How to use Organism in a sentence

organism
  • The organism is made up of molecules which are analogous to them.

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  • The cell-walls of plants render the entry of solid material into the organism impossible.

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  • Any organism may pass through a series of free-living larval stages.

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  • Every organism takes origin from a parent organism of the same kind.

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  • An organism was to him something controlled by a formative organizing principle.

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  • The nodules on the roots of leguminous plants are induced by the presence of a minute organism now known to do no injury to the plant.

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  • The cell reproduced and the organism grew.

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  • He looked on the actions of the individual organism and of society as determined by the needs of self-preservation.

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  • In the former case the nature of the organism is such that it yields readily, when subjected to certain conditions, and all or nearly all the individuals become modified in the same way.

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  • The organism is largely dependent for its vital processes upon gaseous interchanges.

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  • Their cells during the period of incubation of the symbiotic organism are abundantly supplied with starch.

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  • This method of study has to a large extent modified our ideas of the relative importance of the parts of such an organism as a large tree.

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  • They also occur in the fluids of the living organism.

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  • According to the latter theory, the offspring of a given organism may be utterly different from itself,.

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  • Every species has a set number of chromosomes, which contain all the information necessary to make up the organism.

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  • The use of the term to mean the individualized nucleated mass of living protoplasm, which, whether with or without a limiting membrane, primitively forms the proximate histological element of the body of every organism, dates from the second quarter of the i9th century.

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  • Darwins expression the nature of the organism has been interpreted in the preceding paragraph to mean an inherent tendency towards higher organization; that interpretation may now be completed by adding that the organism is susceptible to, and can respond to, the action of external conditions.

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  • AdaptationThe morphological and physiological differentiation of the plant-body has, so far, been attributed to (I) the nature of the organism, that is to its inherent tendency towards higher organization, and (2) to the indefinite results of the external conditions acting as a stimulus which excites the organism to variation, but does not direct the course of variation.

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  • No biological generalization rests on a wider series of observations, or has been subjected to a more critical scrutiny than that every living organism has come into existence from a living portion or portions of a pre-existing organism.

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  • The conception of homogenesis, however, does not imply an absolute similarity between parent and organism.

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  • Homogenesis means simply that such organism comes into existence directly from a parent organism of the same race, and hence of the same species, sub-species, genus and so forth.

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  • During the whole time the animal is living the feeder has to pay what has been termed the " life tax " - that is, so much of the food has to go to the maintenance of the animal as a living organism, independently of that which may be undergoing conversion into what will subsequently be available in the form of beef or mutton.

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  • At low tide the limpet (being a strictly intertidal organism) is exposed to the air, and (according to trustworthy observers) quits its attachment and walks away in search of food (minute encrusting algae), and then once more returns to the identical spot, not an inch in diameter, which belongs, as it were, to it.

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  • In such a case, the best retort was to return in all haste in order to put more energy into the huge centralized organism which the emperor alone could work.

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  • Human experience consists, not of processes in an animal organism, but of these processes recognized as such.

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  • Hence we are inclined to look on the imaginal disks as cellular areas that possess in a latent condition the powers of growth and development that exist in the embryo, powers that only become evident in certain special conditions of the organism.

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  • At other times the pest is introduced, and under congenial conditions (and possibly in the absence of some other organism which keeps it in check in its native country) increases accordingly.

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  • But this specific application is dependent upon a prolonged racial preparation of the organism to respond in this particular way.

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  • They are sometimes called the histogenetic bodies or proteids, because they are essential to the building up of the animal organism.

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  • These cilia pass on any diatoms and -_„ other minute organism which come within their range of action to the -_-„ capacious oval mouth, which appears as a mere 10 --- deepening of the gutter in the middle line.

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  • It became isolated and detached, why or with what advantage to the organism it is difficult to say, and at that period of Arachnidan development the great ventral nerve cords occupied a more lateral position than they do at present.

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  • Degenerative simplicity is never uniformly distributed over all the structures of the organism.

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  • The reduction of the organism to seven leg-bearing somites, of which the first pair, as in so many Eu-arachnida, are chelate, is a form of degeneration connected with a peculiar quasi-parasitic habit resembling that of the crustacean Laemodipoda.

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  • The efforts of the best minds in zoology had been directed for thirty years or more to ascertaining with increased accuracy and minuteness the structure, microscopic and gross, of all possible forms of animals, and not only of the adult structure but of the steps of development of that structure in the growth of each kind of organism from the egg to maturity.

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  • It amounts toa new and unprecedented factor in organic development, external to the organism and yet produced by the activity of the organism upon which it permanently reacts.

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  • The healthy bone marrow reacts with remarkable rapidity to the demand for more blood cells which may be required by the organism; its reactions and variations in disease are very striking.

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  • The part played by the thyroid body in the internal economy of the organism has also received much attention.

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  • The human organism is far too complex to enable us to understand the true significance of diseased processes.

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  • What do we mean when we talk of a healthy organism?

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  • The use of the term " pathological physiology " may at first appear strange, for if we define physiology as the sum of the normal functions of the body or organism, it may be hard to see how there can be a physiology which is pathological.

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  • Influences Working For Evil Upon The Organism (I) Malnutrition.

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  • If the eyeball be kept perfectly clean and no organism be admitted from the outside then ulceration will not follow.

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  • This wasting may be general or local - continuously from the embryonic period there is this natural process of displacement and decay of tissues going on in the growing organism.

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  • There can be little doubt that all unnatural and artificial modes of life tend to deterioration of the powers of resistance of the organism to disease.

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  • Every living organism, animal and vegetable, tends to maintain a normal state of health; it is when the natural laws of health are violated that the liability to disease begins to assert itself.

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  • The living organism may be regarded as constantly engaged in a warfare with these silent and apparently insignificant messengers of destruction and death, with the result that too often the battle ends in favour of the attacking enemy.

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  • Assuming, with Sedgwick and others, this amassed and bound condition of the tissues to be true, it would be necessary to reject the cell-doctrine in pathology altogether, and to regard the living basis of the organism as a continuous substance whose parts are incapable of living independently of the whole.

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  • We do not now concur with the old view that inflammation was essentially an injurious process; rather do we look upon it as beneficial to the organism.

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  • In the various reactions of the tissues against the exciting cause of the injury we see a striking example of a beautifully organized plan of attack and defence on the part of the organism.

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  • In some of the infective conditions the conflict fortifies the organism against future attacks of the same nature, as for example in the immunity following many of the acute infective diseases.

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  • We have already compared the body to a social community, each constituent element of which - the cell - lives its own life but subordinates its individuality to the good of the whole organism.

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  • Haemosiderin in the normal process of haemolysis is stored up in the cells of certain organs until required by the organism for the formation of fresh haemoglobin.

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  • In extraneous pigmentation we have coloured substances either in a solid or fluid state, gaining entrance into the organism and accumulating in certain tissues.

