all other views of the dead sink into insignificance; it permeates the funerary cult in all its stages, and from the Middle Kingdom onwards the dead man is regularly called the Osiris so-~d-so, just as though he were completely identical with the god.

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  • One incident of the tale of Osiris acquired a deep ethical meaning in connection with the dead.

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  • It was related how Seth had brought an accusation against Osiris in the great judgment hail of Heliopolis, and how the latter, helped by the skilful speaker Thoth, had emerged from the ordeal acquitted and triumphant.

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  • the part of the Egyptians that they should desire to place their tombs near the traditional burying-place of Osiris.

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  • in the ceremonies of Osiris.

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  • At other times the gods are threatened with privations or even destruction if they refuse to aid the magician: the Egyptians seem to have found little impiety in such a use of the divine name, though to us it would seem the utmost degree of ptofanity when, for instance, a magician declares that ifhis spell prove ineffective, he will cast fire into Mendes and burn up Osiris.

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  • The Egyptian name was A bdu, " the hill of the symbol or reliquary," in which the sacred head of Osiris was preserved.

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  • Mineptah (Merenptah) added a great Hypogeum of Osiris to the temple of Seti.

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  • The worship here of Osiris in his various forms begins in the XIIth dynasty and becomes more important in later times, so that at last the whole place was considered as sacred to him (Abydos, ii.

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  • At the back were large chambers connected with the Osiris worship (Caulfield, Temple of the Kings); and probably from these led out the great Hypogeum for the celebration of the Osiris mysteries, built by Mineptah (Murray, Osireion).

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  • Forty-two was the number of divine assessors at the judgment of the dead before Osiris, and was the standard number of the nomes or counties in Egypt.

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  • Excavation has brought to light figurines of the Egyptian Osiris, Isis, Ptah, Anubis and especially Bes.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Allis and Osiris (London, 1907), pp. 12 sqq., 401.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris: Studies in the History of Oriental Religion (1907); A.

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  • In the Pyramid texts Thoth is already closely associated with the Osiris myth, having aided the god by his science and knowledge of magic, and demonstrated the justice of his claims in the contest with Set.

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  • Ser- the golden apples of the Hesperides, and the Egyptian pents' gods Kneph and Osiris, and the Indian Krishna and wealth and Indra.

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  • Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (2nd ed., London, 1907), p. 153; also his notes on Pausanias, vol.

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  • In Egypt and in Greece the introduction of wine was ascribed to gods; in Greece to Dionysus; in Egypt to Osiris.

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  • Frazer, The Golden Bough (London, 1900), and Adonis, Attis, Osiris (London, 1906); Georges Lafay, Culte des divinites d'Alexandrie (Paris, 1884); Dollinger, Sectengeschichte des Mittelalters (Munich, 1890); Fr.

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  • 8 In Egypt, Osiris, Isis and Horus proved an influential type.

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  • So in the famous scene of the weighing of the soul, which first appears pictorially under the New Empire, she introduces the deceased before the forty-two assessors of the heavenly judge, Osiris, and presides over the scale in which his actions and life are weighed.

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  • The great judgment of Osiris formulates with the utmost precision the alliance between morals and religion.

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  • Reinach, Cultes, mythes et religions (2 vols., Paris, 1905-6); Frazer, Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); Ed.

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  • In Egypt, Harpa-khruti, Horus the child, was one of the forms of Horus, the sun-god, the child of Osiris.

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  • holy merriment," and were celebrating the festival of Osiris.

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  • The story is in many respects similar to that of Osiris.

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  • (2nd ed.), p. 115, and Adonis, Attis and Osiris (1906); L.

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  • the same set of ideas in more detail, are Adonis, Attis, Osiris (1906) and Lectures on the Early History of the Kingship (1905).

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  • The baser Greek myths of the wanderings, amours and adventures of the gods, myths ignored by Homer, are parallel to the adventures of the Alcheringa people, and the fable of the mutilation of Osiris and the search for the lost organ by Isis, actually occurs among the Alcheringa tales of Messrs Spencer and Gillen.

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  • His graves are shown in many places, like those of Osiris, which, says Plutarch, abounded in Egypt.

