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orvieto

orvieto Sentence Examples

  • Other works of Arnolfo, such as the Braye tomb at Orvieto, show an intimate artistic alliance between him and the Cosmati.

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  • of Orvieto by road, situated on the northeast bank of the lake of Bolsena.

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  • manner of Siger's death, which occurred at Orvieto, is not known.

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  • was in residence at Orvieto.

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  • In prehistoric times the river ran straight on along the valley of the Chiana and joined the Tiber near Orvieto; and there was a great lake, the north end of which was at Incisa and the south at the lake of Chiusi.

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  • Marco-Bisignano, Marsi (Pescina), Melfi-Rapolla Mileto, MoIf etta-Terlizzi-Giovennazzo,Monopoli,Montalcino,M ontefiascone, Montepulciano, Nardo, Narni, Nocera in Umbria, Norcia, Orvieto, Osimo-Cingoli, Parma, Penne-Atri, Piacenza, Poggio Mirteto, Recanati-Loreto, Rieti, Segni, Sutri-Nepi, Teramo, Terni, Terracina-Piperno-Sezze, Tjvoli, Todi, Tnivento, Troia, ValvaSulmona, Veroli, Viterbo-Toscanella.

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  • ORVIETO (anc. Volsinii, later Urbs Vetus, whence the modern name), a town and episcopal see of the province of Perugia, Italy, on the Paglia, 78 m.

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  • was residing at Orvieto; and it was to commemorate this miracle that the existing cathedral was built.

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  • Patrizio, is one of the chief curiosities of Orvieto.

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  • It was begun by the architect Antonio da San Gallo the younger in 1527 for Clement VII., who fled to Orvieto after the sack of Rome, and was finished by Simone Mosca under Paul III.

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  • Communal independence had probably been acquired as early as the end of the 10th century, but the first of the popes to reside in Orvieto and to recognize its communal administration was Hadrian IV.

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  • There were considerable Guelph and Ghibelline struggles even at Orvieto, the latter party being finally destroyed in 1313, and the representatives of the former, the Monaldeschi, obtaining the supreme power.

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  • The territory of Orvieto extended from Chiusi to the coast at Orbetello, to the Lake of Bolsena and the Tiber.

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  • After this period Orvieto was peaceably ruled by papal governors, and had practically no history.

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  • Owing to the strong Guelphic sympathies of the inhabitants, and the inaccessible nature of the site, Orvieto was constantly used as a place of refuge by the popes.

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  • Fumi, Il Duomo d'Orvieto e i suoi restauri (Rome, 1891); Orvieto, note storiche e biografiche (Citta di Castello, 1891), and other works.

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  • of its station on the railway between Chiusi and Orvieto.

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  • II seq.) calls Ovp33c(3evr-63 (Urbs vetus, the modern Orvieto).

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  • Muller, has been generally accepted by modern archaeologists; and it is a strong point in its favour that the bishop of Orvieto in 595 signs himself episcopus civitatis Bulsiniensis (Gregor.

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  • of Orvieto, where many remains of antiquity have been found, on and above the site of the modern Bolsena (q.v.).

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  • In the next century, however, the see was transferred to Orvieto.

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  • 29 (from an Orvieto vase) represents the slaying of the children of Niobe by Apollo and Artemis; fig.

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  • side of the Piazza della Signoria; it is a huge Gothic edifice with a tower, erected in 1332-1346, according to tradition, by Matteo di Giovanello of Gubbio; the name of Angelo da Orvieto occurs on the arch of the main door, but his work may be limited to the sculptures of this arch.

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  • There may, also be mentioned many sculptors and architects, such as Lorenzo Maitani, architect of Orvieto cathedral (end of 13th century); Camaino di Crescentino; Tino di Camaino, sculptor of the monument to Henry VII.

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  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).

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  • Cortona, Orvieto, Viterbo and other cities were recovered for Alexander, and in 1 The historian, not to be confounded with the modern historian and statesman of the same name (q.v.).

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  • After completing his studies at the Collegium Romanum, he lived for some time at Orvieto, where he was engaged in teaching and palaeographical studies.

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  • He then went into exile at Orvieto and Viterbo, and only on the 6th of October 1528 returned to his desolate residence.

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  • On the 6th of December Clement escaped, before the day fixed for his liberation, to Orvieto, and at once set to work to establish peace.

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  • He died at Orvieto, on the 25th of August 1282, and he was canonized in 1330.

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  • was then at Orvieto, and had just recently escaped from captivity at St Angelo at the hands of the imperialists.

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  • FRANCISCUS GRATIANUS, compiler of the Concordia di,s cordantium canonum or Decretum Gratiani, and founder of the science of canon law, was born about the end of the filth century at Chiusi in Tuscany or, according to another account, at Carraria near Orvieto.