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  • They were unable to verify any direct connexion between its production and the organism of tubercle.

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  • Response Of Tissues To Stimulation A stimulus may be defined as every change of the external agencies acting upon an organism; and if a stimulus come in contact with a body possessing the property of irritability, i.e.

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  • Each organism possesses within itself the means of protection against its parasitical enemies, and these properties are more in evidence when the organism is in perfect health than when it is debilitated.

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  • One chief means employed by nature in accomplishing this object is the investment of those parts of the organism liable to be attacked with an armour-like covering of epidermis, periderm, bark, &c. The grape is proof against the inroads of the yeastplant so long as the husk is intact, but on the husk being injured the yeast-plant finds its way into the interior and sets up vinous fermentation of its sugar.

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  • Its serum in course of time is found to contain something (antitoxin) which has the power of neutralizing the toxin secreted by the organism when parasitical upon the body.

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  • This fact gave rise in ancient times to the false idea that the tapeworm originated from the union of these segments; and in modern times it has led to the view that the tapeworm is not a segmented organism (the monozoic view), but is a colony composed of the scolex which arises from the embryo and of the proglottides, which are asexually produced buds that, upon or before attaining their full size and maturity, become separated, grow, and, in some cases, live freely for a time, just as the segments of a strobilating jelly-fish grow, separate and become sexual individuals (the polyzoic view).

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  • The scyphistoma of Nausithoe forms a branching network which grows in the sponge Esperella and forms the colonial polypoid organism named by Schulze Spongicola fistularis, by Allman Stephanoscyphus mirabilis.

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  • Inaddition, the appearance of a specific normal organism in very high numbers may also be regarded as an abnormal result.

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  • When the culture results are available and sensitivity tests indicate a more effective antibiotic, the physician will likely prescribe a new antibiotic specific for the strep or other organism identified.

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  • Fetus-In humans, the developing organism from the end of the eighth week to the moment of birth.

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  • The most significant tests are a white blood cell count (WBC) and a blood culture to identify the organism.

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  • Family therapy is based on family systems theory, in which the family is viewed as a living organism rather than just the sum of its individual members.

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  • Aerobic-An organism that grows and thrives only in environments containing oxygen.

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  • The most troublesome organism in this group is Escherichia coli.

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  • In most cases of mild diarrhea, it is not critical to identify the organism because the disorder is self-limiting.

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  • H. influenzae type B (Hib) is a common organism worldwide; it is found in most healthy individuals in the general population.

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  • It can be caused by nearly any class of organism known to cause human infections, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

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  • Conjunctivitis can be acute or chronic depending on how long the condition lasts, the severity of symptoms, and the type of organism or agent involved.

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  • In such cases, the discharge may be cultured and tested to determine the organism responsible for causing the condition.

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  • The gonococcal organism may occasionally affect the eye, causing blindness if not treated.

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  • Microorganism-An organism that is too small to be seen with the naked eye, such as a bacterium, virus, or fungus.

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  • Immunoglobulin M (IgM) is the first antibody produced in an immune response to any invading organism or toxic substance.

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  • Inclusion conjunctivitis is caused by an intracellular organism called Chlamydia trachomatis.

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  • A sputum culture may be performed, particularly if the sputum is green or has blood in it, to determine whether a bacterial infection is present and to identify the disease-causing organism so that an appropriate antibiotic can be selected.

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  • Pneumonia is an infection of the lungs that can be caused by nearly any class of organism known to cause human infections, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites.

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  • Pneumonia can develop gradually in children after exposure to the causative organism, or it can develop quickly after another illness, reducing the lungs' ability to receive and distribute oxygen.

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  • The onset, duration, and severity of pneumonia depend upon the type of infective organism invading the body and the response of the child's immune system in fighting the infection.

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  • The invading organism causing pneumonia provokes an immune response in the lungs that causes inflammation of the lung tissue (pneumonitis), a condition that actually makes the lung environment more ideal for infection.

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  • A small sample of sputum will be streaked on a special plate filled with medium that allows the specific organism to be grown in the laboratory under certain conditions.

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  • Prognosis varies according to the type of organism causing the infection, the status of the immune system, and the overall health of the affected child.

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  • Streptococcus pneumoniae, the most common organism causing pneumonia, has a significantly lower death rate of about 5 percent.

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  • Pneumocystis carinii-An organism that causes pneumonia in immunodeficient individuals, such as people with AIDS.

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  • When symptoms seem to suggest pneumonia, immediate attention allows early treatment so that breathing difficulties can be corrected quickly and drug therapy begun in order to destroy the causative organism.

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  • It is a state of lessened consciousness and decreased physical activity during which the organism slows down and repairs itself.

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  • Diagnostic tests focus on identifying the organism causing the illness.

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  • The microbiology laboratory may use samples of the bacteria grown to perform other special techniques to help identify the causative organism.

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  • In infant botulism, the infant's stool may be cultured to isolate the organism; this test may be performed by the state health department or the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

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  • Adults usually recover from E. coli poisoning without medical intervention, but many children require hospitalization for contamination with this organism.

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  • A swab of the external canal will not necessarily reveal the actual causative organism, so some other tissue sample (biopsy) will need to be obtained.

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  • Cryptosporidium is another common parasitic organism that causes the symptoms of gastroenteritis.

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  • Individuals with CVID will typically have frequent infections, especially repeat infections caused by the same organism.

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  • The type of organism causing repeat infection can be a clue to which immunoglobulins are deficient.

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  • The doctor will test the child's hearing and order a laboratory culture to identify the organism if the patient has a discharge.

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  • Co-infection-Concurrent infection of a cell or organism with two microorganisms (pneumonia caused by coinfection with a cytomegalovirus and streptococcus).

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  • When phagocytes encounter an invading organism, they surround and engulf it in order to destroy it.

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  • Basically, it has the ability to recognize an organism or tumor cell as not being a normal part of the body and to develop a response to attempt to eliminate it.

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  • This allows the phagocytes to begin engulfing and destroying the organism.

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  • As the name suggests, killer T lymphocytes act to destroy the target organism.

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  • H. influenzae is a common organism worldwide; it has been found in the nasal secretions of as many as 90 percent of healthy individuals in the general population.

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  • The organism can be transmitted by person-to-person contact or by contact with nasal discharges and other body fluids.

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  • The organism sometimes invades localized areas of tissue, producing meningitis, infectious arthritis, conjunctivitis, cellulitis, epiglottitis, or inflammation of the membrane surrounding the heart.

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  • The child may acquire the disease organism as it passes through the mother's birth canal or from the hospital environment.

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  • Sometimes the organism cultured is not Clostridium as suspected.

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  • The microbiology laboratory may use samples of the bacteria grown to perform other special techniques in order to help identify the causative organism.

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  • Vector-A carrier organism (such as a fly or mosquito) which serves to deliver a virus (or other agent of infection) to a host.

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  • Also refers to a retrovirus that had been modified and is used to introduce specific genes into the genome of an organism.