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  • Or we may take the opposite view, and regard the story of Osiris and his war with Seth (who shut him up in a box and mutilated him) as a dualistic myth, originally on the level of the battle betweenaGaunab andTsui-Goab, or between Tagar and Suqe.

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  • He also somewhat obscurely identifies himself with Osiris.

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  • We thus find Osiris very near the beginning of what is known about Egyptian religion.

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  • Herodotus constantly alludes to the most famous Egyptian myth,that of Osiris, and he recognizes the analogies between the Osirian myth and mysteries and those of Dionysus.

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  • Osiris, Horus, Typhon (Seth), Isis and Nephthys were the children of Seb (whom the Greeks identified with Cronus); the myths of their birth were peculiarly savage and obscene.

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  • Osiris introduced civilization into Egypt, and then wandered over the world, making men acquainted with agriculture and the arts, as Pund-jel in his humbler way did in Australia.

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  • He had a beautiful carved chest made which exactly fitted Osiris, and at an entertainment offered to give it to any one who could lie down in it.

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  • As soon as Osiris tried, Typhon had the box nailed up, and threw it into the Tanaite branch of the Nile.

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  • He mangled the body of Osiris (as so many gods of all races were mangled), and tossed the fragments about.

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  • Wherever Isis found a portion of Osiris she buried it; hence Egypt was as rich in graves of Osiris as Namaqualand in graves of Heitsi Eibib.

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  • Afterwards Osiris returned from the shades, and (in the form of a wolf) urged his son Horus to revenge him on Typhon.

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  • Plutarch remarked the fact that the Greek myths of Cronus, of Dionysus, of Apollo and the Python, and of Demeter, " all the things that are shrouded in mystic ceremonies and are presented in rites," " do not fall short in absurdity of the legends about Osiris and Typhon."

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  • Khnum is said to have reconstructed the limbs of the dismembered Osiris.

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  • The dog, like Osiris, Dionysus, Purusha and other gods, was torn to pieces by giants; the fragments became many of the things in the world (Bancroft i.

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  • according to Egede, who settled the Danish colony in Greenland, regarded the stars " very nonsensically," as " so many of their ancestors "; the Egyptian priests showed Plutarch the stars that had been Isis and Osiris.

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  • Later she commonly wore the horns of a cow, and the cow was sacred to her; it is doubtful, however, whether she had any animal representation in early times, nor had she possession of any considerable locality until a late period, when Philae, Behbet and other large temples were dedicated to her worship. Yet she was of great importance in mythology, religion and magic, appearing constantly in the very ancient Pyramid texts as the devoted sister-wife of Osiris and mother of Horus.

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  • Much Egyptian magic turns on the healing or protection of Horus by Isis, and it is chiefly from magical texts that the myth of Isis and Osiris as given by Plutarch can be illustrated.

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  • With her sister Nephthys, Isis is frequently represented as watching the body of Osiris or mourning his death.

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  • Isis was identified with Demeter by Herodotus, and described as the goddess who was held to be the greatest by the Egyptians; he states that she and Osiris, unlike other deities, were worshipped throughout the land.

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  • The Isiac mysteries were a representation of the chief events in the myth of Isis and Osiris - the murder of Osiris, the lamentations of Isis and her wanderings, followed by the triumph of Horus over Seth and the resurrection of the slain god - accompanied by music and an exposition of the inner meaning of the spectacle.

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  • The earthly Jesus is congruent to Horus; Jesus the Christ corresponds to Osiris, the resurrected god.

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  • Only the king or Osiris, the king of the dead could carry this scepter.

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  • Here the god Osiris is on the left with the stela owner, the dead person shown on the right worshipping him.

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  • I used tripwire for several years, and since have used Samhain and Osiris.

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  • But Osiris was a dead god who ruled the underworld.

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  • Osiris: Murdered by Set, Osiris became king of the underworld and commanded the judgment of dead souls who must undertake a journey fraught with dangers to enter his kingdom.

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  • But a number of non-Christian religions feature a deity dying and returning, notably Mithrism and the pantheism of ancient Egypt (Osiris).

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