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  • In June 1 447 he proceeded to Orvieto, to paint in the Cappella Nuova of the cathedral, with the co-operation of his pupil Benozzo Gozzoli.

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  • In Orvieto cathedral he painted three triangular divisions of the ceiling, portraying respectively Christ in a glory of angels, sixteen saints and prophets, and the virgin and apostles: all these are now much repainted and damaged.

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  • 4), and the great shrine at Orvieto, are works of the same class, and of equal importance.

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  • The Romans at first declined to receive him, and he was consecrated at Orvieto on the 23rd of March 1281.

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  • He died at Orvieto on the 19th of March 1263.

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  • of Orvieto.

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  • The early history of the family is involved in obscurity, but they are first heard of as lords of Farneto or Farnese, a castle near the lake of Bolsena, and they played an important part as consuls and signori of Orvieto.

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  • They seem to have always been Guelphs, and in the civil broils of Orvieto they sided with the Monaldeschi faction against the Ghibelline Filippeschi.

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  • He never visited Rome, but lived most of his pontificate at Orvieto.

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  • Other works of Arnolfo, such as the Braye tomb at Orvieto, show an intimate artistic alliance between him and the Cosmati.

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  • of Orvieto by road, situated on the northeast bank of the lake of Bolsena.

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  • instituted the festival of Corpus Christi, and ordered the erection of the cathedral of Orvieto.

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  • manner of Siger's death, which occurred at Orvieto, is not known.

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  • 9-14) says that he was executed at Orvieto: a ghiado it le' morire a gran dolore, Nella corte di Roma ad Orbivieto.

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  • was in residence at Orvieto.

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  • In prehistoric times the river ran straight on along the valley of the Chiana and joined the Tiber near Orvieto; and there was a great lake, the north end of which was at Incisa and the south at the lake of Chiusi.

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  • Marco-Bisignano, Marsi (Pescina), Melfi-Rapolla Mileto, MoIf etta-Terlizzi-Giovennazzo,Monopoli,Montalcino,M ontefiascone, Montepulciano, Nardo, Narni, Nocera in Umbria, Norcia, Orvieto, Osimo-Cingoli, Parma, Penne-Atri, Piacenza, Poggio Mirteto, Recanati-Loreto, Rieti, Segni, Sutri-Nepi, Teramo, Terni, Terracina-Piperno-Sezze, Tjvoli, Todi, Tnivento, Troia, ValvaSulmona, Veroli, Viterbo-Toscanella.

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  • ORVIETO (anc. Volsinii, later Urbs Vetus, whence the modern name), a town and episcopal see of the province of Perugia, Italy, on the Paglia, 78 m.

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  • was residing at Orvieto; and it was to commemorate this miracle that the existing cathedral was built.

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  • Patrizio, is one of the chief curiosities of Orvieto.

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  • It was begun by the architect Antonio da San Gallo the younger in 1527 for Clement VII., who fled to Orvieto after the sack of Rome, and was finished by Simone Mosca under Paul III.

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  • Communal independence had probably been acquired as early as the end of the 10th century, but the first of the popes to reside in Orvieto and to recognize its communal administration was Hadrian IV.

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  • There were considerable Guelph and Ghibelline struggles even at Orvieto, the latter party being finally destroyed in 1313, and the representatives of the former, the Monaldeschi, obtaining the supreme power.

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  • The territory of Orvieto extended from Chiusi to the coast at Orbetello, to the Lake of Bolsena and the Tiber.

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  • After this period Orvieto was peaceably ruled by papal governors, and had practically no history.

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  • Owing to the strong Guelphic sympathies of the inhabitants, and the inaccessible nature of the site, Orvieto was constantly used as a place of refuge by the popes.

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  • Fumi, Il Duomo d'Orvieto e i suoi restauri (Rome, 1891); Orvieto, note storiche e biografiche (Citta di Castello, 1891), and other works.

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  • of its station on the railway between Chiusi and Orvieto.

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  • II seq.) calls Ovp33c(3evr-63 (Urbs vetus, the modern Orvieto).

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  • Muller, has been generally accepted by modern archaeologists; and it is a strong point in its favour that the bishop of Orvieto in 595 signs himself episcopus civitatis Bulsiniensis (Gregor.

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  • of Orvieto, where many remains of antiquity have been found, on and above the site of the modern Bolsena (q.v.).

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  • In the next century, however, the see was transferred to Orvieto.

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  • 29 (from an Orvieto vase) represents the slaying of the children of Niobe by Apollo and Artemis; fig.

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  • side of the Piazza della Signoria; it is a huge Gothic edifice with a tower, erected in 1332-1346, according to tradition, by Matteo di Giovanello of Gubbio; the name of Angelo da Orvieto occurs on the arch of the main door, but his work may be limited to the sculptures of this arch.