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  • Anaerobic-An organism that grows and thrives in an oxygen-free environment.

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  • The organism that causes scabies is a mite.

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  • The first precondition for the development of acute otitis media is exposure to an organism capable of causing the infection.

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  • Many researchers have looked for some infectious cause for JA, but no clear connection to a particular organism had been made as of 2004.

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  • The organism can spread to the blood stream and central nervous system.

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  • Active immunization-Treatment that provides immunity by challenging an individual's own immune system to produce antibody against a particular organism.

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  • Escherichia coli (E. coli) is another common gram-negative organism.

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  • The entire dance floor becomes a moving organism, and the sound of the music involves people in a mutual experience who might never have met otherwise.

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  • It's not just the task of creating a dance that will fit the abilities and styles of multiple dancers - it is also treating the group as a single organism that is expressing an idea through movement.

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  • By the end of the embryonic stage, the collection of cells has grown into a living organism that has a heartbeat.

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  • The mildew is actually a living organism.

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  • Candida Albicans is a fungal organism that lives in our intestinal tract.

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  • If epiglottitis is suspected, no efforts should be made to look at the throat or to swab the throat in order to obtain a culture for identification of the causative organism.

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  • If drainage from infection is present, the doctor may have the material cultured in the laboratory to identify the organism causing infection.

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  • The nose and throat may also be cultured to see if the same organism is responsible for an upper respiratory infection.

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  • The bacteria causing shigellosis is named after Shiga, a Japanese researcher, who discovered the organism in 1897.

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  • Carrier state-The continued presence of an organism (bacteria, virus, or parasite) in the body that does not cause symptoms, but is able to be transmitted and infect other persons.

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  • Named for the golden color of the bacteria grown under laboratory conditions, Staphylococcus aureus is a hardy organism that can survive in extreme temperatures or other inhospitable circumstances.

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  • Phenylalanine is a type of teratogen (any substance or organism that can cause birth defects in a developing fetus).

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  • The two books mentioned remained unnoticed by the reading public, and Lotze first became known to a larger circle through a series of works which aimed at establishing in the study of the physical and mental phenomena of the human organism in its normal and diseased states the same general principles which had been adopted in the investigation of inorganic phenomena.

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  • The laws which govern particles of matter in the inorganic world govern them likewise if they are joined into an organism.

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  • Sir Leslie Stephen finds that moral laws are the conditions needful for the good of the social organism, and are imposed as such by society upon its individual members.

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  • At the same time the world as a developed whole is regarded as an organism which is permeated with the divine Spirit, and so we may say that the world-process is a self-realization of the divine Being.

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  • It can only be understood by subordinating the mechanical conception to the vital, by conceiving the world as one organism animated by a spiritual principle or intelligence (Weltseele).

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  • There are three stadia, or moments, in this process of nature - (i) the mechanical moment, or matter devoid of individuality; (2) the physical moment, or matter which has particularized itself in bodies - the solar system; and (3) the organic moment, or organic beings, beginning with the geological organism - or the mineral kingdom, plants and animals.

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  • In fact, while holding firmly by the former, Bonnet more or less modified the latter in his later writings, and, at length, he admits that a " germ " need not be an actual miniature of the organism, hut that it may be merely an " original preformation " capable of producing the latter.4 But, thus defined, the germ is neither more nor less than the "particula genitalis" of Aristotle, or the "primordium vegetale" or " ovum " of Harvey; and the " evolution " of such a germ would not be distinguishable from " epigenesis."

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  • It is not true, for example, that a fish is a reptile arrested in its development, or that a reptile was ever a fish; but it is true that the reptile embryo, at one stage of its development, is an organism which, if it had an independent existence, must be classified among fishes; and all the organs of the reptile pass, in the course of their development, through conditions which are closely analogous to those which are permanent in some fishes.

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  • The term Anatomy, originally employed in biological science to denote a description of the facts of structure revealed on cutting up an organism, whether with or without the aid of lenses for the purposes of magnification, is restricted in the present article, in accordance with a common modern use, to those facts of internal structure not concerned with the constitution of the individual cell, the structural unit of which the plant is composed.

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  • What little differentiation can be found to exist in the protoplasm of the simple unicellular organism shows the importance of an adequate water-supply, and indeed, the dependence of life upon it.

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  • The cells in which the fungoid organism is vigorously flourishing are exceedingly active, showing large size, brilliant nuclei, protoplasm and vacuole, all of which give signs of iptense metabolic activity.

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  • Botrytis, Ergot, &c. Now it is clear that if an organism gains access to all parts of a plant, and stimulates all or most of its cells to hypertrophy, we may have the latter behaving abnormallyi.e.

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  • Just as every crystallizable chemical substance assumes a definite and constant crystalline form which cannot be accounted for otherwise than by regarding it as one of the properties of the substance, so every living organism assumes a characteristic form which is the outcome of the properties of its protoplasm.

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  • But whereas the crystalline form of a chemical substance is stable and fixed, the organized form of a living organism is unstable and subject to change.

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  • But by a process of successive and continued artificial cultures under different conditions, the virus of the organism is found to become attenuated; and when this weakened virus is administered, the animal is rendered immune against further attacks.

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  • This has taken the form of inoculating the soil with the particular organism required by the particular kind of leguminous crop. To this end the endeavour has been made to produce preparations which shall contain in portable form the organisms required by the several plants, and though, as yet, it can hardly be claimed that they have been generally successful, the work done justifies hopes that the problem will eventually be solved in a practical direction.

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  • At the opening sitting (May 30) Czechs, Poles and Ruthenes defined their national attitude in formal resolutions, and the Slovene leader, Father Korosec, in the name of the Yugoslays, demanded " the union of all the Yugoslav territories of the Monarchy in an independent state organism, free from the rule of any foreign nation, and resting on a democratic basis, under the sceptre of the Habsburg-Lorraine Dynasty."

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  • The astonishing colours and grotesque forms of some animals and plants which the museum zoologists gravely described without comment were shown by these observers of living nature to have their significance in the economy of the organism possessing them; and a general doctrine was recognized, to the effect that no part or structure of an organism is without definite use and adaptation, being designed by the Creator for the benefit of the creature to which it belongs, or else for the benefit, amusement or instruction of his highest creature - man.

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  • Whether this view is soundly based is discussed below; the fact remains, however, that a tapeworm is, with few and rare exceptions, not directly comparable at all points with a liver-fluke or indeed with any other organism.

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  • By a process of infolding, the thicker end is partially invaginated, the middle portion or " hind-body " and the organism may now present a superficial likeness to a cercaria.

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  • We therefore regard the body of a Cestode as a single organism within which the gonads have become segmented, and the segmentation of the body as a secondary phenomenon associated with diffuse osmotic feeding in the narrow intestinal canal.

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  • The bacterium, Clostridium pasteurianum, common in most soils, is able to utilize free nitrogen under anaerobic conditions, and an organism known as Azotobacter chroococcum and some others closely allied to it, have similar powers which they can exercise under aerobic conditions.

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  • Cultures of the typhoid organism planted at a depth of 18 in.

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  • In the winter months the deeper layers of the soil act as a shelter to the organism, which again grows towards the surface during the summer.

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  • Depriving the organism of any of these essential conditions for its existence in the soil will secure our best weapon for defence.

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  • To this end he examined such immediate vital products as blood, bile and urine; he analysed the juices of flesh, establishing the composition of creatin and investigating its decomposition products, creatinin and sarcosin; he classified the various articles of food in accordance with the special function performed by each in the animal economy, and expounded the philosophy of cooking; and in opposition to many of the medical opinions of his time taught that the heat of the body is the result of the processes of combustion and oxidation performed within the organism.

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  • The compound organism now develops two sets of inter-connected genitalia and becomes a Diplozoon.

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  • It escapes into the adjacent tissue and there gives rise either to one or more generations of rediae or at once to a new type of organism - the cercaria.

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  • Comte's immense superiority over such praeRevolutionary utopians as the Abbe Saint Pierre, no less than over the group of post-revolutionary utopians, is especially visible in this firm grasp of the cardinal truth that the improvement of the social organism can only be effected by a moral development, and never by any changes in mere political mechanism, or any violences in the way of an artificial redistribution of wealth.

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  • In the Principles of Sociology Spencer's most influential ideas have been that of the social organism, of the origination of religion out of the worship of ancestral ghosts, of the natural antagonism between nutrition and reproduction, industrialism and warfare.

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  • Neither by geometrical, nor physical, nor metaphysical principles had he succeeded in reaching and grasping the infinite and the spiritual, or in elucidating their relation to man and man's organism, though he had caught glimpses of facts and methods which he thought only required confirmation and development.

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  • An animal may be defined as a living organism, the protoplasm of which does not secrete a cellulose cell-wall, and which requires for its existence proteid material obtained from the living or dead bodies of existing plants or animals.

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  • The first experiment he made with this new organism was brilliantly successful.

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  • But if complete, this Wissenschaftslehre must be able to deduce the whole organism of cognition from certain fundamental axioms, themselves unproved and incapable of proof; only thus can we have a system of reason.

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  • Though forming a distinct and separate organism Cluny claimed to be, and was recognized as, a body of Benedictine houses; but from that time onwards arose a number of independent bodies, or "orders," which took the Benedictine Rule as the basis of their life.

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  • But the influence of Cluny, even on monasteries that did not enter into its organism, was enormous; many adopted Cluny customs and practices and moulded their life and spirit after the model it set; and many such monasteries became in turn centres of revival and reform in many lands, so that during the 10th and 11th centuries arose free unions of monasteries based on a common observance derived from a central abbey.

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  • Comte, Spencer, Bagehot, Durkheim and Giddings, for example, refer to it, if at all, only briefly and incidentally; they conceive society as an organism, or at all events as a growing whole, no one part or force being the cause of all others, and all interacting; society is not the product of any agreement or of force alone, but of a vast variety of interests, desires and needs.

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  • Every change in a living organism involves adaptation; for in all cases life consists in a continuous adjustment of internal to external relations.

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  • Every living organism reacts to its environment; if the reaction is unfavourable, disability leading to ultimate extinction is the result.

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  • It takes a comprehensive view of all the plants which cover the earth, from the minutest organism, only visible by the aid of the microscope, to the most gigantic productions of the tropics.

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  • But besides the innumerable characters which are visible and measurable, there are probably thousands which we cannot measure or which have not been discovered, since every part of the organism enjoys its gradual and independent evolution.

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  • It is certainly a very striking fact that wherever we have been able to trace genetic series, either of invertebrates or vertebrates, in closely sequent geological horizons, or life zones, we find strong proof of evolution through extremely gradual mutation simultaneously affecting many parts of each organism, as set forth above.

    1
    1
  • The dynamical series of stages in nature, the forms in which the ideal structure of nature is realized, are matter, as the equilibrium of the fundamental expansive and contractive forces; light, with its subordinate processes - magnetism, electricity, and chemical action; organism, with its component phases of reproduction, irritability and sensibility.'

    1
    1
  • The latter organism, in certain phases, very closely resembles a Spirochaete.

    1
    1
  • Laveran and Mesnil (27) gave the name Piroplasma donovani to Leishman's form,' and there is no doubt that the parasites are closely allied to that type of organism.

    1
    1
  • Nevertheless the resemblance between the biology of this organism in relation to syphilis (as regards mode of infection, habitat, &c.) and that of Trypanosoma equiperdum, the cause of dourine or " horse-syphilis," may not be without significance.

    1
    1
  • Plimmer, " The Trypanosoma brucei, the organism found in Nagana or the Tsetsefly disease," Quart.

    1
    1
  • One of the most important contributions to the discussion is that of Sir Leslie Stephen (Science of Ethics), who elaborated a theory of the "social organism" in relation to the individual.

    1
    1
  • Instead, therefore, of the criterion of "the greatest happiness of the greatest number," Stephen has that of the "health of the organism."

    1
    1
  • In the Middle and Western states the township is a more artificial organism than the rural town of New England.

    1
    1
  • The county is to be found in every state of the Union, but its importance varies inversely with the position held in the system of local government by that smaller and older organism, the town.

    1
    1
  • To put one extreme case, about the soul he could think at first in the Eudemus like Plato that it is imprisoned in the body, and long afterwards in the De Anima like himself that it is the immateriate essence of the material bodily organism.

    1
    1
  • Still a man is not the only organism; and every organism has a soul, whose immediate organ is the spirit (7rvEwµa), a body which - analogous to a body diviner than the four so-called elements, namely the aether, the element of the stars - gives to the organism its nonterrestrial vital heat, whether it be a plant or an animal.

    1
    1
  • In an ascending scale, a plant is an organism with a nutritive soul; an animal is a higher organism with a nutritive, sensitive, orectic and locomotive soul; a man is the highest organism with a nutritive, sensitive, orectic, locomotive and rational soul.

    1
    1
  • Sensation is not the reception of the selfsame essence of an external body, but one's perception of one's sentient organism as affected, and especially of its organs resisting one another, e.g.

    1
    1
  • His theory of the world and of humanity is universal and idealistic. The world itself and mankind, its highest component, constitute an organism (Gliedbau), and the universe is therefore a divine organism (Wesengliedbau).

    1
    1
  • It is a top-shaped, free-swimming organism provided with a preoral band of cilia,.

    2
    3
  • Such an organism is found in the peculiar Trichoplax, Lohmanniella, &c. The early stages of most animals pass through such a stage, which is known as a ” planula."

    1
    1
  • In connexion with this Biran treats most of the obscure problems which arise in dealing with conscious experience, such as the mode by which the organism is cognized, the mode by which the organism is distinguished from extra-organic things, and the nature of those general ideas by which the relations of things are known to us - cause, power, force, &c.