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  • The splendid west front, of tricuspidal form, enriched with a multitude of columns, statues and inlaid marbles, is said to have been begun by Giovanni Pisano, but really dates from after 1370; it was finished in 1380, and closely resembles that of Orvieto, which is earlier in date (begun in 1310).

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  • There may, also be mentioned many sculptors and architects, such as Lorenzo Maitani, architect of Orvieto cathedral (end of 13th century); Camaino di Crescentino; Tino di Camaino, sculptor of the monument to Henry VII.

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  • in the Campo Santo of Pisa; Agostino and Agnolo, who in 1330 carved the fine tomb of Bishop Guido Tarlati in the cathedral of Arezzo; Lando di Pietro (14th century), architect, entrusted by the Sienese commune with the proposed enlargement of the cathedral (1339), and perhaps author of the famous Gothic reliquary containing the head of S Galgano in the Chiesa del Santuccio, which, however, is more usually attributed to Ugolino di Vieri, author of the tabernacle in the cathedral at Orvieto; Giacopo (or Jacopo) della Quercia, whose lovely fountain, the Fonte Gaia, in the Piazza del Campo has been recently restored; Lorenzo di Pietro (Il Vecchietta), a pupil of Della Quercia and an excellent artist in marble and bronze; Francesco d'Antonio, a skilful goldsmith of the 1 6th century; Francesco di Giorgio Martini (1439-1502), painter, sculptor, military engineer and writer on art; Giacomo Cozzarelli (15th century); and Lorenzo Mariano, surnamed 11 Marrina (16th century).

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  • Cortona, Orvieto, Viterbo and other cities were recovered for Alexander, and in 1 The historian, not to be confounded with the modern historian and statesman of the same name (q.v.).

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    0
  • After completing his studies at the Collegium Romanum, he lived for some time at Orvieto, where he was engaged in teaching and palaeographical studies.

    0
    0
  • He then went into exile at Orvieto and Viterbo, and only on the 6th of October 1528 returned to his desolate residence.

    0
    0
  • On the 6th of December Clement escaped, before the day fixed for his liberation, to Orvieto, and at once set to work to establish peace.

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  • He died at Orvieto, on the 25th of August 1282, and he was canonized in 1330.

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  • The castle round which the town grew up was founded I According to the theory now generally adopted, the Etruscan Volsinii occupied the site of Orvieto, which was hence called Urbs vetus in late classical and medieval times, while the Roman Volsinii was transferred to Bolaena (see VoLsINtu).

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  • was then at Orvieto, and had just recently escaped from captivity at St Angelo at the hands of the imperialists.

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  • FRANCISCUS GRATIANUS, compiler of the Concordia di,s cordantium canonum or Decretum Gratiani, and founder of the science of canon law, was born about the end of the filth century at Chiusi in Tuscany or, according to another account, at Carraria near Orvieto.

    0
    0
  • In June 1 447 he proceeded to Orvieto, to paint in the Cappella Nuova of the cathedral, with the co-operation of his pupil Benozzo Gozzoli.

    0
    0
  • In Orvieto cathedral he painted three triangular divisions of the ceiling, portraying respectively Christ in a glory of angels, sixteen saints and prophets, and the virgin and apostles: all these are now much repainted and damaged.

    0
    0
  • 4), and the great shrine at Orvieto, are works of the same class, and of equal importance.

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    0
  • The Romans at first declined to receive him, and he was consecrated at Orvieto on the 23rd of March 1281.

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  • He died at Orvieto on the 19th of March 1263.

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  • Starting with a visit to Piombino, on the coast opposite Elba, he went by way of Siena to Urbino, where he made drawings and began works; was thence hastily summoned by way of Pesaro and Rimini to Cesena; spent two months between there and Cesenatico, projecting and directing canal and harbour works, and planning the restoration of the palace of Frederic II.; thence hurriedly joined his master, momentarily besieged by enemies at Imola; followed him probably to Sinigaglia and Perugia, through the whirl of storms and surprises, vengeances and treasons, which marked his course that winter, and finally, by way of Chiusi and Acquapendente, as far as Orvieto and probably to Rome, where Caesar arrived on the 14th of February 1503.

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  • of Orvieto.

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  • The early history of the family is involved in obscurity, but they are first heard of as lords of Farneto or Farnese, a castle near the lake of Bolsena, and they played an important part as consuls and signori of Orvieto.

    0
    0
  • They seem to have always been Guelphs, and in the civil broils of Orvieto they sided with the Monaldeschi faction against the Ghibelline Filippeschi.

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  • He never visited Rome, but lived most of his pontificate at Orvieto.

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