    1
    1
  • Aristotle had imputed to all living beings a soul, though to plants only in the sense of a vegetative, not a sensitive, activity, and in Moleschott's time many scientific men still accepted some sort of vital principle, not exactly soul, yet over and above bodily forces in organisms. Moleschott, like Lotze, not only resisted the whole hypothesis of a vital principle, but also, on the basis of Lavoisier's discovery that respiration is combustion, argued that the heat so produced is the only force developed in the organism, and that matter therefore rules man.

    1
    1
  • The second question he answered from his parallelistic metaphysics by deducing that even within the organism there is only a constant dependency of sensation on nervous process without causation, because the nervous process is physical but the sensation psychical.

    1
    1
  • This answer supposed that the whole physical process from the action of the external stimulus on the nervous system to the reaction of the organism on the external world is one series, while the conscious process beginning with sensation is only parallel and as it were left high and dry.

    1
    1
  • But his substitute was his own hypothesis of panpsychism, from which he deduced a "cosmorganic " evolution from a " cosmorganic " or original condition of the world as a living organism into the inorganic, by the principle of tendency to stability.

    1
    1
  • When Green said that " Nature is the system of related appearances, and related appearances are impossible apart from the action of an intelligence," he was speaking as a pure Kantian, who could be answered only by the Aristotelian position that Nature consists of related bodies beyond appearances, and by the realistic supposition that there, , h is a tactical sense of related bodies, of the inter-resisting members of the organism, from which reason infers similar related bodies beyond sense.

    1
    1
  • As, however, he does not suppose that we have a direct perception of something resisting the organism, such as Hamilton maintained, it becomes necessary to state exactly what he means by " attuition."

    1
    1
  • He vacillated a great deal about our mode of perceiving the external world; but his final view (edition of Reid's works, note D*) consisted in supposing that (1) sensation is an apprehension of secondary qualities purely as affections of the organism viewed as ego; (2) perception in general is an apprehension of primary qualities as relations of sensations in the organism viewed as non-ego; while (3) a special perception of a so-called " secundo-primary " quality consists in " the consciousness of a resisting something external to our organism."

    1
    1
  • The common tenet of the whole school is that without inference we immediately perceive the external world, at all events as a resisting something external to our organism.

    1
    1
  • There are three reasons against it, and for the view that we perceive a sensible object within, and infer an external object without, the organism.

    1
    1
  • Secondly, there are so-called " subjective sensations," without any external object as stimulus, most commonly in vision, but also in touch, which is liable to formication, or the feeling of creeping in the skin, and to horripilation, or the feeling of bristling in the hair; yet, even in " subjective sensations," we perceive something sensible, which, however, must be within, and not outside, the organism.

    1
    1
  • The Scottish School never realized that every sensation of the five senses is a perception of a sensible object in the bodily organism; and that touch is a perception, not only of single sensible pressure, but also of double sensible pressure, a perception of our bodily members sensibly pressing and pressed by one another, from which, on the recurrence of a single sensible pressure, we infer the pressure of an external thing for the first time.

    1
    1
  • So touch perceives not a sensation of pressure, but a pressure which is a material fact in the organism.

    1
    1
  • But the primary sense of touch perceives one bodily member causing pressure on another, reciprocally, within the organism, from which we infer similar particular pressures caused between the organism and the external world; but without needing the supposed stupendous belief and assumption of the uniformity of Nature, which is altogether ignored in the inferences of the ordinary man.

    3
    3
  • Although, among other obstacles, the popes of the 12th century had experienced some difficulty in subduing the inhabitants of the city, which was the seat and centre of the of the Christian world, their monarchy did not cease to gain in authority, solidity and prestige, and the work of centralization, which was gradually making them masters of the whole ecclesiastical organism, was accomplished steadily and without serious interruption.

    1
    1
  • Mistress of the entire Christian organism, Rome thus gained control of international education, and the mendicant monks who formed her devoted militia lost no time in monopolizing the professorial chairs.

    1
    1
  • The socialistic idea, with which the " Democratie Chretienne " had identified itself both in France and Belgium, regards numbers as the centre of gravity of the whole state organism.

    1
    1
  • In modern times the best attested premonitions are those relating to events about to occur in the subject's own organism.

    1
    1
  • The fungal part of the organism nearly always consists of a number of the Discomycetes or Pyrenomycetes, while the algal portion is a member of the Schizophyceae (Cyanophyceae or Blue-green Algae) or of the Green Algae; only in a very few cases is the fungus a member of the Basidiomycetes.

    1
    1
  • They owe their capacity to live under the most inhospitable conditions to the dual nature of the organism, and to their capacity to withstand extremes of heat, cold and drought without destruction.

    1
    1
  • It is a special case of growth, and consists of an increase of living substance in such fashion that the new substance is either set free as a new individual, or, whilst remaining attached to the parent organism, separated by some sort of partition so as to have a subordinate individuality.

    1
    1
  • From the surfaces of all objects there are continually flowing thin filmy images exactly copying the solid body whence they originate; and these images by direct impact on the organism produce (we need not care to ask how) the phenomena of vision.

    1
    1
  • The latter Mansel's psychology reduces to consciousness of our organism as extended; with the former is given consciousness of free will and moral obligation.

    3
    3
  • Sir William Dawson's name is especially associated with the Eozoon canadense, which in 1864 he described as an organism having the structure of a foraminifer.

    3
    3
  • His views on the subject were contested at the time, and have since been disproved, the so-called organism being now regarded as a mineral structure.

    1
    1
  • Regarding it as an organism which represented the simplest form of life, Huxley about 1868 named it Bathybius Haeckelii.

    1
    1
  • Multiplication takes place in some cases by the endogenous formation of zoospores, the organism having come to rest; in others by longitudinal division, when the organism is still motile.

    1
    1
  • No unicellular Rhodophyceae are known, although a flagellate organism, Rhodomonas, has recently been described as possessed of the same red colouring matter.

    1
    1
  • He laid much stress on the unity of the organism in every stage of its existence, with the resulting correlation of variations, so that the favouring of one particular variation entailed modifications of correlated structures.

    1
    1
  • He showed how different varieties in a species, or species in a genus, tended to display parallel variation, clearly indicating that the range and direction of variation were limited or determined by the nature of the organism.

    1
    1
  • He insisted that the great powers of increase of all organisms led to a tremendous struggle for existence, and that variability extended to every part and organ of every organism; that the variability was large in amount in proportion to the size of the part affected, and occurred in a considerable proportion of the individuals of those large and dominant species which might be supposed to be breaking up into new species.

    1
    1
  • Wallace, whilst insisting that the range of observed and measured variation was much larger in proportion to the size of the organisms or parts of organism affected than was generally believed, leaned to the Darwinian view in excluding from the normal factors in the origin of species variations of the extremer ranges of magnitude.

    1
    1
  • When the cells of the morula stage of an embryo are shaken asunder, each, instead of forming the appropriate part of a single organism, may form a complete new organism.

    1
    1
  • And similarly in the development of a complicated organism, the suppression or doubling of a single cell or group of cells may bring about striking differences in the symmetry of the adult, or the reduction or increase in the number of metameric organs.

    1
    1
  • A slight change in the structure or activity of a gland, by altering the internal secretion, may produce widespread alterations even in an adult organism; and we have good reason to suppose that, if compatible with viability, such minute changes would have even a greater ultimate effect if they occurred in an embryo.

    1
    1
  • The organism is not a passive medium; the amount and nature of the response it makes to the action of environment depends on its own qualities, and these qualities, on any theory of inheritance, pass from generation to generation.

    1
    1
  • Even the results of mutilation involve an intrinsic factor, for they range, according to the organ and organism affected, from complete regeneration to the most imperfect healing.

    1
    1
  • The old organism is more stable and responds in obvious ways to direct assaults from without; the young organism is at once less stable and more profoundly modified by environmental change, replying in terms less easy to predict from knowledge of the nature and amount of the impinging agency.

    1
    1
  • Every organism is an individual, its different parts, organs and functions being associated in a degree of intimacy that varies, but that corresponds roughly with the integration of the individual and its place in the ascending scales of animal or vegetable life.

    1
    1
  • The various parts of a living organism affect each other in adult life and during growth.

    1
    1
  • A difference in calibre, elasticity or branching of a blood vessel, the smallest variation in a nerve or group of vessel-cells, any anatomical or physiological divergence, is reflected throughout the organism.

    1
    1
  • Their experimental work shows that many facts of inheritance correspond with the theory that the essential fabric of an organism is a mosaic of unit characters.

    1
    1
  • Such units frequently occur in pairs, one member of the pair being characterized by the presence, the other by the absence of a problematical body at least comparable with a ferment, the result of the presence or absence being a notable modification of the whole organism or of parts of it.

    1
    1
  • A similar kind of segregation may take place in the formation of the repeated parts of an organism, so that symmetrical repetition may be compared with normal heredity, and be due to the presence of similar factors in the divisions of the embryonic cells, whilst the differentiation of repeated parts may be due to the unequal distribution of such factors and be comparable with variation.

    5
    5
  • Obviously variations depend on the constitution of the varying organism; a modification, whether it be large or small, is a modification of an already definite and limited structure.

    1
    1
  • Finally, it is important to remember that the fundamental characteristic of a living organism is its power of response to environment, a response or series of responses being necessary in a continuous environment for the normal facies of the organism to appear, and necessary in a shifting environment if the organism is to change suitably and not to perish.

    1
    1
  • With regard to adaptations, it is becoming more and more apparent, as experimental knowledge advances, that it is a fundamental property of every living organism in every stage of its existence to display adaptive response to its environment.

    1
    1
  • The disciplined philosopher, who had devoted himself to the task of comprehending the organism of the state, had no patience with feebler or more mercurial minds who recklessly laid hands on established ordinances, and set them aside where they contravened humanitarian sentiments.

    1
    1
  • Reason convinced that the world and the soul are alike rational observes the external world, mental phenomena, and specially the nervous organism, as the meeting ground of body and mind.

    1
    1
  • Thought in its primary form is, as it were, thoroughly transparent and absolutely fluid, free and mutually interpenetrable in every part - the spirit in its seraphic scientific life, before creation had produced a natural world, and thought had risen to independent existence in the social organism.

    1
    1
  • Philosophy alone sees God revealing Himself in the ideal organism of thought as it were a possible deity prior to the world and to any relation between God and actuality; in the natural world, as a series of materialized forces and forms of life; and in the spiritual world as the human soul, the legal and moral order of society, and the creations of art, religion and philosophy.

    1
    1
  • Once acquired the habitué depends on the drug for a comfortable existence, and as the organism becomes quickly tolerant of the alkaloid the original dose no longer suffices.

    1
    1
  • As the living organism includes something of mechanism - the skeleton, for example - so an organic logic doubtless includes determinations of formal consistency.

    1
    1
  • The skeleton is meaningless apart from reference to its function in the life of an organism, yet there are laws of skeleton structure which can be studied with most advantage if other characters of the organism are relegated to the background.

    1
    1
  • The position of the search for truth, for which knowledge is a growing organism in which thought needs, so to speak, to feed on something other than itself, is conditioned in the view of logic wholly metaphysical.

    1
    1
  • There is, perhaps, an increasing tendency to recognize that the organism of knowledge is a thing which from any single viewpoint must be seen in perspective.

    1
    1
  • It is no longer merely the scene for the drama of the soul and God, nor is man independent of it, but man and nature constitute an organism, humanity being a part of the vaster whole.

    1
    1
  • The social organism of the Aryan tribe did not probably differ essentially from that of most communities at that primitive stage of civilization; whilst the body of the people - the Vis (or aggregate of Vaisyas) - would be mainly occupied with agricultural and pastoral pursuits, two professional classes - those of the warrior and the priest - had already made good their claim to social distinction.

    1
    1
  • In the same way the disease caused by the mildew organism may be counteracted by a slight addition of alcohol and tannin.

    1
    1
  • He does, however, lay much stress upon the naturally social character of man; and this points forward to that treatment of morality as a function of the social organism which characterizes modern ethical theory.

    1
    1
  • All psychical states may, according to him, be treated as incidents of the correspondence between the organism and its environment.

    1
    1
  • By inoculation with increasing doses of these the resistance of the organism is greatly increased and the invading microbes destroyed.

    2
    3
  • The high temperature characteristic of this condition is no doubt injurious to the body itself, but it is frequently more so to the microbe which has invaded the organism; and thus fever, instead of now being regarded as a morbid condition to be suppressed by every means in our power, is considered to be a reaction of the organism tending to protect it by destroying the infection.

    1
    1
  • Fever is not to be looked upon as an unmitigated evil, to be removed if possible, but rather as a defensive mechanism by which the organism may prevent invasion from noxicus microbes.

    1
    1
  • Nevertheless, as in a campaign the general's plan may be spoiled by too hasty or too eager action on the part of some of his troops, so the defensive arrangement carried to excess may prove injurious or fatal to the organism.

    1
    1
  • After the struggle between the organism and the microbes is over, even when it has ended victoriously for the former, injuries are left behind which require repair.

    1
    1
  • Therapeutic measures which are commonly adopted in the treatment of a cold have for their object, to destroy the microbes before they penetrate fairly into the organism, and to restore the balance of the circulation and increase the strength of the invaded parts.

    1
    1
  • Both inflammation and fever are protective processes calculated to defend the organism against the attacks of microbes.

    1
    1
  • But protective processes misdirected or carried to excess may become injurious or even dangerous to the organism.

    1
    1
  • The healthy organism can adapt itself to great varieties both in regard to the quality and quantity of food; but when health begins to fail much care may be required, and many ailments arise from dyspepsia.

    1
    1
  • The state is, therefore, an artificial organism for the promotion of individual and collective good.

    1
    1
  • In Trendelenburg's treatment of the state, as the ethical organism in which the individual (the potential man) may be said first to emerge into actuality, we may trace his nurture on the best ideas of Hellenic antiquity.

    1
    1
  • Lister put forth similar ideas about the same time; and Billroth came forward in 1874 with the extravagant view that the various bacteria are only different states of one and the same organism which he called Cocco-bacteria septica.

    1
    1
  • When Pasteur in 1857 showed that the lactic fermentation depends on the presence of an organism, it was already known from the researches of Schwann (1837) and Helmholtz (1843) that fermentation and putrefaction are intimately connected with the presence of organisms derived from the air, and that the preservation of putrescible substances depends on this principle.

    1
    1
  • In 1862 Pasteur placed it beyond reasonable doubt that the ammoniacal fermentation of urea is due to the action of a minute Schizomycete; in 1864 this was confirmed by van Tieghem, and in 1874 by Cohn, who named the organism Micrococcus ureae.

    1
    1
  • In 1862 Pasteur repeated and extended such experiments, and paved the way for a complete explanation of the anomalies; Cohn in 1872 published confirmatory results; and it became clear that no putrefaction can take place without bacteria or some other living organism.

    1
    1
  • Long before any clear ideas as to the relations of Schizomycetes to fermentation and disease were possible, various thinkers at different times had suggested that resemblances existed between the phenomena of certain diseases and those of fermentation, and the idea that a virus or contagium might be something of the nature of a minute organism capable of spreading and 1 Cladothrix dichotoma, for example, which is ordinarily a branched, filamentous, sheathed form, at certain seasons breaks up into a number of separate cells which develop a tuft of cilia and escape from the sheath.

    2
    2
  • In 1870 Pasteur had proved that a disease of silkworms was due to an organism of the nature of a bacterium; and in 1871 Oertel showed that a Micrococcus already known to exist in diphtheria is intimately concerned in producing that disease.

    1
    1
  • The cilia may be present during a short period only in the life of a Schizomycete, and their number may vary according to the medium on which the organism is growing.

    1
    1
  • Hardy has shown that such a destruction of part of the filament may be effected by the attacks of another organism.

    1
    1
  • None of these systems, which are chiefly due to the medical bacteriologists, has maintained its position, owing to the difficulty of applying the characters and to the fact that such properties are physiological and liable to great fluctuations in culture, because a given organism may vary greatly in such respects according to its degree of vitality at the time, its age, the mode of nutrition observed; or, at any rate, the strictest rules should be followed in accepting the evidence adduced to render the union of any forms probable.

    2
    2
  • Mintz and others had proved that nitrification was promoted by some organism, when Winogradsky hit on the happy idea of isolating the organism by using gelatinous silica, and so avoiding the difficulties which Warington had shown to exist with the organism in presence of organic nitrogen, owing to its refusal to nitrify on gelatine or other nitrogenous media.

    1
    1
  • Considerable advances in our knowledge of the various chromogenic bacteria have been made by the studies of Beyerinck, Lankester, Engelmann, Ewart and others, and have assumed exceptional importance owing to the discovery that Bacteriopurpurin - the red colouring matter contained in certain sulphur bacteria - absorbs certain rays of solar energy, and enables the organism to utilize the energy for its own life-purposes.

    2
    2
  • If we now streak these plates with an organism, e.g.

    1
    1
  • The cause of this luminosity is Micrococcus phosphorens, an immotile round, or almost round organism.

    1
    1
  • This organism is quite distinct from that causing the luminosity of marine fish.

    1
    1
  • The idea that this film of bacteria oxidizes the alcohol beneath by merely condensing atmospheric oxygen in its interstices, after the manner of spongy platinum, has long been given up; but the explanation of the action as an incomplete combustion, depending on the peculiar respiration of these organisms - much as in the case of nitrifying and sulphur bacteria - is not clear, though the discovery that the acetic bacteria will not only oxidize alcohol to acetic acid, but further oxidize the latter to CO 2 and 01-1 2 supports the view that the alcohol is absorbed by the organism and employed as its respirable substance.

    2
    2
  • Bacterial diseases in the higher plants have been described, but the subject requires careful treatment, since several points suggest doubts as to the organism described being the of the disease referred to their agency.

    1
    1
  • The microscope magnifies the distance traversed as well as the organism, and although a bacterium which covers 9 - ro cm.

    1
    1
  • It was formerly supposed that the injection of attenuated cultures or dead organisms-vaccines in the widest sensewas only of service in producing immunity as a preventive measure against the corresponding organism, but the work of Sir Almroth Wright has shown that the use of such vaccines may be of service even after infection has occurred, especially when the resulting disease is localized.

    1
    1
  • It may be noted, however, that it is still doubtful whether this organism is to be placed amongst the bacteria or amongst the protozoa.

    1
    1
  • By means of microscopic examination more than one organism may sometimes be observed in the tissues,but one single organism by its constant presence and special relations to the tissue changes can usually be selected as the probable cause of the disease, and attempts towards its cultivation can then be made.

    1
    1
  • The cultural as well as the microscopical characters of a pathogenic organism may be closely similar to other non-pathogenic members of the same group, and it thus comes to be a matter of extreme difficulty in certain cases to state what criterion should be used in differentiating varieties.

    1
    1
  • Such a serum may accordingly within certain limits be used for differentiating this organism from others closely allied to it (vide infra).

    1
    1
  • It is found that if the inoculation be made deep down in a solid medium, growth of an anaerobic organism will take place, especially if the medium contains some reducing agent such as glucose.

    3
    3
  • To obtain growth of an anaerobic organism on the surface of a medium, in using the plate method, and also for cultures in fluids, the air is displaced by an indifferent gas, usually hydrogen.

    3
    3
  • This, for example, is the case with the anthrax bacillus; although the effect of this organism in the living body indicates the production of toxins which diffuse for a distance around the bacteria.

    3
    3
  • It may also be mentioned that many toxins have now been obtained by growing the particular organism in a proteid-free medium, a fact which shows that if the toxin is a proteid it may be formed synthetically by the bacterium as well as by modification of proteid already present.

    2
    2
  • The circumstances which alter the virulence of bacteria will be referred to again in connexion with immunity, but it may be stated here that, as a general rule, the virulence of an organism towards an animal is increased by sojourn in the tissues of that animal.

    3
    3
  • The increase of virulence becomes especially marked when the organism is inoculated from animal to animal in series, the method of passage.

    3
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  • Many of the earlier methods of attenuation were devised in the case of the anthrax bacillus, an organism which is, however, somewhat exceptional as regards the relative stability of its virulence.

    3
    3
  • Many such methods consist, to speak generally, in growing the organism outside the body under somewhat unsuitable conditions, e.g.

    3
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  • A second method is by injection of the bacterium in the dead condition, whereby immunity against the living organism may be produced.

    1
    1
  • A third method is by injections of the separated toxins of a bacterium, the resulting immunity being not only against the toxin, but, so far as present knowledge shows, also against the living organism.

    1
    1
  • The serum of the susceptible rabbit, for example, is bactericidal to this organism, whilst the serum of the immune dog is not.

    1
    1
  • Metchnikoff showed that in animals immune to a given organism phagocytosis is present, whereas in susceptible animals it is deficient or absent.

    1
    1
  • The above comparison further indicates that the scyphistoma should not be regarded as a polyp but rather as a medusoid organism.

    1
    1
  • The only certain criterion of a medusa-individual is the presence of definite sense-organs, but in cases where the organism is much reduced, this criterion may fail us, as it does in the genus Lucernaria.

    1
    1
  • The state church, the Church of England as by law established, represents the tradition of a time when church and state were regarded as two aspects of one divinely ordered organism.

    1
    1
  • Comparison of living and lifeless organic matter presents the initial difficulty that we cannot draw an exact line between a living and a dead organism.

    1
    1
  • A living organism usually displays active metabolism of proteid, but the metabolism may slow down, actually cease and yet reawaken; a dead organism is one in which the metabolism has ceased and does not reawaken.

    1
    1
  • Whilst quinine possesses this power, however, it is far more potently lethal to a particular form of animal organism known as the plasmodium malariae.

    1
    1
  • Quinine is apparently powerless to kill the organism when it is in its reproductive phase.

    1
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  • To what peculiar excitation of our bodily or mental organism, it is asked, are the emotions due which make us declare an object beautiful or sublime?

    1
    1
  • Life is something added to the organism; over and above the universally diffused sensibility there is some living and productive power to which we give the name of Nature.

    1
    1
  • The point common to all Pteridophyta is that from the first the gametophyte is an independent organism, while the sporophyte, though in the first stages of its development it obtains nutriment from the prothallus, becomes physiologically independent when its root develops.

    1
    1
  • Nevertheless, the belief that material processes must be held sufficient to account for material changes in the human organism as in all other regions of the material world, can be held quite independently of any particular theory as to the relation between mind and body, and in many of its forms is equally destructive of a belief in the freedom of the will.

    1
    1
  • Self-consciousness, if it be conceived as distinguishing itself from its past history or from the natural world, must be conceived also as in some sense related to the empirical self which has a history in time and to the natural organism in which it finds a home.

    1
    1
  • There is no logical connexion between this theory and the doctrine that appetite of desire has always pleasure (or the absence of pain) for its object; but a materialist, framing a system of psychology, will naturally direct his attention to the impulses arising out of bodily wants, whose obvious end is the preservation of the agent's organism; and this, together with a philosophic wish to simplify, may lead him to the conclusion that all human impulses are similarly self-regarding.

    2
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  • The argument, for instance, that intuitive and a priori beliefs gain their absolute character from the fact that they are the result of continued transmission and accumulation of past nervous modifications in the history of the race would, if taken seriously, lead us to the belief that ultimate ethical sanctions are to be sought, not by an appeal to the moral consciousness, but by the investigation of brain tissue and the relation of man's bodily organism to its environment.

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  • Sir Leslie Stephen, for instance, wishes to substitute the conception of " social health " for that of universal happiness, and considers that the conditions of social health are to be discovered by an examination of the " social organism " or of " social tissue," the laws of which can be studied apart from those laws by which the individuals composing society regulate their conduct.

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  • A great antithesis lies at the basis of all thought and life - that of the real and the ideal, of organism, or sense, and intellect.

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  • The specific functions of the ego, as determined by the relative predominance of sense or intellect, are either functions of the senses (or organism) or functions of the intellect.

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  • There followed the wholesale massacre of St Bartholomews St BarEve, in Paris and in the provinces; a natural con- thofomew, sequence of public and private hatreds which had August poisoned the entire social organism.

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  • The self-love theory of Hobbes, with its subtle perversions of the motives of ordinary humanity, led to a reaction which culminated in the utilitarianism of Bentham and the two Mills; but their theory, though superior to the extravagant egoism of Hobbes, had this main defect, according to Herbert Spencer, that it conceived the world as an aggregate of units, and was so far individualistic. Sir Leslie Stephen in his Science of Ethics insisted that the unit is the social organism, and therefore that the aim of moralists is not the "greatest happiness of the greatest number," but rather the "health of the organism."

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  • By a process which was going on elsewhere in Europe the frontier settled into a new political organism.

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  • The oils and fats are distributed throughout the animal and vegetable kingdom from the lowest organism up to the most highly organized forms of animal and vegetable life, and are found in almost all tissues and organs.

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  • A branched filamentous organism from the Lower Carboniferous of Scotland, described by Kidston under the name of Bythotrephis worstoniensis, shows some remains of cellular structure, and may probably be a true Alga, resembling some of the filamentous Florideae in habit.

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  • Pachytheca, a spherical organism, usually about the size of a small pea, found in rocks of Silurian and Devonian age, has been much investigated and discussed, without any decisive light having been thrown on its nature.

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  • Speaking in the widest sense, every substance has an action on living protoplasm, but for convenience pharmacological substances have come to be limited to those which are used as drugs, or which have a distinct action upon the animal organism.

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  • They are contained in sufficient amount in our ordinary dietary to supply the needs of the organism.

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  • Speaking generally, when given in small doses their action on the healthy organism is slight or nil, but in disease some of them are capable of acting as substitutes for deficient secretions.

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  • The organism Streptococcus pneumoniae is a non-motile, facultatively anaerobic, gram positive, encapsulated coccus, growing in pairs and short chains.

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  • If we look at style as an organism, style-markers are its genetic material - making this project analogous to the human genome project.

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  • This strategy could allow a comparative analysis of metabolism regulation of both amino acids within the same organism.

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  • That's feline leucocyte antigen - which is part of the immune system which determines how a cat can handle a particular disease organism.

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  • It is capable of repelling bacteria and other microbes, releases a biocide and can also remove the organism on contact.

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  • Foodborne botulism is caused by ingestion of the botulinum neurotoxin, which is produced during growth of the organism in food.

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  • There are many such caspases within an organism, which work together in a proteolytic cascade to activate themselves and one other.

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  • How can one begin to think about the distinctive character, or being, of an organism?

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  • Dexamethasone A steroid drug Enterobacter cloacae An organism that is normally found in the digestive tract.

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  • The organism is run, in the ideal, on quantum coherence.

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  • Once clearly disentangled, the work of connecting the three in a vibrant inter-relating organism can begin.

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  • The overall nature of the organism is then emergent from the sum of these local functions.

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  • Gas gangrene is caused by Clostridia and the most common causative organism is Clostridium perfringens, which produces exotoxins that cause local tissue damage.

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